Docstoc

Does the choice of prosthesis make difference in TKR outcome

Document Sample
Does the choice of prosthesis make difference in TKR outcome Powered By Docstoc
					• Does the choice of 
  prosthesis make a 
  difference in TKR 
  outcome  ?
  outcome  ? 
Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis 
Good Results 
 • No Pain 
 • Stability 
   • Extension 
   • flexion 
 • Good Range of motion 
• Durability
  Durability 
Results in my 
hands 
• 80 %  Good and Excellent 
  results 
• 17% fair results= pain 
• 3% poor results 
  Complications
  Complications 
• Good and Excellent results 
• longevity of prostheses
  longevity of prostheses 
 Results + Durability 
• Proper patient selection 

• Use of well­designed 
implants 
• Skilled Surgical Technique
 Proper patient selection

Wrong indications 
 affect the short 
 term results 
•  Knee­spine­syndrome 
       ­ 
   Knee  spine ­ 
•  Knee­hip­spine syndrome
       ­  ­ 
   Knee  hip  spine syndrome 
Patients type B 
•  Obesity 
•  smoking 
•  Immunosuppression 
                           •Complications
                            Complications 
                           • 
•  Rheumatoid arthritis 
•  Diabetes mellitus 
•  Corticosteroids 
•  Non compliant patients 

  • Non cooperative patients 

  • The patient who wishes to return 
    to impact­loading sports
             ­ 
    to impact  loading sports 
  Expectations 
•  Preoperative assessment of mental 
   status with a standardized instrument 
   such as 
  •  Mini Mental Status Examination ( MMSE ) 
•  Psychological evaluation
   Psychological evaluation 
Use of well­designed 
implants
The evolution of Total knee 
artrhoplasty 
•  In 1890 Themistocles Gluck became the 
     st 
   1  surgeon to implant an artificial knee 
   joint. 
•  It was made of ivory and was held in 
   place with a cement made from 
   colophony, pumice and gypsum
   colophony, pumice and gypsum 
•  Jean and Robert Judet implanted 
   an hinged arthroplasty in 1947 but 
   this acrylic joint quickly failed. 

•  Borje Waldius from Sweden first 
   inserted an acrylic resin protoype 
   in severe RA in October 1951
   in severe RA in October 1951 
•  Subsequent prostheses 
   were made from metal. 

•  Walldius selected his 
   patients from those who 
   were mainly elderly and 
   had limited walking 
   ability
   ability 
•  In 1953 Shiers in the UK 
   introduced a hinge that was 
   thinner and less bulky but still 
   required resection of 36 mm of 
   bone
   bone 
•  In 1970 group of French 
   surgeons developed the 
   Guepar hinge 
•  Less bulky 
•  Valgus alignment 
•  A posteriorly set hinge to allow 
   more flexion
   more flexion 
Semiconstrained Total knee 
replacement
replacement 
•  Janes M Sheehan from 
   Dublin 
The Problem

• With all of  the early prosthesis 
  was that they failed to take into 
  account all of the motions 
  natural to the knee . 
Functional Anatomy of the knee
Functional Anatomy of the knee 
Increasing  stress and 
shortening durability
The Evolution of TKA
The Evolution of TKA 
Interposition and Resurfacing 
Prostheses 
•  Use of the MacIntosh hemiarthroplasty 
(1958) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis 
   often restores alignment and stability for 
   a few years. 
•  late dislocation 
•  sinkage.
    sinkage. 
Gunston polycentric prosthesis 
( 1968 )
( 1968 ) 
•  Rely on the 
   anatomy of the 
   knee 
  •  Rocking 
  •  Gliding 
  •  Axial rotation 
•  Tension of the 
   surround ligaments 
Condylar replacement 
•  This was the single most 
   important development in TKA 
   and was eventually to lead to a 
   consistency and quality of 
   results that rivaled those of THA
   results that rivaled those of THA 
•  Two sugeons and two engineers 
   deserve enormous credit for their 
   innovative ideas. They were Michael 
 Freeman and Alan Swanson of 
 London Hospital and Imperial 
 College in England and John 
 Insall and Peter Walker of the 
 Hospital for Special Surgery.
 Hospital for Special Surgery. 
ICLH ( Imperial College London   Hospital )
     ( Imperial College London   Hospital ) 
                st 
•  It was the 1  prosthesis to include 
   special jigs and instrumentation to aid in 
   correct bony resection and implantation 

•  Tensor instrument (1974)
   Tensor instrument (1974) 
Walker Ranawat and 
 Insall contributed 
 two prostheses : 
The unicondylar 
The Duocondylar
The Duocondylar 
  Total Condylar Prosthesis (1974) 
Sacrificing cruciates 
 ligaments 
Performing right angle bone 
 cuts 
Creating parallel and equal 
 space in flexion and 
 extension
 extension 
Anatomical shaped femoral condyles 
A dished tibial component 
Patellofemoral flange 
Polyethylene patellar button
Polyethylene patellar button 
This was the gold standard 
•  There are a great variety of implants 
   available  within the over all condylar 
   category. 

•  Initial unconstrained total knee 
   resurfacing designs sacrificed both the 
   ACL and PCL
   ACL and PCL 
Great cruciate debate
Great cruciate debate 
  Retaining the PCL
  Retaining the PCL 
•  Two part kinematic knee intoduced in 
   Boston in 1978 by Walker, Sledge 
   and Ewald. 
•  The Press Fit Condylar (PFC ) 
   prosthesis developed by Scott and 
   Thornhill 
•  Genesis knee by Rand at Mayo Clinic 
PCL­ Retaining Prostheses 
PCL 
•  By preserving the PCL , Femoral 
   Rollback is produced. Allows the 
   posterior femur to flex further without 
   impinging on the posterior tibia 
•  Femoral roll back is controlled by both 
   the ACL and PCL  working in concert
   the ACL and PCL  working in concert 
•  Goodfelow and 
   O’connor in 1977 
   O ’ 
   confirmed that the 
   cruciate ligaments 
   worked together 
   as a four­bar 
            ­ 
        four 
   linkage system 
   and when one was 
   sacrificed the 
   mechanism 
   became ineffective
   became ineffective 
 Anatomical femoral rollback in 
 the absence of ACL 
•  Since there is no ACL, 
   instead of a smooth 
   gradual roll there is a 
   combination of foreword 
   sliding and backward 
   sliding
   sliding 
•  Fluoroscopic studies 
   by Stiehl and Dennis 

•  paradoxical roll 
  forward of the femur 
  with anterior translation 
  of tibiofemoral  contact 
  area occurs
   area occurs 
  Retaining the PCL 
•  Conforming component 

•  “ Kinematic conflict” 
     Kinematic conflict 

•  With the use of a dished tibial 
   component impingement 
   occurs posteriorly with 
   flexion 


•  It led to the use of flat plastic 
   inserts
   inserts 
•  The Curved femoral femoral 
   surface of these devices 
   articulated against a flat 
   tibial surface. 
• low contact area 
  generated high 
  stresses
  stresses 
 PCL substituting 
 implants 
•  In 1978 Insall and 
   Burstein produced the 1  st 

   posterior stabilized knee 
   joint by modifying a more 
   constrained version of 
   total condylar devised 
   earlier by Insall and 
   walker .
   walker . 
•  A central spine of the tibial 
   component engaged with a 
   transverse cam on the 
   femoral component  at 70 ° 
   of flexion
   of flexion 
•  Anteroposterior stability 
•  Mechanical Roll Back 
  •  Improve the knee flexion 
•  A congruent articular 
   surface can be used
   surface can be used 
  Posterior­Stabilized Fixed Bearing 

•  Undesirable aspects of the posterior 
   stabilized fixed bearing knee related to 
   abnormal wear at the articular surface, 
   and additional undersurface wear with 
   the late version of modular component
Back side 
wear 

The amount of debris 
released from this backside 
articulation has been 
estimates to be 2­100 times 
greater than the debris 
generated at the femorotibial 
articulation
The Design 
 Solution
Mobile bearing knees 
•  Have been in use since 1978 ,when Buechel 
   and Pappas introduced knee implants with a 
   meniscal­bearing design( cruciate retaining ) 
   and a rotating –platform design (cruciate 
   sacrificing ) 
•  The rationale was that mobile bearing knee 
   implants allowed increased tibiofemoral 
   articular conformity without restricting axial 
   rotation.
Mobile bearing knees 
•  The mobile­bearing cruciate sacrificing 
   device had no post and cam 
   mechanism , instead providing stability 
   by curved design of the tibial insert 
   articulation surface, and a stringent 
   surgical technique to achieve a 
   balanced flexion gap
In this design the tibial PE 
  rotates on a polished metal 
  tibial plate 
With the mobile bearing knee 
  rotational movement is 
  decoupled from the flexion 
  extension movement 


Spin Off
Spin Off 
The Design Solution 

Posterior­ stabilized rotating 
platform knee . 
 •  The rationale was to 
    combine the beneficial 
    feature of mobile bearing 
    rotating platform along 
    with the beneficial feature 
    of posterior stabilized fixed 
    bearing design
Patients now expect 
more
High flexion è axial rotation and 
             è
translation
translation 
“ Digging in “ of the posterior femur 
   into the tibial articular surface
Small contact area 
High posterior stress
The Design Solution
•  A high flexion design includes a 
   posterior femoral condyle that extends 2 
   mm beyond that of the standard design 
   which  allows a larger contact area 
   between the femoral and the tibial 
   polyethylene component at high flexion 
   angles
   angles 
•  The tibial Polyethylene insert incorporates 
   a deep anterior patellar cut out to reduce 
   tension on the extensor mechanism by 
   providing greater clearance for the patellar 
   tendon during deep flexion.
   tendon during deep flexion. 
• 60% of all knee 
  replacement are in 
  females
  females 
Female versus Male
Female versus Male 
   Modified ML/AP Aspect Ratio 

Female femurs have a: 
•  More trapezoidal­shape 

•  Narrower M/L dimension 
   for a comparable A/P 
   dimension. 




          Source:  * Data on file at Zimmer, ** Mahfouz et al 2006
  Patellofemoral 
   anatomy and 
kinematics seem 
 to differ among 
men and women
            Increased trochlear 
            groove angle 
•  Women have a 
   statistically 
   significant 
   higher Q­angle 
   than men** 

•  Increased 
   trochlear groove 
   anlgle by 3°
                       Traditional Implant    Gender Solutions NexGen 
                                                 High­Flex Implant
The Design Solution
    Gender Specific Implants 



•  TKA designs with modified dimensions to 
   accommodate the anatomical differences 
   that occur between sexes 
•  Triathlon knee system ( Stryker) 
•  Zimmer Gender High flex knee (zimmer )
   Zimmer Gender High flex knee (zimmer ) 
•  For better or for worse, knee 
   replacement surgery remains an 
   industry driven field. As 
   physicians we must ask 
   ourselves honestly, “Do we 
   really need to change our 
   implant every time a company 
   comes out with a new design?
•  There are many outcome studies 
   evaluating long term follow up of TKA 
   and they have shown little differences 
   between men and women when looking 
   at revision rates, range of motion and 
   clinical scores on several validates 
   outcome instruments.
   outcome instruments. 
•  Vessely et al. reviewed 1000 TKA using 
   traditional design at 15 years follow up 
   and evaluated failure mode. No 
   differences in revision rates were noted 
   based on gender.
   based on gender. 
•  7326 primary cruciate retaining  TKAs 
•  differences in outcomes between men and 
   women with an average follow up 6.5 
   years 
•  No difference was found in post operative 
   knee Society Scores (KSS) , pain scores 
   or waking scores between the sexes
   or waking scores between the sexes 
• Does the choice of 
  the implant influence 
  the results in TKR  ?
  the results in TKR  ? 
Japan
•  Between April 2003 and July 2006   25 
   patients with OA 
•  The mean follow up was 40 month 
•  No significant differences were found in 
   the mobile –bearing and fixed bearing 
               – 
   knees in terms of clinical and 
   radiographic results
   radiographic results 
2007
A fixed –bearing Anatomic modular 
       knee (AMK DePuy ) 
Low Contact Stress Mobile­bearing 
rotating­platform  ( LSC  ; DePuy )
•  146 patients who underwent simultaneous 
   Bilateral TKA. 
•  Fixed bearing on one side and rotating 
   platform on the other. 
•  No differences were identified 
   radiographically or using  functional 
   scores . There was no evidence of 
   superiority of either design over a long 
   period of time with mean follow up 
   exceeding 13 years.
   exceeding 13 years. 
2007
Press Fit Condylar Sygma 
 (PFC ) fixed bearing and 
     mobile (DePuy )
•  Randomized prospective study 
   comparing mobile bearing and 
   fixed bearing TKA in the same 
   patient, using clinical and 
   radiographic outcomes.
   radiographic outcomes. 
•  After a mean of 5.6 years no 
   significant difference was 
   identified between the two 
   alternative designs by any of 
   the clinical out come measures 
   employed.
   employed. 
Edinburgh 
Scotland
•  A total of 56 patients, half of whom received 
   each design, were assessed preoperatively 
   and at one year after operation using knee 
   scores and analysis of range of movement 
   using electrogoniometry
• There was no significant 
  difference in outcome, 
  including the maximum knee 
  flexion, between patients 
  receiving the standard and 
  high flexion designs of this 
  implant.
NexGen CR­Flex 
 fixed bearing 
knee ( zimmer )
• 50 knees that had a total knee 
  artrhoplasty with a high­flexion 
  design and 50 that had a total 
  knee artrhoplasty with a 
  standard design were included 
  in this study and were followed 
  prospectively for a minimum of 
  two years.
• although short­term clinical 
  outcomes were satisfactory, 
  the high­flexion cruciate­ 
  retaining knees did not have 
  greater knee flexion compared 
  with those that had the 
  standard cruciate­retaining 
  design.
Retention versus Sacrifice of 
posterior cruciate ligament
• Does the choice of 
  the implant influence 
  the results in TKR  ? 
     Most probably 
         NOT
         NOT 
What can affect the results? 
         affect the results 

• Skilled Surgical Technique
Skilled  technique 
•  Restoration of mechanical alignment 
•  Preservation or restoration of the 
   joint line 
•  Creation of equal flexion and 
   extension gaps 
•  Maintaining or restoring a normal Q 
   angle 
•  Balanced soft tissue
   Balanced soft tissue 
• The best knee 
  replacement surgery 
  is consistent , regular 
  protocoled technique.
 T
•  hanks and Sorry

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:173
posted:5/6/2011
language:English
pages:102