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					                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net


                                                     Administration
SDL: Standard Distribution List.
   - locate your unit’s distribution symbol
   - contains unit addresses, phone numbers and correspondence handling information
   - publications have distribution blocks at the bottom of each cover page to show
       unit authorization and allowances
DPRI: Directives, Publications, and Reports Index.
   - has 7 chapters with listings in numerical and alphabetical formats for finding
manuals
   - chapter 2 provides distribution information, and is in numerical format
   - ch 3 is a quick, alphabetical search, locate SSIC (Standard Subject Identification
       Code) number for changing publications
   - 3 changes to publications, pen and ink, cut and paste, page by page
To request an allowance change use form CG-5323.
To request a publication use CG-4428.

     1. What kind of information can you acquire from the Standard Distribution List?
        Unit’s distribution OPFAC (operating facility), and unit’s distribution symbol.
     2. Where can you find your units distribution symbol block for a publication?
        On the bottom of the cover page of the publication.
     3. What information will be addressed in the distribution blocks?
        Unit authorization and allowance.
     4. In what chapter of the DPRI would you find the publications or directives listed in
        alphabetical order? 3
     5. When can you remove the copy of the change message in a publication?
        After a revision has been published.
     6. If the directive you a requesting is classified, you have to send a letter requesting
        the directive to_.
        Sponsoring Office at CG HQ.
     7. What form will you use to request a publication? CG-4428




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           1
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           2
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net


                                                        Maintenance

     -     If the stokes litter is stored on weather decks, a fresh water wash down is required weekly.
     -     The stokes litter is to be inspected quarterly or after each use.
     -     The liferaft is to be visually inspected weekly.
     -     The liferaft is to be sent out annually for inspection and recertification.
     -     Hydrostatic releases are sent out for inspection and testing annually.
     -     The antiexposure coveralls are to be inspected before each use and semi-annually.
     -     Antiexposure coveralls are not to be dried in a machine dryer.
     -     Talcum powder is used to lubricate dry suit seals.
     -     Maintenance to the dry suit is limited to cleaning and lubrication of slide fasteners and application
           of 303 Aerospace Protectant to latex seals.
     -     Repairs to the dry suit is limited to replacement of the latex seals.
     -     PFD’s are inspected visually before use and semi-annually.
     -     Repairs to the ring buoy are limited to line and reflective tape replacement.
     -     Boatcrew survival vests are inspected semi-annually.
     -     Pyrotechnics for boatcrew vests are inspected weekly.
     -     Required maintenance for the Parallel Motion Protractor include: routine cleaning, checking
           tightness of friction points, and checking straight edge for parallel.




     -     Maintenance to the bearing circle is done after exposure to sea salt and before deployments.




     -     Maintenance to the telescopic Alidade and binoculars is done weekly and prior to storage.
     -     Binoculars should not be stored wet.
     -     Things to be kept away from the magnetic compass: electrical wiring, windshield wipers, motors,
           flashlights, electronic equipment.
     -     Mount the deviation table in the pilot house near the compass.
     -     The commanding officer determines the contents of the abandon ship kit.
Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           3
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

     -     The anchor should be inspected for free movement between the shank and flukes.




     -     The wildcat controls the anchor chain.




     -     The gypsy head is often mounted on the anchor windlass outboard of the wild cat.
     -     The gypsy head us used to handle line when mooring or warping the ship.
     -     The gypsy head working surface is coated with inorganic zinc.
     -     The anchor windlass brake controls the free-fall of the anchor and chain.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           4
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




     -     The break wheel controls the windlass break.
     -     The windless break should be kept free of dirt, foreign matter, grease, and oil.
     -     The cat’s paw is a safety device in case of emergencies when raising the anchor and should be
           inspected for cracks and ease of movement.




     -     The anchor shank should be visually inspected for bending and twisting.
     -     The swivel eliminates twisting of the chain, ensure it rotates freely, rust may be removed by
           sandblasting.




                                                                                Each shot is connect by a detachable link.
Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           5
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

     The shot sequence is red, white, blue, red, white, blue then red, yellow, red (you’re dead).




     -     The detachable link comes as a matched set and can’t be interchanged, it must be replaced if it’s
           twisted, cracked, or elongated beyond maximum limits.
     -     The pair shaped DL connects the first link of the outboard swivel shot to the anchor shackle.
     -     The pelican hook should be inspected quarterly for: cracks, deformations, ease of operation, and
           excessive wear.




     -     If inspecting the turnbuckle and it doesn’t turn freely, clean and lubricate threads.
     -     All load handling equipment is checked daily for obvious defects and safety hazards.
     -     Visibly inspect frame and structure’s paint for cracks.
     -     The daily inspections include both a visual and operational checks over the full range of motion.
     -     Rated load tests are conducted at 100% of working load limit while underway.
     -     Static load test are at 150% of working load limit.
     -     Dynamic tests are at 125%.
     -     Weight handling systems are any piece of equipment designed and used for the purpose of moving
           heavy loads.
     -     Safe and working load limits are the max weight that can be handled by equipment.
     -     Level one inspections are: most frequent and simplest, blocks, shackles, swivels, and associated
           pins and links, require dynamic load test only, and inspections of foundation welds, gears and
           bolt cracks, tightness, wear, deformation, and corrosion.
     -     Level two inspections are: disassembly, inspection and overhaul of all major components whose
           performance or mechanical condition may have deteriorated, and require both dynamic and
           static load tests.
     -     Level three inspections are: a complete overhaul of the equipment, disassemble and overhaul all
           hydraulic or pneumatic components.
     -     A test load must hold for 10 minutes without slipping.

Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           6
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

     -     Wire rope must be replaced if you find 6 broken wires in one lay length or 3 broken wires in one
           strand in one rope lay.




                                                                               Kinking




     -     Improperly uncoiling or unrolling wire rope will cause; kinking and/or deformation of the wire
           rope.
     -     The minimum safety factor of wire rope is five times its breaking strength on board a ship.
     -     Internal inspections of wire rope are to be done only by a qualified person.
     -     Wire rope on cranes and booms is to be inspected quarterly.
     -     Wire rope shall be replaced, if the outside strands of wire are worn more than 1/3 the original
           diameter.
     -     Kinking is a twist in a wire rope that causes a permanent bend.
     -     Wire rope that shows signs of crushing or other signs of distortion shall be replaced.
     -     Heat damage can be found where the wire rope passes over frozen or non-turning sheaves.
     -     Standing rigging is to be periodically inspected and tightened.


     Maintaining surfaces
     - Ch 3 of COMDITINST M9000.6 addresses confined space entry afloat.
     - The major hazards associated with Blast Cleaning are static shock, hose blowout, use of PPE.
     - The acceptable replacement for Turpentine due to its low cost and relative safety is mineral spirits.
     - The wording “flammable-keep fire away” must be stenciled on the exterior of a storage cabinet.
     - The two most common means of paint mixing are vibrating and stirring.
     - Color 11105 is red and is used for Transmit Antenna base.
     - Color 25526 is pastel blue and is used for Berthing Bulkhead(flame retardant).
     - Color 17038 is black and is used for 47” Motor boat Boot Top.
     - Color 13538 is yellow and is used for Fuel piping.
     F. There are three types of spraying systems.
     F. Thick nap rollers are used on smooth surfaces.
     T. The quality of a brush is determined by the bristles.
     F. To promote even coverage dip 2/3 of the brush into the paint to “load” the brush.
     F. Lamb’s wool rollers are recommended for enamel paint.
     T. Optimum performance of a conventional spray system is achieved at an air temperature of 70
     degrees.
     - Paint: Opaque or color pigments are dispersed in this vehicle.

Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           7
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

     - Varnish: The vehicle dries by oxidation.
     - Lacquer: The vehicle dries by evaporation.
     1. Vinyl: A- water resistant B- excellent durability D- quick drying.
     2. Latex: C- excellent color retention D- quick drying.
     3. Phenolic: A- water resistant B- excellent durability
     4. Rubber-Based: A- water resistant D- Quick drying.


                                         Operations and Seamanship

     -     3 Basic hull types:
           Displacement Hulls ex: Buoy Tender, Tug, Sail, Container ships.
           Plaining Hulls ex: RHI, Jet ski, most speed boats.
           Semi-Displacement ex: 47’, 41’, 87’, Cabin Cruiser.
     -     Keels: back bone of a vessel.
           Bar Keel: increases strength, protects hull plating if runs aground, reduces rolling.
           _ increases vessel’s draft.
           Flat plate keel: has an I plate fastened to a flat plate, built-up from a metal plate reinforcing the
           upper or inner surface of the keel, is built within a vessel’s hull, does not increase vessels draft.




- Class A fire: water/ABC dry chemical. – Class B fire: AFFF, CO2, PKP. – Class C fire: CO2, PKP. –
Class D fire: Water (high velocity fog), sand.
- Boat crew survival vest includes: Survival knife, signaling mirror, whistle, MK-124, MK-79, distress
signal light.
- Whistle is audible up to 1,100 yards. (required up to 1000)
- MK-124 has orange smoke on the day end and a (raised band) red flair on the night.
- The anti-exposure coveralls are required to be worn if the water temperature is above 50
degrees and below 60.
- Each end of the MK-124 burns for about 20 seconds.
- The MK-124 is held at 45 degrees from the horizon.
- Cool the MK-124 in water, or set on the ground when on land.
- The MK-79 (red star flare), altitude ranges between 250 to 650 feet and burns for at least 4.5 seconds.
- It contains 7 pencil flares.
- The distress signal light (firefly) emits 50-70 flashes a minute at a candle power of 100,000, for 9 hrs.


Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           8
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

- The M127A1 (white parachute flare), fired at 90 degrees, reaches an altitude between 650 and 700ft, for
about 36sec at 125,000 candle power, and descends at about at 10-15 fps. If fired at 60 degrees or less it
will be burning when it lands.
- If the water and air temperature is below 50 degrees the dry suit is required.
- The work uniform and a PFD may be worn if the water temperature is above 60.
- With the garment layering concept, the first layer should not be made of cotton.
- The second layer provides the actual thermal protection.
- The third layer is the outer.
- Thermal underwear may be worn under both the anti-exposure coveralls and the dry suit.
- A PFD is not required for the anti-exposure coveralls but is with the dry suit.
- Before entering the water with anti-exposure coveralls, you should: ensure zipper is completely closed,
tighten all straps, inflate the floatation chamber, and ensure all straps and gear is tucked in properly.
- Anti-exposure coveralls are considered a type V PFD.
- You should enter the water from the windward side.
- When entering the water it is better to gently slip in.
- A PFD must be worn at all times while underway.
- Before donning a dry suit, lubricate the neck and wrist seals with unscented talcum powder.
- On the dry suit, beeswax should be used to lubricate the slide fastener.
- Weight and buoyancy are the two primary forces that determine vessel stability.
- The vessel is in equilibrium, when at rest and the center of buoyancy is below the center of gravity.
- Two principal types of stability are transfers and longitudinal.
- Two types of forces that affect stability are static and dynamic.
- The center of buoyancy is affected by external forces.
- Factors that cause fatigue are: exposure to temperature extremes, excessive constant noise, strong
sunlight, motion sickness, sleep loss, poor conditioning, heavy workload, eye strain, illness and hunger, and
boredom.
- Effects of fatigue are: being physically and mentally unprepared for mission, judgment errors, decreased
coordination, reduced attention span, lower standard of performance, and decreased concern for safety.
- Symptoms also include: confusion, decreased motor skills, and irritability.
- Prevention used: adequate rest, dress appropriate, rotate duties, proper nourishment.
- Learn to recognize and take corrective action, and observe other crew members for signs.
- Motion sickness causes: rolling and pitching, tasks that require close attention, stress.
- Symptoms: nausea, increased salivation, paleness, sweating, drowsiness, weakness, stomach discomfort.
- Prevention: stay out of confined spaces, fresh air, look toward horizon or shoreline, don’t smoke,
excessive head movement.
- Medications for: Dramamine, Meclizine, Promethazine, Ephedrine, TTS patch.
- Don’t take if hung over, without supervision, or pregnant.
- The five signs of Hypothermia are: Shivering, Numbness, Glassy stare, Apathy, and Loss of
consciousness.
- The main factors that determine how long a person can survive in cold water are: water temp, physical
condition, and actions taken by victim.
- Water cools 25 to 30 faster then air.
- Survival time for a normal adult in 55 degree water is 4.5 hrs.
- Dry suit: 10hrs. Antiexposure Coveralls: 3.5hrs. Work uniform: 1.5hrs.
- Alert hypothermia victims can be given warm liquids.
- When treating: care for life threatening problems, take to medical facility, place in warm place, remove
cloths and dry victim, wrap in blankets, handle gently, don’t warm quickly, or give alcohol.
- Be prepared to give rescue breathing and CPR if severe, check pulse and respiration, if in water moving
will rob warm water between cloths, don’t attempt to swim unless reaching more victims.
- If alone in water use HELP (Heat, Escape, Lessening, Position).
- Huddle close together if in group.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study           9
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net


                                             Honors and Ceremonies

     -   The Broad Command Pennant indicates command of a squadron of ships.
     -   The length of the ship or the size of the flag pole determines the size of the ensign used for colors.
     -   Morning colors while underway, is conducted at sunrise.
     -   When no band or recording is available for evening colors, retreat is bugled.
     -   600yrds is close aboard.
     -   For passing honors, 2 is the correct number of blasts to indicate port.
     -   When two USCG cutters pass with the same rank CO, the date of rank or linear number
         determines seniority.
     - 0-9 personnel arrive requiring 8 side boys.
     - 0-8 – 0-7 require 6 side boys.
     - 0-6 – 0-5 require 4 side boys.
     - All others require 2.
     The Boatswain’s Pipe
     - Over the side: to depart
     - Alongside: to arrive
     - Fore and Aft: front to back
     - Butt Kits: ashtrays or garbage cans




     -     To adjust the bowl the joint can be soldered.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 10
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 11
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net


                                       Operations and Seamanship II




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 12
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 13
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 14
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 15
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 16
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 17
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Temporary eye in the end of a line, tie two lines together securely.




Securing a heaving line to a tow line, ring, or spar, correctly tied will not jam or loosen.


Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 18
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Temporarily securing lines to objects such as a ring or eye, can slip easily.




Lengthens lines, connecting line to an eye. For double repeat step 2 and pull tight.




Quick release clove hitch.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 19
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Used on line of equal size, for finishing securing laces, and small stuff.




Securing line to logs, spars, planks, or rough surfaces.




Provides extra holding power.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 20
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 21
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




     -     All wire rope slings shall be weight tested by the supplier and tagged with their safe working
           loads.
     -     All chain slings are to be constructed from heat treated alloy chains and rigging hardware.
     -     Alloy chain will have an “A” stamped on the links.
     -     Never use a chain sling when it is possible to use a wire rope.
     -     Never shorten a chain by knotting.
     -     Never lift with a twisted chain.
     -     Synthetic slings offer the advantage of flexibility protection for finished material.
     -     Only a manufacturer shall repair synthetic slings.
     -     Repaired slings shall be proof tested before being placed back service.
     -     Synthetic slings are highly susceptible to damage from acids and caustics.
     -     Synthetic slings are more likely to be damaged by sharp edges.
     -     Rigging hardware includes shackles, hooks, and master links.
     -     Hooks shall be proof tested by the manufacture and stamped with rated safe working load.
     -     Shackles for rigging shall be stamped by the manufacture with the rated safe working load.
     -     The shackle pin or bolt shall never be replaced by anything other then the one for that specific
           shackle supplied by the manufacturer.
     -     The master link shall be made of grade 8 steel alloy and stamped with the size and the rated safe
           working load.
     -     Towline is sized to the vessel, depending on the vessels towing capacity.
     -     To reduce wear and chaffing at the towline end, you would select a towing pennant.
     -     Skiff hooks are used to attach the towline to the trailer eye of the towed vessel.
Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 22
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

     -     The two ways to rig a bos’n chair are luff tackle, and a single whip purchase.




     -     Luff tackle is raised by the operator with a 3/1 advantage.
     -     A stage rigged with a stage hitch provides two parts of the gantline under the stage instead of one.




     -     You can rig a stage with an eye splice or a stage hitch.
     -     The hook is designed to be the weakest link in any lifting rig.
     -     When making a towing bridle the legs should be long enough to maintain an angle of less than 30
           degrees.
     -     A typical bos’n chair is 27in.
     -     Sounding one short blast indicates “I intend to leave you on my starboard side”.
     -     Sounding two short blasts indicates “I intend to leave you on my starboard side”.
Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 23
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

     -     Sounding three short blasts indicates, “I’m operating astern propulsion”.
     -     Sounding one short blast indicates “I intend to overtake you on your starboard side.
     -     Sounding two short blasts indicates “I intend to overtake you on your port side”.
     -     Emergency Pyrotechnics are normally red or orange in color.
     -     An example of a distress flag would be a, square with a ball above or below it.
     -     A piece of canvas that is orange would indicate a vessel in distress.
     -     Morse code SOS is three short, three long, three short.

                                              Piloting and Navigation




     -     There are six basic chart colors on a nautical chart.
     -     Chart No. 1 is the reference publication used to locate various chart symbols and their meanings.
     -     The information you will find in the Title Block of a Nautical Chart: Official title, Geographic
           location, Projection type, Scale, Depth measurements, Horizontal geodetic datum, and Sounding
           datum.
     -     The depth measurements can be found in the margin at the top and bottom of the chart colored
           magenta.
     -     The information you could find in the Chart. 1 book is: General, Topography, Hydrography, Aids
           and services, and Alphabetical indexes.
     -     The edition number and date are on the lower left hand corner of a chart.
     -     Notes and cautions are called special notices and are generally located on the land portions or
           chart martins.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 24
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 25
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 26
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 27
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 28
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 29
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




     -     Red buoy is kept on your right (starboard).
     -     Green buoy is kept on your left (port).




                                                                   : Never approach without extreme caution.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 30
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




                                                                                 You will see this!




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 31
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 32
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 33
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 34
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net




                                              Sneaky back door stuff

- Proword                                    Meaning
  “over”                                     response is required
  “out”                                      no response is required
  “wait”                                     pause is less then 60 seconds
  “wait out”                                 pause is more then 60 seconds

-Nautical miles X 2000 = yrds
Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 35
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

-When 1 or more groups are shown on same halyard they must be separated by a tackline.
-Ship to ship radiotelephone is frequency 13.
-Azimuth and Amplitude are celestial bearings.
-Determining sides to render salutes remember “Peso”, port even, starboard odd.
-1. I whistle- starboard / II whistle- port. 2. I hand salute. 3. II “ready too”. 4. III carry
on.
-Amplitude – 2/3 diameter is above horizon.
-Military GPS is accurate to 21 meters. ( it’s not back door but that 10 just looks so
good )
-Advance and transfer- determining where a turn begins and ends.
-Nav Briefs:
     Pre-underway checklist
    48- Establish schedule for getting underway.
            - Test all ship functions.
            - Take off all unnecessary equipment.
        24- Conduct a Nav brief.
            - energize gyro compass.
            - Verify final arrangements.
        4- finalize everything.
-Azmuth= taken anytime
-Amplitude= sunset/rise
-IALA B- the buoy system we use
-When doing arc to time divide by fifteen and multiply the remainder by 4. Divide by
long hand so you are left with a remainder.
- CBDR: constant baring decreasing range.
- True wind is always on the same side and aft of relative wind.
- Fleet Guide: US Navy bases.
- Bowditch: most important reference book, info on every aspect of NAV, procedure
tables for calculations, glossary of nautical terms.
- Nautical Chart & Publication Allowance for Cutters: self explanatory.
- Notice to Mariners: changes to charts
- CO: coastal charts – HA: harbors & Approach charts – OA: Operating area charts
- T or P: temporary or preliminary corrections done in pencil on charts and correction
cards.
- Channel 16: international distress frequency. Channel 6: international on-scene SAR
ship to ship frequency. Channel 12: port operations ship to shore and ship to ship
frequency. Channel 13: ship bridge to bridge navigation frequency.
            - Abbreviations in the DPRI: “CI” COMDTINST (Commandant
                Instruction)
            - “ CIM” COMDTINST M (Commandant Instruction Manual)
            - “CP” COMDTPUB P (Commandant Publication)
            - “CN” COMDTNOTE (Commandant Notice)
            - “U” Unclassified
            - “F” For Official Use Only (FOUO)
            - “C” Confidential
Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 36
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

            - “S” Secret
            - “T” Top Secret
Sky types: “mares’ tails”= Cirrostratus Cs, “mackerel sky”= Cirrocumulus Cc,
“thundercloud/head”= Cumulonimbus (Cb), “fair weather”= Cumulus (Cu)
- Nautical Twilight: when the sun is 12 degrees below the visible horizon, or too dark for
celestial observation.
- Civil Twilight: when the sun is 6 degrees below the visible horizon, or bright enough to
observe and shoot celestial stars.
            - 1:12,000 Harbor plans
            - 1:20,000,000 world charts
            - use water proof black ink to make chart changes
            - Nautical Chart & Publication Allowance for Cutters
            - 14BHA14263
     14- Geographical subregion
     B- Portfolio
     HA- Type of Chart
     14263- Chart #
- Wipping: 15-20 wraps with a foot left over (perm)
- 10X circumference being used (temp)
- Splicing natural line tuck each strand 3 times, synthetic 4.
- A turn angle is the difference between present & next track.
- Advance (along present course)
- Transfer ( onto new course)
    - Order publications with DPRI
    - Azimuth: from OO N&S clock/counter through 90 – 180.
    - Bending shackles: attaches anchor to the chain
    - Celestial Meridian: great circle on celestial sphere that passes through the poles &
        is perpendicular to equator.
    - Diurnal tide: only one high & low water occur during a tidal day.
    - Gnomonic chart: parallels appear as concentric circles or arches, & meridians are
        straight lines moving away from poles.
    - Mooring shackles: used only when mooring to bouys with anchor chain.
    - Outboard swivel shot: anchor to chain.
    - Pitch Poling: when a vessel capsizes stern over bow.
    - Distance / 100= speed (3 minute rule)
    - Sea buoy: outermost buoy marking the entrance to a channel or harbor.
    - Standard Meridian: those longitudes exactly divisible by 15 (time reckoning).
    ***Target angle: relative bearing of your ship viewed from another ship.
    - OBJECT RELATIVE BEARING RANGE
    - Towing vessel 135 degree yellow light.
    - Sailing vessel whistle sig: 1 prolonged followed by 2 short in 2 minutes.
    - 60 degrees of separation for LOP (line of position) need 3 lop’s.
    - two lines are required for an estimated fix
    - 1 lop
    - 3 is a fix
Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 37
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.
                                                       BM3 Study Guide
                                                    Courtesy of David Naylor
                                                    www.boatswainsmate.net

     -     GPS: pressing the MARK SWITCH twice fast will store current position.
     -     DC closure logs are kept on all named vessels 65ft and over.
     -     ANTON has 4 light colors: red, green, white, and yellow.
               o Colors not lighted: as above plus black and orange.
     -     The publication that provides a sample checklist for getting underway is the Coast
           Guard Navigation Standards Manual, COMDTINST M3530.2.
     -     The color ink used for the contour line for a NAV drift of a vessel is blue (shoal
           water).
     -     Semidiurnal: the predominating type of tide, two highs and two lows a day.
     -     Preferred channel markers if lit have composite groups (2+1).
     -     Safe water marks: If lighted, red ball top mark with a sound signal attached and a
           white morse alfa light.
     -     Only scenario to go against norm for error calcs is GYRO CRS/BRG to GYRO
           ERROR to get TRUE CRS/BRG, sub W and add E.




This is not an end all be all. You still have to learn MO Boards (true wind, CPA, contact
true course and speed). All this came from the BM3 volumes.




Disclaimer: Any study guide may have incorrect information, as everyone is human...including the BMs who've written the study 38
guides (not to mention policy changes). This is why it is critical that you read the appropriate manuals when studying, not just read the
study guides. If you find something wrong, notify the study guide author so they can update it and submit a corrected copy. You are
responsible for knowing the material, so I encourage you to hit the books first and use the study guides as a companion document to
your studying.

				
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