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TERRY FOX NoraLee Montemarano

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					Terrance Stanley "Terry" Fox
                                        Terrance Stanley "Terry" Fox




                      Terrance Stanley "Terry" Fox was born
                              in Winnipeg, Manitoba,
                  and raised in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia,
              a community near Vancouver on Canada's west coast.
                    An active teenager involved in many sports,
             Terry was only 18 years old when he was diagnosed with
                        osteogenic sarcoma (bone cancer)
                    and forced to have his right leg amputated
               15 centimetres (six inches) above the knee in 1977.



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                                      Terrance Stanley "Terry" Fox




                                While in hospital,
                     Terry was so overcome by the suffering
             of other cancer patients, many of them young children,
                  that he decided to run across Canada to raise
                           money for cancer research.

                He would call his journey the Marathon of Hope.



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                                           Terrance Stanley "Terry" Fox




                  After 18 months and running over 5,000 kilometres
                                 (3,107 miles) to prepare,
                   Terry started his run in St. John’s, Newfoundland
                           on April 12, 1980 with little fanfare.
             Although it was difficult to garner attention in the beginning,
                   enthusiasm soon grew, and the money collected
                            along his route began to mount.
                He ran 42 kilometres (26 miles) a day through Canada's
                        Atlantic provinces, Quebec and Ontario.

                     It was a journey that Canadians never forgot.


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                                      Terrance Stanley "Terry" Fox




                              On September 1st,
              after 143 days and 5,373 kilometres (3,339 miles),
                   Terry was forced to stop running outside
                   of Thunder Bay, Ontario because cancer
               had appeared in his lungs. An entire nation was
     stunned and saddened. Terry passed away on June 28, 1981 at age 22.

         The heroic Canadian was gone, but his legacy was just beginning.

                 To date, more than $400 million has been raised
              worldwide for cancer research in Terry's name through
                     the annual Terry Fox Run, held across
                          Canada and around the world.

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  OSTEOGENIC SARCOMA’S DISTINCTIVE FEATURES



                      Osteogenic sarcoma,
                  also called osteosarcoma,
                   is the most common type
                  of bone cancer in children.
              It arises in the ends of the bones.
             The bones most frequently involved
                  are the large bones of the
                      upper arm (humerus)
                 and the leg (femur and tibia).
             Osteogenic sarcoma usually occurs
                between the ages of 10 and 25
                 and is more common among
                      males than females.

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  OSTEOGENIC SARCOMA’S DISTINCTIVE FEATURES




     Young people with this type of cancer
   generally complain of pain and swelling,
  which they sometimes blame on an injury.
          Diagnosis can be difficult,
  because the disease is easily confused with
       local infection, effects of injury,
       glandular deficiencies, arthritis,
   vitamin deficiencies, and benign tumors.




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  OSTEOGENIC SARCOMA’S DISTINCTIVE FEATURES




               Although osteogenic sarcoma
               may be suspected by the way
                  the bone looks on x-rays,
        diagnosis can be confirmed only by biopsy.
   Because the disease commonly spreads (metastasizes)
                 to other parts of the body,
            especially the lungs, chest x-rays, l
          ung tomograms, CT scans of the chest,
              and an x-ray skeletal survey or
       bone scan may also be done before treatment.

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   OSTEOGENIC SARCOMA’S DISTINCTIVE FEATURES




             Surgery (amputation or limb-sparing)
              is the primary method of treatment,
             followed by a course of chemotherapy
              using one or more anticancer drugs.
                   A prosthesis (artificial limb)
                    and physical rehabilitation
               may be important parts of therapy.



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             PROSTHESIS—ARTIFICIAL EXTENSION




                           In medicine,
              a prosthesis is an artificial extension
                that replaces a missing body part.
                 Prostheses are typically used to
             replace parts lost by injury (traumatic)
               or missing from birth (congenital)
             or to supplement defective body parts.




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             PROSTHESIS—ARTIFICIAL EXTENSION



                   There are many styles and types of
                     artificial limbs (the prosthesis).
                  They usually have the following parts:

               For above knee amputation (thigh level):

               •Suspension (what holds the prosthesis on)
                   •Socket (the part of the prosthesis
                      that fits around your stump)
                         •Knee joint (artificial)
                             •Pylon (the pipe)
                         •Ankle/foot (artificial)
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             PROSTHESIS—ARTIFICIAL EXTENSION




     For below knee amputation (calf level):
    •Suspension (what holds the prosthesis on)
      •Socket (the part of the prosthesis that
             fits around your stump)
                  •Pylon (the pipe)
               •Ankle/foot (artificial)



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             PROSTHESIS—ARTIFICIAL EXTENSION


                   Once the prosthesis is completed,
               it will be covered by a material to match
                       the shape of your other leg.
               This material cover may be a soft foam,
                     protected by a special stocking
                         or it may be a hard shell.
                      The team will help you decide
                       which cover is best for you.
                   The cover will not be added until
                          the team is sure that no
                             other adjustments
                      to the prosthesis are needed.

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