Master of Social Work Projects by lmh12885

VIEWS: 91 PAGES: 72

More Info
									DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK
    California State University
         Bakersfield, CA




      Handbook
         for
Students and Advisors
            (2009 - 2010 Edition)




 Bruce D. Friedman, PhD, ACSW, CSWM, LCSW
                    Director

          Revised September 2009
                                   IMPORTANT NOTE

This handbook is not a substitute for the current catalogue of the California State
University, Bakersfield. Students are to be familiar with the official University policies
delineated in the University catalogue. Some sections of the University catalogue may
be quoted directly in this handbook, which is intended only as a supplement to the
University catalogue and, unlike the catalogue, may change from year to year and is
subject to revision during the current year.




                                                                                             2
                                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS


IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS .................................................................................. 5
MISSION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES .................................................................................. 9
   CSUB MISSION STATEMENT ....................................................................................................... 9
   DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK GOALS ...................................................................................... 9
   FOUNDATION PROGRAM OBJECTIVES ........................................................................................ 10
   CONCENTRATION PROGRAM OBJECTIVES .................................................................................. 10
ADMISSION ................................................................................................................................ 11
   ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................................ 12
     Bachelor's Degree .............................................................................................................. 12
     Essential Requirements .................................................................................................... 12
     Additional Requirements ..................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.12
     Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement .............................................................. 13
   ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE ................................................................................................. 13
   REVIEW PROCESS................................................................................................................. 13
   ADVANCED STANDING PROGRAM .................................................................................. 14
MSW CURRICULUM................................................................................................................. 15
   PREREQUISITES .................................................................................................................... 17
   WAVING OF CREDITS .......................................................................................................... 17
     Advanced standing ............................................................................................................ 17
     Testing out of courses........................................................................................................ 17
     Transfer of courses taken at other colleges/universities .............................................. 17
   LIFE OR WORK EXPERIENCE ............................................................................................. 18
   SPECIAL CURRICULA .......................................................................................................... 18
   PROGRAMS OF STUDY ........................................................................................................ 19
     Full Time Program of Study (for students entering in 2008) ....................................... 19
     Part Time Program of Study (for students entering in 2008) ...................................... 20
     Advanced Standing Full Time Program of Study (for students entering in 2008).... 21
   FIELD INSTRUCTION ............................................................................................................ 23
   FOUNDATION FIELD PRACTICUM .................................................................................... 23
     Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 23
     Objectives ............................................................................................................................ 23
     Requirements...................................................................................................................... 24
     Catalog Description of Foundation Field Courses ........................................................ 24
   ADVANCED FIELD PRACTICUM ........................................................................................ 25
     Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 25
     Objectives ............................................................................................................................ 25
     Requirements...................................................................................................................... 26
     Catalog Description of Concentration Field Courses ................................................... 26
   ORGANIZATION OF FIELD COURSES ............................................................................... 27
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................... 28


                                                                                                                                             3
       Credit requirement ............................................................................................................. 28
       Completion of Field Practicum ......................................................................................... 28
       Specified Plan of Study ..................................................................................................... 28
       Residency ............................................................................................................................ 28
       Academic Performance Requirement ............................................................................. 28
       Time Limit for Completing the Program .......................................................................... 28
       Leave of Absence .............................................................................................................. 28
       Advancement to Graduate Candidacy ............................................................................ 29
       Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing.......................................... 29
       Application for Graduation ................................................................................................ 30
       Participation in Commencement Ceremonies ............................................................... 30
GUIDELINES FOR THESIS OR PROJECT .......................................................................... 31
   FORMATION OF THESIS COMMITTEES .............................. ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.36
   THE THESIS PROPOSAL .................................................... ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.36
   THE THESIS ...................................................................... ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.36
   WRITING GUIDELINES ...................................................... ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.36
ADVISEMENT ............................................................................................................................ 47
   ADVISEMENT AS A TOOL TO STUDENTS ........................................................................ 47
   REGULAR ADVISEMENT ..................................................................................................... 47
   DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADVISOR ..................................................... 47
   CHANGE OF ADVISORS ............................................. ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.49
   PART-TIME STUDENTS ........................................................................................................ 48
   SPECIAL ADVISEMENT ....................................................................................................... 49
     Initiation of Special Advisement ....................................................................................... 49
     Composition of Special Advisement Committees ......................................................... 49
     Procedures for Special Advisement ................................................................................ 49
STUDENT STATUS REVIEW.................................................................................................. 50
   PREAMBLE ............................................................................................................................. 50
   GENERAL GUIDELINES ....................................................................................................... 50
   DISMISSAL FROM THE DEPARTMENT ............................................................................. 52
   ACADEMIC PROBATION...................................................................................................... 53
   PROCEDURES......................................................................................................................... 53
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT ........................................................................................... 56
   ACADEMIC HONESTY .......................................................................................................... 56
   ACADEMIC FREEDOM ......................................................................................................... 57
   CLASSROOM CONDUCT ...................................................................................................... 57
   SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY ........................................................................................ 57
   APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES.............................................................................................. 58
FORMS ........................................................................................................................................ 59




                                                                                                                                               4
                        IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS


Department of Social Work Office                              (661) 654-3434

Bruce Friedman, Chair of Department                           (661) 654-2308
            E-mail: bfriedman@csub.edu

Patricia Henry, Director of Field Education                   (661) 654-3452
             Email: phenry2@csub.edu

Jong Choi                                                     (661) 654-2390
               Email: jchoi6@csub.edu

Joan Digges                                                   (661) 654-6543
               Email: jdigges@csub.edu

Bruce Hartsell                                                (661) 654-2106
             Email: bhartsell@csub.edu

Sam Jenkins                                                   (661) 664-5018

Roseanna McCleary                                             (661) 654-6552
           Email: rmccleary@csub.edu

Robert Mejia                                                  661) 654-6043
               Email: rmejia3@csub.edu

Debra Morrison-Orton
            Email: dmorrison_orton@csub.edu

Barbara Reifel                                                (661) 654-3122
             Email: breifel@csub.edu

Madhavappallil Thomas                                         (661) 654-2470
           Email: mthomas5@csub.edu


Field Practicum Office Hours will be posted outside of the Director of Field Education’s
office. Non-posted scheduling will be by appointment only.




                                                                                           5
                    California State University, Bakersfield
                              Academic Calendar
                                    2009/10
Fall Quarter, 2009
April 04 . . . . . . . . Transfer Day Orientation and Advising (for Fall Quarter)
April 25 . . . . . . . . Freshman Day Orientation and Advising (for Fall Quarter)
Apr 27 - May 08 . Academic Advising for Continuing Students (for Summer & Fall Quarters)
May 04 - Sep 10 . Registration for Continuing Students (for Fall Quarter)
May 09 . . . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Summer & Fall Quarters)
May 09 . . . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Summer & Fall Quarters)
June 16 . . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Summer & Fall Quarters)
July 07 . . . . . . . . Last Day to Apply for Fall Graduation ($40 fee)
Jul 08 - Aug 5 . . . Late Application for Fall Graduation Accepted ($55 fee)
July 09 . . . . . . . . .Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Fall Quarter)
July 09 . . . . . . . . .Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Fall Quarter)
August 13 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Fall Quarter)
August 13 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Fall Quarter)
August 22 . . . . . . Ramadan Begins – Islamic Holy Day
September 07 . . . HOLIDAY - Labor Day - Campus Closed
September 08 . . . ALL FACULTY DUE ON CAMPUS
September 10 . . . Last Day of Registration for Continuing Students (for Fall Quarter)
September 11 . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Fall Quarter)
September 11 . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Fall Quarter)
September 14 . . . First Day of Classes
Sep 14 - 21 . . . . . Schedule Adjustment Period (for Fall Quarter)
Sep 18 - 19 . . . . . Rosh Hashanah – Jewish Holy Day
September 20 . . . Eid Al-Fitr (end of Ramadan) – Islamic Holy Day
September 21 . . . Last Day to Add Classes
September 21 . . . Last Day to Change between Audit and Letter Grading
September 21 . . . Last Day of Schedule Adjustment Period (for Fall Quarter)
September 26 . . . Dasera – Hindu Holy Day
Sep 27 - 28 . . . . . .Yom Kippur – Jewish Holy Day
October 02 . . . . . . Census Day
October 02 . . . . . . Last Day to Change between Credit/No-credit and Letter Grading
October 02 . . . . . . Last Day to Withdraw from Classes without a "W" being recorded; withdrawals from
                          classes after this date and continuing through the next four-week period will be
                          permitted only for serious and compelling reasons and require written approval by the
                          Dean or Department Chair
October 02 . . . . . . Last Day to Apply for Winter Graduation ($40 fee)
Oct 03 - 31 . . . . . . Late Application for Winter Graduation Accepted ($55 fee)
October 17 . . . . . . Diwali – Hindu Holy Day
Oct 19 - 30 . . . . . . Academic Advising for Continuing Students (for Winter Quarter)
October 20 . . . . . . Campus-wide Emergency Evacuation Day
October 24 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Winter Quarter)
October 24 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Winter Quarter)
Oct 26 - Dec 30 . . Registration for Continuing Students (for Winter Quarter)
October 30 . . . . . . Last Day to Withdraw from Classes for a Serious and Compelling Reason
Nov 09 - 13 . . . . . SOCI Week
November 11 . . . . HOLIDAY – Veterans Day – Campus Closed
November 20 . . . . Last Day of Classes
November 20 . . . . Last Day to Submit Completed Master’s Thesis to Library (Room 211)
Nov 21 & 23 - 25 . . Examination Period
Nov 26 - 27 . . . . . HOLIDAY - Thanksgiving – Campus Closed
November 30 . . . . Commencement
December 1 . . . . . Grades Due
                            Fall Quarter Break: December 2, 2009 – December 31, 2009


                                                                                                              6
                    California State University, Bakersfield
                              Academic Calendar
                                    2009/10
Winter Quarter, 2010
October 02 . . . . . . Last Day to Apply for Winter Graduation ($40 fee)
Oct 03 - 31 . . . . . . Late Application for Winter Graduation Accepted ($55 fee)
Oct 19 - 30 . . . . . . Academic Advising for Continuing Students (for Winter Quarter)
October 24 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Winter Quarter)
October 24 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Winter Quarter)
Oct 26 - Dec 30 . . Registration for Continuing Students (for Winter Quarter)
November 27 . . . . Eid Al-Adha - Islamic Holy Day
December 25 . . . . Christmas Day
January 01 . . . . . . HOLIDAY - New Year's Day - Campus Closed
January 04 . . . . . . ALL FACULTY DUE ON CAMPUS
January 04 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Winter Quarter)
January 04 . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Winter Quarter)
January 06 . . . . . . First Day of Classes
Jan 06 - 13 . . . . . . Schedule Adjustment Period (for Winter Quarter)
January 13 . . . . . . Last Day to Add Classes
January 13 . . . . . . Last Day to Change between Audit and Letter Grading
January 13 . . . . . . Last Day of Schedule Adjustment Period (for Winter Quarter)
January 18 . . . . . . HOLIDAY - Martin Luther King Jr. Day - Campus Closed
January 22 . . . . . . Last Day to Apply for Spring Graduation ($40 fee)
Jan 23 - Feb 20 . . Late Application for Spring Graduation Accepted ($55 fee)
January 27 . . . . . . Census Day
January 27 . . . . . . Last Day to Change between Credit/No-credit and Letter Grading
January 27 . . . . . . Last Day to Withdraw from Classes without a "W" being recorded; withdrawals from
                        classes after this date and continuing through the next four-week period will be
                        permitted only for serious and compelling reasons and require written approval by the
                        dean or department chair
Feb 01 - 12 . . . . . . Academic Advising for Continuing Students (for Spring Quarter)
Feb 08 - Mar 25 . . Registration for Continuing Students (for Spring Quarter)
February 17 . . . . . Ash Wednesday - Christian Holy Day
February 24 . . . . . Last Day to Withdraw from Classes for a Serious and Compelling Reason
February 28 . . . . . Holi - Hindu Holy Day
Mar 01 - 05 . . . . . SOCI Week
March 16 . . . . . . . Last Day of Classes
March 16 . . . . . . . Last Day to Submit Completed Master’s Thesis to Library (Room 211)
Mar 17 - 20 . . . . . . Examination Period
March 22 . . . . . . . Grades Due
March 26 . . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Spring Quarter)
March 26 . . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Spring Quarter)

                            Spring Break: March 23, 2010 – March 28, 2010




                                                                                                            7
                    California State University, Bakersfield
                              Academic Calendar
                                    2009/10
Spring Quarter, 2010
January 22 . . . . . . Last Day to Apply for Spring Graduation ($40 fee)
Jan 23 – Feb 20 . . Late Application for Spring Graduation Accepted ($55 fee)
Feb 01 - 12 . . . . . . Academic Advising for Continuing Students (for Spring Quarter)
Feb 08 - Mar 25 . . Registration for Continuing Students (for Spring Quarter)
March 26 . . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for All Students (for Spring Quarter)
March 26 . . . . . . . Orientation and Advising for Antelope Valley Students (for Spring Quarter)
March 28 . . . . . . . Palm Sunday - Christian Holy Day
Mar 29 - 30 . . . . . . Passover - Jewish Holy Day
March 29 . . . . . . . ALL FACULTY DUE ON CAMPUS
March 29 . . . . . . . First Day of Classes
Mar 29 - Apr 06 . . Schedule Adjustment Period (for Spring Quarter)
March 31 . . . . . . . HOLIDAY - Cesar Chavez Day – Campus Closed
April 02 . . . . . . . . Good Friday - Christian Holy Day
April 04 . . . . . . . . . Easter - Christian Holy Day
April 06 . . . . . . . . . Last Day to Add Classes
April 06 . . . . . . . . . Last Day to Change between Audit and Letter Grading
April 06 . . . . . . . . . Last Day of Schedule Adjustment Period (for Spring Quarter)
April 19 . . . . . . . . . Census Day
April 19 . . . . . . . . . Last Day to Change between Credit/No-credit and Letter Grading
April 19 . . . . . . . . . Last Day to Withdraw from Classes without a "W" being recorded; withdrawals from
                           classes after this date and continuing through the next four-week period will be
                           permitted only for serious and compelling reasons and require written approval by the
                           dean or department chair
Apr 26 - May 07 . . Academic Advising for Continuing Students (for Summer & Fall Quarters)
Apr 26 - Jun 10 . . . Registration for Continuing Students (for Summer Quarter)
May 03 - Sep 09 . . Registration for Continuing Students (for Fall Quarter)
May 04 . . . . . . . . . Campus-wide Emergency Evacuation Day
May 18 . . . . . . . . . Last Day to Withdraw from Classes for a Serious and Compelling Reason
May 24 - 28 . . . . . . SOCI Week
May 31 . . . . . . . . . . HOLIDAY - Memorial Day – Campus Closed
June 07 . . . . . . . . . Last Day of Classes
June 07 . . . . . . . . . Last Day for Completion of Work by Master's Candidates to Graduate in June
June 07 . . . . . . . . . Last Day to Submit Completed Master’s Thesis to Library (Room 211)
June 08 . . . . . . . . . Study/Reading Day
Jun 09 - 12 . . . . . . . Examination Period
Jun 11 - 12 . . . . . . . Commencement
June 14 . . . . . . . . . Grades Due
Jun 21 - 28 . . . . . . . Schedule Adjustment Period (for Summer Quarter)




                                                                                                               8
                          MISSION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVE

CSUB Mission Statement
In its role as a comprehensive, regional public university, California State University,
Bakersfield, aspires to be the educational and intellectual center for the southern San
Joaquin Valley. Its mission is guided by the principles of excellence and diversity. First
and foremost, the faculty, staff, and administration of CSUB are committed to seek
excellence in teaching. In addition, CSUB is committed to seek excellence in
scholarship and service in order to provide an active learning environment. CSUB
recognizes its responsibility to contribute positively to the needs of the public it serves
and to the quality of life in its region.

Department of Social Work Goals

The Department of Social Work is committed to the following goals, which are derived
from the mission statement. These goals are consistent with CSWE’s Educational
Policy, Section 1.1.

The program goals are to:

   1. Prepare competent and ethical graduates for advanced social work practice
      through the provision of content that reflects the knowledge, values, and skills of
      the social work profession.
   2. Prepare competent and ethical graduates who can practice effectively within
      public and private agencies where they will work with diverse populations and
      client systems of various sizes and types.
   3. Prepare graduates for practice within the social contexts of the organizations in
      which they work and for the changing social and economic environments in the
      region.
   4. Provide an educational foundation that prepares graduates to become aware of
      their lifelong responsibility to continue their professional growth and
      development.
   5. Provide leadership in the development of service delivery systems.
   6. Develop social work knowledge.
   7. Conduct systematic evaluation of program activities and explore ways for
      continuous renewal, revision, and improvement.

The department is committed to preparing social workers for competent and ethical
advanced generalist practice. Recognizing the region’s need for professional social
workers, the department has developed flexible schedules to allow full-time, part-time,
and advanced standing study options. In addition, the department has recognized a
need to expand its program to meet the growing need for social workers in the Antelope
Valley. A revision in our curriculum reflects our commitment to promoting practice
excellence in a variety of settings through the advanced generalist concentration.
The department derived program objectives from the program goals and CSWE’s
Educational Policy, Section 3. To facilitate continuity, the department established
foundation objectives and concentration objectives that are closely linked to each other,



                                                                                              9
with the concentration objectives generally reflecting a higher level of skill than the
foundation objectives.

Foundation Program Objectives

Before their final year, students demonstrate the ability to

   1. Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional social work practice.
   2a. Understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and
       principles.
   2b. Practice according to the value base, ethical standards, and principles of the
       profession.
   3. Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related to
       clients’ age, class, color, culture, ability, ethnicity, family structure, gender,
       marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
   4a. Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination
   4b. Apply strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and
       economic justice.
   5a. Understand the history of the social work profession and its contemporary
       structures and issues.
   5b. Interpret the history of the social work profession and its contemporary structures
       and issues.
   6. Apply the knowledge and skills of a generalist social work perspective to practice
       with systems of all sizes.
   7a. Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand
       individual development and behavior across the life span
   7b Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand
       interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups,
       organizations, and communities.
   8a. Analyze social policies using prescribed approaches.
   8b. Formulate social policies using prescribed approaches.
   8c. Influence social policies using prescribed approaches.
   9a. Evaluate research studies.
   9b. Apply research findings to practice.
   9c. Evaluate practice interventions.
   10. Use communication skills appropriately across client populations, colleagues,
       and communities.
   11. Use supervision and consultation appropriate to social work practice.
   12a. Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems.
   12b. Seek necessary organizational change.

Concentration Program Objectives

Graduates demonstrate the ability to

     1. Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional social work
         practice.



                                                                                          10
     2a. Analyze the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and
         principles.
     2b. Practice according to the value base, ethical standards, and principles of the
         profession.
     3a. Analyze how individual variables influence social work practice.
     3b. Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related
         to clients’ age, class, color, culture, ability, ethnicity, family structure, gender,
         marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
     4a. Analyze the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination
     4b. Apply strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and
         economic justice.
     5. Analyze contemporary issues in the social work profession within the historical
         context.
     6. Apply the knowledge and skills of an advanced generalist social work
         perspective to practice with systems of all sizes.
     7a. Analyze theoretical frameworks that explain human behavior.
     7b Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand
         individual development and behavior across the lifespan and the interactions
         among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations,
         and communities.
     8a. Analyze social policies using synthesized approaches.
     8b. Formulate, social policies using synthesized approaches.
     8c. Influence social policies using synthesized approaches.
     9a. Evaluate research studies.
     9b. Apply research findings to practice.
     9c. Evaluate practice interventions.
     10. Use communication skills appropriately across client populations, colleagues,
         and communities.
     11. Use supervision and consultation appropriate to social work practice.
     12a. Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems.
     12b. Seek necessary organizational change.

These program objectives influence course objectives, and they are measured via the
program’s systematic evaluation processes.




                                        ADMISSION
Program Description

The profession of social work is grounded in a commitment to serving vulnerable and
oppressed populations and to advocating for public policies that promote justice. The
Master of Social Work (MSW) program prepares students for advanced generalist social
work practice. Graduates are prepared to work with individuals, families, groups,
organizations, and communities in fields such as mental health, physical health, family
and child welfare, gerontology, corrections, juvenile justice, youth services, substance
abuse treatment, and industrial social work. The program involves over 90 quarter units
of academic work, a 960-hour internship, and a culminating experience.


                                                                                            11
The program includes foundation courses, in which students develop basic knowledge,
skills, and values of social work, and concentration courses, in which students develop
knowledge, skills, and values consistent with advanced practice.

Students may participate in the program on a full-time or part-time basis. An advanced-
standing option is available for students who have received a BSW from an accredited
program within the last five years. Students may complete the full-time program in two
years and the part-time program in three years.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Admission to the MSW program is based on an overall evaluation of the applicant on
the following criteria: 1) intellectual and academic potential, 2) relevant human services
experience, 3) leadership potential, and 4) quality of reference letters.

Bachelor's Degree
The Department of Social Work requires a minimum of an earned baccalaureate degree
for admission to its MSW program.

Essential Requirements
An applicant must meet these requirements before the Admissions Committee will
review the application. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that the
application file is complete.
   1. Possession of a Bachelors degree from a recognized college or university. For
      degrees earned in the United States, this means the degree is from an institution
      accredited by one of the six regional accrediting associations.
   2. A cumulative undergraduate GPA of at least 2.5 (on a four point scale).
   3. A completed University application form, which is obtainable from any CSU
      campus
   4. A completed departmental application
   5. Official sealed copies of transcripts from all colleges attended
   6. A personal statement completed according to the guidelines in the application
   7. Three letters of reference
   8. Application fee of $55
Applicants who meet the above requirements are admitted as “classified” graduate
students. Applicants who do not yet have a bachelor’s degree may be admitted as
“conditional” graduate students and must submit proof of having completed their
degrees before beginning the MSW program.


Additional Requirements
   1. A liberal arts foundation significantly equivalent to the general education
      requirements listed in the CSUB catalog


                                                                                         12
   2. Computer literacy

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement
   The California State University system requires all degree candidates to
   demonstrate upper division writing competency. The writing proficiency requirement
   can be fulfilled in one of several ways:

   1.   Be a graduate of a university in the California State University System
   2.   Be a graduate of a university in the University of California System
   3.   Receive a minimum score of 41 on the CBEST
   4.   Receive a minimum score of 4.5 on the GRE
   5.   Receive a minimum score of 4.5 on the GMAT

ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE
The membership on the Admission Committee consists of:
   1. Four faculty members elected by the Social Work Faculty
   2. Up to four MSWs from the community representing a cross section of agencies
   3. Up to two student representatives appointed by the Social Work Club. The
      student representatives participate in deliberation of admissions and scholarship
      policies only and not in admission or scholarship decisions.

REVIEW PROCESS
The Admissions Committee reviews completed application files only. The review
process is as follows:

    1. Two faculty members are assigned to read each applicant’s file. A third reader is
       assigned in the event of a split decision.

    2. Each reader uses an admission evaluation format developed by the Admissions
       Committee to rate the application materials.

    3. Each reader evaluates the applicant’s (a) intellectual and academic potential, (b)
       relevant human services experience, (c) quality of reference letters, and (d)
       quality of personal statement. Scores are given based upon a methodology
       established by the Admissions Committee.

    4. Minimum scores for acceptance are determined by the committee based upon
       the number of applicants and the positions available in the program each year.

    5. Applicants are admitted, admitted conditionally, or not admitted.

If the Admissions Committee finds that an informed admission decision can be made
only after an interview with the applicant, the Committee may invite the applicant for a
personal interview.




                                                                                           13
ADVANCED STANDING PROGRAM
Students who meet the following requirements may apply for admission with Advanced
Standing:
   1. Must have completed the BSW degree within five years prior to admission to the
      graduate program.
   2. Must have an overall GPA of 3.0 for the baccalaureate degree.
   3. Must have a grade of B (3.0) or better for all social work courses.

Students who qualify for Advanced Standing receive waiver of the foundation content
except SW530 (Research Methods for Social Work). They may test out of SW530 with
an 80% or better score.




                                                                                  14
                                MSW CURRICULUM

MSW courses provide two levels of competencies, namely Foundation and
Concentration. The following are Foundation courses:

SW   510     Social Policy and Services (5)
SW   520     Foundations of Human Behavior (5)
SW   530     Research Methods for Social Work (5)
SW   540     Generalist Social Work Practice I (5)
SW   541     Generalist Social Work Practice II (5)
SW   593     Assessment and Diagnosis in Social Work (5)
SW   550     Field Practicum I (3) (Taken three times)

The following courses constitute the concentration sequence:

SW   610     Advanced Social Policy & Services (5)
SW   620     Advanced Human Behavior for Social Workers (5)
SW   630     Advanced Research Methods for Social Work Practice (5)
SW   646     Advanced Practice I (5)
SW   647     Advanced Practice II (5)
SW   648     Advanced Practice III (5)
SW   650     Advanced Field Practicum I (3) (Taken three times)
SW   691     Thesis (3) (Taken three times) or
SW   692     Project (3) (Taken three times)


Elective Course Work

Students in the MSW program must take at least ten hours of electives approved by the
department. Students who received special funding may be required to take specific
electives. Students may take additional electives. Electives that are not approved by
the department will not count toward the graduation requirements. The following
electives will be offered in the 2009-2010 academic year.

   Fall

   SW 640 Advanced Practice in Child and Family Services
   SW 641 Advanced Practice in Mental Health Services
   SW 643 Advanced Practice in Health

   Winter

   SW 565 Advanced Practice with Older Adults and their Families
   SW 572 Child Maltreatment
   SW 574 Advanced Substance Abuse, Dual Diagnosis, Assessment, and Treatment



                                                                                   15
Field Practicum

Field practicum is an integral part of social work education and provides an opportunity
to integrate knowledge, skills, and values. Over the course of the program, students
receive 960 clock hours in the field. Field practicum may extend beyond the typical
academic quarter schedule. The field experience is guided by an individualized learning
contract that students develop with their field instructors. As part of the field practicum,
students also participate in a weekly seminar where they practice the integration of
knowledge, skills, and values. The Director of Field Education is responsible for this
component of the curriculum.

Since suitable placements may not be available to all students in the Bakersfield area,
students may be required to travel to other communities.

Thesis or Community Project

The CSU system requires a culminating experience for graduate education The MSW
program requires students to complete a thesis or community project as a prerequisite
to graduation and awarding of the MSW Degree (9 units).

Degree Requirements

The University confers the MSW degree upon fulfillment of the following requirements:

1. Completion of 97 credit hours that includes 70 hours of coursework (41 hours for
   advanced-standing students) according to an approved degree plan.
2. Completion of 960 hours of field experience (480 hours for advanced-standing
   students) and associated seminars (18 credit hours),
3. Completion of a Thesis or Community Project (9 credit hours).
4. Grade point average of 3.0 and a grade of C (2.0) or better in all courses taken to
   satisfy the requirements for the degree as specified in each student’s Plan of Study.
5. Completion of 64 credits in residence for regular students and 32 for the advanced-
   standing students.
6. All coursework leading to the MSW degree must be completed within 7 years from
   first enrollment.

Advancement to Graduate Candidacy

Regular MSW students may be advanced to candidacy upon completion of the
Foundation curriculum, and advanced-standing students may be advanced to candidacy
during the second quarter of their studies. Advancement to candidacy is based upon a
formal review and recommendation by the faculty and approval by the Associate Vice
President for Graduate Studies. Advancement to candidacy is required prior to initiation
of the Thesis or Community Project.




                                                                                          16
PREREQUISITES
The MSW curriculum is designed to provide a well-planned educational experience for
the student, and therefore sequencing of courses is very important in the preparation of
graduate level social workers. Students must fulfill prerequisite requirements as listed in
the university catalog.

WAVING OF CREDITS
Waiving of credits from the program of study of Master’s students is allowed in the
following three situations:

Advanced standing
Students who qualify for advanced standing receive waiver of all the foundation content
(28 credits) except SW530, for which they may test out with an 80% or better score.

Testing out of courses
Students with a strong foundation in applied research may test out of SW530: Research
Methods for Social Work
Students must apply to the Director to take the proficiency exam (form MSW1). Students
may obtain a copy of the course syllabus with assignments and readings for the cost of
reproduction. Proficiency examinations may be taken only one time, and the student must
score 80% or better to pass. Courses waived by testing will not appear on the transcript.
Testing out of a course does not reduce the number of credits required for graduation.
Students are required to substitute electives to fill the number of credits required for
graduation.

Transfer of courses taken at other colleges/universities
Graduate course work from another institution may be allowed as transfer credit toward
the MSW degree if the course work meets specified criteria:
   1. It must have been taken within five years prior to enrollment in the MSW program at
      CSUB. This requirement notwithstanding, all coursework that counts for the
      master’s degree must have been completed within the seven-year period
      immediately preceding the approved application for graduation.
   2. If the course is to substitute for a Foundation course, it must have equivalent
      content taken at an accredited Social Work program.
   3. Generally, no course transfers are permitted for required Concentration courses.
   4. A maximum of 13 quarter credits of transfer will be considered (This is in accord
      with CSU policy regarding transfer units for graduate programs).
   5. Transcripts and course syllabi or other explanations of course content may be
      required to judge appropriateness. The Curriculum Committee is responsible for
      making decisions on transfer of credits.




                                                                                           17
   6. All coursework that counts for the master’s degree must have been completed
      within the seven-year period immediately preceding the approved application for
      graduation.

LIFE OR WORK EXPERIENCE
In accordance with the standards of our accrediting body, the Council on Social Work
Education, it is the policy of the Department not to permit granting of academic credit for
previous life or work experience at either the undergraduate or graduate level.

SPECIAL CURRICULA

Students who participate in special programs such as those funded by the California
Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC), the Mental Health Services Act, and the
Hartford Partnership Program for Aging Education, are required to fulfill learning
objectives that may be in addition to those required of other students.




                                                                                         18
                                  PROGRAMS OF STUDY
  Following are sample programs of study for full-time, part-time, and advanced standing
  students. These are examples only. Students should work with their advisors to assure
  proper sequencing of courses and to assure timely completion of the program. The
  department offers courses so full-time students can complete the program in two years,
  and part-time students can complete the program in three years.

  Full Time Program of Study (for students entering in 2009)
  First year
Fall                         Winter                       Spring
510: Social Policy &         530: Research Methods        610: Advanced Social Policy
     Services (5)                 for Social Work (5)          & Services (5)
520: Foundations of          541: Generalist Social       620: Advanced Human
     Human Behavior (5)           Work Practice II (5)         Behavior for Social
                                                               Workers (5)
540: Generalist Social       593: Assessment and
     Work Practice (5)            Diagnosis in Social     630: Advanced Research
                                  Work (5)                     Methods for Social Work
550: Field Practicum I (3)
                                                               practice (5)
                             550: Field Practicum I (3)
                                                          550: Field Practicum I (3)


Total units: 18              Total units: 18              Total units: 18


  Second year
Fall                         Winter                       Spring
646: Advanced Practice I     647: Advanced Practice II    648: Advanced Practice III (5)
     (5)                          (5)                     650: Advanced Field
650: Advanced Field          650: Advanced Field               Practicum I (3)
     Practicum I (3)              Practicum I (3)         691: Thesis (3)
691: Thesis (3)              691: Thesis (3)              OR
OR                           OR                           692: Project (3)
692: Project (3)             692: Project (3)
Elective (5)                 Elective (5)


Total units: 16              Total units: 16              Total units: 11




                                                                                           19
Part Time Program of Study (for students entering in 2009)
First year
Fall                  Winter                  Spring                  Summer
                                                                      620: Advanced
510: Social Policy 530: Research              541: Generalist
                                                                         Human
    & Services (5)     Methods for                Social Work
                                                                         Behavior for
                       Social Work                Practice II (5)
520: Foundations                                                         Social
                       (5)
    of Human                                  593: Assessment            Workers (5)
       Behavior (5)   540: Generalist             & Diagnosis         630: Advanced
                          Social Work             (5)                    Research
                          Practice I (5)                                 Methods for
                                                                         Social Work
                                                                         Practice (5)
Total units: 10       Total units: 10         Total units: 10         Total units: 10

Second year
Fall                  Winter                  Spring                      Summer
550: Field            550: Field          550: Field Practicum I
    Practicum I           Practicum I (3)     (3)
    (3)               Elective (5)            610: Advanced Social
Elective (5)                                      Policy & Services
                                                  (5)
Total units: 8        Total units: 8          Total units: 8

Third year
Fall                        Winter                             Spring
646: Advanced Practice      647: Advanced Practice II          648: Advanced Practice III
     I (5)                       (5)                                (5)
650: Advanced Field         650: Advanced Field                650: Advanced Field
     Practicum I (3)             Practicum I (3)                    Practicum I (3)
691: Thesis (3)             691: Thesis (3)                    691: Thesis (3)
OR                          OR                                 OR
692: Project (3)            692: Project (3)                   692: Project (3)


Total units: 11             Total units: 11                    Total units: 11




                                                                                            20
  Advanced Standing Full Time Program of Study (for students entering in 2009)
  First Year
Fall                        Winter                     Spring

                            530: Research Methods      610: Advanced Social Policy
Optional Elective (5)       for Social Work (5)             & Services (5)
                            593: Assessment and        620: Advanced Human
                                 Diagnosis in Social        Behavior for Social
                                 Work (5)                   Workers (5)
                            (Optional) Elective (5)
                                                       630: Advanced Research
                                                            Methods for Social
                                                            Work Practice (5)


Total Units: 0-5            Total units: 10-15         Total units: 15

  Second year
Fall                       Winter                      Spring
646: Advanced Practice I   647: Advanced Practice II   648: Advanced Practice III (5)
     (5)                        (5)
                                                       650: Advanced Field
650: Advanced Field        650: Advanced Field              Practicum I (3)
     Practicum I (3)            Practicum I (3)        691: Thesis (3)
691: Thesis (3)            691: Thesis (3)             OR
OR                         OR                          692: Project (3)
692: Project (3)           692: Project (3)            (optional) Elective (5)
(optional) Elective (5)    (optional) Elective (5)


Total units: 11-16         Total units: 11-16          Total units: 11-16




                                                                                        21
Advanced Standing Part Time Program of Study (for Students entering 2009)
First year
Fall              Winter             Spring             Summer
                  530: Research      610: Advanced      620: Advanced
Elective (5)             Methods for      Social Policy      Human
                         Social Work      & Services         Behavior for
                         (5)              (5)                Social
                  Elective (5)       593: Assessment         Workers (5)
                                          & Diagnosis 630: Advanced
                                          (5)                Research
                                                             Methods for
                                                             Social Work
                                                             Practice (5)

Total units: 5    Total units: 10    Total units: 10    Total units: 10



   Second year
Fall                     Winter                   Spring
646: Advanced Practice I 647: Advanced Practice   648: Advanced Practice
      (5)                      II (5)                   III (5)
650: Advanced Field      650: Advanced Field      650: Advanced Field
      Practicum I (3)          Practicum I (3)          Practicum I (3)
691: Thesis (3)          691: Thesis (3)          691: Thesis (3)
      OR                       OR                       OR
692: Project (3)         692: Project (3)         692: Project (3)

Total units: 11         Total units: 11           Total units: 11




                                                                            22
FIELD INSTRUCTION
  Field instruction is an integral component of the curriculum in social work education.
  Students enrolled in Field Practicum spend sixteen hours each week in a field
  placement applying the knowledge, skills, and values learned in other courses. The
  field experience is guided by an individualized learning contract that students develop
  with their field instructors. They meet with a field instructor or agency task supervisor for
  a minimum of 1 ½ hours per week. As part of the Field Practicum, students also
  participate in a weekly three-hour seminar. The Field Practicum Seminar provides
  students the opportunity to integrate knowledge, skills, and values with field experience.
  Students typically take SW550 each of three terms during the first year in the field and
  SW650 each of three terms during the second year. The first three courses are
  considered foundation courses, and the latter three are part of the concentration. In
  addition to the sixteen hours of field experience each week, each of these field practicum
  courses includes a weekly seminar in which attendance is mandatory. By the end of the
  program, students are required to have completed nine hundred sixty hours of field
  experience.
  The Department places students in agencies in Kern and other selected counties. A
  group of highly qualified field faculty members supervise students placed in those
  agencies. Field placement assignments are collaborative decisions of the Director of
  Field Education, field faculty, faculty adviser, student, and, in some cases, the Director.
  In some situations, students may be eligible to use their employment for field practicum.
  A number of conditions are to be met before this can be decided. The Director of Field
  Education is responsible for negotiating and directly monitoring these arrangements.

  FOUNDATION FIELD PRACTICUM

  Introduction

  By the end of the Foundation Field Practicum sequence, students are expected to
  satisfactorily demonstrate mastery of the generalist social work practice skills taught in
  the foundation courses.

  Objectives

  Upon completion of the foundation field practicum, students will demonstrate the ability
  to:

     1. Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional social work practice.
     2a. Understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and
        principle.
     2b. Practice according to the value base ethical standards, and principles of the
        profession.




                                                                                             23
    3. Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related to
       clients’ age, class, color, culture, ability, ethnicity, family structure, gender,
       marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
   4a. Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination.
   4b. Apply strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and
       economic justice.
   5. Apply the knowledge and skills of a generalist social work perspective to
       practice with systems of all sizes.
   6a. Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand
       individual development and behavior across the life span.
   6b. Use theoretical framework supported by empirical evidence to understand
        interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups,
        organizations, and communities.
   7a. Evaluate research findings to practice.
   7b. Apply research findings to practice.
   7c. Evaluate practice interventions.
   8. Use communication skills appropriately across client populations, colleagues,
       and communities.
   9. Use supervision and consultation appropriate to social work practice.
   10a. Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems.
   10b. Seek necessary organizational change.


Requirements

Students enrolled in the foundation field practicum are required to spend three hours
per week in the field practicum seminar and sixteen hours per week in the field
practicum placement. The field seminars consist of readings in assigned texts, articles,
and other outside materials as well as role-plays, videos, and guest speakers to
integrate classroom learning with the field experience. Students are required to
complete a learning contract by the end of the fourth week of placement. Students are
also required to participate in one and one half hours of direct supervision per week with
an MSW and to complete a minimum of one weekly Process Recording. Students must
complete a total of 480 hours in the field practicum placement.


Catalog Description of Foundation Field Courses
SW550: Field Practicum I (3)
This course includes 16 hours each week of supervised practice experience in a
community social agency and a three-hour integrative seminar. The course focuses on
the application of Foundation knowledge, skills, values, and ethics to practice with
individuals, families, groups, and communities. Students develop skills in effective use
of self; in assessment, intervention, and evaluation; in written and oral professional
communication; in effective use of supervision; and in critical assessment of agency
policy and practice. The course may extend beyond the limits of a typical quarter.



                                                                                        24
Prerequisites include admission to the program and completion of or concurrent
enrollment with SW 540. May be taken up to three times for credit.


ADVANCED FIELD PRACTICUM

Introduction

The advanced field practicum, like the foundation practicum, is an integral component of
the curriculum in social work education.

The advanced practicum builds upon the foundation practicum and is designed to
enhance the foundation experience through supervised social work advanced practice
experience.

Objectives

The learning objectives in the advanced field practicum build upon the broad objectives
of the foundation practicum. By the end of the concentration practicum series, the
student will demonstrate the ability to:
    1. Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional social work
        practice.
    2a. Analyze the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and principles.
    2b. Practice according to the value base, ethical standards, and principles of the
        profession.
    3a. Analyze how individual variables influence social work practice.
    3b. Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related to
        clients’ age, class, color, culture, ability, ethnicity, family structure, gender,
        marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
    4a. Analyze the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination.
    4b. Apply strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and
        economic justice.
    5. Analyze contemporary issues in the social work profession within the historical
        context.
    6. Apply the knowledge and skills of an advanced generalist social work
        perspective to practice with systems of all sizes.
    7a. Analyze theoretical frameworks that explain human behavior.
    7b. Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand
        individual development and behavior across the lifespan and the interactions
        among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations,
        and communities.
    8a. Evaluate research studies.
    8b. Apply research findings to practice.
    8c. Evaluate practice interventions.
    9. Use communication skills appropriately across client populations, colleagues,
        and communities.
    10. Use supervision and consultation appropriate to social work practice.

                                                                                       25
   11a. Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems.
   11b. Seek necessary organizational change.

Requirements

To enter SW650 Advanced Field Practicum, students must have completed a total of
480 hours in the field practicum placement, successfully completed three quarters of
SW550, the foundation field practicum sequence, and enrolled in SW 646 Advanced
Practice. Students should follow the numerical sequence for each quarter of Advanced
Practice.

Catalog Description of Concentration Field Courses

SW 650 Advanced Field Practicum (3)
Supervised practicum that engages students in supervised direct service activities and
provides practice experiences for application of the skills acquired in all foundation
areas. The goal is to produce a professionally reflective, self-evaluating,
knowledgeable, and developing social worker. Students are prepared for entry into an
advanced generalist practice, with the ability to utilize a variety of intervention
techniques in diverse settings and with diverse populations. The course may extend
beyond the limits of a typical quarter. Prerequisites: Completion of an approved
foundation practicum sequence and completion of or concurrent enrollment in SW 646.
May be taken up to three times for credit.


The field practicum seminar runs concurrently with the student’s field practicum
placement. The seminar consists of readings from assigned texts, articles, and other
selected readings. Interactive discussion will be reinforced by experiential exercises,
videos, and guest speakers to help integrate classroom learning with the field practicum
experience.




                                                                                       26
ORGANIZATION OF FIELD COURSES

     Type of Program            Fall        Winter       Spring      Summer

 Full-Time Regular 1st year    SW 550      SW 550       SW 550


Full-Time Regular 2nd year     SW 650      SW 650       SW 650


     Part-Time 1st year       No Field No Field No Field

    Part-Time 2nd year         SW 550      SW 550       SW 550


     Part-Time 3rd year        SW 650      SW 650       SW 650


Advanced Standing Full or
   Part-Time 1st year         No Field No Field No Field

Advanced Standing Full or
                               SW 650      SW 650       SW 650
   Part-Time 2nd year

All students must make arrangements to be in the field practicum placement for eight
hours on each of two days each week unless other arrangements have been approved
in advance by the Director of Field Education.




                                                                                   27
                               DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The University confers the MSW degree upon fulfillment of the following requirements:

Credit requirement
For the regular program, completion of 97 hours of graduate credit is required. For the
advanced standing program, completion of 68 credit hours is required. To remain in
good standing, students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. All work
toward the graduate degree must be completed within seven years from enrollment.

Completion of Field Practicum
A student in the regular program must successfully complete the foundation field
practicum to be eligible to enter the concentration field practicum. To be eligible for
graduation, a student must receive a grade of credit for each course in the
concentration field practicum sequence.

Specified Plan of Study
Each graduate student, in consultation with the student’s advisor, will complete a Plan
of Study appropriate for the master’s degree and the student’s academic and/or
professional goals. This Plan of Study should be completed at the time the student
achieves Graduate Classified Standing (normally, at the time of admission to the
program). The advisor will certify the completion of the student’s Plan of Study at the
time of application for graduation.

Residency
Regular students must complete 84 credits in residence at CSUB, and the advanced-
standing students must complete 68 credits in residence.

Academic Performance Requirement
All graduate students must maintain a grade point average of 3.0. A course in which no
letter grade is assigned shall not be used in computing the grade point average. A
grade below "C" is not acceptable for any graduate course.

Time Limit for Completing the Program
The MSW curriculum is structured so full-time students can complete the program in
two years and part-time students can complete the program in three years. Additional
time may be allowed; however, Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations specifies
that a master’s degree shall be completed within a seven-year period.

Leave of Absence
In accordance with the University Catalog, students who are making satisfactory
progress may request a planned educational leave for up to two years. Students who
discontinue their enrollment without approval of the Department Director for more than
two consecutive quarters must submit a new application for admission to the program,



                                                                                          28
to the University, and must pay the applicable application fees. Previous course work
will be reassessed and will not automatically be accepted for credit.

Advancement to Graduate Candidacy

Full-time students will be evaluated for advancement to candidacy at the end of the first
year. Full-time students with a GPA below 2.25 at the end of the first year will be
discharged from the program. Students with a GPA from 2.25 to 2.89, those with
unresolved matters from previous Student Status Reviews, and those without positive
recommendations from the field evaluation process will be evaluated via the Student
Status Review process regarding advancement to candidacy. Students with a GPA of
3.0 or better, who have fulfilled all conditions of admission, and who receive a positive
recommendation from the field evaluation process will be advanced to candidacy.

Part-time students will be evaluated for advancement to candidacy after taking the
advanced policy course. Part-time students with a GPA below 2.60 at that time will be
discharged from the program. Students with a GPA from 2.60 to 2.89, those with
unresolved matters from previous Student Status Reviews, and those without positive
recommendations from the field evaluation process will be evaluated via the Student
Status Review process regarding advancement to candidacy. Students with a GPA of
3.0 or better, who have fulfilled all conditions of admission, and who receive a positive
recommendation from the field evaluation process will be advanced to candidacy.

Early in the term at the end of which students will be evaluated for advancement to
candidacy, the department will prepare a checklist to document those criteria that each
student has met and to identify those criteria that have not been met. The faculty will
meet as a whole to review a summary report of the checklist, and advisors will follow up
with assigned students regarding the criteria that have not been met.

At the end of the term in which students will be evaluated for advancement to
candidacy, the faculty will meet as a whole to review student performance and to make
recommendations regarding advancement to candidacy.

Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing
Graduate students who have been advanced to candidacy and have completed all
course work required by the master’s degree program but who have not completed the
culminating experience (thesis or community project) may enroll in a special course
available in each graduate program for the purpose of maintaining continuous
enrollment at CSUB. The student will continue to register for this course each academic
term until the culminating experience requirement for the master’s degree is completed.
If the student is unable to complete the culminating experience requirement within the
maximum units allowed by the graduate program, then the student may register for a
special 700 course, at zero (0) credit units, through the Extended University to maintain
"continuous enrollment" for purposes of using University facilities, in particular the
library. Call 654-2441 for the current fee.



                                                                                        29
Application for Graduation
All MSW students must file an application for graduation at least one full academic term
before they plan to graduate because a response to the application from the
Evaluations Office may take 6-8 weeks. This means that students who plan to graduate
in June must file an application for graduation in January. If the Evaluations Office
notifies the student of any deficiencies in graduation requirements, the student must
make up the deficiencies and re-apply for graduation.


Participation in Commencement Ceremonies
Graduate students are eligible to participate in the Commencement Ceremonies held
each June at CSUB only if all requirements, including the culminating experience (thesis
or community project), have been completed prior to the date of commencement.
Exceptions to this policy are at the discretion of the Department Director.




                                                                                      30
GUIDELINES FOR THESIS OR PROJECT

Introduction
At California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), Masters in Social Work (MSW)
Program, students are required to complete a culminating experience that synthesizes
and integrates knowledge and skills gained throughout their MSW experience. The
MSW program requires students to choose a thesis, community project, or intensive
case study. As stated in the 2007-2009 CSUB Student Catalogue:

Culminating Experience Requirement - All graduate students must satisfactorily
complete a culminating experience (thesis, project, or comprehensive examination) to
qualify for the master’s degree. The specific type of experience will depend upon the
requirements of each master’s degree program. Satisfactory completion of a
culminating experience will be in compliance with Title 5, Part V, Chapter 1, Subchapter
2, Article 7 of the California Code of Regulations, Section 50510, paragraph 3.
Satisfactory completion of a culminating experience (thesis, project, or comprehensive
examination) is defined as follows:

A.    A thesis is the written product of a systematic study of a significant problem. It
      identifies the problem, states the major assumptions, explains the significance of
      the undertaking, sets forth the sources for and methods of gathering information,
      analyzes the data, and offers a conclusion or recommendation(s). The finished
      product evidences originality, critical and independent thinking, appropriate
      organization and format, and thorough documentation. Normally, an oral defense
      of the thesis is required.

      All master’s theses must be professionally bound and formally filed with the
      CSUB Library. The format of all master’s theses must meet the technical
      requirements established by the university. Students should consult the Office to
      the Associate Vice President for Academic Programs for these technical
      requirements.**

B.    A project is a significant undertaking appropriate to the professional fields as well
      as to fine and applied arts. It demonstrates originality and independent thinking,
      appropriate form and organization, and an academic rationale. It is described
      and summarized in a written abstract that includes the project’s significance,
      objectives, methodology, and conclusion or recommendation(s). An oral defense
      of the project may be required.

       Projects may or may not be bound, depending upon program requirements.
      Students should consult with their program coordinator for any binding
      requirements, which may not involve professional binding.**

C.    A comprehensive examination is an assessment of the student’s ability to
      integrate the knowledge of the area, show critical and independent thinking, and


                                                                                        31
       demonstrate mastery of the subject matter. The results of the examination
       evidences independent thinking, appropriate organization, critical analysis, and
       accuracy of documentation. A record of the examination questions and
       responses shall be maintained by the respective graduate program.

Graduate students must be at Graduate Classified level prior to enrolling in the required
culminating experience course for the respective graduate program. Some graduate
programs may require Graduate Candidacy status prior to enrollment in the required
culminating experience. Certification for the completion of the culminating experience
must be provided to the Evaluations Office and the Office of the Associate Vice
President for Academic Programs, prior to graduation and the award of the master’s
degree.

**Note change in procedures after April 2008. All theses and projects are now
      submitted electronically. See:
      http://www.csub.edu/GradStudies/PDF/MasterThesisApp.pdf


The faculty of the Department of Social Work has determined that students in the
Masters in Social Work (MSW) Program may choose a thesis or community project.
The thesis or community project is designed to allow students to demonstrate
integration and synthesis of knowledge and skills gained throughout their MSW
experience.

The first step is for students to identify whether to choose a thesis or community project.

   a. The thesis requires students to identify a problem, state the major assumptions,
      explain the significance of the undertaking, set forth the sources for and methods
      of gathering information, analyze the data, and offer conclusion(s) or
      recommendation(s). A thesis is completed under the direction of a thesis
      committee.
   b. The community project is connected to the field practicum in partnership with the
      field agency where students are assigned in their final year of study. The project
      involves multi-system practice that integrates all aspects of the generalist
      practice curriculum including social policy, research, practice, and human
      behavior. This takes place within an assigned community field practicum setting.
      To promote optimal student learning, the field seminar instructor (SW 650) shall
      also oversee the community project (SW 692). While evaluation is an essential
      component of the project, it is not the primary focus of the project. The project
      should include significant micro, mezzo, and macro elements. The project
      necessarily includes literature review, service provision, data collection, data
      analysis, and recommendations for program or service improvement. The
      project must demonstrate students’ ability to synthesize existing knowledge, to
      generate useful new knowledge, and to disseminate that knowledge via a
      scholarly written report. A project is completed under the direction of a project
      instructor.



                                                                                          32
                         Social Work Skills and Competencies

In order to integrate and synthesize the social work knowledge and skills gained in the
MSW program, the following skills and competencies are used in completion of the
thesis or community project.

      Ability to identify, access, and critically evaluate scientifically appropriate
       information

      Ability to critically evaluate policies, regulations, and programs related to clients
       in any part of the life span, especially those in underserved and vulnerable
       groups

      Ability to apply direct social work practice skills

      Ability to develop social work interventions and/or policy practice/advocacy
       strategies using an evidence based approach

      Ability to apply appropriate social work theories and frameworks to a complex
       social issue/problem

      Ability to use, apply and/or integrate technology

      Ability to effectively communicate verbally and in writing

      Ability to apply social work ethical principles

      Skills in the application and integration of evidence based research to agency
       programming

      Skills in program evaluation or needs assessment

      Skills in providing direct services

      Skills in developing research methodology

      Skills in data analysis

      Skill in identifying the strengths of diverse populations

      Skills related to the awareness of cultural issues

      Skill in working collaboratively with an agency/organization, faculty sponsor, and
       other systems



                                                                                           33
Please note: Both the thesis and the community project involve a commitment to social
justice and vulnerable, underserved populations. The topic should be related to a
student’s declared emphasis (child welfare, mental health, or gerontology), especially if
the student is receiving stipend support.

More information about the thesis and the project are set out in separate sections
below.

THESIS
A master's thesis embodies original work by the candidate, conducted under the
supervision of members of the faculty of Department of Social Work at California State
University, Bakersfield. As a contribution to knowledge within social work, it must,
without fail, be clear, be grammatically correct and include a review of pertinent
literature that represents the systematic study of a significant problem. It identifies the
problem, states the major assumptions, explains the significance of the undertaking,
sets forth the sources for and methods of gathering information, analyzes the data, and
offers a conclusion or recommendation(s). The finished product evidences originality,
critical and independent thinking, appropriate organization and format, and thorough
documentation. Normally, an oral defense of the thesis is required.

The proposed time line for the process can be found below. The student discusses the
topic of the proposed thesis with faculty members she or he is considering as possible
chair of the thesis committee. After consultation with faculty members, the student
selects a faculty member as chair. The chair and student select a thesis committee,
and they work together to focus the topic of the research. Once approved by the
Department Director, the chair of the thesis committee, in consultation with the
committee members, monitors and approves progress on the thesis. The student works
with the chair and committee members during the final year of the program and
completes the thesis before graduation.

Full-time students must submit the request to form a thesis committee to the Director of
the program by the end of the spring quarter of their foundation year, and part-time
students must submit the request by the end of the winter quarter in their second year.

The university establishes the time by which the final thesis must be submitted.
Students must work with their committees to complete the thesis in time to obtain
committee approval prior to the university deadline. Graduation will be delayed if the
university timeline is not followed.

The thesis accounts for 9 units of study. A student completing a thesis will graduate with
a minimum of 97 quarter hours. Students are required to enroll in thesis for 3 units per
quarter during fall, winter, and spring. The thesis committee will make a determination to
award 3 units per quarter based on the evaluation of performance and progress made
during that quarter.




                                                                                         34
The development of the thesis involves several phases, including formation of a
committee, selection of a topic, development of a proposal, approval of the proposal by
the committee chair, obtaining approval from the Institutional Review Board, conducting
research, writing the thesis, and presenting the thesis.

Formation of Thesis Committees
Students are strongly encouraged to initiate the thesis process early in their education
by discussing with faculty members their interests and the topics they would like to
explore. After they have selected the chair and the chair has approved the members of
the thesis committee, students petition the Director for approval (Form in Appendix A of
these guidelines). The committee consists of a minimum of three members. The chair
must be a Ph.D. in the Social Work Department.

The Thesis Proposal

Students write a thesis proposal in close collaboration with the thesis committee. The
form and content of the proposal depend on the nature of the thesis. The proposal
requires approval by the Department Director before it is submitted to the Institutional
Review Board, and approval by the Institutional Review Board is required before data
collection begins.

The Thesis
The thesis is a research project that addresses a problem through sound research
methodology. It can be an original piece of work or an extension of an already
completed study.

Although the form and content of the thesis are prescribed by the thesis committee, the
following list illustrates typical content of a thesis.

      Chapter I – Introduction
      The introduction articulates the topic and its relevance to Social Work. It also
      specifies the hypotheses or research questions.
      Chapter II – Literature Review
      The literature review establishes the context for the research. It illustrates what
      is known about the topic and provides a justification for furthering knowledge in
      the selected area of research.
      Chapter III – Research Methodology
      Chapter III of the thesis starts with a restatement of your hypotheses or research
      questions and goes on to describe in replicable detail how the research was
      conducted.
      Chapter IV – Findings




                                                                                           35
       Chapter IV describes the results of the research. It includes a report of the data
       that were obtained and an analysis of the data.
       Chapter V – Summary, Implications, and Recommendations
       Chapter V summarizes the preceding chapters, discusses the implications of the
       findings, and makes recommendations for further research.

Writing Guidelines
Chapter 6 of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6h
edition (2009) provides writing and formatting guidelines with additional specifications
provided by the University Office of Graduate Studies. Students are responsible for
obtaining the most current University requirements before preparing the thesis for
submission. See Appendix B for the recommended timeline for completion.




                                                                                           36
THESIS TIMELINE AND FORMS

                                      2009-2010

Task/Item to be submitted                    Due Dates*

Thesis proposal discussions with prospective April 2009
committee members

Proposal draft completed, submitted to       May 2009
prospective thesis chair

Set up thesis committee                      May 2009

Prepare IRB submission                       May 2009

IRB Submissions                              Standard Review May 2009;
                                             September 2009
                                             Exempted and Expedited Review,
                                             September 2009
                                             Third Party Data Review, September
                                             2009
Proof of IRB approval                        Due by September 2009

Introduction, Literature Review, Research    Due by November 2009
Question(s)/hypotheses, Methodology
section submitted
Data Collection, Analyses Sections           Due by March 2010
submitted


Full draft of thesis                         Due by April 2010


Thesis presentation                          May 2010

Thesis submitted to library                  Before June 1, 2010


*Students shall obtain specific due dates for the submission of each task from
their Thesis Committee Chair.




                                                                                  37
COMMUNITY PROJECT

Students may select either a thesis or a community project for their culminating
experience in the MSW program. The community project provides students with an
opportunity to have hands-on experience in identifying and addressing a social problem
or issue of significance to the community and the social work profession. The project
requires multisystem integration of micro, mezzo, and macro elements and ends with a
report that contributes to growth of professional knowledge and strengthening of
practice standards in the community. Community project proposals are subject to IRB
approval.

The community project option allows non-profit agencies across Kern County, Tulare
County, and the Antelope Valley to submit a proposal that involves working with a
student on an identified, social work-related agency need. Projects typically involve one
student who, in partnership with an agency; plans, implements, and evaluates a
community project over three academic quarters (September 2009 through May 2010).

Examples of projects include:

   1. Completing a needs assessment of a special population for a program proposal
   2. Doing a pilot of an evidenced based intervention (e.g., an Intensive Case Study,
      see Appendix C for description)
   3. Planning and implementing innovative services to fill an identified gap within the
      community
   4. Developing a program using evidenced based research
   5. Developing a training program for staff or a targeted population
   6. Evaluating an agency program
   7. Writing a substantial grant

If an agency or organization is interested in working with a student on a community
project, they should work collaboratively with the student in completing the Community
Projects Request for Proposal Form. The student will submit the proposal for review
and approval. The skills and competencies that the community project should cover can
be found in the application.

Sponsorship of a project will require meeting with the student on a regular basis (one-
two times a month) to assist in obtaining resources, reviewing written materials,
providing clarity and direction, and approving the final report. Students will be
developing projects from their submitted proposals during May and June, 2010.

Basic Components of the Community Project

Following are the major components of the community project:

   1. Community Project Process
       a. Identification of a social problem, issue, and/or a community need;



                                                                                          38
         b. Identification of a targeted population to be served;
         c. Literature review of the identified social problem, issue and/or community
            need;
         d. Data collection and assessment of current services available in the
            community;
         e. Planning the anticipated timeline and identification of needed resources;
         f. Intervention and monitoring of the project;
         g. Project evaluation.

   2. Community project report (use APA format)
        a. Title page (sample will be provided)
        b. Dedication (optional)
        c. Table of contents (including figures and tables page)
        d. Abstract
        e. Major sections:
                 i. Introduction
                ii. Purpose of the community project
               iii. Literature review
               iv. Methods
                v. Results
               vi. Discussion
              vii. Strengths/weaknesses of project
             viii. Implications for social work (including policy implications)
               ix. Next steps
                x. References
               xi. Appendices (as needed, include approved proposal and IRB
                    approval)

This format may vary, with the approval of the instructor, depending on the nature of the
project.

Independent Work

Students who wish to work together collaboratively on a group community project shall
be required to provide evidence of independent work on all aspects of the project,
including the final report. All students shall work closely with their field practicum,
seminar and community project instructors to meet community project requirements as
outlined above.

Academic Credit and Time Requirements

Although students are required to register for SW692 (Community Project) for three
consecutive quarters (3 units each quarter, total of 9 units) in their final year of study,
students are strongly advised to begin planning the project as soon as field placement
assignments are made in the preceding spring term. Because project proposals must
be submitted to the Institutional Review Board, and because full review occurs only



                                                                                              39
periodically, students can relieve themselves of significant time constraints by beginning
to read the relevant literature and submitting a project proposal to the Institutional
Review Board in time for review in the spring of 2009.

While the deadline for project proposals is early in the fall term, students are
encouraged to work with their agency and project instructor in the spring and summer of
2009 and complete the bulk of their literature review during the summer of 2009.
Students are expected to accomplish the following to receive a grade of “credit” each
term.

       Fall – Completion of proposal, approval from IRB, and full (not final) draft of a
              thorough literature review
       Winter – Data collection, assessment, goal setting, planning, intervention, and
              ongoing monitoring
       Spring – Intervention, final evaluation and termination of services, completion of
              full report and presentation in an assigned forum

Students who achieve these milestones will receive a grade of “credit” for that quarter.
Students who do not meet the course requirements for a quarter, will receive “no credit”
and will be required to repeat the course. A grade of incomplete will be given only
under extreme circumstances or hardship, e.g. major illness or natural disasters (as
determined by the community project instructor).

While students receive three credit units per quarter, because of the experiential nature
of the project, it is expected that an average of 6-12 hours a week will be devoted to
completion of the project. More hours may be required when completing certain
sections of the project (e.g., data collection).

Steps in the Process

Identifying Key Personnel
By the end of the spring term before beginning the project, students should know who
their instructor will be for the field practicum seminar, their agency field instructor, and
their project instructor. Although these key individuals might change, the possibility of a
change should not prevent students from planning their projects during the spring term.

Choosing a Topic/Getting Started
Choosing a topic involves some or all of the suggestions below:

      While the project requires hands-on experience above and beyond one’s typical
       practicum assignment in their field placement agency, students, in collaboration
       with their instructors and agency staff, have significant discretion about how to
       focus the topic of their projects. Students who choose an area of genuine
       interest are more likely to enjoy the learning experience than those who do not.




                                                                                          40
      Another important consideration involves the availability of relevant literature.
       Scan the literature in a few areas of interest and integrate concepts from related
       topics if there is little literature available.
      Discuss your ideas with agency mentors, faculty, other students, and others you
       know who are interested in the same topics.
      Contact stakeholders who have expertise in your chosen area in order to assist
       you in formulating a topic.
      Systematically explore:
          o What gaps currently exist in services for vulnerable populations in the
              community?
          o Are others interested in your topic?
          o How invested are the key staff members at the agency in the topic?
          o Has any similar work been done, either within the agency or elsewhere,
              that you can build on, or will you be navigating uncharted waters.
          o How feasible is the project in terms of time, costs, and availability of
              required resources?
          o What value will the project provide to the agency, its clients, and the
              profession?
          o Does the project relate to a social justice issue, a vulnerable, underserved
              population, and to your chosen emphasis (child welfare, mental health,
              gerontology)?
          o Which social work skills and competencies will be strengthened,
              integrated, and synthesized while doing the project?

Students are strongly encouraged to select a topic and to develop a proposal by the end
of the spring term before they enroll in the fall term of SW692 and be well underway on
their literature review. (See Community Project Timeline, Appendix B).

Developing a Project Proposal and IRB Submission Packet
Please refer to the Community Project Request Form. The proposal must be approved
by the project instructor before continuing with the project.

After the proposal is submitted and approved, a meeting with the project instructor
should follow to determine next steps involving the CSUB Institutional Review Board.
Depending on the proposed project’s level of human subject involvement, there may
need to be a research protocol review at the exempted, expedited, or standard level. All
students must have IRB approval before carrying out any data collection with human
subjects for the project. This includes secondary data. Evidence of IRB approval or
notification that IRB approval is not needed for the project is required.

The following links relate to IRB protocol submissions and deadlines:

Main page: http://www.csub.edu/grasp/irbhsr/

Submitting your research for review (instructions for writing research protocol):
http://www.csub.edu/grasp/irbhsr/researchReview.html


                                                                                       41
Consent form examples: http://www.csub.edu/grasp/irbhsr/IRBExampleConsent.doc
http://www.csub.edu/grasp/irbhsr/example%20of%20online%20consent%20form/Page
%201.htm

Please note: All students should have already completed and passed the IRBs Human
Subjects Protection Training
(http://www.csub.edu/grasp/irbhsr/assurance_of_honesty.html) and be on the GRASP
office’s list of completion.

The IRB deadlines are as follows: An expedited level of review will require
approximately two weeks for a response. The IRB cannot review an incomplete protocol
– missing sections and materials will delay approval.

Carrying Out the Project
Next steps depend on the particular project. For all projects, an extensive review of the
literature should be completed and project goal(s), purpose, and/or research question(s)
should be clearly stated. Project methods should be clearly defined (someone should
be able to replicate them). The course instructor should review these sections prior to
proceeding to data collection and analyses. Once the literature review, project goal(s),
and methods have been approved, data collection can proceed.

Please note: Projects must follow the proposals. If circumstances require a departure
from the proposal, the project instructor and the Institutional Review Board must be
consulted before proceeding. Contact the assigned instructor and, in consultation with
the instructor, consult with the IRB Research Ethics Coordinator (Dr. Steve Suter, 661-
654-373, ssuter@csub.edu). Approval of changes can usually be done via email if the
changes are not extensive.

Data Collection and Assessment
Although reading some of the relevant literature is necessary before writing the project
proposal, a thorough literature review is necessary before providing intervention. The
literature places the project in the context of existing knowledge. The relevant existing
knowledge may relate to the problem being examined, to services, to methods of study
or practice, and to a variety of other related topics. The written literature review should
reflect a reasonable summary of current knowledge about the topic. If there are
divergent views within the field, the literature review should reflect those divergent
views. If there are significant gaps in knowledge, those gaps should be reflected in the
literature review.

Goal Setting and Planning
Goals and objectives are developed outlining the intended community project outcomes
along with a plan for how they will be achieved. This involves evaluating possible
strategies, designing an intervention plan, and identifying all parties involved in the
intervention.




                                                                                          42
Intervention and Monitoring
Intervention consists of the actions taken to implement the plan. Ongoing monitoring of
the intervention helps determine if the desired outcomes are being achieved and allows
for revision of the plan as necessary.

Analyzing Data and Evaluation
The data analysis and evaluation process will also be determined by the project
proposal, the purpose of the project, and/or the research questions. The methods of
analysis must be appropriate to the inquiry. Data analysis and evaluation is required
before the final report can be written and should be completed by the middle of the
spring term.

Disseminating Knowledge
Social workers are expected to contribute to the knowledge base of the profession.
This contribution requires sharing knowledge. The knowledge derived from the project
is disseminated in two ways: a written report and a public presentation. The
components of the completed community project report are listed on page 8 above.

To receive credit for each quarter, beginning in the fall 2009 through the spring 2010,
students must successfully achieve the tasks specified in the Community Project
Timeline (See page 45) and complete the Community Project Report sections required
by their project instructors.

Students are expected to demonstrate the capacity for significant amounts of
independent work on the project. Instructors may choose how often to hold meetings
and whether those meetings are individual or group meetings. Instructors may choose
whether to allow or require electronic or paper submission of drafts. Missing meetings,
whether individual or group, can cause significant delays in progress, and delays in
progress can delay graduation.

Presentations
Students are required to do a 15-20 minute summary presentation of the project for
other students, faculty, and interested community members. In addition, students are
required to develop a poster describing the main points of the project. Posters will be
displayed prior and after the summary presentations.

Final Report
The final project report should be written in APA format. Two original copies, one for
the instructor and one for the agency are required. In addition, the report should be
sent to the instructor electronically. All finished projects for 2009-2010 will be converted
to a PDF file and uploaded to the CSUB Walter Stiern library website for dissemination.
For instructions, see: http://www.csub.edu/GradStudies/PDF/MasterThesisApp.pdf

Please Note: Some flexibility on the instructors’, the agency’s, and the students’ parts
may be required to improve the learning experience of the project. Feedback on ways
to strengthen and improve the project will be requested at the end of each quarter.



                                                                                          43
Description of Intensive Case Study Option

The intensive case study is a community project option for students and is closely
aligned with the practicum experience. In choosing this option, the student will identify a
case (individual, family, group, community, organization) from his/her field experience.
The case must come from an at-risk population with whom social workers are involved
(i.e. women; children; ethnic minorities of color; economically, physically and/or mentally
challenged individuals; gay men and lesbian women; aged, etc.)

The student will then develop an assessment of the case including analyses of the
effects of membership in the oppressed population group from a worker point of view.
This will include links to the theoretical bases of social work practice and the strengths
and limitations (protective and risk factors) of the client system. Assessment tools can
be used for the analysis, development of intervention strategies, and for the practice
evaluation. A description of the client systems’ analysis of the problem or situation,
should be included, i.e., how the client sees the situation.

Agency policies and/or macro systems affecting the client system (positively or
negatively) will be explored and discussed in depth as to the effect that those policies
have on the client system.

The student will then implement the planned intervention and describe in detail the
rationale behind those strategies called upon during service delivery. IRB approval is
necessary if you use a single subject design model to measure or test your intervention.
This discussion will include identifying the theories from which the intervention
strategies were drawn. An evidence-based justification for the use of these particular
intervention strategies will be described.

Most importantly is the description of how practice effectiveness with the client system
was evaluated. This involves a thorough discussion of outcomes of the intervention and
a means for presenting them in a poster format that will be presented to the community.
It also includes a discussion of the appropriateness/correctness of the client system
assessment.

Throughout the intensive case study process, there needs to be descriptions and
discussions of any ethical dilemmas that arise as a result of the interaction with the
client system. This discussion should also include how these dilemmas were
addressed.




                                                                                           44
COMMUNITY PROJECT TIMELINE

                                        2009-2010
Task/Item to be submitted                    Due Dates*

Info Session for Thesis and Community         April 2009
Project
Proposal Development with Agency and          May – June 2009
Community Project instructor

Final Proposal to Community Project           Due September 2009
instructor
IRB Submissions                               Standard Review, May 2009;
                                              September 2009
                                              Exempted and Expedited Review,
                                              September 2009
                                              Third Party Data Review, September
                                              2009
Proof of IRB approval                         Due by September 30, 2009

Introduction, Data Collection, Literature     Due by November 2009
Review, Project Goals/Objectives or
Research Question(s)/Hypotheses,
Methodology Activities and Reports

Data Collection, Assessment, Analyses,        Due by March 2010
Goals and Intervention Plans, Intervention
and Monitoring Activities and Reports

Intervention, Final Evaluation,               Due by April 2010
Termination of Services Activities and Full
draft of Project Report
Poster Session                                TBA: May 2010

Final Community Project Report                May 2010

*Students shall obtain specific due dates for the submission of each task from
their Project instructor

       Fall – Completion of proposal, approval from IRB, and full (not final) draft of a
              thorough literature review
       Winter – Data collection, assessment, goal setting, planning, intervention, and
              ongoing monitoring
       Spring – Intervention, final evaluation and termination of services, completion of
              full report and presentation in an assigned forum



                                                                                        45
Evaluation of 2009 – 2010 Culminating Experience Proposals

Proposals will be rated based on the following criteria.

   1. Culminating experience uses 75% of skills/competencies listed in proposal

   2. Culminating experience identifies and describes a commitment to social justice

   3. Culminating experience involves a commitment to vulnerable, underserved
      populations

   4. Culminating experience clearly makes a contribution to client system or the
      agency and the community

   5. The agency staff working with the student is available to assist the student with
      the project




                                                                                       46
                                     ADVISEMENT

ADVISEMENT AS A TOOL TO STUDENTS
All students are assigned to an advisor before they are invited to the program
orientation, usually conducted during the first week of September. These faculty
advisers along with the Director of Field Education assist the students in assessing their
particular strengths and help them select their areas of study. Students are helped to
assess their objectives in relation to their future career goals and learning needs. They
are also helped to evaluate what practicum setting will best meet their interests and
learning needs.
Faculty advisers and the Director of Field Education meet with students on a regular
basis to assess progress and to identify potential problems associated with performance
in the classroom and the field. The advisors are required to fill out the relevant columns
of the student’s program of study kept in the student personal file. The students are
strongly advised to meet the advisors at least once every quarter.
Students who have academic or field difficulties that need advisory resources beyond
the regular advisement are first informally handled by a Special Advisement. Detailed
policies and procedures of Special Advisement are given in the student handbook.
Special Advisement is an informal process within the Department to help the student in
his/her difficulties in academic or field performance.
The Student Status Review is a formal procedure to review the student’s performance.
Detailed procedures of Student Status Review are given below.
The student is automatically placed on academic probation whenever the GPA falls
below 3.0. The Director notifies the respective advisor as soon as this happens.

PURPOSES OF ADVISEMENT
Student advisement is an integral part of the educational experience and a major faculty
responsibility. The advisement system has the following purposes: 1) to provide each
student with a faculty member who knows the student's educational interests, goals, and
educational program and who serves as a resource in assisting the student in his/her total
educational experience; and 2) to provide the Department with a clear channel through
which to carry out certain administration functions in reference to each student
There are two levels for the advisement system in the Department of Social Work: Regular
Advisement, and Special Advisement.

REGULAR ADVISEMENT
The Director of the Department assigns each student an advisor before registration. To the
degree possible, advisors are assigned according to the student’s career interests.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ADVISOR
The advisor has primary responsibility for helping the student make maximum use of
learning opportunities and, in general, acts to advance the student's best interests.



                                                                                        47
Specifically, the advisor:
   1. Works closely with the student at the beginning of the educational experience to
      complete the Plan of Study. The student keeps a copy of the plan and the advisor
      places the original in the student's official record to be updated each quarter as
      needed;
   2. Assists with registration and signs the student's registration documents each
      quarter;
   3. Consults with the student regarding short and long term educational goals;
   4. Assists the student in choosing selected areas of study and electives to meet
      his/her goals;
   5. Helps the student assess her/his educational needs and objectives regarding the
      two field placements while considering potential resources;
   6. Based on this assessment, makes recommendations about the student's
      educational needs and placement preference to the Director of Field Education and
      shares the recommendations with the student;
   7. In the event it is deemed useful/necessary initiates a Special Advisement for the
      student and chairs the meeting, working with the student to implement the
      recommendations that ensue; and
   8. Is available to the student to discuss personal issues as they impinge on the
      student's educational experience and, if indicated, make appropriate referrals to
      University and community resources.
The student must meet the advisor at least once every quarter to review academic
progress.
CHANGE OF ADVISORS
Students have the option to change advisers if needed by making a formal request to
the Director of the Social Work Department. When students select their concentrations,
they may change advisors to a faculty member who teaches in the concentration they
have selected, if this has not coincided with the initial assignment. Such changes will take
into consideration the student's preferences to the degree possible. Reassignment is
based on faculty workload and the agreement of the faculty member affected.

PART-TIME STUDENTS
Part time students follow the same curriculum and sequence of courses that full-time
students follow, but they are allowed to complete their course of study in four years.
Since all courses are not offered all semesters, part- time study requires careful,
advanced planning. To ensure consistency, every part time student is required to
prepare, in consultation with the advisor, a reasonable study plan that can be
implemented within a maximum of four years after admission. This plan is placed in the
student’s file and is evaluated each quarter during advisement to assess progress.




                                                                                           48
SPECIAL ADVISEMENT
Special advisement procedures are designated to provide extended advisory resources in
the interest of enhancing the student's learning opportunities or changing a student's
program. Special advisement is advisory to the student and his/her faculty advisor and will
not relate directly to administrative decisions about student status. However, information
from advisement may be considered in due-process procedures, including Student Status
Review.
Special advisement is one of several possible resources available to an advisor and a
student to supplement or reinforce the regular services of the advisor. The advisor and
student may consider other available advisory supplements. Special Advisement will
usually be expected as a step in the due-process procedure prior to Student Status
Review; however, in exceptional circumstances, the Director may waive the requirement of
Special Advisement prior to Student Status Review.

Initiation of Special Advisement
Special Advisement is normally initiated by the faculty advisor; it may also be initiated by
the student or a faculty member, upon written request to the advisor stating the situation
that is believed to make special advisement indicated.
Special advisement procedures may be initiated whenever there are special academic
interests and/or difficulties believed to require advisory services other than those available
from the advisor.

Composition of Special Advisement Committees
A Special Advisement committee shall include:
   1. The student's faculty advisor, who shall serve as chair and shall summarize the
      discussion and recommendations in a written report for the student and the
      student’s file;
   2. Interested or involved faculty members;
   3. At the option of the student, an additional faculty member of the student's choice.

Procedures for Special Advisement
   1. The faculty advisor will arrange a meeting of the Special Advisement Committee as
      soon as possible after the need arises or the request is made;
   2. The student shall be provided opportunity to meet with the Special Advisement
      Committee and participate in discussion;
   3. The advisor will collaborate with the student and others on follow-up actions;
   4. The advisor will provide a written summary of the recommendations to the student
      and will place a copy in the student’s master file.




                                                                                            49
                              STUDENT STATUS REVIEW

PREAMBLE
Student Status Review is the process by which the Department of Social Work addresses
student performance problems. The Student Status Review Committee (SSRC) is
charged by the Faculty of the Department of Social Work with responsibility for the
academic review of any student's academic performance that violates appropriate
expectations in the classroom or practicum setting.
Social work students are expected to establish and maintain professional relationships at
all levels, both within and outside the classroom (with faculty, staff and students; with
individual clients, groups, the community, and others). This entails, among other things,
adhering to standards of academic honesty, respecting self and others, and being able to
communicate in ways that are non-exploitative of others. Moreover, social work students
are expected to adhere to the values and standards of the social work profession as
exemplified in the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.
The Student Status Review Committee shall be a standing committee of the Department
of Social Work. To properly discharge its responsibilities and authority, the Student Status
Review Committee will be representative of the faculty and shall be constituted of three (3)
full time faculty members (and alternates) appointed by the Director. Members of the
Committee shall elect the Chair of the Committee. These faculty representatives will be
responsible for conducting hearings. Decisions made will require a simple majority vote of
the Committee. Minutes of hearings and Committee decisions will be forwarded to the
Director of the Department within three working days of the meeting. In the event the
meeting takes place immediately prior to an extended holiday, every effort must be made
to complete the minutes and recommendations prior to leaving for holiday.
The student may appeal the SSRC's decision to the Director of the Department. Upon
receipt of the SSRC's decision and the minutes of the hearing or an appeal from the
student, the Director will act upon the matter and implement the decision. The Director will
communicate this decision to the student and the SSRC.

GENERAL GUIDELINES
The student status review process may be initiated by a) the student, b) the student's
faculty advisor, or c) any faculty member concerned about the student's status.
A faculty member who initiates the review and who serves on the SSRC shall be
temporarily replaced by an alternate and shall not vote on the matter before the
Committee.
Anyone initiating the Student Status Review process must make the request to the Chair
of the SSRC in writing with a copy of the request placed in the student’s file in the main
office.
Student performance and behavior will be reviewed by the SSRC in the following
circumstances:
   1. The student fails to correct deficits in his/her academic performance as stipulated in
      prior Special Advisement agreements.


                                                                                          50
2. The student receives a grade of D or below in a core course.
3. The student’s GPA for courses in the Social Work program drops below a 3.0.
4. Faculty has concern over attitudinal, behavioral or ethical considerations that
   question the student's fitness for the profession of social work. This involves
   maintaining social functioning that allows for effective participation in the
   academic and practicum requirements of the program. Social functioning refers
   to the student’s ability to cope with the demands generated by interaction with
   the environment. Impairment in social functioning and/or occupational functioning
   may be exhibited by a single discrete episode that clearly violates the
   University’s expectations for student conduct or the NASW Code of Ethics, state
   regulations defining professional misconduct, or by a pattern of recurring
   behavior which may include, but not limited to the following:
      a. Is consistently unable or unwilling to carry out departmental or practicum
         responsibilities.
      b. Presents frequent personal crises such that tasks, assignments, tests,
         appointments and field activities are not completed in a timely manner
         and/or require rescheduling.
      c. Exhibits provocative behavior that alienates the student from others,
         disrupts class or meetings or the flow of work in the practicum agency or
         results in repeated complaints from the field instructor, students, faculty, or
         others in the academic or practicum environment or related agencies.
      d. Frequently misinterprets or misrepresents others’ communications or
         behaviors.
      e. Displays frequent attention-seeking behavior, which disrupts the academic
         or practicum environment.
      f. Displays erratic, disorganized, incoherent, or unpredictable behavior.
      g. Lacks insight or is unable to perceive the negative consequences of own
         behavior.
      h. Frequently blames others or external factors for failures and difficulties in
         the academic or practicum environment.
      i.   Takes the position that there is justification for having hurt or mistreated
           another person.
      j.   Repeatedly fails to plan ahead or is impulsive, causing distress, disruption,
           or harm to others.
      k. Is verbally or physically aggressive toward others.
      l.   Is disoriented to person, place, or time, such that the school or practicum
           responsibilities cannot be carried out.
      m. Is unable to sustain harmonious school and practicum relationships as
         exhibited by recurring interpersonal conflicts.



                                                                                          51
          n. Displays intoxication or impairment at the University or practicum agency,
             due to abuse of psychoactive substance.
          o. Displays behavior that results in a consensus among faculty and/or field
             practicum personnel that the student would present a clear threat to others
             upon entering the professional field of social work practice.
Social work is based on humanitarian ideals, which are designed to carry out a
commitment to improving the general welfare, promoting respect for individual
differences and demonstrating a belief in the dignity of human beings. In keeping with
these expectations of the profession, it is expected that students will integrate and
demonstrate these fundamental values. Inability to demonstrate the values of the social
work profession includes not being able to meet standards concerning social functioning
and humanitarian ideals. Unacceptable performance in the area of humanistic attitudes,
beliefs, and values is grounds for student status review, especially when another’s right
to self-determination and dignity is infringed upon, and includes the following:
   1. Inability to tolerate different points of view such that it affects classroom or
      practicum performance of the student or others.
   2. Lack of flexibility in attitudes toward race, culture, ethnicity, age, physical or
      mental abilities, gender (including the roles of males and females), sexual
      orientation, religion, or other human diversities such that it affects classroom or
      practicum performance or impinges on the right of others.
   3. Not allowing clients the opportunity to make their own choices and experience
      the consequences of such choices (appropriate exceptions noted regarding
      minors or when severity of consequences are unacceptable such as in the case
      of suicidal behavior).
Nothing in these standards shall abridge the standards concerning child abuse and
neglect or threats to self or others according to local, state, and federal statutes.
Standards for students apply to field practicum as well as the academic environment.
The SSRC will include in its deliberations all available information relating to student
performance, including academic performance, attitudinal or ethical considerations, and
personal circumstances that affect academic performance.
The SSRC may recommend one of three actions:
   1. Dismissal from the Department of Social Work
   2. Academic probation
   3. Proceed without probation

DISMISSAL FROM THE DEPARTMENT
The SSRC may recommend dismissal from the Department for students whose
academic, classroom, or practicum performance is judged to be unacceptable.
A student who fails to satisfy conditions of probation in a timely fashion will be dismissed.
A student will be dismissed when his/her performance in the classroom or in the practicum
setting is inconsistent with the spirit and the letter of the NASW Code of Ethics in situations


                                                                                            52
in which ethical judgment is to be exercised and professional intervention or professional
conduct is required.

ACADEMIC PROBATION
Stipulations herein delineated reflect minimum standards of academic performance in
professional social work courses that may exceed University rules and regulations on
quarter and cumulative GPA.

A. Criteria for academic probation.
These criteria are not intended to exhaust all ways a student might be placed on probation.
   a. Any student may be placed on probation whose performance and/or professional
      development is judged to be inadequate, e.g. not consistently progressing toward
      completion of the degree.
   b. Any student who earns a D or below in a core social work course shall be
      considered failing in that course and placed on academic probation.
B. Duration.
The duration of academic probation will be at the discretion of the SSRC where there
are no set University rules and regulations. A student cannot graduate from the
program while on probationary status.
C. Required student performance.
The SSRC will delineate specific expectations for student performance while on probation.
At the conclusion of the probationary period the SSRC will review the student's
performance and make one of the following decisions:
   a. Remove from probation
   b. Continue probation
   c. Dismiss from school. A recommendation to dismiss will require a simple majority of
      voting members of the SSRC.


D. Intervention
Academic probation sets in motion interventions that are designed to maximize the
opportunity for the student to learn. The SSRC may recommend interventions that would
facilitate student performance. Examples might include referral to the the Oasis Tutoring
Center, an additional field placement and/or extended field placement, regular meetings
with the academic advisor, medical or psychiatric evaluation, delay of Field Placement,
etc.

PROCEDURES
A. A written request for student status review with supporting material must be made to
   the Chair of the Student Status Review Committee. Such request must specify
   student performance or conduct that necessitates review of the student's status.


                                                                                         53
B. The Chair of the SSRC will forward the request and supporting material to members of
   the Committee. Within one (1) week, members of the SSRC will review the request
   and determine whether or not the issues meet requisite conditions for student status
   review. If the matter falls within the purview of the SSRC, the Committee will set a date
   for the student status review. The notification to the student shall be in writing and
   shall specify the alleged deficiencies in performance or conduct and the date, time, and
   location of the review. The notification shall be delivered to the student in person or by
   registered mail, specifying receipt requested. The notification shall also be sent to the
   student's faculty advisor, and the Director of the Department. The Student Status
   Review meeting will be set to convene at least one (1) week following written
   notification to the student. The notification provision may be waived at the request of
   the student or, with the student's written approval, at the SSRCs request.
C. The person initiating the request for a Student Status Review may request that such
   review be canceled or discontinued by submitting a written request to the Chair of the
   SSRC giving reasons for the request. Upon receipt of the request for cancellation, the
   Chair of the SSRC shall poll members to determine whether cancellation is
   appropriate. Such request shall be made as early as practical.
D. The person initiating the review must be present during the Student Status Review
   process.
E. A student shall have the right to present data that challenge the allegations
   necessitating this review.
F. A student may ask others to address the SSRC on his/her behalf.
G. A student shall be able to question anyone participating in the proceedings during the
   meeting.
H. The procedures for Student Status Review Committee meeting include the following:
   1. Call to order
   2. Roll call of participants
       a. Verification of presence of Committee members
       b. Verification of presence of student
       c. Verification of presence of person requesting the review of the student
       d. Verification of presence of student's academic advisor
       e. Verification of presence of student's invitees (if student has invited others to
          address the Committee
   3. Verification of due notice to student
   4. Disposition of procedural questions, if any
   5. Hearing
       a. Statement of the circumstances necessitating this review
       b. Statement by the student (if the student desires)



                                                                                             54
       c. Presentation of the Department's evidence
       d. Additional statement by the student (if the student desires)
       e. Presentation of student evidence
       f. Statements of invitees speaking on student's behalf
       g. Chair's written notification to student of the date and location at which a copy of
          the minutes may be obtained
   6. Executive session to review facts and determine decision
I. The Chair shall make the procedures for the meeting available to all participants.
J. An appointed secretary will take minutes of the Student Status Review proceedings.
   The student will be advised in writing during the student status review process of the
   date and location a copy of minutes may be obtained. It is the student's
   responsibility to obtain a copy of the minutes. Corrections to the minutes shall be
   made within six working days from the date of the hearing.
K. The Chair will notify the student in writing of the Committee's decision within one week
   following the hearing. Notification shall be delivered to the student in person or by
   registered mail, specifying receipt requested.
L. The Chair will submit signed minutes and the Committee's decision to the Director
   within one week following the hearing.
M. Students may appeal the Committee's decision to the Director within one week after
   receiving notification of the decision. The appeal shall be in writing.
N. The Director will act upon the Committee's decision and/or the student's appeal and
   implement his/her disposition of the matter within one week of receipt of the decision
   and/or the student's appeal.
O. The student may appeal an adverse decision in the manner prescribed by the
   University.




                                                                                            55
                            STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT


ACADEMIC HONESTY
The Department of Social Work strictly adheres to the University's policy on Academic
Dishonesty. Students should become familiar with this policy, and address only
questions to their advisor. Failure to comply with the policy may lead to suspension or
expulsion from the University. The policy is as follows:
The principles of truth and honesty are recognized as fundamental to a community of
teachers and scholars. The University expects that both faculty and students will honor
these principles and in so doing will protect the integrity of all academic work and
student grades. Students are expected to do all work assigned to them without
unauthorized assistance and are not to give unauthorized assistance. Faculty members
have the responsibility of exercising care in the planning and supervision of academic
work so that honest effort will be positively encouraged.
There are certain forms of conduct that violate this community’s principles. ACADEMIC
DISHONESTY (CHEATING) is a broad category of actions that use fraud and deception
to improve a grade or obtain course credit. Academic dishonesty (cheating) is not
limited to examination situations alone, but arises whenever students attempt to gain an
unearned academic advantage. PLAGIARISM is a specific form of academic dishonesty
(cheating) that consists of the misuse of published or unpublished works of another by
claiming them as one’s own. It may consist of handing in someone else’s work; copying
or purchasing a composition; using ideas, paragraphs, sentences, or phrases written by
another; or using data and/or statistics compiled by another without giving citation.
Another example of academic dishonesty is the SUBMISSION OF THE SAME, or
essentially the same, PAPER or other assignment for credit in two different courses
without receiving prior approval.
When a faculty member discovers a violation of the community’s principles, the faculty
member is required to give a failing grade to the student for the course. In addition to
assigning the final grade, the faculty member also notifies in writing the Dean of
Students and the relevant school dean that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred
and a grade of F has been assigned. The student receives a copy of this letter.
The letter becomes part of the student’s permanent file. If a second act of dishonesty
occurs, the student is administratively dismissed from CSUB.
Under the Student Academic Grievance Procedures, a student may appeal any
sanction employed by faculty or the University based on an allegation of academic
dishonesty. The initiation of the grievance must occur within fifteen (15) school days
after notification of the grade is mailed or personally given to the student. Copies of
these procedures are available in the offices of the school deans.




                                                                                          56
ACADEMIC FREEDOM
Freedom to pursue truth and to achieve personal and intellectual development is
essential to CSUBs community of scholars. The University is firmly committed to such
freedom for both students and faculty.
For the achievement of academic freedom, a necessary condition for such pursuit is an
acceptance of spirit of inquiry and appreciation for diverse ideas, viewpoints, cultures,
and life-styles. Acceptance must be present both in the classroom and in other areas of
the campus. The achievement of academic freedom, however, must occur within a
respect for law and the protection of the opinions of others.

CLASSROOM CONDUCT
The classroom is essential for the achievement of academic freedom, the pursuit of
truth, and the development of students. Because of its importance, students must
exhibit respect for the views of others, the professionalism of the instructor, and the
goals of academic freedom.
Faculty members are obligated to recognize and respect student diversity and opinion.
However, they have a fundamental responsibility to uphold the integrity of the learning
environment. When confronted by unreasonable disruption of the classroom, faculty
members are expected to initiate actions to correct such conditions. Such actions can
result in disciplinary action ranging from removal from the classroom to suspension from
the campus.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY
Sexual harassment is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of
the Educational Amendments of 1972, the California Fair Employment and Housing Act,
as well as under CSU Executive Order 345. California State University, Bakersfield is
committed to creating and maintaining an environment in which faculty, staff, and
students work together in an atmosphere of mutual respect and unconstrained
academic interchange. In the university environment, all faculty, staff, and students are
entitled to be treated on the basis of their qualifications, competence, and
accomplishments without regard to gender. Individuals are entitled to benefit from
university programs and activities without being discriminated against on the basis of
their sex. Sexual harassment violates university policy, seriously threatens the
academic environment, and is illegal. The policy on campus is to eliminate sexual
harassment and to provide prompt and equitable relief to the extent possible.
Sexual harassment includes such behavior as sexual advances, request for sexual
favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature directed toward an
employee, student, or applicant when one or more of the following circumstances are
present:

   o Submission to or toleration of the conduct is an explicit or implicit term or
     condition of appointment, employment, admission, or academic evaluation;
   o Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for a personnel
     decision or an academic evaluation affecting an individual;


                                                                                          57
   o The conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with an employee’s work
     performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive or otherwise adverse
     working environment;
   o The conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with a student’s academic
     performance, creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive or otherwise adverse
     learning environment, or adversely affecting any student.

Sexual harassment will not be tolerated by the university and may result in disciplinary
action, up to and including termination or dismissal. Administrative personnel are
available to answer questions or handle complaints by students, employees, student
applicants or employee applicants. The names and office locations of sexual
harassment counselors and respective administrative personnel are available in the
Counseling Center and the Office of Personnel Services. Any employee or student who
believes that this policy has been violated should promptly report the facts of the
incident(s) and the person(s) involved.
Formal complaints alleging sexual harassment of employees or applicants for
employment should be made to the Director of Personnel Services, Administration 108,
654-2266. Complaints involving sexual harassment of students should be made to the
Ombudsman, located in the Counseling Center, Health Services 13, 654-3366. Such
complaints will be investigated without delay in accordance with university procedures
and appropriate action taken.

APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES
A graduate student who experiences difficulties arising from course evaluation,
judgment of performance, master’s degree requirements, advancement to candidacy,
general regulations, and/or grievance situations should discuss the issues first with the
graduate program coordinator. If the student wishes to review further the problem or to
appeal a decision, the student should then consult, in sequential order, with the
appropriate department chair, school dean, the dean for Graduate Studies and
Research, and, finally, the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs.




                                                                                        58
                                        FORMS
The following forms are used in the MSW program and a copy of each follows.

   Number      Purpose
   MSW1        Application to test out/transfer courses to be applied toward the
               MSW degree
   MSW2        Deleted
   MSW3        Address change form
   MSW4        Request for thesis committee faculty
   MSW5        Thesis proposal title page
   MSW6        Sample thesis title page
   MSW7        Sample signature page
   MSW8        Deleted
   MSW9        Student Education Plan
   MSW10       Graduation Application Check Off
   MSW11       Application for Master Degree
               Community Project Request Form
               Community Project Request for Proposals




                                                                                   59
                                                                                 MSW1
                          California State University, Bakersfield
                               Department of Social Work


 APPLICATION TO TEST OUT/TRANSFER COURSES TO BE APPLIED TOWARD
                         THE MSW DEGREE



Student____________________________________              Student
Number___________________


TESTING OUT (The following courses are available for testing out; 10 credits maximum)
    [ ] 510: Social policy and services (5 credits)
    [ ] 520: Foundations of Human Behavior (5 credits)
    [ ] 530: Research methods for Social Work (5 credits)


TRANSFER (List courses below. 6 credits maximum, except for regular students
transferring from accredited MSW programs; students may have to show equivalency
through syllabi etc.)


______________________________________for _______________________________
______________________________________for _______________________________
______________________________________for _______________________________
______________________________________for _______________________________



Recommended

_______________________________________________________________________
                Advisor                                               Date
Approved

_______________________________________________________________________
               Coordinator of Graduate Program                        Date


                                                                                    60
                                                                  MSW3
                       California State University, Bakersfield
                            Department of Social Work


                             CHANGE OF ADDRESS


Date: ___________________________
Student's Name: __________________________________________________


New Address:
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________


Old Address:
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________



_________________________________________
Signature of the Student




                                                                         61
                                                                                    MSW4

                         California State University, Bakersfield

                           Department Of Social Work
                   REQUEST FOR THESIS COMMITTEE FACULTY

Note: Full time students must submit in the last quarter of the Foundation year; part time
      students by the end of the Winter Quarter in their second year.


Student’s Name__________________________ Email:_________________________

Address _______________________________________________________________

Home Phone # _______________________ Work Phone#_______________________

Emphasis ___________________________________________



I request the following faculty members to be considered for appointment to my thesis
committee.


Thesis Chair _____________________________________________________

Committee member ________________________________________________

Committee member ________________________________________________

Title of the Study __________________________________________________

Student Signature_____________________________ Date_________________



Approved:

___________________________________________ Date ________________
Bruce Friedman, Ph.D.
Director




                                                                                        62
                                                                           MSW5
                     California State University, Bakersfield

                       Department Of Social Work

                       THESIS PROPOSAL TITLE PAGE


Student name:
______________________________________________________________________

Thesis Title:
______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________



Chair_______________________________


Signature: ___________________________             Date:________________


Member: ____________________________


Signature: ___________________________             Date:________________


Member: ____________________________


Signature: ___________________________             Date:________________

Approved:

___________________________________________ Date ________________
Bruce D. Friedman, Ph.D.
Director




                                                                             63
                                             MSW6


         SAMPLE THESIS TITLE PAGE


      EFFECTIVENESS OF TECHNOLOGY
 INTEGRATION AND THE LEARNING OUTCOMES
    OF STUDENTS IN A NEW MSW PROGRAM




                 A THESIS

             SUBMITTED TO THE
FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK,
 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, BAKERSFIELD


                    BY


               (YOUR NAME)




IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS
             FOR THE DEGREE OF
           MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK




               (JUNE 20,____)




                                               64
                                                                                          MSW7
                                SAMPLE SIGNATURE PAGE




This thesis has been completed under our supervision in accordance with the regulations of the
Department of Social Work, California State University, Bakersfield, and reflects original work
by the author.

   1. Chair:_____________________________ Signature: ____________________________


   2. Member: __________________________ Signature: ____________________________


   3. Member: __________________________ Signature: ____________________________


   4. Department Director: _________________________ Signature: ____________________




                                                                                              65
                 STUDENT EDUCATION PLAN                                                       MSW9
Student:                                 Advisor:                    Date:___________________
                 Date entered program___________           Expected date of Grad __________
                              Full time___________                     Part time __________
                      CalSWEC I:Yes ___________                              No __________
                      CalSWEC II:Yes ___________                             No __________
           Culminating Event: Thesis ___________                         Project __________
    Human Biology: Prior to admission ___________              Or date completed __________
      Writing Skills: Prior to admission___________            Or date completed __________
               Emphasis: _____________________

                                                                       Date
                        Courses                          Will take
                                                                     Completed       Grade

                        SW510 Social Policy
                        SW520 Found of Human Behavior
                        SW530 Research
                        SW540 Gen SW Practice I
                        SW541 Gen SW Practice II
                        SW593 Assessment and Diagnosis
                        SW550 Field Practicum I
                        SW550 Field Practicum I
                        SW550 Field Practicum I
                        SW610 Advanced Policies
                        SW620 Advanced Human Behavior
                        SW630 Advanced Research
                        SW646 Advanced SW Practice I
                        SW647 Advanced SW Practice II
                        SW648 Advanced SW Practice III
                        SW650 Advanced Practicum I
                        SW650 Advanced Practicum I
                        SW650 Advanced Practicum I
                        Elective:
                        Elective:
                        Elective:




                                                                                                66
                        Graduation Application Check off                                 MSW10



Student’s Name: ___________________________________Student’s ID:__________________

Year in Program: from ________ to _________

List courses still in progress:

        __________________________

        __________________________

        __________________________

        __________________________

List courses still to take prior to graduation:

        ___________________________

        ___________________________

        ____________________________

        ____________________________

Total Cumulative GPA to date: ________


___________________________________
Advisor’s Signature


This form has to be signed by your advisor prior to having the Application for the Master’s
Degree approved and signed by the Department Director..

Make a copy of the completed Application for the Master’s Degree after the Department Director
has signed it and give it along with this form to the Department Secretary.




                                                                                              67
                                                                    MSW11
                  California State University, Bakersfield
                 APPLICATION FOR MASTER’S DEGREE



                 PRINT NAME AS IT IS TO APPEAR ON DIPLOMA

(No.)           (Street)              (No.)              (Street)

(City)          (State)     (Zip      (City)             (State)    (Zip
Code)                                 Code)


LOCAL ADDRESS                         MAILING ADDRESS FOR DIPLOMA

LIST ALL COURSES IN PROGRESS AND THOSE TO BE TAKEN IN FUTURE TERMS AS
WELL AS THOSE STILL “INC”. DO NOT LIST COURSES ALREADY COMPLETED.




                                                                           68
                     CSUB Department of Social Work
                 Community Project Request Form, 2009-2010

Please complete this form and submit it to your assigned project instructor.

Name: ____________________________                 Date: _____________________

Cohort (check one): Full time ____ Part time ____ Advanced Standing ____

Type of culminating experience (check one): _____ Project _____ Case Study

Name of Sponsoring Agency/Organization:

________________________________________________________________

Contact person:
____________________________________________________

Phone: ______________________              E-mail:__________________________

Agency Website URL (if available):____________________________________

Description of Community Project:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

From the following list, please check which social work skills and competencies
will be used in the proposal project:

_____ Ability to identify, access, and critically evaluate scientifically appropriate
      information as it relates to the community project




                                                                                        69
_____ Ability to critically evaluate policies, regulations, and programs related to
      clients in any part of the life span, especially those in underserved and
      vulnerable groups as it applies to the community project

_____ Ability to apply direct social work practice skills as needed in designing
      and implementing the community project

_____ Ability to develop social work interventions and/or policy practice/advocacy
      strategies using an evidence based approach

_____ Ability to apply appropriate social work theories and frameworks to a
      complex social issue/problem related to the proposed project

_____ Ability to use, apply and/or integrate technology as needed for the
      proposed project

_____ Ability to effectively communicate verbally and in writing

_____ Ability to apply social work ethical principles as needed in developing and
      implementing the community project

_____ Skills in the application and integration of evidence based research to
      agency programming

_____ Skills in program evaluation or needs assessment

_____ Skills in providing direct services

_____ Skills in developing research methodology

_____ Skills in data analysis

_____ Skill in identifying the strengths of diverse populations

_____ Skills related to the awareness of cultural issues that may impact the
      project

_____ Skill in working collaboratively with your agency/organization, faculty
      sponsor, and other systems involved in the community project

_____ Other social work related skill(s) (please specify):

Are there other agencies or organizations involved or could be involved in the
project?

Yes_____      No_____



                                                                                      70
If yes, please list below and give contact information if available:

1. _____________________________Contact info: ______________________

2. _____________________________Contact info: ______________________

3. _____________________________Contact info: ______________________

Available times to meet with student(s) about the project (at least 1-2 times a
month):

Day: ___________________________ Time: ___________________________

Any additional information about the project?
________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________


Signature of agency person approving submission of proposal:

________________________________________________________________

Print name: _______________________________________________________


Submit the proposal to the assigned project instructor.




                                                                                  71
                 CSUB Department of Social Work
              Community Project Request for Proposals
                            2009-2010

At California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), Masters in Social Work
(MSW) Program, students are required to complete a culminating experience that
synthesizes and integrates knowledge and skills gained in their MSW course
work. This may take the form of a community project.

The community project option allows non-profit agencies across Kern County,
Tulare County, and the Lancaster, CA, areas to submit a proposal that involves
working with a student on an identified, social work-related agency need.
Projects typically involve one student who, in partnership with your agency, plan,
implement, and evaluate a three quarter (September to May) community project.

Examples of projects include:

   1. Completing a needs assessment of a special population for a program
      proposal
   2. Doing a pilot of an evidenced based intervention (e.g., an Intensive Case
      Study, see Appendix C for description)
   3. Planning and implementing innovative services to fill an identified gap
      within the community
   4. Developing a program using evidenced based research
   5. Developing a training program for staff or a targeted population
   6. Evaluating an agency program
   7. Writing a substantial grant

If your agency or organization is interested in working with a student on a
community project, please, in collaboration with the student, assist them in
completing the attached Community Projects Request for Proposal Form. The
student will submit the proposal for review and approval. The skills and
competencies that the community project should cover can be found in the
application.

Sponsorship of a project will require meeting with the student on a regular basis
(one-two times a month) to assist in obtaining resources, review written
materials, give clarity and direction, and approve the final report. Students will be
developing projects from their submitted proposals during May and June, 2008.

If you have questions or want to discuss an idea, please contact Dr. Jong Choi
(661-654-2390), jchoi6@csub.edu, or Dr. Bruce D. Friedman (661-654-2308),
bfriedman@csub.edu.




                                                                                  72

								
To top