Grant Application Process by odn31682

VIEWS: 12 PAGES: 19

More Info
									 
 
 
 
 
 
                           
                                                                       The     
                                                                     Grant 
                                                        Application Process 
                                                                             
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A “How To” guide for organisations seeking better success in the 
competitive world of grant funding! 
 
                                                     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Acknowledgement: David Zacher (MADEC) for providing permission to use and 
amend original content for the Grant Application Process 
 
 




 
            Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                               2 
Contents 
 
Introduction   …………………………………………………………………………4 
Planning       …………………………………………………………………………5 
 


        Knowing your Organisation  ……..…………………...….…………………5 
 


        Background Information for your next Submission  …………...…….......5 
 


                                 …
        Identify your needs  …….…  ………………...…………………………..6 
 


        Advocates        ……….……………………………...…………………….…..6 
 


        Know the marketplace                …………………………………...…....…......7 
 


        Philanthropics            ………………………………………………………..8 
 


Developing Your Submission                  ………………………………………....…….9 
 


        Needs Statement (The Why?) …………………………………..…….……..9 
 


        Aims, Objectives & Outcomes (the What?)  ……….…………………..…9 
 


        Developing a Project Timeline (The When?)  .……………...…………........11 
 


        Developing a Program Outline (The How?)  ………………...…………….12 
 


        Budget           ………………………………………………………………....13 
         
         


Putting it all together           ………………………………………………………...14 
 
 


        Title Page       ………………………………………………..….…………….14 
 


        Language and Usage  ………………………………………………………...14 
 


        Writing Style  …………………………………………………………………14 
 


        Covering letter           …………………………………………………….......14 
 


        Summary          …………………………………………………………………15 
 


       Attachments  ……………………………………………………………........15 
 
Unsuccessful & Successful Applications…………………………………………..16 
 
Grant Application Checklist       ………………………………………………..17 
 
Useful websites     …………………………………………………….……….......18
 
Quick Tips  ………………………………………………………………………......19 
 
 


 
               Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                  3 
 

Introduction 
Traditionally, clubs, sporting bodies, associations, progress groups and not for 
profit organisations (for the purposes throughout this publication, we will call 
them all ‘organisations’), tend to look for funding from grant bodies such as their 
local council, or respond to newspaper advertisements from grant agencies 
centred around a specific issue.   

For instance, sporting organisations tend to concentrate on sport or other health 
related bodies, seeking funding from a very limited range of government funded 
opportunities. The reality is that many organisations underestimate their own 
enormous contribution to the communities in which they operate, or fail to 
recognise broader funding areas that could be examined.  

Using a sporting organisation again as an example, many in the group may 
believe that their primary role is to get a team out on the field every Saturday 
and beat the opposition to win a premiership.  Another way of looking at it is to 
think about what other important things the organisation actually achieves. For 
example, it can easily be shown that the organisation works to:  

       Build community spirit through providing a rallying point for an 
        otherwise disparate community.  The organisation might offer a range of 
        community events and activities such as dances, trivia or games nights, 
        weekends away, or day trips to places of interest.  
       Provide opportunities for young people in an area of low employment. It 
        might offer supervised training sessions that help build self esteem and 
        team‐work, by involving all members in some aspects of the play and 
        competition.  
       Maintain and develop community facilities, by keeping playing fields, 
        meeting and training rooms in excellent working condition  
       Provide people in isolated rural areas, or residents from non‐English 
        speaking backgrounds, with greater access to facilities, services or 
        sporting opportunities, including running programs that offers coaching 
        and participation for children with disabilities.  

In other words, this sporting organisation is much more important to the 
community than they probably previously imagined. It is these additional 
community benefits that will extend their opportunity to access the grant‐making 
programs of many more Government and philanthropic organisations.  



 
              Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                 4 
 
PLANNING 
 
Planning and pre‐writing preparation is essential for a good submission.  Once 
you  have  done  your  homework,  gathered  your  information  and  have  it 
organised in an easily accessible format, you will be able to use this material 
for various proposals and applications.  
 
        Know Your Organisation 
  
     Know what your Organisation is, why it exists.  

     Develop an organisational statement (one concise page). This should include:  
         • The vision and mission/purpose if these have been developed  
         • How and why your Organisation  got started  
         • What the Organisation is doing today  
         • Where it is going in the future?  
         
     Also include brief descriptions of the Organisation’s  
         • Structure  
         • Administrative procedures and Financial processes  
         • Clients it serves, including programs, activities or services.  
          
        Background Submission Information  

     Using  the  criteria  set  out  in  the  grant  conditions;  consider  background 
     information you might use to support your application. This may include:  


                ABS or local Council data (including community plans) 
                Research papers or ‘Expert’ opinions related to the issue 
                Articles or speeches related to the issue  
                Government Strategies, Plans or ‘visions’ for the future 
                Surveys & previous Case studies.  
              
     This  information  can  be  put  in  any  future  project  proposal  file,  and  will 
     provide you with facts to support your application when you write it.  


 
                 Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                    5 
        Identify Your Needs 
  
     The need for funding may be to establish a new program, build something, or 
     extend current services to meet an identified need.  Substantiate your need for 
     funding. This could include:  
                 Reports (e.g. Health, socio‐economic or other factors relevant) 
                 Survey results 
                 Examples of gaps in products or services required by your 
                  community or Organisation. 
           
     Other people and organisations may be able to assist in the identification of a 
     need for funding. These may include:  
        Local, State or Federal representatives and government  
        Other Organisation or community members  
        Association groups that your organisation may be a part of   
 
        Advocates 
  
     Advocates are people who support you, and who are willing to express their 
     support  in  either  a  written  or  oral  form.  Brief  letters  of  support  may  assist 
     your submission.  
              Develop  a  contact  list  of  possible  advocates  (e.g.  Local  Councillors, 
              sports academies, local or State associated body representative) 
              Write letters to relevant contacts  
              Share expertise to develop contacts  
              Meet with representatives of a variety of funding sources  
              Start  an  advisory  committee  as  a  ‘sounding  board’  for  ideas  and  to 
              gain community support for the project.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
                  Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                     6 
       Know the Marketplace  

    There  are  many  different  marketplaces  for  funding;  including  Government 
    (including  local,  State  and  Federal),  private  sponsorships  and  philanthropic 
    organisations. 

       − Government 
        When applying for Government funding you need to be aware of the 
        following:  
               Meeting the published guidelines  
               Using standard application formats  
               Raising matched funding (if this is a requirement)  
               Keeping to the deadline for the closing date for submissions – one 
               minute late may be too late  
               There may be a requirement to submit frequent and specific 
               project reports  
               Submitting to a review process (if required).  
            
     It is always advisable to ring the Grant Enquiry line or contact person to 
      further clarify the application process.  
 
    − Private Sponsorships
Finding and attracting sponsors to help support your event, project or service 
can be another way of realizing its success, provided you remember some 
important ground rules.  Sponsors want to know HOW their contribution will 
give them: 
           More prestige and recognition in the community 
           Better access to their marketplace 
           A new method or approach to promoting their message 
           Tangible benefits they might receive in return 
           A linked relationship with your project/event in the future 
           Advantage over their competition 

A clearly defined and well laid out sponsorship proposal is essential.  The Our 
Community website, www.ourcommunity.com.au  has some great tips on what 
to include, along with many other useful ideas and guides on attracting funding, 
specifically for not for profit organisationʹs.


 
               Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                  7 
Many large corporate organizations, such as the National Australia Bank, 
Australia Post, Fosters and Telstra have developed community partnerships or 
sponsorship agreements.  Some examples are contained at the back of this 
publication. 

Philanthropic Grants  

‘’Philanthropy’’ is a desire to improve the welfare of humanity through the 
giving of money, time, information, goods and services, influence and voice for 
community good.  

According to Philanthropy Australia, it is estimated that there are over 2000 
foundations in Australia giving between half a billion and one billion dollars 
per annum!  The Giving Australia report of October 2005 estimated the total 
giving of money, goods and services to not‐for‐profit organisations by 
individuals and businesses to total $11 billion per year! 

Individual philanthropic grants are often much smaller than those made by 
governments. The language used in instructions and on application forms can 
often be difficult to understand, so check with grant funding body and ask for 
clarification, if needed.  If your organisation or organization wants to pursue 
Philanthropic donations or grants, firstly find out about the charitable status of 
your organization, as many foundations have criteria about the types of 
organisation’s they can legally fund 
 
Deductible Gift Recipients (DGR’s) 
 
Some organisations are entitled to receive tax deductible gifts; these are called 
DGRs (deductible gift recipients). An organisationʹs eligibility for DGR status is 
determined by income tax law. In order to be endorsed as a deductible gift 
recipient an entity must have an ABN, maintain a gift fund, and apply to the Tax 
Office for endorsement.. .Check the Australian Taxation Officeʹs website for 
additional information to assist you. 
 
The Australian Directory of Philanthropy 

This is available in both hard copy and online versions and lists over 400 
Australian trusts, foundations and corporate givers with their contact details and 
funding preferences. 


 
             Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                8 
 
DEVELOPING YOUR SUBMISSION  
 
Many funding bodies are now developing their applications forms with a more 
simplified, ‘Why, What, When and How’ approach to grant responses.  Some 
limit responses to between 200‐500 words for each criteria, which ensures 
responses in their applications are kept succinct and relevant to their defined 
eligibility criteria. 
 
        Needs Statement (The Why) 

    Demonstrate why the project is important to your Organisation and the 
    community.  

                  Document the problem as it is now; 

                  Why it meets an identified community plan or need; 
                  Indicate how the situation could be improved; 
                  Use the information from your Project proposal File; 
                  The  Statement  should  be  motivating  to  convince  the  potential 
                   source of funds that the project is important; 
                  Include  your  credentials  and  state  why  yours  is  the  most 
                   appropriate organisation to receive the funding; 
          
        Aims and Objectives (The What) 
 
         − Aims 
      
         General  statements  of  what  you  want  to  accomplish.  Evaluate  the  aim;  ‐ 
         Does it reflect what you want to change, and to the right degree?  
         Example of aim that matches the objective below. 
           
         − Objectives  

         The  standard  format  for  an  objective  is:  “To  (action  verb  and  statement 
         reflecting  your  measurement  indicator)  by  (performance  standard)  by 
         (deadline) at a cost of no more than (cost frame).”  
         “To increase the number of coaches by 10% in our town through training 
         in coaching skills, over 12 months at a cost of $7,000.” 

 
                  Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                     9 
        Result or Outcome  

    An outcome, or result should come out of one or more of your objectives – it 
    should  define  or  measure  the  success  of  your  project.  In  the  above  example 
    this could be:  

         • Percentage of participants evaluating the course as worthwhile  
         • Number of participants successfully taking on coaching roles in the next 
            year  
         • Percentage increase in number of active coaches in the next year  
         
Identify how you will determine the result or outcomes of your project: What is 
it that people will do differently after the grant that they don’t do now?  

How will that difference be measured?  

            Include a plan to assess the project.  
            Describe who will evaluate the project.  
            Say what records will be kept. 
            Indicate how success will be measured & measurement indicators  
            Determine performance success standards ‐ at what point can you 
             consider the project to have been successful?  
            Determine the timeframe ‐ the amount of time you need in order to 
             reach your performance standards  
            Determine the cost ‐ the amount needed to implement the objectives 
             through the activities you have selected.  
      




 
                 Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                   10 
       Develop a Project Timeline/Schedule (The When) 

    Timelines are useful planning tools. There are a number of specially designed 
    computer packages to do this, but essentially it is listing all the outcomes you 
    aim to achieve. Each outcome can include:  

        • Start and finish dates for each activity required to achieve the outcome  
        • The number of hours needed to complete the activity(ies)  
        • Key personnel  
        • Personnel costs  
        • Consultants and contract services  
        • Non‐personnel resources  
        • Subtotal cost for the activity(ies)  
        • Milestones or performance indicators  
        • Dates on which the funding body will receive milestone reports 
          

    Project Timeline Example  

        Project Activity       Start     Finish   Responsibility       Cost                      Milestone 
                               Date       Date 
     Appoint                 June 2011  Aug 2011  Committee       $500                          Officer starts 
     Development                                  President       120 hrs in                    Sep 2011 
     Officer                                                      kind 
     Appoint Project         June 2011  Aug 2011  Committee       $500                          Manager 
     Manager                                      President       120 hrs in                    starts Sep 
                                                                  kind                          2011 
     Complete design of      May 2011  Sep 2011  Appointed        $10,000                       Plans to 
     club house                                   Architect                                     Council Sep 
                                                                                                2011 
     Plans to Council        Sep 2011       Oct 2011      Appointed            2 hrs in kind    Approval Oct 
                                                          Architect                             2011 
     Internal building    Nov 2011  Dec 2011              Appointed            $30,000          Work 
     modifications,                                       Contractor                            completed 
     remove old fixtures                                                                        Dec 2011 
     etc. 




 
                Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                  11 
       Develop a Program Outline (The How)

        A  program  outline  is  another  design  tool,  which  help  plan  a  project  in 
        detail.  

        • Describe program activities in detail ‐ how do they fulfill the objectives?  
        • Describe the sequence, flow and interrelationship of activities.  
        • Describe the planned staffing – assign responsibility to individuals.  
        • Describe the client population and method of determining client 
           selection.  
        • Present a reasonable scope of activities that can be accomplished within 
           the timeframe and the resources of your agency with the funding.  
        • Outline the cost/benefit ratio of your project.  
        • Give specific time frames.  
        • Discuss risk and ways to minimise these.  
        • Describe your unique methods and project design.  

       Budget  
    A budget should include costs of:  
        • people  
        • committee and staff  
        • consultants  
        • insurance  
        • equipment  
        • office  
        • office equipment  
        • supplies  
        • travel  
        • telephone  
        • printing  
        • postage  
          




 
               Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                 12 
                                           Donation




PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER  

     Title Page  
        
       The title is very important. It should:  
              • Be creative but not misleading  
              • Be designed to catch the reader’s attention without misleading 
                 him/her.  
              • Describe the project  
              • Express the end result of the project not the methods  
              • Describe the benefits to the clients/members/community  
              • Be short and easy to remember. 
               
       For example, “Nutrition education for disadvantaged parents through 
       teleconferencing”. Look to newspaper headlines for ideas on how to do this 

 
             Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                               13 
           
        Language and Usage 
  
     Your style should be simple and concise.  
      

         • Emphasise end results, not tasks or methods  
         • Emphasise the ultimate benefit of your program’s work  
         • Use the language of a reader.  
          
        Writing Style  

     Your  style  must  reflect  what  the  funding  source  wants  and  what  the 
     reviewers will be looking for.  
         • Be concise and clear (stick to the word count!) 
         • Use short sentences and short paragraphs  
         • Avoid overdone formatting and mixing too many font sizes or styles  
         • Use bullet points  
         • Use bold headings and sub headings (better still, copy the exact criteria 
           from the application to ensure all are answered) 
         • Use charts and graphs where appropriate.  
          
         Your submission should include (where possible):  
         • A covering letter  
         • A title page  
         • A summary  
         • A needs assessment/statement  
         • Response to all selection criteria  
         • Articles, attachments and statistics  
         • Budget. 
          
         − Covering Letter 
           
         The  covering  letter  should  be  short  (half  a  page),  motivating,  say 
         something different, and stress need or unique application for funding.  




 
                Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                  14 
         
         
        − Summary  
     
        The summary is one of the most important parts of your project proposal, 
        because it is the part of the grant submission that is most frequently read. 
        If it is not succinct and motivating, you may lose the reader.  

        Try  to  keep  your  summary  between  100‐250  words  and  place  before  the 
        main body of text. The summary should describe:  
               • The key objectives  
               • Your approach  
               • How your project will be evaluated.  
                
               It should not be an exhaustive list, but should be a concise outline 
        of the proposal.  

        − Attachments  
         
        Most  decisions  on  grant  applications  are  made  by  a  committee,  or  a 
        Minister,  who  want  to  read  only  the  major  details  of  your  concept. 
        However,  this  committee  will  probably  receive  recommendations  from  a 
        secretariat or public servants who will read the detail of your project and 
        advise  the  decision  makers.  Appendices  and  back‐up  information  are 
        written for those who advise the decision makers.  
        The following are possible attachments:  
               • Studies/research and tables or graphs that support your case  
               • Information on key personnel  
               • Minutes of advisory committee meetings  
               • List of committee members  
               • Auditor’s report/statement  
               • Letters of recommendation and endorsement  
               • Pictures, architect drawings  
               • Copies of your Organisation’s publications; and  
               • List of other organisations you are approaching for funding.  




 
              Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                15 
       Unsuccessful applications 

    If you are not successful in an application, try to find out why by asking for 
    feedback from the funding body. This serves to: 

              improve future grant writing submissions; 
              helps to develop a better relationship with funding bodies in any 
               subsequent rounds; 
              helps you better pinpoint the areas for improvement 
              understand their funding limits & success rates of applicants who 
               applied 
              highlight particular priority areas of interest that were successful 

       Successful Applications 


    If you are successful ‐ LET PEOPLE KNOW – CELEBRATE! 

    Spread the good word about the work you’ve  done  and the  funding  you’ve 
    received.  Options  include  local  media  stories,  radio  interview,  newsletter, 
    producing training materials, or all of the above. 
     
    Keep  copies  of  written  material  in  your  development  file  to  support  future 
    grant submissions.  

       Execution of the Grant and Evaluation 

    There are a number of responsibilities you need to be aware of when signing 
    off (or executing) a funding agreement.  Often you may need to read complex 
    legal  information  and  sign  some  form  of  contract  with  the  funding  body 
    before  receiving  the  grant.    Check  with  the  funding  body  contact  person  if 
    you  are  unsure  of  responsibilities,  such  as  level  of  accountability,  progress 
    and  evaluation  reports,  consequences  of  non  compliance  or  delays  in  your 
    project, etc. 

    Once you have received the funds, acknowledge the grant by letter. 




 
               Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                 16 
 
    Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                      17 
Useful Grant Websites 
 
Parliament of Australia – Guide to Community Grants 
http://www.aph.gov.au/library/intguide/sp/spgrants.htm 
 
Philanthropy Australia 
http://www.philanthropy.org.au/  
 
Our Community 
http://www.ourcommunity.com.au/ 
 
Sport and Recreation Victoria 
http://www.sport.vic.gov.au/web9/dvcsrv.nsf/headingpagesdisplay/grants+&+funding 
 
Community Group funding portal 
http://www.community.gov.au/  
 
Telstra Foundation Grants 
http://www.telstrafoundation.com/  
 
Foster Community Partnerships 
http://www.fosters.com.au/about/community_partnerships.htm  
 
Department of Planning and Community Development 
http://www.grants.dvc.vic.gov.au/  
 
Government grants link funding portal 
http://www.grantslink.gov.au/  
 
Mildura Rural City Council grants page 
http://www.mildura.vic.gov.au/Page/Page.asp?Page_Id=69&h=0  
 
Foundation for Rural and Regional renewal 
http://www.frrr.org.au/index.asp  
 
Regional Development Victoria 
http://www.business.vic.gov.au/BUSVIC/STANDARD//PC_62421.html  
 
 


 
                 Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                   18 
 

                      Top Tips for successful Grant Submissions 
 
 Nominate someone (other than the Secretary!) that will become your group’s Grants Officer 

    and aim to include a grants report at each meeting; 

 Set a grants goal, establish a grants calendar and have a subcommittee discuss and plan for 

    upcoming grants each month; 

 Keep a grants compendium of information, including your organization’s objectives, goals, 

    previously successful grants, achievements, etc; 

 Subscribe to a grants register, or join the Our Community “Easy Grants” newsletter.  Seek 

    out government, philanthropic and sponsor websites, noting previously funded projects; 

 Subscribe to email lists or ring funding agencies direct to keep notified of grants, as soon as 

    they open; 

 Keep a research folder with information relating to your area, including population, level of 

    disadvantage, relevant government studies, reports and current funding policies; 

 Read the guidelines (twice!) to make sure you understand key points and requirements of 

    the grant process, application and method of submission (including deadlines!); 

 Gather letters of support, partnership agreements, surveys‐ anything that will add value to 

    your proposal; 

 Be realistic in what you can deliver for the grant you’re seeking and make sure the figures 

    add up!  Get someone else to read your final draft; 

 Don’t give up!  If you miss out, don’t be afraid to ask how you can improve your application 

    next time to improve your success rate; 

 If successful – celebrate! Then go through the funding agreement carefully to make sure the 

    committee understands your obligations and reporting requirements; 

 Publicise!  Don’t forget to tell the world about your achievements.  Be seen as an active and 

    responsive organisation who manages grants effectively.  It will give you a great track 

    record for future applications.  




 
                   Grant Application Process – the Why, What, When and How of grant seeking 
                                                     19 

								
To top