CorePace Basic Concepts Electricity and Pacemakers

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					Basic Concepts—Electricity and Pacemakers
                 Module 3




                                            1
Objectives

Upon completion you will be able to:
• Describe the relationship between voltage, current, and
  resistance
• Describe the clinical significance of alterations in voltage,
  current, and resistance




                                                                  2
Characteristics of an electrical circuit:
Including a pacemaker circuit


• Voltage
• Current
• Impedance




                                            3
Voltage

• Voltage is the force, or “push,” that causes electrons to
  move through a circuit
• In a pacing system, voltage is:
  – Measured in volts (V)
  – Represented by the letter “V”
  – Provided by the pacemaker battery
  – Often referred to as amplitude or pulse amplitude
Current

• The flow of electrons in a completed circuit
• In a pacing system, current is:
  – Measured in milliamps (mA)
  – Represented by the letter “I”
  – Determined by the amount of electrons that move through a circuit
Impedance

• The opposition to current flow
• In a pacing system, impedance is:
  – Measured in ohms (W)
  – Represented by the letter “R”
  – The measurement of the sum of all resistance to the flow of current
Voltage, Current, and Impedance are Interdependent

• The interrelationship of the three components is analogous
  to the flow of water through a hose
  – Voltage represents the force with which . . .
  – Current (water) is delivered through . . .
  – A hose, where each component represents the total impedance:
     • The nozzle, representing the electrode
     • The tubing, representing the lead wire
Voltage, Current, and Impedance
Recap


• Voltage: The force moving the current (V)
  – In pacemakers it is a function of the battery chemistry

• Current: The actual continuing volume of flow of electricity (I)
  – This flow of electrons causes the myocardial cells to depolarize (to
    “beat”)

• Impedance: The sum of all resistance to current flow (R or W
  or sometimes Z)
  – Impedance is a function of the characteristics of the conductor (wire),
    the electrode (tip), and the myocardium




                                                                              8
Voltage and Current Flow
Electrical Analogies




                                   Spigot (voltage) turned up, lots of
   Water pressure in system         water flows (high current drain)
   is analogous to voltage –
      providing the force to
        move the current




                               Spigot (voltage) turned low, little flow
                                        (low current drain)
Resistance and Current Flow
Electrical Analogies

• Normal resistance – friction caused by the hose and nozzle




• Low resistance – leaks in the hose reduce the resistance


          More water discharges, but is all of it going to
          the nozzle?

• High resistance – a knot results in low total current flow
Ohm’s Law

• Describes the relationship   • V=IXR
  between voltage, current,                    V
  and resistance                               =
                                             I X R


               V               • I=V/R
                                              V

                                         I    = R



          I          R         • R=V/I
                                              V
                                             I =
                                                 R
Ohm’s law tells us:

1. If the impedance remains constant, and the voltage
   decreases, the current decreases
2. If the voltage is constant, and the impedance decreases,
   the current increases




                   So What?
Status Check
   What happens to current if the voltage is reduced but the
   impedance is unchanged?

• Start with:                        • Reduce the voltage to 2.5 V
  – Voltage = 5 V                       – Voltage = 5 V
  – Impedance = 500 W                   – Impedance = 500 W
  – Current = 10 mA                     – Current = ?

• Solve for Current (I):             • Is the current increased/
  – I = V/R                            decreased or unchanged?
  – I = 5 V ÷ 500 W = 0.010 Amps        – I = V/R

  – Current is 10 mA                    – V = 2.5 V ÷ 500 W =
                                             0.005 Amps or 5 mA

                                     • The current is reduced
                                                                     13
Status Check
What happens to current if the impedance is reduced
but the voltage is unchanged?
• Start with:                      • Reduce impedance to 250 W
  – Voltage = 5 V                    – Voltage = 5 V
  – Impedance = 500 W                – Impedance = 250 W
  – Current = 10 mA                  – Current = ?

• Solve for Current (I):           • Is the current increased/
  – I = V/R                          decreased or unchanged?
  – I = 5 V ÷ 500 W = 0.010 Amps     – I = V/R

  – Current is 10 mA                 – V = 2.5 V ÷ 250 W =
                                          0.02 Amps or 20 mA

                                   • The current is increased

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Other terms

• Cathode: A negatively
  charged electrode
  – For example, the electrode on
    the tip of a pacing lead

• Anode: A positively
  charged electrode
  – Examples:
     • The “ring” electrode on a bipolar
       lead
     • The IPG case on a unipolar          Anode
       system

  – More on this later (see:
                                                   Cathode
    Pacemaker Basics)


                                                             15
Battery Basics
So where does the current come from?


• A battery produces electricity as a result of a chemical
  reaction. In its simplest form, a battery consists of:
  – A negative electrode (anode)
  – An electrolyte, (which conducts ions)
                                                                Positive terminal
  – A separator, (also an ion conductor) and
  – A positive electrode (cathode)
                                                                           Anode
                                      Cathode


                                      Separator



                                            Negative terminal



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Brief Statements
Indications
•   Implantable Pulse Generators (IPGs) are indicated for rate adaptive pacing in patients who ay benefit from increased
    pacing rates concurrent with increases in activity and increases in activity and/or minute ventilation. Pacemakers are
    also indicated for dual chamber and atrial tracking modes in patients who may benefit from maintenance of AV
    synchrony. Dual chamber modes are specifically indicated for treatment of conduction disorders that require restoration
    of both rate and AV synchrony, which include various degrees of AV block to maintain the atrial contribution to cardiac
    output and VVI intolerance (e.g. pacemaker syndrome) in the presence of persistent sinus rhythm.
•   Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are indicated for ventricular antitachycardia pacing and ventricular
    defibrillation for automated treatment of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias.
•   Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) ICDs are indicated for ventricular antitachycardia pacing and ventricular
    defibrillation for automated treatment of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and for the reduction of the symptoms of
    moderate to severe heart failure (NYHA Functional Class III or IV) in those patients who remain symptomatic despite
    stable, optimal medical therapy and have a left ventricular ejection fraction less than or equal to 35% and a QRS
    duration of ≥130 ms.
•   CRT IPGs are indicated for the reduction of the symptoms of moderate to severe heart failure (NYHA Functional Class
    III or IV) in those patients who remain symptomatic despite stable, optimal medical therapy, and have a left ventricular
    ejection fraction less than or equal to 35% and a QRS duration of ≥130 ms.
Contraindications
•   IPGs and CRT IPGs are contraindicated for dual chamber atrial pacing in patients with chronic refractory atrial
    tachyarrhythmias; asynchronous pacing in the presence (or likelihood) of competitive paced and intrinsic rhythms;
    unipolar pacing for patients with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator because it may cause unwanted delivery or
    inhibition of ICD therapy; and certain IPGs are contraindicated for use with epicardial leads and with abdominal
    implantation.
•   ICDs and CRT ICDs are contraindicated in patients whose ventricular tachyarrhythmias may have transient or
    reversible causes, patients with incessant VT or VF, and for patients who have a unipolar pacemaker. ICDs are also
    contraindicated for patients whose primary disorder is bradyarrhythmia.




                                                                                                                                  17
Brief Statements (continued)
Warnings/Precautions
• Changes in a patient’s disease and/or medications may alter the efficacy of the device’s programmed
  parameters. Patients should avoid sources of magnetic and electromagnetic radiation to avoid
  possible underdetection, inappropriate sensing and/or therapy delivery, tissue damage, induction of an
  arrhythmia, device electrical reset or device damage. Do not place transthoracic defibrillation paddles
  directly over the device. Additionally, for CRT ICDs and CRT IPGs, certain programming and device
  operations may not provide cardiac resynchronization. Also for CRT IPGs, Elective Replacement
  Indicator (ERI) results in the device switching to VVI pacing at 65 ppm. In this mode, patients may
  experience loss of cardiac resynchronization therapy and / or loss of AV synchrony. For this reason,
  the device should be replaced prior to ERI being set.
Potential complications
• Potential complications include, but are not limited to, rejection phenomena, erosion through the skin,
  muscle or nerve stimulation, oversensing, failure to detect and/or terminate arrhythmia episodes, and
  surgical complications such as hematoma, infection, inflammation, and thrombosis. An additional
  complication for ICDs and CRT ICDs is the acceleration of ventricular tachycardia.
• See the device manual for detailed information regarding the implant procedure, indications,
  contraindications, warnings, precautions, and potential complications/adverse events. For further
  information, please call Medtronic at 1-800-328-2518 and/or consult Medtronic’s website at
  www.medtronic.com.
Caution: Federal law (USA) restricts these devices to sale by or on the order of a physician.




                                                                                                            18
Brief Statement: Medtronic Leads
Indications
• Medtronic leads are used as part of a cardiac rhythm disease management system. Leads are
  intended for pacing and sensing and/or defibrillation. Defibrillation leads have application for patients
  for whom implantable cardioverter defibrillation is indicated
Contraindications
• Medtronic leads are contraindicated for the following:
• ventricular use in patients with tricuspid valvular disease or a tricuspid mechanical heart valve.
• patients for whom a single dose of 1.0 mg of dexamethasone sodium phosphate or dexamethasone
  acetate may be contraindicated. (includes all leads which contain these steroids)
• Epicardial leads should not be used on patients with a heavily infracted or fibrotic myocardium.
• The SelectSecure Model 3830 Lead is also contraindicated for the following:
• patients for whom a single dose of 40.µg of beclomethasone dipropionate may be contraindicated.
• patients with obstructed or inadequate vasculature for intravenous catheterization.




                                                                                                              19
Brief Statement: Medtronic Leads (continued)
Warnings/Precautions
• People with metal implants such as pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), and
  accompanying leads should not receive diathermy treatment. The interaction between the implant and
  diathermy can cause tissue damage, fibrillation, or damage to the device components, which could
  result in serious injury, loss of therapy, or the need to reprogram or replace the device.
• For the SelectSecure Model 3830 lead, total patient exposure to beclomethasone 17,21-dipropionate
  should be considered when implanting multiple leads. No drug interactions with inhaled
  beclomethasone 17,21-dipropionate have been described. Drug interactions of beclomethasone
  17,21-dipropionate with the Model 3830 lead have not been studied.
Potential Complications
• Potential complications include, but are not limited to, valve damage, fibrillation and other arrhythmias,
  thrombosis, thrombotic and air embolism, cardiac perforation, heart wall rupture, cardiac tamponade,
  muscle or nerve stimulation, pericardial rub, infection, myocardial irritability, and pneumothorax.
  Other potential complications related to the lead may include lead dislodgement, lead conductor
  fracture, insulation failure, threshold elevation or exit block.
• See specific device manual for detailed information regarding the implant procedure, indications,
  contraindications, warnings, precautions, and potential complications/adverse events. For further
  information, please call Medtronic at 1-800-328-2518 and/or consult Medtronic’s website at
  www.medtronic.com.
Caution: Federal law (USA) restricts this device to sale by or on the order of a physician.




                                                                                                               20
Disclosure

                                NOTE:
    This presentation is provided for general educational purposes
     only and should not be considered the exclusive source for this
          type of information. At all times, it is the professional
        responsibility of the practitioner to exercise independent
                clinical judgment in a particular situation.




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