Fitness Training Template by lbp18895

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									PERSONAL TRAINING AND FITNESS ASSESSMENT

Sphygmomanometers: Not Just for Blood Pressure Anymore! 1X

Dixie Stanforth, M.Sc., UT Austin, Austin, TX; Ryan Stukel, M.Sc., Sport Performance
International, Austin, TX;

Can you quantify if clients are activating core muscles during simple movement patterns?
Training clients to know what “stability with mobility” feels like is essential to develop a
strong and balanced core. Join Dixie and Ryan for an interactive session using blood
pressure cuffs to learn how to “turn on” the deep core muscles of the lumbar and cervical
spine. These skills will help clients assess their own abilities, while providing a useful
metric to develop safe and effective core strengthening programs. Some cuffs provided; if
possible, bring the one you will use when training clients to maximize practice time.

Vertical Core Training

Dixie Stanforth, M.Sc., UT Austin, Austin, TX; Timothy M. Skwiat, M.Ed., Train 4 The
Game, Austin, TX;

Tired of the same old boring “crunch” routines? Join us for a
FUN-ctional session where we target the core through movement by working
against body weight and gravity. You’ll have the chance to work through
a circuit where you challenge the core in all three planes: you’ll learn
by doing, rather than simply hearing “about” something. We will link
movement prep and dynamic flexibility to basic exercises that you can
incorporate into your own workouts as well as those of your clients.
Bring your questions, your ideas and your core for a chance to interact
with some of Austin's finest!

The Ten Most Important Take-Away Messages From The U.S. Physical Activity
Guidelines

Edward T. Howley, Ph.D., FACSM, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN;

This presentation will highlight the ten most important take away messages from the U.S.
Physical Activity Guidelines. For each, a brief rationale will be provided describing why
it is important. This information should be helpful to registered dieticians, wellness
coordinators, and fitness professionals in their communication with clients, colleagues,
and the general public.
How to Increase Physical Activity and Have Fun Doing It

Rebecca A. Battista, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Lacrosse, La Crosse, WI;

When did we stop playing outside? Isn’t it important for physical activity to be fun?
Wouldn’t you like to find a treasure at the end of your walk, or stand on the top of a large
boulder? Outdoor activities such as geocaching, rock climbing, and bouldering are
growing in popularity. These activities are fun and provide the stimulus necessary to
achieve the ACSM recommendations for physical activity in adults. This lecture will
present the latest research concerning the intensity levels of these outdoor activities and
offer suggestions concerning ways to encourage your clients to participate.

Scope of Practice Panel {when to move a client along}

Pete Ronai, M.S., Ahlbin Rehabilitation Ctrs Of Bridgeport Hospital, Milford, CT; Len
Kravitz, Ph.D., Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Laura Kruskall, Ph.D., R.D.,
FACSM, UNLV, Las Vegas, NV; Mike Bracko, Ed.D, FACSM, Dr. Bracko’s Fitness,
Calgary, AB, Canada;

								
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