Glasgow University Templates - DOC

Document Sample
Glasgow University Templates - DOC Powered By Docstoc
					                                                      Medi-CAL Unit
                                                      University of Aberdeen
                                                      Medical School, Foresterhill
                                                      Aberdeen, Scotland, AB25 2ZD
                                                      http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/medicine/calunit




Phase II Final Report
July 2001



Mini-Engines for easy
and rapid web-based
CAL authoring




SHEFC C&IT Programme:
Development and Dissemination of
Web-Based Tools (Proposal 10)
Keywords: Applets, CAL, Distance Learning, Generic, Java, On-line, Video, Web
2
Mini-Engines
Phase II Final Report, July 2001

Table of contents


Background .......................................................................................................7

Aims and Objectives ........................................................................................7

Aim .............................................................................................................7

Original Phase II Project Objectives and Changes ...................................7

Additional Achievements ...........................................................................9

Deliverables .....................................................................................................10

Tools available – The Mini-Engines........................................................ 10

Exemplar Applications ............................................................................ 12

Guides .................................................................................................... 12

Reports ................................................................................................... 12

Web Site and Downloads ....................................................................... 14

Dissemination Strategy .................................................................................15

Aim and Objectives ................................................................................. 15

Targets.................................................................................................... 15

Dissemination through Publications and Announcements ..................... 18

Advertising on Own Web Site ................................................................. 18

Advertising on other project web sites .................................................... 18

Demonstration Materials ......................................................................... 18

Email Mailing Lists .................................................................................. 18

Newsletters ............................................................................................. 19

Posters, Flyers and Greetings Cards ..................................................... 19

SHEFC Assets Server ............................................................................ 19


                                                                         3
Dissemination through Meetings And Discussions ................................ 19

Conference Papers ................................................................................. 20

Group Workshops and Tutorials ............................................................. 20

Video Conference Seminar Programmes ............................................... 20

Group Discussions – Special Interest Groups ........................................ 20

Group Discussions – Institutional Committees ....................................... 21

Group Discussions – Videoconference .................................................. 21

Formal Contacts ..................................................................................... 21

Informal Contacts.................................................................................... 21

Collaborations ......................................................................................... 22

Evaluation: Impact and Success..................................................................23

Impact on the Scottish HE Community ................................................... 23

Perceived value of the Mini-Engines ...................................................... 24

Barriers to Uptake ................................................................................... 25

Alternative Technologies ........................................................................ 25

Platform Compatibility (see Technical Evaluation below) ...................... 25

Timing ..................................................................................................... 25

Workload................................................................................................. 25

Other Factors cited ................................................................................. 25

Evaluation: Technical.....................................................................................26

Glossary.................................................................................................. 26

Platform cross-compatibility.................................................................... 26

Browser type compatibility ...................................................................... 27

Browser intra-version compatibility ......................................................... 28

Netscape family ...................................................................................... 29

Password protection, Internet Explorer 5.0 and Video ........................... 29

Frame Compatibility ................................................................................ 29

Front-End ................................................................................................ 29

Added value / additional applet features added ..................................... 30

Background Colour ................................................................................. 30

Feedback Box ......................................................................................... 30


                                                                      4
Shopping Basket..................................................................................... 30

Accessibility ............................................................................................ 30

External Technical Evaluation ................................................................ 31

Mini-Engine interoperability using XML, IMS and QTI............................ 31

End-User Evaluation ............................................................................... 33

Personnel .........................................................................................................34

Steering Committee ........................................................................................34

Phase III ............................................................................................................35

Summary of Phase III ............................................................................. 35

Continued dissemination throughout the HE community ....................... 35

Continued Staff Training ......................................................................... 36

Added Value ........................................................................................... 37

Financial Statement ........................................................................................39

Appendix I: Institutions Contacted ..............................................................41

Appendix II: Flier .............................................................................................45

Appendix III: Christmas Card........................................................................47




                                                                            5
6
Project Outcomes
          Background

The Mini-Engines project resulted in the creation of several Java applets (termed
here as Mini-Engines) that can be used together, in any order, to build web-based
computer assisted learning (CAL) applications. The applets are generic and are
suitable for building web-based CAL in a wide variety of subject areas. They can
be mixed and matched along with other web resources including digital video and
sound. The applets are provided with extensive support material. They are aimed
primarily at those involved with building web-based CAL for their own institutions.

The current project stemmed from the Child Development project
(http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/umi2/) funded under the SHEFC UMI2 initiative. For the
sake of clarity the Child Development project is referred to as Phase I. Phase I
ran from 26 May 1997 - 31 December 1998.

Following Phase I, the opportunity arose to take advantage of the generic nature
of Mini-Engines. The funding was provided by SHEFC as part of the Development
and Dissemination of the Web-Based Tools Initiative and is referred to as Phase
II. Phase II ran from June 1999 - 31 July 2001. The present report deals only
with Phase II.


          Aims and Objectives

Aim
The primary aim of Phase II was to provide web-based tools in the form of Mini-
Engines to allow staff in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) throughout Scotland
to increase their use of C&IT in teaching and learning. There were two central
objectives to achieve this aim:

1. Promulgation of the Mini-Engines throughout Scottish HEIs in a range of
   disciplines.
2. Development of new, appropriate, Mini-Engines and exemplar applications to
   encourage promulgation throughout Scottish HEIs.
The aim has been achieved, on time, with the objectives being exceeded.

Original Phase II Project Objectives and Changes
The original proposal stated “Most disciplines will be able to use the mini-engines
to construct a desired web based application. They are in no way limited to the
field of medicine. We wished to develop extensive support in the use of these
mini-engines for the HE sector but this was unfortunately outwith the scope of the
SHEFC Child Health UMI2 project. The SHEFC C&IT programme for the
development and dissemination of web-based tools will allow us to do this.”

This has been achieved.




                                         7
The original project objectives detailed in the proposal to SHEFC in January 1999
are detailed below and are italicised. The status of each objective at the closure
of Phase II is given.

   Objective 1. A series of platform independent versions of the existing generic
   mini-engines developed as part of the SHEFC UMI2 Child Health project.

   Achieved. See Table 1. With conflicts unfolding concerning browser
   compatibility and „flavours‟ of Java as Phase II progressed the true platform
   independence of the Mini-Engines was inevitably compromised. This is
   discussed in the Technical section of the report. The Mini-Engines can however
   be used on both PC and Apple platforms using both Internet Explorer and
   Netscape Navigator.

   Objective 2. A platform independent front-end that will allow non-
   programmers to use the mini-engines to construct web based interactive
   multimedia computer assisted learning (CAL).

   Not achieved. As the project progressed several commercially available
   authoring environments were released that enabled the user to incorporate
   Java based components. As the Mini-Engines could be used without change in
   these environments the development of a front-end was considered to be
   unnecessary.

   Objective 3. Development of new mini-engines upon request by Scottish HE
   Institutions.

   Achieved. See Table 1.

   Objective 4. Implementation of these mini-engines and front-end initially in
   3 institutions in the fields of Art & Architecture, Computing Science,
   Mathematics, Medicine & Medical Sciences and Zoology. Other institutions and
   subject areas will be approached as dictated by the project schedule.

   Achieved. See Table 3. An application in Chemistry rather than Mathematics
   was developed.

   Objective 5. A non-programmer's guide to using the front-end.

   Not Achieved. Not required. See point 2 above.

   Objective 6. A non-programmer's guide to preparing materials for hand-over
   for development (alternative to using the front-end).

   Achieved. See Table 2.

   Objective 7. A programmer's guide to using the mini-engines and the front-
   end.

   Achieved. See Table 2. Front-end component not developed as noted in Point
   2 above.

   Objective 8. A full technical report including a full technical specification and
   fully commented code to enable further development of the software (mini-
   engines and the front-end).

   Achieved. See Tables 2 and 4. Front-end component not developed as noted
   in Point 2 above.


                                         8
  Objective 9. A project web page (maintained after closure of the project).
  Achieved. See Table 2.

  Objective 10. An FTP/HTTP site for download of the code and documentation
  (maintained after closure of the project).

  Achieved. See Table 2.

  Objective 11. An evaluation report detailing the development process,
  project implementation, deliverable implementation and an evaluation of the
  implementation process and its impact.

  Achieved. Part of the present report. See also Table 4.

  Objective 12. A series of staff development workshops.

  Achieved. See Table 11. At the suggestion of SHEFC workshops were not
  initially part of the project plan. Training sessions for people in institutions
  however evolved into workshops.


Additional Achievements
  1. Customisable Mini-Engines (see Technical Report)

  2. On-Line Tour (see Dissemination)

  3. Authoring Templates (see Dissemination)




                                         9
          Deliverables

Tools available – The Mini-Engines
Objectives 1 and 3. The Mini-Engines are the central deliverable from the project.
They are Java applets and are described in the Evaluation: Technical section
below. The Mini-Engines can be mixed and matched as required to rapidly create
web-based CAL.

Each Mini-Engine is based upon a different question style. These range from
simple true/false type questions to complex numerical simulations. A total of 18
Mini-Engines were developed and are detailed below.

Table 1. Available Mini-Engines.

No.    Description              No.    Description

1      Checkbox question        10     Leaflet

2      Image map                11     Slide show

3      Option applet            12     Linear measurement

4      True/false question      13     Circumference measurement

5      Text input               14     Area measurement

6      Shopping basket          15     Zoom and focus

7      Sort order               16     Keyword search in paragraph of text

8      Growth chart             17     Labelling applet

9      Rolling credits          18     Numeric simulation


                   These tools are available for download at
                    http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/

                   These tools will also be made available on the SHEFC
                    Assets server.

                   Additional customisable functions were added to many of
                    the applets to make their appeal to the HE sector as
                    wide as possible. This additional functionality is
                    described in the Evaluation: Technical section.




                                          10
Supporting Materials

Many of the supporting materials noted below can also be considered as tools in
themselves. They are aimed at helping both content providers and CAL designers
to use the Mini-Engines. Some of the supporting materials in Table 2 are
described in greater detail elsewhere in this report.

Table 2. Summary of Supporting Materials.

          Item                 Location

                               http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/resources/links.shtml
          Objective 4.
          Exemplar
          Applications.        Listed Below.


          Objective 6. Guide
                               Http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/webcal
          for Contributors.


          Objective 7. Guide
          for Programmers
          and Developers.      Http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/webcal


                               http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/information/reports.shtml
          Objective 8.
          Technical Report.
                               Listed Below.


          Objective 9.
                               Http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools
          Project Website.


          Objective 10.
                               Http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools
          FTP/HTTP
          Download Site.       FTP://ftp.mill.abdn.ac.uk/download (anonymous login)


          Objective 11.
                               http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/information/reports.shtml
          Evaluation
          Reports.

          Objective 12.
                               Listed Below.
          Workshops.


          On-line Mini-
                               Http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/tourlaunch.htm
          Engine Tour.


          Authoring
                               Http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/information/reports.shtml
          Templates.


          Code.
                               http://www.abdn.ac.uk/~mil068/mailform.shtml


          Additional Code
                               http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/coderef/index.html
          Documentation
          (Javadoc).



                 These supporting materials are available via links at
                  http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/


                                          11
                 These supporting materials will also be made available
                  on the SHEFC Assets server.

                 The Guides and Templates are also available in PDF
                  format for download.


Exemplar Applications

Objective 4. The applications enabled others to visualise how the Mini-Engines
could be employed in their own or in a similar field. They also served to
encourage input and feedback so that the Mini-Engine design could be improved.

Table 3. Available Exemplar Applications.

                  Title                             Contributors
Art and Architecture: Design3          Isiah Ali-MacLachlan, Dr Graham Green
Chemistry: Organic Chemistry Tutorial1 Dr Mary Masson
Computing Science: Numeric Simulator2 Dr J. McCall, Prof. J. Cassidy
Online Distance Learning: Assessweb1 John Mackie
Medicine: Ultrasound in Obstetrics1    Dr A.P. Smith
Medicine: Breast Cancer1               Professor Neva Haites
                                       Dr Zosia Patterson
Zoology: Virtual Animals1              Dr Dave Sims, Dr Martin Collins


              Originators: 1University of Aberdeen, 2Robert Gordon University,
              3
               Glasgow School of Art

                 These applications are available at
                  http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/resources/links.htm

                 The exemplar applications are already distributed around
                  various servers and it is the responsibility of the
                  individual institutions to maintain the applications.

                 We will encourage movement of the applications to the
                  SHEFC Assets server.


Guides
Objectives 6 and 7. Two on-line guides were produced, one aimed at content
providers and one aimed at Developers and Programmers. Both are available as a
series of web pages and in PDF format for download and printing. In addition we
have produced templates that help content providers construct questions for use
in the applets. In a letter regarding the award (15 December 1999) SHEFC
requested a proposal that “commits to wide consultation to ensure the utility of
the on-line guides and to generate interest”. In response to this the person in
charge of dissemination undertook significant re-writing of the guides with as
wide a consultation on their content and utility as possible.


Reports
Objectives 8 and 11. The number of reports to be produced was unspecified in
the original proposal. In the letter regarding the award (15 December 1999)
SHEFC requested a proposal that “focuses on technical evaluation of the code”. In
response to this several external reports emerged including those from the


                                        12
Disability in Higher Education (DISinHE) group and the University of Cambridge
CARET group. Additional material relating to Objective 8 (technical report)
includes documentation within the applets, the guides and additional Javadoc
information.

At the end of phase II the following reports were produced:

Table 4. Evaluation Reports.

Evaluation Reports

External Technical Evaluation of the applets July 2001. (University of Cambridge).

Teaching Undergraduate Students the Examination of Small Children: An
Evaluation of Web-Based Computer Assisted Learning

Report on Investigation into Rendering Problems in Netscape Browsers.

DISinHE: Videoconference to assess accessibility issues

DISinHE: Recommended changes to Model Patients

DISinHE: Recommended access keys for model patients

DISinHE: Summary of Web Accessibility Guidelines

Results of Usability Testing of on-line organic chemistry tutorial

Report on the evaluation of the "Ultrasound in Obstetrics" application by hospital
staff



Table 5. Project Reports.

Project Reports

Phase II Final Report, July 2001.

Draft Exit Strategy May 2001.

Bi-Annual Report, February 2001.

Interim Report November 2000.

Interim Report June 2000.

Interim Report March 2000.

Bi-Annual Summary Report December 1999.

Status Report 22 November 1999.

Interim Report 17th August 1999.

Status Report 24 May 1999.




                                         13
Web Site and Downloads
Objectives 9 and 10. The project web site and links to download the materials
from it are now well established. Towards the end of the project download of the
code involved submission of an email address (not validated) which was then
followed up by an email questionnaire.




                                       14
Dissemination
          Dissemination Strategy

Aim and Objectives
Our primary aim was to provide web-based tools in the form of "Mini-Engines" to
allow staff in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) throughout Scotland to increase
their use of C&IT in teaching and learning. There were two central objectives to
achieve this aim:

       1. Promulgation of the Mini-Engines throughout Scottish HEIs in a range
          of disciplines.
       2. Developments of new, appropriate, Mini-Engines and exemplar
          applications to encourage promulgation throughout Scottish HEIs.

Dissemination and staff training was fundamental to achieving the two central
objectives.

Outputs from our dissemination and training activities were:

1. Promulgation of existing Mini-Engines, through our Dissemination Targets, to
   academic staff to allow them to make appropriate use of C&IT
2. Promulgation of new Mini-Engines, through our Dissemination Targets, to
   academic staff to allow them to make appropriate use of C&IT
3. Promulgation of exemplar applications, through our Dissemination Targets, to
   academic staff to allow them to visualize and make appropriate use of C&IT
4. Dissemination of support materials to our Dissemination Targets
5. Outreach activities to our Dissemination Targets

Targets
The primary dissemination targets (DTs) were units and groups dealing with the
development and integration of IT, CAL and learning materials at institutional or
faculty level. We referred to such groups and units collectively as Learning
Technology Units (LTUs). We also targeted, where appropriate, Teaching &
Learning Staff Developers, Computing Service Staff and Library Staff. DTs also
included other initiatives such as the LTSN, JISC, ILT and TAGS.

Academics were not targeted per se but they were supported in appropriate
circumstances.




                                        15
Figure 1. Dissemination Targets




Table 6: Dissemination Targets (DTs)

               Group                   Targeted

          Senior Managers                   No

       Enthusiastic Academics               Yes

     Unenthusiastic Academics               No

Learning & Teaching Staff Developers        Yes

            IT Services                     Yes

               Others                       Yes

               LTSN                         Yes




                                       16
We contacted a total of 94 dissemination targets. Some institutions outwith the
SHEFC funding remit were also contacted. In some cases multiple campus
locations were targeted within the same institution (see Appendix I).

Table 7. Dissemination Targets by Institution.

Institution (n=23 + Newcastle)               Number of DTs contacted

Aberdeen College                                       9
University of Aberdeen                                 5
University of Abertay                                  2
Bell College of Technology                             2
University of Dundee                                   3
Edinburgh College of Art                               1
University of Edinburgh                                5
Glasgow Caledonian University                          8
Glasgow School of Art                                  4
University of Glasgow                                  4
Gray’s School of Art                                   4
Heriot-Watt University                                 3
Highlands & Islands Millennium Institute               11
Napier University                                      2
Northern College of Education                          6
University of Paisley                                  1
Queen Margaret University College                      2
The Robert Gordon University                           7
Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama              2
Scottish Agricultural College                          3
University of St. Andrews                              5
University of Stirling                                 2
University of Strathclyde                              2
Newcastle LTSN-01                                      1




                                            17
Dissemination through Publications and Announcements

Table 8. Summary of dissemination through Publications and Announcements

Tool / Method                            Employed in Project
Advertising on own web site                     Yes
Advertising on other project web sites          Yes
Advertising on web search engines               No
Demonstration CD-ROM                            Yes
Demonstration Web Applications                  Yes
Email Mailing Lists                             Yes
Newsletters (Internal institutional)            No
Newsletters (National)                          Yes
Newsletters (Staff Development)                 No
Posters, Flyers, Greetings Cards                Yes
SHEFC Assets Server                             Yes


Advertising on Own Web Site
The project‟s own web site acted as the central focus for our dissemination
activities. It was from this site that access to all resources could be gained and
the latest information and reports posted.


Advertising on other project web sites
The Virtual Learning Space project placed a link to the Mini-Engines project on
their web-site although no evidence that this elicited contact from potential DTs
was obtained. The link was at the URL:

http://itlearningspace-scot.ac.uk/campus/library/library.cfm


Demonstration Materials
As noted above, we used the Mini-Engines Tour and the Exemplar Applications to
demonstrate the flexibility and utility of the Mini-Engines. The Tour was also
published on CD-ROM for those who had problems with Internet access.
Email Mailing Lists
Various JISCMail lists were emailed with information about the project. There
were 17 responses returned:
    2 requests for applets
    1 request from QuestionMark Computing regarding IMS Compatibility
    14 requests for passwords/further information

The e-mail was sent to:
    scotcit@mailbase.ac.uk
    computer-assisted-learning@mailbase.ac.uk
    teaching-on-line@mailbase.ac.uk
    w3lessonware@mailbase.ac.uk

Responses from non-Scottish HEIs enquiring about the use of Mini-Engines are
detailed in Table 9.




                                         18
Table 9. Non-Scottish Contacts made through e-mail mailing list dissemination
efforts.

Institution                                  Institution
University of Bath, Centre for the           University of Birmingham
Development of New Technologies in
Learning
University of Brighton, School of            University of Huddersfield (BaCITS
Information Management                       Project)
City University, London                      University of Keele
Central Middlesex Hospital
Harvard University, USA                      University of Newcastle
Institute of Health Sciences, Oxford         University of Sheffield
North Essex Hospitals' Library &             University of Southampton
Information Service
Queen‟s University Belfast                   Virtual Internet Patient Simulation,
                                             Switzerland
St James's University Hospital, Leeds


Newsletters
Fliers were distributed with the LTSN-01 (Medicine) for a major conference in
Munich July 2001.


Posters, Flyers and Greetings Cards
A project flier was prepared (see Appendix II). Christmas cards were sent to 52
dissemination targets in December 2000 (Appendix III).


SHEFC Assets Server
Materials (including the Mini-Engines) have been made available on the SHEFC
Assets Server at http://www.assets.scotcit.ac.uk/

As the Assets project proceeds we intend to make most of our CAL and Mini-
Engine resources available via the Assets server.


Dissemination through Meetings And Discussions

Table 10. Summary of dissemination through Meetings And Discussions.

Tool / Method                                               Employed in Project
Conference Papers                                                  Yes
e-workshops (including SeSDL / VLS)                                No
Group Workshops & Tutorials                                        Yes
Video Conference Seminar Programmes                                Yes
Group Discussions (Chat Sessions On-line)                          No
Group Discussions (Email Discussion Lists)                         No
Group Discussions (Focus Groups)                                   No
Group Discussions (Special Interest Groups)                        Yes
Group Discussions (Institutional Committees)                       Yes
Group Discussions (Video Conference)                               Yes
Formal Contacts (visits to targeted individuals)                   Yes
Informal contacts                                                  Yes
Link with those responsible for C&IT staff development             No


                                        19
Conference Papers
No refereed academic papers arose from this phase of the project, however Mini-
Engines have been described previously:

   1. Lester, C.R., Robinson, D.A. and Hamilton, N.M. (1998). Using Java and
      Dynamic HTML to Develop Collaborative, Computer Assisted Learning. (H.
      Maurer and R.G. Olson., eds.). Association for the Advancement of
      Computing in Education. Virginia, USA.

   2. Robinson, D.A., Lester, C.R. and Hamilton, N.M. (1998). Delivering
      Computer Assisted Learning across the WWW. Computer Networks and
      ISDN Systems. Volume 30, pp. 301 - 307


Group Workshops and Tutorials
When dissemination was successful and we had established an expression of
interest from our DT, the offer to provide staff training was accepted without
exception. These sessions were run by the Project Developer (Robin Ford) and
were tailored specifically to the needs and abilities of the person being trained.
Sessions lasted between one half and two days. Group workshops became the
major focus of activity towards the end of Phase II.

Table 11. Staff training workshops.

Lead Person (n=number          Institution                       Date Delivered
attending)
Ian Burt (3)                   Gray‟s School of Art              6 December 2000
Catherine Ogilvie              Robert Gordon University          19 March 2001
Anne Ward                      Glasgow Caledonian                31 May 2001
                               University
Marion Kelt                    Glasgow Caledonian                31 May 2001
                               University
Lynn McLauchlin (7)            Glasgow School of Art             12 July 2001
Kirstine Lehaney               Royal Scottish Academy of         Self-Trained after
                               Music & Drama                     start-up
John McQuillan                 University of Paisley             Self-Trained after
                                                                 start-up
Bill Steele                    Bell College of Technology        Self-Trained after
                                                                 start-up


Video Conference Seminar Programmes
   1. Hamilton, N.M. and Willats, J. Mini-Engines. Scottish Community Health
      Informatics Laboratory Group Videoconference. October 2000. Invited
      Speaker.

   2. Hamilton, N.M. and Willats, J. Mini-Engines. PaedSIG Videoconference.
      November 2000. Invited Speaker.

   3. Hamilton, N.M. Web-based Computer Assisted Learning. CADE/ SeSDL
      Video Conference. April 2001. Invited Speaker.


Group Discussions – Special Interest Groups
   1. Hamilton, N.M. Computer Assisted Learning. GP Trainer's Group, Meldrum
      House, Old Meldrum. January 2000. Invited Speaker.




                                         20
    2. Hamilton, N.M. Computer Assisted Learning. Department of
       Ophthalmology. April 2000. Invited Speaker.

    3. Hamilton, N.M. and Ford, R. Using Video in PowerPoint. University of
       Aberdeen. December 2000. Invited Speaker.

The project also has close contacts with the CETIS Assessment Special Interest
Group.


Group Discussions – Institutional Committees
   1. Hamilton, N.M. Effectiveness, Efficiency and Expansion. Principal's Briefing
      Meeting. University of Aberdeen. November 1999. (Demonstration and
      Poster).


Group Discussions – Videoconference
Information about the project was disseminated via the regular ScotCIT
videoconference meetings.


Formal Contacts
These visits were used to inform the DTs about the Mini-Engines. These often
preceded the staff training sessions noted above in Table 12. A list of Institutions
formally contacted is given in Appendix I. See also Targets section above.

Table 12. Formal Contact site visits.

Date             Person                  Location               Total Time
                                                                 (Hours)*
01/2000    Ian Wallace (Glasgow)        Medi-CAL Unit                 8

06/2000      John McCall (RGU)          Medi-CAL Unit                 4

07/2000         Rachel Harris           Medi-CAL Unit                 2

07/2000         Rachel Harris           Medi-CAL Unit                 3

08/2000         Allan Stewart           Medi-CAL Unit                 2

10/2000        Lyn McLaughlin              GSA**                      2

10/2000   Robin Shaw/John McKay            GSA**                      3

11/2000       Catherine Ogilvie            RGU***                     3

11/2000         Julian Mullins       Gray's School of Art             4

05/2001       Edward Marston          Aberdeen College                3
*Time includes travel time, ** Glasgow School of Art, ***The Robert Gordon University


Informal Contacts
The following visits were made to generate content to produce exemplar
applications, however, they assisted further dissemination through informal
contacts.

These visits were generally made at the start of development and were aimed
primarily at briefing the contributors about the aims of the project, outlining
deadlines and detailing the process of preparing a script and collecting the
multimedia assets. However, further dissemination was achieved through the
informal contacts that we made during the visits.




                                                21
Table 13. Exemplar Application production meetings.

 Date            Location                 Project           Total Time
                                                             (Hours)*
29/09/99   University of Aberdeen        Virtual Safari           2

07/10/99   University of Aberdeen       Virtual Animals           2

12/10/99   University of Aberdeen       Virtual Animals           1

27/10/99   University of Aberdeen     Ultrasound Scanning         1

08/11/99   University of Aberdeen       Virtual Animals           2

09/11/99   University of Aberdeen       Virtual Animals           1

12/11/99   University of Aberdeen     Organic Chemistry           2

16/11/99   University of Aberdeen       Virtual Animals           1

08/12/99             RGU               Dose Simulation            2

06/12/99   University of Aberdeen     Organic Chemistry           1

14/12/99   University of Aberdeen       Virtual Animals           1

12/01/00    Glasgow School of Art           Various               8

12/01/00     University of Aberdeen       Chemistry               2

31/01/00     University of Aberdeen       Chemistry               3

10/01/00             RGU               Dose Simulation            1

04/02/00     University of Aberdeen       Chemistry               2

02/03/00     University of Aberdeen       Chemistry               2

04/05/00     University of Aberdeen   Numeric simulation          2

05/05/00     University of Aberdeen       Chemistry               2

05/05/00     University of Aberdeen     Virtual Animals           1

18/05/00     University of Aberdeen       Assessweb               1

23/05/00     University of Aberdeen       Assessweb               1
*Time includes travel time. Does not include time where the Content Expert visited the CAL Unit in
Aberdeen

Collaborations
We have assisted in the emergence of new collaborations (for example the
Scottish Arts Schools) and we hope that these collaborations, working through
other initiatives such as VATS, will help to further promulgate our Mini-Engines
throughout Scottish Higher Education. The project also worked closely with other
SHEFC funded projects including TAGS, SeSDL and ASSETS (see
http://www.scotcit.ac.uk/ for project information).




                                                  22
Evaluation
          Evaluation: Impact and Success

Impact on the Scottish HE Community

The primary aim of Phase II was to provide web-based tools in the form of Mini-
Engines to allow staff in HEIs throughout Scotland to increase their use of C&IT in
teaching and learning. There were two central objectives to achieve this aim:

   1. Promulgation of the Mini-Engines throughout Scottish HEIs in a range of
      disciplines.
   2. Developments of new, appropriate, Mini-Engines and exemplar
      applications to encourage promulgation throughout Scottish HEIs.
The data shown in Table 14 indicates how successful we have been in achieving
these objectives.

We regard the uptake of the Mini-Engines in 10 out of 24 targeted institutions to
be a significant success (see Table 14).




                                        23
Table 14. Indicators of impact. Note that in some cases it was too early to collect
the data. This is indicated a “?” symbol in the count column.

Parameter                                                                 Count

Number of Institutions using the Mini-Engines                               10

Aberdeen College
Bell College of Technology
Glasgow Caledonian University
Glasgow School of Arts
Robert Gordon University
Gray‟s School of Art
Northern College
Royal Scottish Academy of Music & Drama
University of Aberdeen
University of Paisley

Possibly may use the Mini-Engines in the future                              7

Napier University
Scottish Agricultural College
University of Abertay
University of Glasgow
University of Highlands and Islands
University of St. Andrews
University of Stirling
Number of Departments using the Mini-Engines                                 8

Number of Disciplines using the Mini-Engines                                10

Arts, Computing, Education, Engineering, Languages, Library,
Physics, Medicine, Music & Drama, Zoology
Number of Applications being built using the Mini-Engines                    ?

Number of learning hours these applications will represent                   ?

Number of academics providing content                                        ?

Number of unsolicited requests for support                                   2

Number of unsolicited enquiries that we received                             4




Perceived value of the Mini-Engines
Mini-Engines were perceived as being useful because of their flexible and
interactive nature. Some people commented on the positive aspects of the ability
to include images and video as well as sound. The fact that Mini-Engines were
free to download meant that they were seen as good "value for money" when
compared to commercially available software.




                                         24
Barriers to Uptake
Whilst 10 out of 24 targeted institutions have taken up the Mini-Engines there
were DTs who did not view the Mini-Engines of being particular value to them.

All DTs were interviewed by questionnaire to assess uptake, barriers to uptake
and other factors influencing uptake. In some cases specific additional follow-up
visits were made to assess the influencing factors. These visits are listed in Table
15.

Table 15. Follow-up evaluation visits.

Date         Location                       Activity                     Total Time
                                                                          (Hours)*
08/2000     Medi-CAL Unit                Evaluation of Tour                  2

07/2000      University of    Evaluation of Tour, Contributors Guide &       3
            Aberdeen LTU                Programmers Guide

08/2000      University of    Evaluation of Tour, Contributors Guide &       3
            Aberdeen LTU                Programmers Guide

08/2000      University of    Evaluation of Tour, Contributors Guide &       3
            Aberdeen LTU                Programmers Guide

10/2000   Glasgow School of    Evaluation of Mini-Engines running on         3
                 Art                           Macs

*Time includes travel time


The barriers to uptake were as follows:


Alternative Technologies
In general, those who did not wish to use the Mini-Engines had embarked upon
their own development programme and had already chosen CAL construction
tools.
Platform Compatibility (see Technical Evaluation below)
Apple Macintosh incompatibility was observed with several of the Mini-Engines.
This was resolved by making Apple Macintosh specific versions of some of the
applets.
Timing
Some DTs reported that the Mini-Engines were interesting but they were at the
stage within their own project where they were looking for content and not
construction tools.
Workload
Several people stated that they were interested but did not have the time to get
acquainted with the Mini-Engines.


Other Factors cited
   1. Not suitable for recorded scoring of student performance
   2. Non-conformance with existing house style (addressed by making the
      applets customisable)
   3. “Not Invented Here” syndrome
   4. Lack of technical awareness
   5. Lack of desire to invest the time to investigate potential usefulness
   6. Availability of delivery machines for students

                                           25
           Evaluation: Technical

Glossary
OS Operating System
JVM Java Virtual Machine
WYSIWYG What You See Is What You Get
CAA Computer Aided Assessment
CSS Cascading Style Sheets
HTML Hyper Text Mark Up Language
IE Internet Explorer
NN Netscape Navigator
N6 Netscape 6
DOM Document Object Model
JRE Java Runtime Environment
MRJ Macintosh Runtime for Java

Platform cross-compatibility
Although the Java programming language was designed as "write once, run
anywhere" it is still necessary to have a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) that is
platform specific. This has lead to inconsistencies in the release date of a JRE for
certain platforms and in particular the Apple Macintosh Operating System (Mac
OS). It has also meant that Internet Explorer (IE) and Netscape Navigator (NN)
for the Macintosh (Mac) were much later in implementing an "in build" Java
Virtual Machine (JVM) on the Macintosh. In fact the latest solution is a plug-in
solution using the Macintosh Run-time for Java (MRJ - see intra-version
incompatibility below).

The Mini-Engines were tested on the following versions of two major Operating
Systems:

Windows 95, 98 NT 4.0 and 2000
Mac OS 8.0, 9.0 and Z1 9.1

The Mini-Engines were designed and developed using the Windows platform and
this is undoubtedly the best platform to run them on in their present state. No
problems have yet been found migrating from one generation to the next using
Internet Explorer versions post version 4.0. Similarly Netscape post 4.0
encountered no problems although Netscape 6 did cause a problem (this problem
was resolved as described in the section on browser inter-version compatibility
below).

The Mac OS 8.0 was the only platform where all of the Mini-Engines failed. The
browsers used for the test were Netscape 3, 4.03 and Internet Explorer 4.5. As
Mac OS 8.0 was released in 1997 and two major version numbers (Mac OS 9.0
and Mac OS X) have been introduced since, solving the problem was not
considered to be a priority. On Mac OS 9.0 using IE 4.5 and Netscape 6 all the
Mini-Engines were fully functional. For both browsers the MRJ 2.2 was installed
and the plug-in activated.

There were inconsistencies in the translation of the Cascading Style Sheet (CSS)
between IE and NN6 but a solution common to both browsers was found so there
was no need for browser type or version detection to be implemented. Applets
tended to load slowly on the Macintosh computers that were tested.



                                         26
In summary, if most of the target audience uses the Macintosh platform, the
Mini-Engines should be developed on a Mac.

Table 16 lists the platform cross-compatibility problems encountered and their
solutions.

Table 16. Platform cross-compatibility problems

 Problem                                 Solution

 Catastrophic failure i.e. the Applets   A re-compile of the Mini-Engine source
 did not run.                            code solved all of the repeatable
                                         catastrophic failures. The Sun JDK1.2.2
                                         build 1.2.2_005 compiler was used.
 Unreadable text, differences in font    This problem was resolved at design
 size meant impossible to read.          time by testing the applets on as many
                                         browsers and platforms as possible.
 Style sheet problems, some              Once the target platform(s) is decided
 positioning properties unable to be     upon the CSS properties can be
 set in the HTML.                        determined.
 Visual appearance. Java uses            It should be taken into account that
 platform specific implementations of    applets will not look the same on all
 common components such as               browser and OS combinations. Design
 scrollbars and buttons. This meant      must involve a compromise between the
 that applets using these components     appearance and functionality.
 looked different on different OS.



Browser type compatibility
Internet Explorer >v4, Netscape >v4, HotJava 3, Opera >v4 and Sun's
appletviewer all running on Windows NT 4.0 were used to test the Mini-Engines.
All were found to load and run the applets successfully. All of the browsers have
differences in the realisation of the D/HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

We investigated the differences in the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) used by the
different browsers.

The browsers HotJava, Opera, IE and NN, in addition to appletviewer were tested.
HotJava, Opera and appletviewer showed no differences as expected as they all
used the same Java Runtime Environment (JRE 1.2.2_005, Sun Corporation).

The JVM used by IE5.0 was Microsoft VM for Java, 5.0 Release 5.0.0.3802. The
JVM used by N4.73 was Symantec Java! ByteCode Compiler Version 210.065.

This difference in JVM caused problems. For example a short investigation was
conducted to find a font size (defined as point size in the Java code) that would
produce the same actual pixel size for each character in each JVM (see Figure 2).




                                         27
Figure 2. Font size for cross compatibility

                                                     25
                                                     23
 Width of a character (proportional to pixel size)



                                                     21
                                                     19

                                                     17

                                                     15

                                                     13
                                                     11

                                                      9

                                                      7
                                                                                                  IE family=SanSerif, style=plain
                                                      5                                           av family=SanSerif,style=plain
                                                      3                                           NN SanSerif,style=plain

                                                      1

                                                     -1 0   2   4   6        8         10    12        14       16       18         20
                                                                        Requested font size (points)



From the graph it can be seen that there are only two font sizes (4 and 6 points)
produced the same size font in all the browsers. The smallest useful font size
when displaying on a computer monitor is about 8 points so the two common
point sizes have little use when designing CAL applications. Requesting zero font
size and obtaining the default setting, each JVM giving a slightly different result,
illustrated the problem of JVM differences.

One solution to this and many of the problems created by the differences in the
JVM is to test each target browser and reach a compromise whereby the
problems are minimised. For example, when using a font size of 15 points the
Mini-Engine must be wide enough to display all the text in IE and yet not give the
appearance of redundant space in NN. More importantly if developing using NN
the developer must be aware that IE displays the text in a wider format. Netscape
6 now uses the JRE from Sun so that there will only be two data series once NN
has been superseded and this may lead to fewer inconsistencies.


Browser intra-version compatibility
The Mini-Engines are likely to be used in conjunction with D/HTML, CSS and
JavaScript. This limits the number of different browsers available to present an
application whilst reducing the number of browsers that need to be tested. For
this investigation the only browsers tested for intra-version compatibility were
Internet Explorer and Netscape, as they are the most common browsers in use
today. With different versions of Internet Explorer on the same platform there
were no problems with the Mini-Engine code or functionality. During the testing
period Netscape released a new engine (Gecko) as the basis of the Netscape 6
browser. This effectively meant that Netscape 6 (N6) could be considered to be a
new browser when compared to Netscape 4.7x (N4.7x) versions.




                                                                                  28
Netscape family
Before the N6 version the Netscape browsers used a JVM written by Symantec,
this was an integral part of the browser and although it could be disabled, it was
enabled by default. The Mini-Engines were tested on the pre N6 browsers and
were found to work well in the Symantec JVM.

The Version 6 of the Netscape browser no longer used a "built in" Java Virtual
Machine (JVM). In addition it used a new document object model (DOM).
Compilation of the Mini-Engine Byte code using a Microsoft compiler resulted in
an error being returned when using N6 (Invalid pc in line number table).
Compilation using the Java compiler from Sun (JDK 1.2.2) resulted in no errors
being returned in all the Netscape family of browsers tested that were post
version 4.x.

The new DOM is considered by some to be the closest to the w3c specification for
HTML 4 and CSS. Our investigations would support that view as many of the
problems we noted were related to redundant CSS code causing problems in
positioning of elements. These problems were resolved and the new Mini-Engine
code was made available that was compatible between N4.x and N6.

Password protection, Internet Explorer 5.0 and Video
Password protection of the exemplar application site resulted in the user being
prompted for a password each time a video was accessed. Entry of the password
returned an error. This is a known issue and documented feature of Internet
Explorer 5.0. Microsoft support did not know of any solutions. One work around, if
the site must be password protected and IE 5.0 must be used is to use an
alternative default media player (e.g. RealPlayer). There was a second issue
where the child window was being closed when video was called using IE5.5.
Mini-Engine code was updated to fix this problem.

Frame Compatibility
As part of good practice recommended in accessibility guidelines (see below) we
avoided using the Mini-Engines with frame based applications wherever possible.
However, to ensure as wide an uptake as possible, we re-designed several of the
Mini-Engines to make them frame compatible.

Those earlier versions of the Mini-Engines that displayed a “Next” button
sometimes caused the browser to load the new (or next) page into the main
window and not the target frame that it was originally loaded from. This was
resolved by flagging the “Next” button as off, so that it was not visible. The user
then used the default browser navigation button to move to the next question.

Front-End
As noted above regarding one of the project‟s original objectives:

“A platform independent front-end that will allow non-programmers to use the
mini-engines to construct web based interactive multimedia computer assisted
learning (CAL). Not achieved. As the project progressed, several commercially
available authoring environments were released (e.g. Click2Learn ToolBook
http://home.click2learn.com/products/toolbook.html) that enabled the user to
incorporate Java based components. As the Mini-Engines could be used without
change in these environments the development of a front-end was considered to
be unnecessary.”

One of the advantages of the Mini-Engine is their simplicity. A single 126kb file
can be used to add 17 different question types into a CAL package. The Mini-
Engines rely upon the idea that one can simply cut and paste HTML code from
one page to another. The parameters are then very simple to modify which in

                                         29
turn allows the developer to rapidly customise the applet to their own
specification. The website at http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools has applet
templates from which developers can cut and paste.


Added value / additional applet features added
Additional customisable functions were added to many of the applets to make
their appeal to the HE sector as wide as possible. The ability to change font,
family size, colour and roll over colour for the buttons, information for the user,
information on a particular answer, correct and incorrect feedback was added and
extended.


Background Colour
The source code was updated so that the background colour can be changed.
JDK1.2.2 has been used to recompile the source code to improve cross
compatibility. The code was optimised and reduced the file size to 30% of its
original.


Feedback Box
The feedback box can now change colour. The width proportion of the feedback
box to the buttons can be set. In some cases the feedback can be switched off
(for example the image map applet).


Shopping Basket
Shopping basket was extended to allow multiple baskets and multiple drag
objects. The baskets can now either be images, polygons or labels and the drag
objects can be images or labels. A developer mode has been included to speed up
author configuration.

Accessibility
We worked closely with the Disability in Higher Education (DisInHE) team
(http://www.disinhe.ac.uk/) to address accessibility issues. This team is now
known as the Digital Media Access Group (DMAG). Meetings with DMAG are listed
in Table 17.

Table 17. Accessibility Meetings.

     Date        Person             Location           Total Time (Hours)*
    10/02/00   Lesley Wilcock     Videoconference               1

    13/03/00   Lesley Wilcock   University of Dundee            8

    10/2000     Peter Jeffels      Medi-CAL Unit                1

*Time included travel time. Does not include time where the Content Expert
visited the Medi-CAL Unit in Aberdeen

We implemented the group's recommendations into the exemplar CAL
applications.

Implemented accessibility features included:

     Re-organization of page layout to be 'screen reader' friendly
     Alternative text for navigation and help
     Hyperlinks have descriptive text

                                               30
   Images have alternative text
   Explanatory text for images
   MouseOver events have descriptive text
   Applets have alternative text
   Access keys added (alt + L etc.)


Four reports from the DMAG group are available at
http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/information/reports.shtml

Compliance with the Bobby system http://www.cast.org/bobby/ of the
applications built using the Mini-Engines was also assessed. Most pages with
applets fail due to the inherent nature of the applet however our plain text and
images pages are generally Bobby compliant.

Peter Jeffels (Prospect CPD, University of Aberdeen) also provided us with
additional comments on accessibility.

External Technical Evaluation
An external technical evaluation was undertaken by the Centre for Applied
Research in Educational Technologies (CARET, University of Cambridge). The
report is available at http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/information/reports.shtml

The report summaries its findings as “The implementation of this project has
created an extensive resource that is free, easy to use, well supported,
reasonably robust and straightforward for developers to modify and develop
further as needed. The code is technically sound and the applets perform
reasonably well under a variety of adverse and erroneous conditions. Packaging
or re-developing the functionality of these applets to meet IMS/QTI or SCORM
specifications (see http://www.adlnet.org) would extend their applicability and
user community even further.”

In response to the report‟s findings the following changes were implemented:
       1. JavaScript functions were updated to account for Netscape 6.
       2. The entire source code was re-commented and web pages generated
          to document all the Mini-Engine source files.
       3. Error trapping and reporting was enhanced. The Mini-Engines appeared
          and reported even if the Applet tag had no parameter/value pairs. The
          error reporting was user friendly and told the developer exactly what
          and where a problem occurred.
       4. The Java source files were changed to use Javadoc syntax. Information
          that was originally only available on-line was made available in the
          source files (accessible by Javadoc).

Re-development of the applets for IMS/QTI and SCORM compliance was outwith
the scope of the present phase of the project.

Mini-Engine interoperability using XML, IMS and QTI
Extensible Mark-up Language, (XML) uses tags to define, separate and wrap data
in a structured way. By definition XML can be extended and different groups are
producing a subset (or branch) of XML for their own particular needs. IMS is one
such group and as stated on their web-site
(http://www.imsproject.org/aboutims.html):

"IMS Global Learning Consortium, Inc. (IMS) is developing and promoting open
specifications for facilitating online distributed learning activities such as locating

                                           31
and using educational content, tracking learner progress, reporting learner
performance, and exchanging student records between administrative systems."

Mini-Engines are ideal for creating on-line distributed learning resources. Of
particular relevance to the Mini-Engines is the Question & Test Interoperability
Specifications (QTI), a subset of the IMS specifications.

As stated on the IMS pages (http://www.imsproject.org/question/):

"IMS Question & Test Interoperability Specification. The IMS Question & Test
Interoperability Specification provides proposed standard XML language for
describing questions and tests. The specification has been produced to allow the
interoperability of content within assessment systems. This will be useful for
publishers, certification authorities, teachers, trainers, publishers and creators of
assessments, and the software vendors whose tools they use. Authoring tools,
and publishers, may publish XML and this data can be imported into other
authoring tools and delivery systems."

The QTI specifications are designed to be as flexible as possible. Mini-Engines
could be included in a particular QTI item. To implement this type of QTI
compliance the Mini-Engine code would not require to be changed per se as code
could be written to wrap the applet in a QTI compliant form. However, by doing
this, content would still be locked into the Mini-Engine and the material would
only be interoperable as a Mini-Engine. The actual question text and responses
would not be available to third party delivery systems.

The main drive behind IMS is content interoperability not application
interoperability. To achieve this content must be kept separate from the delivery
system. To take full advantage of the QTI specification the Mini-Engine code
would need to be re- written so that they could parse QTI compliant content and
then render the data.

Alternatively, code could be added to existing Mini-Engines so that they could
output QTI compliant content for use by other QTI compliant front-ends.

SCORM (Shareable Courseware Object Reference Model Initiative) is one
alternative to the IMS specification. It is unclear at the moment to what degree, if
any, that these will be integrated.




                                          32
End-User Evaluation
End-user evaluation of the applets and of the exemplar applications was
undertaken throughout the duration of the project. In addition, an educational
evaluation of an application constructed using the Mini-Engines was also
undertaken (see Table 18).

Table 18. End-User evaluation.

  Date           Group                Location                Rationale            Period

10/11/2000     Phase II 3M      University of Aberdeen   Evaluation of CAL vs.   Over 15 day
             Medical Students       Medical School           video/lecture         period


The report from this study is available at
http://w3.abdn.ac.uk/generictools/information/reports.shtml

The report was summarised as follows:
“A computer-assisted learning [CAL] application for teaching History taking and
examination of small children was evaluated by comparing it with conventional
teaching. One group of students viewed a VHS format video and was then given
the opportunity to discuss the viewed material with a tutor, whilst the second
group worked through the CAL application with technical, but no academic
support. After the intervention both groups completed a short written assessment
of acceptability, knowledge and understanding of the subject taught.

The two groups of students achieved the same marks in the written test. Thus,
the CAL application is an acceptable and effective method of teaching medical
students history taking and examination of small children.”




                                             33
Project Management
           Personnel
The project started on the 01 June 1999 and finished on 31 July 2001. The
original project end date was 31 October 2000 (17 months duration).

Lesley Wilcock was appointed as project development officer to the project on 30
August 1999, and her contract ended on 29 August 2000. She was a full time
appointment.

With the acquisition of additional funding to the 31 July 2001 we appointed Julia
Willats in a Dissemination, Evaluation, Editorial and Training role. Julia's contract
ran from 24 May 2000 to 14 December 2000 (originally to 31 July 2000).

Dr Karl Siegert was then appointed to undertake evaluation over a 4 month
period from 6 August to 6 December 2000. Following this contract he took over
from Julia Willats in the Dissemination, Evaluation, Editorial and Training role with
his contract terminating 31 July 2001.

Robert Ford was appointed as developer to the project (replacing Lesley Wilcock)
on 1 December 2000 and finished on 31 July 2001.


           Steering Committee
The Steering Committee met in person or by videoconference approximately once
every four months. Steering Committee members were:
      Dr Simon Heath. University of Aberdeen.

      Patricia Spence. University of Aberdeen. Director, Learning Technology Unit.

      Dr John Thom. University of Aberdeen. University of Aberdeen Web Master.

      Professor David Harper. The Robert Gordon University.

      Dr John McKay. Glasgow School of Art.

Dr John Milne (Aberdeen University, Learning Technology Unit) served on the
committee prior to Patricia Spence.




                                           34
Exit Strategy

           Phase III

Due to staff changes and prudent spending the project terminated on the 31 July
2001 with an underspend. This will allow us to extend the project into a third
phase. Phase III will run for a total of 6 months (01 August 2001 to 31 January
2002).


Summary of Phase III
This project already has all of the tools and supporting materials in place. Support
of the tools and supporting materials will continue after project exit on 31 July
2001. We will continue our work and focus on the two key activities:

   1. Continued dissemination throughout the HE community
   2. Continued Staff Training to help users get started with the use of the tools
      and to encourage devolved dissemination and training through their own
      institutions

And, as added value to the Scottish HE Community:

   1. We will endeavour to make available almost our entire portfolio of web-
      based materials (including non-SHEFC funded) on the SHEFC Assets
      server. The Training Officer will assist with this.
   2. Maintenance and updates of the current project FTP site, web site and all
      supporting materials


Continued dissemination throughout the HE community
Our evidence suggested that institutions with well-established development
teams do not wish to use our mini-engines as they add little additional value over
their existing methodologies.

Institutions or departments that do not have well established development
programmes received our mini-engines with great enthusiasm as it reduced their
own training time, set-up time and CAL development time significantly. As noted
above, we adopted an approach of Devolved Dissemination where we targeted
individuals supporting the CAL development efforts of the institution and trained
them so that they become self-supporting. It was our intention that these people
would then develop materials for their own institution, train others if required,
and disseminate the use of the Mini-Engines throughout their own institution.

As part of Phase III we will re-visit institutions that have not taken up the Mini-
Engines to see if any new initiatives have been undertaken and if they would
benefit from using the Mini-Engines.




                                          35
We will also examine all institutions again to look for CAL development initiatives
at Faculty and Departmental level. To these ends we will:

   1. Extend dissemination activities to all Scottish HEIs at the institutional,
      faculty and departmental levels. We will continue to target IT development
      and support staff rather than academic staff
   2. Run workshops in the major institutions. This will be aimed at attracting
      those involved with faculty and departmental initiatives
   3. Continue supporting those that had already been trained in the use of
      Mini-Engines
   4. Keep all supporting materials revised and updated
   5. Carry out further evaluation in order to continue to provide the best
      service and to be able to respond to the constituency‟s changing
      requirements

The current Dissemination officer (Dr Karl J Siegert) will undertake these tasks
and continue in post for 6 months. By this time we will have identified most if not
all dissemination targets likely to want to take up the Mini-Engines.


Continued Staff Training
As part of or continuation to promote and support the use of the Mini-Engines we
will continue to provide training as required.

As noted above our aim is to target people supporting the CAL development
efforts of individual institutions. These people will become self-supporting. It is
hoped that they will develop materials for their own institution, train others if
required, and disseminate the use of the Mini-Engines. Our training efforts to date
have been received extremely well. We are able to specifically tailor training
sessions for individuals. We have already received requests for training after the
closure of Phase II (see Table 19).

Table 19. Requested Training at the closure of Phase II.

Lead Person                                    Institution
Lee Milby                                      Northern College

Morag McMillan co-ordinating several people    Aberdeen College

Janet Hood                                     Aberdeen College

John Smith                                     UHI Millennium Institute

Liz Broumley

Bernard Scott

David Hookham                                  Scottish Agricultural College

Tom Cuningham                                  Napier University
Dennis Bates




                                         36
The current project Development Officer (Mr Robert Ford) will undertake these
tasks and continue in post for 6 months. The post has been renamed as Training
Officer to reflect the emphasis in the activities.

Specifically, he will be involved in:

       6. Bespoke training sessions for individuals
       7. Training sessions as part of the institutional workshops noted in 2
           above
       8. Technical Support
       9. Update and revision of the supporting materials as required
       10. Evaluation of project outcomes
       11. Generation of new code. This would be strictly for generic applets only
           with a wide use in HE. As we have most question types developed
           already we see this as being a minor activity.


Added Value
Both posts will be based in the Medi-CAL Unit. They will not be involved in
generating code specifically for the University of Aberdeen or the Medical Faculty.
Any code generation that they undertake will be in response to the constituency‟s
needs (see point 11 above).

Their presence will however assist in making our existing resources and new
developments freely available to all Scottish HEIs.

Specifically:

   12. We will endeavour to make available almost our entire portfolio of web-
       based materials (including non-SHEFC funded) on the SHEFC Assets
       server. The Training Officer will assist with the logistics of achieving this.
   13. Maintenance of the current project FTP site. This is intended as a matter of
       course, however the Training Officer will assist with any transfer to the
       SHEFC Assets server.
   14. Development of the next generation of applets to make them IMS/QTI
       compliant. Other Medi-CAL Unit staff will undertake this work however the
       developments could be made freely available to Scottish HEs. The Training
       and Dissemination Officers will create supporting materials specifically for
       Scottish HE if we proceed with this.
   15. Development of new applets. See item 11 above. The Training and
       Dissemination Officers will create supporting materials specifically for
       Scottish HE as required.




                                         37
38
Finance
              Financial Statement

                            1998/99      1999/00       2000/01     TOTAL


Balance b/f                  -23893.20          0.00        0.00   -23893.20
Funding Council Income        -6450.00   -15550.00     -76364.00   -98364.00
Total Income                 -30343.20   -15550.00     -76364.00 -122257.20


Expenditure

Academic Staff                            23362.98      66795.48   90158.46
Travel & Subsistence                          859.50      499.38    1358.88
Conference Fees                                75.00        0.00      75.00
Equipment/Consumables                      2027.89       3346.05    5373.94
Consumables                                   167.78      255.39     423.17
Total Expenditure                 0.00    26493.15      70896.30   97389.45


(Surplus)/Deficit            -30343.20    10943.15      -5467.70   -24867.75




                                         39
40
          Appendices
                         Appendix I: Institutions Contacted


     Institution                       Other Campus Contacted          Other Campus Contacted
01   University of Aberdeen
     Regent Walk
     ABERDEEN AB24 3FX
     Tel 01224-272000
     Fax 01224-273863
     Web: www.abdn.ac.uk


02   The Robert Gordon University
     Schoolhill
     ABERDEEN AB10 1FR
     Tel 01224-262000
     Fax 01224-263000
     Web: www.rgu.ac.uk


03   Gray's School of Arts
     The Robert Gordons University
     Garthdee Road
     ABERDEEN AB9 7QD
     Tel 01224-263600
     Web: http://bestartschool.co.uk


04   Aberdeen College
     Gallowgate Centre
     ABERDEEN AB25 1BN
     Tel 01224-612330
     Fax 01224-612001
     Web site: www.abcol.ac.uk


05   Northern College of Education     Northern College of Education
     Aberdeen Campus                   Dundee Campus
     Hilton Place                      Gardyne Road
     ABERDEEN AB24 4FA                 DUNDEE DD5 1NY
     Tel 01224-283500                  Tel 01382-464000
     Fax 01224-283900                  Fax 01382-464900
     Web: www.norcol.ac.uk


06   Scottish Agricultural College     Scottish Agricultural College   Scottish Agricultural College
     Craibstone Estate                 Auchincruive                    West Mains Road
     Bucksburn                         AYR KA6 5HW                     EDINBURGH EH9 3JG
     ABERDEEN AB21 9YA                 Tel 01292-520331                Tel 0131-535 4000
     Tel 01224-711000                  Fax 01292-525020                Fax 0131-535 4246
     Fax 01224-711290
     Web: www.sac.ac.uk


07   UHI Millennium Institute
     Caledonia House
     63 Academy Street
     Inverness IV1 1BB
     Tel 01463-279000
     Fax 01463-279001


                                                              41
     Web site: http://www.uhi.ac.uk


08   University of Dundee
     DUNDEE DD1 4HN
     Tel 01382-344000
     Fax 01382-201604
     Web: www.dundee.ac.uk


09   University of Abertay Dundee
     Bell Street
     DUNDEE DD1 1HG
     Tel 01382-308000
     Fax 01382-308877
     Web: www.abertay-dundee.ac.uk


10   University of Stirling
     STIRLING FK9 4LA
     Tel 01786-473171
     Fax 01786-463000
     Web: www.stir.ac.uk


11   University of St Andrews
     St Andrews
     Fife KY16 9AJ
     Tel 01334-476161
     Fax 01334-462570
     Web: www.st-and.ac.uk


12   University of Edinburgh             Moray House Institute of Education
     Old College, South Bridge            University of Edinburgh
     EDINBURGH EH8 9YL                   Old Moray House
     Tel 0131-650 1000                   Holyrood Road
     Fax 0131-650 2147                   EDINBURGH EH8 8AQ
     Web: www.ed.ac.uk                   Tel 0131-6516052
                                         Fax 0131-6516689
                                         Web: www.mhie.ac.uk
                                         http://www.education.ed.ac.uk/


13   Heriot-Watt University              Heriot-Watt University
     Lord Balerno Building, Riccarton    Scottish Borders Campus
     EDINBURGH EH14 4AS                  Netherdale
     Tel 0131-449 5111                   GALASHIELS
     Fax 0131-449 5153                   TD1 3HF
     Web: www.hw.ac.uk                   Tel 01896-753351
                                         Fax 01896 -758965

14   Napier University
     219 Colinton Road
     EDINBURGH EH14 1DJ
     Tel 0131-444 2266
     Fax 0131-455 4666
     Web: www.napier.ac.uk


15   Edinburgh College of Art
     Lauriston Place
     EDINBURGH EH3 9DF
     Tel 0131-221 6000
     Fax 0131-221 6001
     Web: www.eca.ac.uk

16   Queen Margaret University College   Queen Margaret University College
     Corstorphine Campus                 Leith Campus
     Clerwood Terrace                    Duke Street
     EDINBURGH EH12 8TS                  EDINBURGH EH6 8HF
     Tel 0131-317 3000                   Tel 0131-317 3000
     Fax 0131-317 3256                   Fax 0131-317 3308
     Web: www.qmced.ac.uk


                                                              42
17   University of Glasgow           St. Andrews College, Glasgow    University of Glasgow
     GLASGOW G12 8QQ                 University of Glasgow           Department of Education
     Tel 0141-339 8855               Faculty of Education            Gilmorehill Campus
     Fax 0141-330 4808               St. Andrew's Campus             8 University Gardens
     Web: www.gla.ac.uk              Duntocher Road                  GLASGOW G12 8QH
                                     Bearsden                        Tel 0141-3304407
                                     GLASGOW G61 4QA                 Fax 0141-3305451
                                     Tel: 0141-3303400
                                     Fax 0141-3303005
                                     Web: www.stac.ac.uk


18   Glasgow Caledonian University   Glasgow Caledonian University
     Cowcaddens Road                 Park Campus
     GLASGOW G4 OBA                  1 Park Drive
     Tel 0141-331 3000               GLASGOW G3 6LP
     Fax 0141-331 3005               Tel 0141-337 4000
     Web: www.gcal.ac.uk             Fax 0141-337 4500

     University of Strathclyde       University of Strathclyde
19   John Anderson Campus            Jordanhill Campus
     GLASGOW G1 1XQ                  Southbrae Drive
     Tel 0141-552 4400               GLASGOW G13 1PP
     Fax 0141-552 0775               Tel 0141-950 3000
     Web: www.strath.ac.uk           Fax 0141-950 3166



20   University of Paisley           University of Paisley
     High Street                     Craigie Campus
     PAISLEY PA1 2BE                 Beech Grove
     Tel 0141-848 3000               AYR KA8 OSR
     Fax 0141-887 0812               Tel 01292-886000
     Web: www.paisley.ac.uk          Fax 01292-886006


21   Glasgow School of Art
     167 Renfrew Street
     GLASGOW G3 6RQ
     Tel 0141-353 4500
     Fax 0141-353 4528
     Web: www.gsa.ac.uk

     Royal Scottish Academy of
22   Music and Drama
     100 Renfrew Street
     GLASGOW G2 3DB
     Tel 0141-332 4101
     Fax 0141-332 8901
     Web: www.rsamd.ac.uk

23   Bell College of Technology
     Almada Street
     MOTHERWELL ML3 0JB
     Tel 01698-283100
     Fax 01698-828131
     Web: http://www.bell.ac.uk


24   Institute for System Level
     Integration
     The Alba Centre
     Simpson Parkway,
      LIVINGSTONE EH54 7BH
     Tel 01506-469300
     Fax 01506-469301
     Web: www.sli-institute.ac.uk




                                                             43
44
Appendix II: Flier




                     45
46
Appendix III: Christmas Card




                      47

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:47
posted:5/6/2011
language:English
pages:47
Description: Glasgow University Templates document sample