Orienteering Intro Powerpoint by wanghonghx

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									ORIENTEERING SEMINAR
INNOVATION in NAVIGATION: Navigation is
the skill of finding your way from a place where
you are to a place where you want to be.
Backwoods Adventures (The Navigation
Experts) has developed Canada's most
innovative and hands-on adventure clinics and
racing navigation seminars. Over 1000 people
have taken our clinics and seminars in the last
few years including novice outdoors people,
gnarly weekend warriors, orienteers and
professional adventure racers.

•    Orienteering / Adventure Racing Navigation
•    Corporate Adventures
•    Adventure Kids! School Groups                 www.dontgetlost.ca




    BACKWOODS ADVENTURES
ORIENTEERING: A sport where one uses a map
and compass to find their around a course.

From the IOF website:

―Foot orienteering is an endurance sport which involves a huge
mental element. There is no marked route - the orienteer must
navigate with map and compass while running. The map gives
detailed information on the terrain such as hills, ground surface,
obstacles etc. To be successful in foot orienteering, the athlete
needs excellent map reading skills, absolute concentration and
the ability to make quick decisions on the best route while
running at high speed. Orienteers run over rough ground,
completely unprepared forest terrain or rough open hills - cross
country in the true sense of the word. Therefore, considerable
body strength and agility is needed. Fitness similar to that of a
3000m steeplechase or marathon runner is required.‖


                                        Video clip
C:\Documents and Settings\Nina Wallace\My Documents\My Videos\Veoh\FollowmevideoofThierryGueo.wmv   Mike Waddington of the Golden Horseshoe Orienteering

                                                                                                    Photo by Barb Campbell




ORIENTEERING:WHAT IS IT?
HISTORY OF ORIENTEERING

1897- 31st October - the first orienteering event in the world: Norway
1960’s – Orienteering in introduced in North American by Bjorn Kjelstrom
1966 – First World Championships – Finland
1990 – First World Junior Orienteering Championships – Sweden


Orienteering was originally introduced
as a military exercise. It is now a
Olympic recognized sport with 43
countries ranked internationally.




                                   Images from :http://www.dvoa.us.orienteering.org/sites/hist/vf_map.jpg




HISTORY OF ORIENTEERING
 Images from :http://www.dvoa.us.orienteering.org/sites/hist/vf_map.jpg




HISTORY OF ORIENTEERING
                 http://




                           www.pdcarto.com/maps.html




HISTORY OF ORIENTEERING
          ORIENTEERING IN THE HAMILTON AREA

          KING'S FOREST – THE FIRST MAP. The Golden
          Horseshoe Orienteering Club (GHO) was formed
          from the merger of the Niagara (NIA) and Hamilton
          King's Foresters (HKF) orienteering clubs. In 1969,
          HKF produced their first orienteering map of King's
          Forest in Hamilton - hence the club name.
          Mapping standards have changed a lot in the last
          35 years and so has the King's Forest.
          Subdivisions, golf courses, roads, and the Red Hill
          Valley Expressway threaten east Hamilton's
          largest park. GHO continues to hold orienteering
          events in the King's Forest. In 2004 over 600
          students participate in the School Adventure
          Orienteering Challenge in King's Forest.




GHO ORIENTEERING
TERRAIN IN THE GOLDEN HORSESHOE


 RIDGE & VALLEY       PARK        MORRAINE




  ESCARPMENT        LIMESTONE




     GHO ORIENTEERING
IMPORTANT PARTS OF A MAP

Scale:   Government Topographic Maps – 1:50 000
         Orienteering Maps – 1:10 000 to 1:15 000

Legend: Know what all those symbols mean

Map name

Date the map was made

Magnetic North




  ORIENTEERING MAPS
ORIENTEERING MAPS




   ORIENTEERING MAPS
                   FROM: http://www.williams.edu/Biology/Faculty_Staff/hwilliams/Orienteering/compass.html




ORIENTEERING COMPASSES
THE RULES

1. ORIENTING THE MAP

The most important rule is to keep your
map oriented to north. What this means is that the map and the
terrain will be aligned. If there is a building to your left in the
terrain, your map should be turned so that the building marked on
the map is on the left side.


Two ways to orient your map:



 1) Use the terrain – match up the terrain and your map
 2) Use your compass – match up the red end of the needle with the north lines
    on your map.




               THE RULES
ORIENTING THE MAP




                ORIENT THE MAP BY COMPASS OR BY THE TERRAIN




           THE RULES
KNOW WHERE YOU ARE

2. THUMB

It is very important to always know where you are. Strategies towards this goal
     include:

•          Marking your location with your thumb
•          Keeping in contact with the map

The best orienteers always know where they are and can navigate through
rugged terrain faster than most of us can run on a road.




              THE RULES
FUNDAMENTAL RULES


        1) KEEP THE MAP ORIENTED

        2) PUT YOUR THUMB ON THE MAP

        3) CONCENTRATE – DON’T GO TOO FAST!

        4) DON’T FOLLOW !!

Keep these rules in mind and continuously obey them!!
Don’t stop concentrating – that’s when mistakes are made.




ORIENTEERING FUNDAMENTALS
FUNDAMENTAL RULES

STRATEGY

Break each long leg into smaller more manageable legs.
Look for the following important features:

(i) Handrails — A linear feature such as a trail, field edge, fence or ridge that you
    can run along. These would be parallel to your selected route.

(ii) Attack Point — Find a large feature that may be easier to locate near what you
     will be looking for. You can then use this feature to ―attack‖ the CP.

(iii) Catching Feature — These features ―catch‖ you before you go to far. These act
      as a warning that you are near, or beyond what you are looking for. Obvious
      catching features are linear features such as trails, valleys, rivers etc.




ORIENTEERING FUNDAMENTALS
From:http://ocin.org/school/Teachkt.pdf




   ORIENTEERING SEMINAR
                                                       C:\Documents and
                                                       Settings\Nina

                                          VIDEO CLIP   Wallace\My
                                                       Documents\My
                                                       Videos\Veoh\Orienteeri
                                                       ngforbeginners.avi
DIFFERENT TYPES:

Traditional (Foot)
Ski
Snowshoe
Mtn Biking
Canoe / Kayak

ADVENTURE RUNNING
Teams of 3 trail run, scramble, orienteer, trek, and road run through a half
marathon or 10K.

The Snowshoe Raid
The Giant Rib’s Raid
The Night Raid
Raid the Hammer




ORIENTEERING: WHAT IS IT?
Most times it is a individual sport.

Mass Starts vs. Staggered Starts
                  In Relays all teams start at the same time
                  In most other formats there is staggered starts – to
                   minimize following.



Typical Events

Up to Fifteen Courses of varying lengths and technical difficulties.

                    1.5 to 2 km all on trails
                    9 km – never follow a trail




ORIENTEERING: WHAT IS IT?
PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

Look for:
1) Orienting the Map
2) Keeping in Contact with the Map
3) Traveling at a speed that one can successfully keep in contact with the map
4) Route Choice
5) Handrails
6) Attack point
7) Checkpoint




ORIENTEERING FUNDAMENTALS
DIFFERENT TYPES:

DISTANCES

Sprint
Winning Time ~ 15 minutes
C:\Documents and Settings\Nina Wallace\My Documents\My Videos\Veoh\FollowmevideowithThierryGue.wmv


Middle
Winning Time ~ 25 – 30 minutes

Relay
 3 times 40 minutes

Long
Winning Time ~ 75-90 minutes

Ultra
 6 hours to 24 hours



         HOW LONG IS A COURSE                                                                        VIDEO CLIP
3. CONTOURS

•   Closer together =
    steeper hill

•   Far apart =
    gradual slope

•   Top of the hill is drawn
    as a circle or oval.

To figure out what is up       Hill top
and down, look for the
tops of hills and water
features for valleys.




ORIENTEERING FUNDAMENTALS
                       1



A
               2




     B

                   3




    CONTOURS
       F

                   D
       A
   E




           C
                       B




READING CONTOURS
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=pritchard+st.,+hamilton,+ontario&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=35.357014,82.265625&layer=&ie=UTF8&om=1&z=17&ll=43.203831,-79.817466&spn=0.003973,0.013561&t=k&iwloc=addr
TAKING A COMPASS BEARING


                           Place the compass on the map and
                           align the base plate with the
                           direction of the travel lines in the
                           desired direction of travel
                           (A to B on diagram).

                           You are using the long edge of the
                           compass to make a line between
                           where you are and where you want
                           to go.




    COMPASS BEARINGS
TAKING A COMPASS BEARING


                           Turn the compass housing until the
                           lines in the house align with the
                           newly drawn magnetic north on the
                           map.

                           Make sure that the north end of the
                           housing lines correspond to the
                           north meridian lines.



                           DO NOT ALIGN THE HOUSING
                           LINES TO SOUTH!




    COMPASS BEARINGS
With the compass off the map and
holding the compass at waist level
directly in front of you, turn your body
(not the map) until the compass
needle aligns with the housing lines.
Make sure that the red end of the
needle lines up with the north end of
the housing.




Follow the direction of the travel arrow,
straight ahead.




    COMPASS BEARINGS
PACE COUNTING


How do you judge distance? Determine your pace count.
To determine your pace count….

1.   Find a section of woods and trail with a known distance
2.   Walk, jog, or run this section of known distance
3.   Count every second step (every second step is one pace).
4.   Calculate the number of paces per 100m



Use the MAP SCALE to determine distance between point
Convert the distance to your PACE COUNT




          PACE COUNTING
ERRORS


Errors are caused by many different factors:

•       Lack of concentration
•       Being influenced by others
•       Judgement errors – distance judgement
•       Going too fast
•       Following
C:\Documents and Settings\Nina Wallace\My Documents\My Videos\Veoh\Top8booms.avi




                                   ERRORS                                          VIDEO CLIP
MAP MAKING

1. Club visits potential areas to see if area is geographically interesting.

2. Club visits land-owners to get permission.

3. Air photos

4. Base map made

5. Cartographers are hired

6. Map digitally drawn

7. Club visits site to make corrections

8. Printing

                                             = $ 10 000 (approx)


    HOW TO MAKE A MAP
HOW TO MAKE A MAP…

Field Checking linear features

1. Stand at the feature.
2. Align the map (orient it)
3. Look or sight up/down the feature.
4. Draw a light straight line.
5. Pace it off.
6. Mark the distance, align the map, look back and draw in the small curves.




    HOW TO MAKE A MAP
PLOTTING THE CHECKPOINTS

In adventure racing teams have to plot their checkpoints on their maps.
How do you do it?
Plot the Grid Reference Points (GRP) using the UTM easting and northing
system [example: GRP #561317]

The first three digits (561) are the EASTING
The second three digits (317) are the NORTHING

                                      32

                                                1km
                                      31

                                           56         57   58

         PLOTTING CP’S
http://www.dontgetlost.ca/raid/giant.htm




          www.dontgetlost.ca




THE END

								
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