Grounds Maintenance Work Order Templates

Document Sample
Grounds Maintenance Work Order Templates Powered By Docstoc
					       Golf Course Maintenance Plan, INDEX
1. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….pg. 2
  a. General Information………………………………………………………………………………………………….2
  b. Soil Type…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….2
  c. Climatic Conditions………………………………………………………………………………………………….2
  d. Productivity…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….2
  e. Turfgrass Species Adapted………………………………………………………………………………….2
     (1). Greens……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….2
     (2). Tees…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….2
     (3). Fairways………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
     (4). Rough and Trap Facings…………………………………………………………………………….3
2. Existing Conditions (Analysis)………………………………………………………………………….3
  a. Greens – General Condition……………………………………………………………………………….3
  b. Tees………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….5
  c. Fairways……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….5
3. Recommendations………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….6
  a. Management Concept…………………………………………………………………………………………………….6
  b. Budgeting…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….7
  c. Records………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….7
  d. Maintenance Program………………………………………………………………………………………………….7
     (1). Greens Maintenance Recommendations…………………………………………….7
     (2). Fertilization…………………………………………………………………………………………………….8
     (3). Topdressing………………………………………………………………………………………………………….9
     (4). Renovation…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….9
     (5). Irrigation…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….10
     (6). Tee Maintenance……………………………………………………………………………………………….12
     (7). Fairway Maintenance…………………………………………………………………………………….12
4. Use of the Golf Course……………………………………………………………………………………………….13
5. Yearly Maintenance Program…………………………………………………………………………………….13
  e. Greens and Tee Maintenance Program………………………………………………………….14
  f. Fairway Maintenance Program…………………………………………………………………………….15
  g. Rough Maintenance Program………………………………………………………………………………….15
  h. Sand Bunker Maintenance Program………………………………………………………………….15
  i. Driving Range/Practice Area Maintenance Program……………………….16
  j. Routine Maintenance Work…………………………………………………………………………………….16
  k. Non-Routine Maintenance Work………………………………………………………………………….16
  l. Winter Program.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….16




                                 1
Note to superintendent: Fill out your information where blue type is indicated.
                 GOLF COURSE MAINTENANCE PLAN
                       #-HOLE name of course_ GOLF COURSE
                                Name of base AFB
                             DATE (Update annually)

1. INTRODUCTION:
     a. General Information. Name of base Air Force Base is
located in the area and name of state, county and/or city. The #
hole name of course golf course is located in location on base.
Elevations range from if known or estimate. Thus, name of course
golf course lies on lands ranging from type of land golf course is
on such as rolling, flat, mountainous, etc.
     b. Soil Type. Short statement of types of soils found on the
golf course.
     c. Climatic Conditions. Name of base and location of region
type in US (cool, humid, desert, etc.) Avg. annual rainfall and by
season, if known. Avg. length of growing season. Avg. date of 1st
and last killing frost, and any information you want to add.
     d. Productivity. Soils on the golf course are generally
productive. Turf grows well under good management practices.
However, statement if there are any conditions that are difficult
to grow good turf (dump sites, underlining gravel, etc.)
     e. Turf Grass Species Best Adapted to Local Soils and Climatic
Conditions. A wide selection of grasses grows well in this area.
However, many of the species are not suited, to golf course play
due to the inability of the grass to rehabilitate itself. Those
best suited to soil and climate and considered most effective for
golf course use are discussed below according to their specific and
recommended uses.
     (1) Greens: Putting green surfaces must be smooth, dense and
sufficiently firm to alleviate footprints and other irregularities
that may deflect the line of the golf ball. The putting green must
be soft without being spongy so that the surface is smooth and true
to satisfy the challenge of the game. Maintenance of turf under
such specialized conditions requires close and frequent clipping, a
well-planned fertilization, irrigation, aerification, topdressing,
and disease and insect control programs to make the greens
acceptable to heavy playing requirements. Put your turf type and
variety here, is considered one of the best to meet green
requirements for this locality if maintenance standards meet with
playing requirements.
     (2) Tees: Turf for the tees must be tough, capable of
withstanding heavy foot traffic, close clipping and able to heal
divot scars quickly. Selection of grasses for tees may be made from
the many improved varieties of put your variety(s) here.

                                              2
     (3) Fairways: Modern golf demands a smooth, thick, weed-free
turf that will hold the ball up, provide a cushion for the shot and
give the players a firm stance. To meet these requirements,
adjustments have to be made in the golf course management and
maintenance programs at frequent intervals. Emphasize on close
clipping, moderate fertilization and watering practices are to keep
turf in an active growing condition, and to insure that an
extensive weed, insect and disease control program is followed
regularly. The new improved varieties of put your variety(s) here
lend themselves well to the highly intensified management and
maintenance program.
          (a). It is very important to predetermine the type of
maintenance program that will be followed before the selection of
the grasses is made for the fairways prior to the construction of a
new golf course fairway.
          (b). The turf type are best adapted for this locality and
make a very satisfactory fairway turf where grass is cut at HOC
inch height, and water is applied at regular intervals.
     (4). Rough and Trap Facings: The roughs are commonly the most
neglected areas on a golf course. Past management practices have
been to permit them to grow up naturally to any type of vegetation.
This provides a serious problem of weed infestation and harbors
insects and disease. Most of the your region region grass species
are satisfactory for the roughs and trap facings with the exception
of variety(s) that don’t do well. The roughs may be seeded with
regular mixtures of improved put your variety(s) here. The
adjustment in mowing heights on the rough areas can provide the
desired hazards in the close areas around greens, tees, and
bunkers.

2. EXISTING CONDITIONS: (Analysis)
     a. Greens - General Condition. The golf course superintendent
or his assistant best determines the condition of the greens.
Personnel having daily contact with the greens can best determine
whether the greens are spongy, hard, waterlogged, uneven or
diseased? Close coordination must be maintained with the golf
manager. Many of these problems that plague the superintendent can
be traced back to the design and construction of the greens. Other
problems affecting greens condition relate to extremely heavy play
and especially after drenching rains coupled with hot, sunny
weather immediately after rains, tend to damage turf.
          (1). The grass species used determines the greens
maintenance program to be followed. For example, species used for
greens in your area species all differ in their response to
fertilization, water and top-dressing practices. Individual strains
of each species normally differ in maintenance requirements.
          (2). The existing greens on the name of course golf
course are now growing in the above species of type of grass.
Maintenance practices are followed to cultivate high quality
variety of grass. The amounts and frequency of fertilizer
applications are influenced by amount and frequency of water
applications and, in turn, the growth rate of variety is directly
affected, as is the clipping frequency, top-dressing and other
                                 3
operations that effect putting quality. The application of
herbicides and fungicides is directly influenced by the amounts and
frequency of watering and other routine maintenance practices.
Thus, these interrelationships illustrate the need for a thorough
understanding of how each maintenance practice effects all the
others, according to the specie, or species, of turf involved.
Because of the different reaction of the various turf species to
maintenance practices, it is extremely difficult to establish even
basic rules for the maintenance program on the greens. If the
superintendent understands the reasons for, and the effects of,
each maintenance practice used in relation to the turf specie
involved, he can adjust normal maintenance practices to provide
satisfactory putting greens.
          (3). New construction, renovation and reseeding of
various greens on the name of course golf course over a period of
years has resulted in a combination of variety types (include Poa
annua). Maintenance practices necessary to provide satisfactory
putting surfaces for each of the various turf species making up the
greens result in a complicated watering, fertilization, clipping,
disease and insect control program. Complicated maintenance
programs are time-consuming, inefficient and usually ineffective
and require the full-time services of an experienced professional
golf course superintendent if greens are to be maintained
economically and satisfactorily. All greens are being overseeded
with variety to insure variety to be the dominant species
maintained. This program will eventually result in all greens being
a higher consistency of variety and type.
          (4). Design and construction procedures in the past have
not provided the necessary drainage on some of the older greens.
However, reconstruction of greens may be accomplished to provide
drainage. Poor drainage can be the result of design, construction
or a combination of both. (this statement may or may not be needed)
          (5). Other factors affecting the maintenance program and
playing condition of the greens are surface and subsurface
drainage. The principal causes of poor drainage are soil
compaction, impervious subsoil, seepage, poor surface contours, and
inadequate tilling and poor soil mixtures.
          (6). In most cases where poor surface drainage is a
problem, reconstruction of the green is the best procedure to take
and, at the same time, correction of the physical condition and
under drainage can be accomplished. This is especially true if bad
drainage is the result of compacted soils and poor surface
contouring. Installation of open hole or slit tile drains is seldom
satisfactory for the removal of excess surface water. Unless grades
are especially sharp, water will not flow rapidly enough through
the turf to the low point above the tile to prevent saturation,
thus, causing mildew and rapid deterioration of putting surfaces.
Percolation through compacted soils is slow; therefore drainage
conditions are not greatly improved except in narrow strips
immediately above these tile lines.
          (7). In redesigning the greens, the surface contours
should provide broad run-off channels with 1% slopes to carry
surface water gradually in the direction where traffic is least
                                 4
concentrated. The contours should avoid the formation of pond-like
depressions in which water can stand. Since most of the traffic
onto the greens is from the front, contours that concentrate water
at this point intensifies compaction problems.
          (8). Correction of drainage due to compaction of the top
four or five inches of the surface layer of soil may be
accomplished by the use of various types of aerating equipment.
Where compaction is limited to small areas, a tubular tine fork is
suitable for opening drainage channels through the compacted layer.
On larger areas, equipment such as a greens aerator or spiker is
preferable. It is not always necessary to fill holes made by
equipment with topdressing material, but normally recommended,
since roots will quickly fill the open spaces. Topdressing is
applied on a regular monthly basis during the growing season, at a
minimum, to fill holes, ballmarks, and to smooth and firm the
putting surface.
          (9). It is difficult to improve subsurface drainage
permanently on greens that have been constructed from tightly
compacted or poor soil mixtures. Tile drainage will do very little
to remove water due to slow percolation. The best and most
economical remedy is reconstruction. The reconstruction procedure
should include a tile drainage system (gridiron or herringbone),
four inch layer of pea gravel over the tile, a four inch layer of
coarse sand over the gravel, and a minimum of 12 to 14 inches of an
USGA approved mixed material consisting of sand and peat, USGA
specifications.
     b. Tees. Concentrated foot traffic, divot scars, spike
abrasions, weed and crabgrass infestations cause most of the
problems on the tees. The use of high quality topdressing mix,
adequate fertilization, weed control and frequent movement of tee
markers can remove most tee problems confronting the
superintendent. However since a tight closely clipped turf is
essential for a satisfactory teeing surface, it is important to
select a turfgrass specie that can withstand close clipping with
minimum watering and heal quickly from heavy traffic and playing
injuries. Tee drainage is seldom a problem. However, if needs for
drainage develop due to compaction or other causes, the
recommendations for drainage on greens would provide satisfactory
drainage for the tees; however, a drain tile system need not be as
extensive. Maintenance of good turf on the tees is complicated
unless the tees are large enough so that tee markers can be moved
frequently to allow playing injuries to heal quickly. This problem
can be solved generally in two ways: first, alternate tees may be
constructed; or secondly, the size of the tees must be increased to
provide the necessary teeing surface. Long, easy grades should
blend the tees into the surrounding area to allow for mowing with
triplex mowers.
     c. Fairways. Analysis and discussion of the #-hole name of
course golf course fairways will be made relative to requirements
necessary to provide satisfactory playing conditions. Design,
construction and the maintenance received are the ingredients that
determine whether the fairways of the golf course are good, fair or
poor. Modern golf course fairway design is based upon the planned
                                 5
strategy of play, testing the skills of both the long and the short
hitter, permitting finesse as a reward where possible. Modification
of the basic layout of the golf course by relocating and
construction of new greens, relocation of the fairways without re-
grading and turf renovation, construction of lakes and sand bunkers
may result in rough, uneven fairways with weak, weedy turf, and
poor drainage conditions all of which tend to increase maintenance.
Compaction due to mowing and other maintenance practices when the
soil is too wet, lack of adequate weed control, fertilization,
aerification and uncontrolled personnel traffic have all
contributed to most of the unsatisfactory fairway conditions that
exist. Bunkers are not always necessarily placed to provide a
playing hazard, but also to direct the line of play. Trees can be
an asset to the golf course, but clumps of shrubs and small
evergreens scattered over the landscape or strung out in a straight
line pattern are not considered an amenity to a golf course.

3. RECOMMENDATIONS
     a. Management Concept. The basis of a good turf management
program begins with design of a golf course by a professional golf
course architect. He can coordinate the construction operations,
progressing through the processes of soil preparation, seeding, and
recurring items of day-to-day care, all blended together to provide
a challenge for the low handicap golfer as well as the infrequent
and weekend players. Those personnel experienced and/or specialized
in turf maintenance problems fully realize that many of these
problems may be entirely eliminated at this point. Since this golf
course already exists, its success is dependent upon the
development of a sound management program under the supervision of
a qualified experienced superintendent with a cadre of technical
workers, know-how to do the job, and why they are doing it.
"Keeping of the Greens" is considered to be an art and a science.
First is the art of greens keeping. The art, of greens keeping is
founded upon the education through a university program or
technical school, experience, knowledge and mechanics of all the
operations concerned with the growing of high-quality turf and the
ability to perform these operations efficiently at the proper time.
Secondly, the science of turf production is based upon scientific
and fundamental principles of plant growth and development and is
concerned with the underlying reasons back of these practices
(management), which constitutes the art of successful building and
maintenance. The superintendent’s responsibility is to plan and
direct all operations necessary for the maintenance and improvement
of the golf course.
          (1). He is accountable to the golf course manager and
must be qualified to: keep accurate records, handle labor
effectively and efficiently, make budget estimates, maintain
effective operating schedules, and many other supervisory skills.
          (2). He must have a fair knowledge of mechanics and be
able to keep expensive equipment in repair at a minimum cost. He
must understand the requirements of the day and be alert to foresee
impending trouble before playing conditions are impaired. In
addition to these qualifications, the golf course superintendent is
                                 6
a specialist with a thorough knowledge of the scientific and
technical phases of growing turf to meet the requirements of golf.
     b. Budgeting. The responsibility of maintenance operations of
the golf course belongs to the superintendent. Therefore, the
preparation of the annual operating budget should be an integral
part of the job he is to accomplish. The superintendent should
submit the proposed budget well in advance so modification of the
proposed budget may be made subject to the limitation of funds. It
is very important that the degree of excellence of playing
conditions must be realized before the allocation of available
funds to other operations other than the maintenance program. On
the other hand, the superintendent must use good judgment in
retaining the fundamental items of importance to the satisfactory
maintenance of the course while omitting those items of less basic
value if funds are restricted. Provisions must always be made in
the budget for unforeseeable items, which are caused by unusual
weather conditions, unexpected insect and disease damage, or other
factors.
     c. Records. It is essential that the superintendent keep
accurate day-to-day records of the course operation. These records
are important in keeping management officials and, in turn, the
membership informed of the problems of course maintenance. These
records provide a picture of maintenance activities and relative
costs, a continuing check on the efficiency of each worker, helps
to simplify the preparation of the proposed budget, constitutes an
itemized record of the season’s expenditures and provides means of
analyzing the maintenance program for future economies. In addition
to the above, record of course conditions should be kept such as
dates, amounts and areas of all application of fertilizers, top-
dressing, seeding, sodding, fungicide, insecticide weed control
treatments, etc. All records should be summarized and reviewed and
evaluated periodically.
     d. Maintenance Program. The actual course maintenance program
must be planned and executed by the superintendent. However, the
following recommendations will serve as a guide in developing a
sound maintenance program. Each integral part of the course is
covered separately in these recommendations.
          (1). Greens Maintenance Recommendations:
               (a). As renovation and modification of greens
becomes necessary, grass surfaces must be selected to renovate with
the specie of grass type that can provide the most favorable
putting surface with minimum maintenance requirements. Variety is
considered to be the acceptable product as the ultimate one grass
for greens. The purpose is to eventually have only one specie or
type of grass on all the greens. This will eliminate the need for
more than one greens maintenance program to satisfy the
requirements of several types of blends or grass species that now
exist.
               (b). Brushing relieves steminess in turf by raising
the stems so that portions are removed by clipping. Where steminess
is severe, various types of metal or fiber combs may be used.
Brushing may be done, as necessary to relieve this unsatisfactory

                                 7
condition. Brushing is not a technique used in hot and humid
weather.
               (c). Clipping should normally be accomplished daily.
Clipping heights are established according to the type of specie of
grass, season, and growth rate of the specie. Maximum cutting
heights for your variety should not exceed HOC inch. Higher cutting
encourages matting, sponginess, and steminess and will increase the
requirements for top-dressing and brushing. Good quality grass type
may be clipped to minimum heights of HOC inch without suffering
injury. Never reduce the mowing height suddenly. Reducing the
amount of leaf area drastically at one time will scalp the surface
and burn down root systems.
               (d). Verticutting and spiking serves to open up the
thatch layer and lets oxygen and water penetrate into the soil. It
will help relieve thatch build up and soil compaction. Verticutting
and spiking will be done when needed under the superintendents'
direction.
          (2). Fertilization and chemical applications should be
well understood by the superintendent in order to carry out an
effective fertilization and chemical program. The following
suggested program is not a foolproof program and is to be adjusted
according to turf species and local conditions, to water program,
and to results of periodic soil tests.
               (a). Application and analysis of fertilizer and
chemicals are to be made according to soil tests. Soils on
established turf should be tested every other year, preferably in
October. The nutrient level of nitrogen, phosphate, potash, iron,
magnesium, and calcium should be built up or down to the level
required for the best growing conditions according to soil tests.
               (b). Greens:
                    1. Apply any product to correct pH levels here
and timing.
                    2. Apply micronutrient package in early month
at recommended rates.(if needed)
                    3. Apply lbs. of N you use here pounds of
nitrogen per 1000 square feet of greens per season emphasizing the
fall season.
                    4. Green fertilizing is to be spread out over
the growing season to achieve even growth to the green surface. The
fertilizer program is made and adjusted yearly by the
superintendent when fertilizer needs, types, season, and weather
conditions are factored in.
               (c) Tees:
                    1. Apply pH adjustment and/or the micronutrient
package at the same times and rates as the greens program.
                    2. Apply fertilizer and soil amendments at the
same rates and times as greens fertilizing. (or on your schedule
here)


              (d). Fairways:


                                 8
                      1. Apply product you use to control pH to
achieve optimum pH.
                     2. Apply lbs. of N you use here pounds of
nitrogen per growing season to ensure adequate and sustained turf
growth.
                     3. The superintendents fertilizer plan will
have to be reevaluated yearly due to fertilizer type, turf needs,
and weather factors.
               (e) Roughs:
                     l. Apply lbs. of N you use here pound of
nitrogen per 1000 square feet of a 3-1-2 ratio fertilizer, one
application per year usually in month(s) applied.
                     2. It is pointed out that good judgment and
extreme care must be exercised in making fertilizer applications.
Regardless of the forms (organic or inorganic) of nitrogen used,
uniformity in making application and close control over the amounts
applied at each application must be exercised. Careless application
of fertilizers/chemicals may result in direct injury to the turf,
causing additional maintenance to be performed to renovate injured
turf. Decisions to vary maintenance factors should be made by the
superintendent after reasonable observation and study of the
problem to be corrected.
          (3). Topdressing serves two basic purposes: one, to
modify soil conditions; and two, to improve the putting surface.
Based upon observation and experience the superintendent may
topdress for the following reasons:
               (a). Restore turf quality and improve the putting
surface when greens have become uneven due to winter play and frost
action.
               (b). To renovate thin turf that has become thin
because of disease and insect injury to promote rapid healing of
playing scars, and to renovate sod that has become matted.
               (c). To build a layer of good sand mix under turf
where problems of compaction are the result of poor soil texture.
Such conditions may be corrected through a regular program of
topdressing and soil conditioners but must include a coordinated
program of aeration if it is to be effective.
               (d). The frequency of application and the quantity
of materials used must be adjusted to the requirements of each
green. Quantities used should not exceed 1/4 cubic yard per 1000
square feet at any one application. Applications may be made at two
to three week intervals if necessary. Your grass type will not
stand over l/4 cubic yard per 1000 square feet at one application.
The materials should be well screened and clean, uniformly
distributed over the area, and thoroughly worked into the turf.
               (e). Percentages of sand, and organic matter used in
topdressing mixtures will vary in relation to the end result
needed. Mixtures may vary according to texture of green being
topdressed and the reason for topdressing. Pure sand, meeting USGA
specifications is now the material of choice for greens
topdressing.


                                   9
          (4). Renovation of greens is considered a specialized
form of maintenance to be used only when normal maintenance
procedures fail to produce the desired putting green quality and
the turf continues to deteriorate under normal maintenance. Before
any renovation can take place, the cause of deterioration must be
determined. Listed below are the principal reasons for poor quality
of turf on greens and recommendations for correction.
               (a). The experienced and alert superintendent may
note poor drainage problems by the occurrence of sedges, Poa annua,
or other moisture-tolerant plants that persist. Further evidence is
soil that puddles when wet, bakes severely when dry, or honeycombs
when frozen. It is recommended that poor drainage such as ponding
caused by improper contouring, inadequate subsurface drainage
caused by tightly compacted soils, and inadequate tilling be
resolved by reconstruction of the greens. It is a waste of time and
effort to attempt to secure permanent satisfaction by renovation or
other practices. Soils that compact badly may require a regular
program as outlined above in order to maintain high quality playing
turf.
               (b). Heavy matting and sponginess develops in turf
consistently cut too high or too infrequently. However, the
renovation process is similar to that as outlined for compaction,
except that in addition, heavy verticutting, brushing, and clipping
must be accomplished and the debris removed before the aeration,
fertilization, seeding, and light topdressing operations are
accomplished. The severity of the renovation procedure at any one
time is dependent upon whether the green is to be kept in use or
not in use during this period of renovation.
               (c). Reseeding is recommended (northern tier) over
the revegetating (southern tier) method when renovation has been
determined to be necessary. Use rate of seeding or revegetating.
Seeding rate should be cut in half and seeded in two directions.
Then lightly cover with topdressing material and kept moist until
grass germinates and is growing in a healthy condition.
          (5). The Irrigation program directly affects all other
maintenance programs concerning the greens. Thus, it is a
requirement that the superintendent be thoroughly familiar with the
underlying principles of water management to determine how much
water is needed, how often water must be applied, how fast it can
be applied, and the results to be obtained from its use. These
problems are concerned with the needs of the grass for sufficient
quantities of water to maintain satisfactory growth.
               (a). The best indicators for determining the amount
of water to a green at any given time is the amount of water in the
root zone and general appearance of the turf. The use of some type
of sampling tube is very convenient to remove soil to a depth of
approximately six inches. Soil sampling of various areas over the
green will show the uniformity of water distribution over the
green. If water is running off the high areas too fast or is not
penetrating localized dry spots properly, the low sections of the
green become saturated before the other areas have received
sufficient water amounts. Moisture conditions on both areas will be
unsatisfactory for proper grass growth. Thorough aeration of the
                                10
dry areas to insure faster water penetration will eliminate the
necessity for over-watering of low areas to provide sufficient
quantities of water for drier areas. The amount of water that can
be applied at any one time to provide sufficient moisture for plant
needs depends upon the total amount which the soil can store
without being saturated. In the top six inches of the soil layer,
the following data approximates the holding capacity of various
soil types. The data is based on water available for plant use in
the top six inches of soil.
                    1. Light sandy soils can retain about one-inch
or approximately 625 gallons per 1000 square feet.
                    2. Average loam soil will retain about 1-1/2
to 1-3/4 inch or, approximately 900-1000 gallons per 1000 square
feet.
                    3. Clay loam soil will retain two inches or
about 1300 gallons per 1000 square feet.
                    4. Prepared soils containing average amounts
of organic matter (topdressing) will retain about 2-1/3 to 2-1/2
inches of available water in top six inch layer of soil
(approximately 1700 gallons) per 1000 square feet. The above
figures are averages and must be adjusted somewhat for every
individual soil or green.
               (b). The frequency and rate of watering is due to
the quantity of water the soil can retain, the rate of loss due to
grass consumption, and rate of loss due to weather conditions. When
grass is growing vigorously and the weather is hot and dry, water
losses will average 1/2 to one inch every two to four days. As
noted in data above, light, sandy soils will retain the least
amount of available water. Thus, applications must be made more
frequently on the light sandy soils than on the heavier soils with
a good organic matter content. The rate water can be applied is
determined by the physical condition of the soil on the greens.
Location of sprinkler heads must be done to insure even
distribution over the green surface.
               (c). Time of watering applications is usually
controlled by the demands of play and local conditions. When
temperatures are high, water should be applied in evening, night,
or early morning hours. Some daytime water may be necessary with
short cycles to cool the turf, (syringing).
               (d). Water Management schedules must supplement for
normal precipitation. It is important that watering be discontinued
during times when soil moisture is replenished by normal
precipitation. On the other hand, it is equally important to
supplement high precipitation sufficiently to satisfy the needs of
the grass. The watering schedule may vary for each green according
to its construction and absorption peculiarities.
               (e). Seasonal adjustment to watering must be made.
Early season watering should provide for the development of a deep
root system. The periods between watering should be stretched as
far as possible to allow the surface layer of soil to dry out to a
depth of two to three inches. This will encourage deeper
penetration of new roots. When spring dry periods occur it may be
necessary to apply water even though the grass shows no immediate
                                11
need for it. The development of deep root systems lowers water
requirements during the summer. The superintendent should make full
use of DTN and/or weather reports in determining when and how much
to water. Good early season management of water applications,
fertilization, and aeration of the greens will produce a strong,
deep rooted, hardened grass with a slow growth rate that is more
capable of heavy play and will withstand average conditions without
extra maintenance.
                (f). The organisms that cause serious turf disease
develop most rapidly when soil moisture is high. Almost all
diseases injurious to golf grasses grow rapidly and are more
prevalent when soils are kept saturated and not allowed to dry out
occasionally Therefore, there is no satisfactory substitute for
good judgment, experience, and professional knowledge in management
of the watering program.
          (6). Tee Maintenance:
                (a). It is recommended that where tees are in poor
condition as a result from playing demands (concentrated wear,
divot scars, abrasions, etc.), that a reconstruction program be
activated to increase the size of the tees and/or provide alternate
tees, so that each teeing surface have adequate areas to
accommodate # sets you use sets of tee markers. The slopes up to
the tees should be gentle enough to allow tees to be mowed the
triplex mowers. Grass species selected for use on the tees should
be able to withstand a clipping height of HOC inch.
                (b). Watering practices and principles for the tees
are much the same as those outlined previously for the greens.
Quantities of water used, frequency of application and rate of
application must be adjusted to the needs of the turf and the same
general management outlined for greens can be applied to tees.
                (c). Drainage is seldom a problem on the tees
constructed from good soil mixtures. It may be necessary to re-
move shallow depressions by topdressing. Usually, where poor
drainage is a problem, it is best to reconstruct the tee and
provide the necessary drain tile and topdressing mix.
                (d). Renovation of established turf on tees is
considered a day-to-day maintenance problem. Where it is not
practical to provide satisfactory teeing conditions with normal
maintenance, it is usually more desirable and more economical to
reconstruct the tee.
                (e). Other maintenance includes topdressing
following aeration procedures. Divot repair seeding or sodding may
be used as a quick measure to repair playing scars where limited
teeing surface is provided
          (7) Fairways Maintenance
                (a). Analysis of the #-hole name of course golf
course fairways indicates, general heavy playing conditions exist.
Recommendations will be made to upgrade the fairways to satisfy
modern golf demands.
                (b). Design of the fairways is an integral part of
golf course planning. Add a statement here if any fairways have
been redesigned and for what reason.

                                12
               (c). The development of a sound renovation program
for the fairways must be based upon correct diagnosis of principal
causes of turf deterioration. The superintendent should be able to
analyze each problem and determine if the deterioration was caused
by the use of unadapted grasses, poor physical properties of the
soil and inadequate drainage, low fertility and unfavorable soil
reaction, poor maintenance practices such as over-watering and
improper clipping, or injury due to disease, insects, or winter
kill.
               (8). Materials must be provided such as seed,
fertilizer, and pesticides for pest control. Variety and grass type
is the turf of choice. A full fertilizer program with a basic ratio
of 3-1-2 is considered best for the grass type. Basic applications
of fertilizer should be made in amounts recommended according to
soil tests.
               (9). Necessary mechanical hand tools, aerifying
equipment, fertilizer applicator, seeding machine, insecticide and
herbicide spray equipment must be on hand to properly maintain
fairways.
               (10). The fairway turf should be well established
before mowing is started. Mowing should be often enough so that
only 1/3 of the growth is removed at one cutting. Herbicides for
weed control should not be used until after the grass is mature,(75
to 90 days).

4. USE OF THE COURSE:
     The course supports an excellent recreational program and, as
such, provides for extremely heavy play. It is necessary,
therefore, to keep the course maintained in a manner to be
conducive to playing a round of golf in a reasonable time frame,
approx. 4 hours or less. Consequently, fairways are mowed extremely
close, no tall rough areas are maintained around greens, and other
measures to speed up play have been employed. Heavy play, plus use
of the course by players of varied degrees of skill, has a marked
wearing action on the turf. Therefore, maintenance requirements
become more complicated and maintenance frequencies are
accelerated. To obtain the desired results, management attention
must be carefully directed to maintenance procedures and exact
accomplishment of those procedures in order to provide an
acceptable recreational facility used to full capacity. The only
other alternative is the restricted use of the facility to coincide
with the maintenance program, which is considered unacceptable.

5. YEARLY MAINTENANCE PROGRAM
     a. In order to promote concerted action toward the
accomplishment of seasonal grounds maintenance work at a time when
maximum results can be expected, and at the same time effect
maximum utilization of manpower, equipment, and materials, the
management and maintenance program is outlined herewith.
     b. The program is considered flexible enough so that work may
be accomplished within the allocated periods of time, consideration


                                13
being given to abnormal weather conditions and other unforeseen
work stoppages.
     c. A 20% man-hour differential should be permitted on the
basis of weather and other uncontrollable conditions that may
interfere with work operations.
     d. The golf course superintendent will coordinate the
irrigation schedule so that other work can be accomplished with a
minimum of “down time”.
     e. Greens and Tees Maintenance Program.
          (1). Greens and tees are to be rolled in early spring.
Rolling of greens will also be done on Fridays, as needed, during
the playing season.
          (2). Apply micronutrient package at recommended rates the
month applied if micros are used. Also, if needed, pH adjust
product and time applied.
          (3). Fertilizer is to be applied according to the yearly
plan. Number of apps. applications are to be applied during season
at monthly (or your intervals) intervals. The last application will
be applied in late fall as the turfgrass go into dormancy. Each
winter season the fertilizer plan will be reevaluated and updated.
          (4). The spraying program will start as soon as
conditions exist for the development of disease vectors. Continual
applications will be applied on both a preventative and curative
applications depending on disease type, and severity, weather, and
golfing events. (Application of a fungicide is to be applied before
the first snow cover for snow mold control.) Keep if you use a snow
mold control product.
          (5). Greens will be spiked, as required, throughout the
playing season.
          (6). Greens will be verticut, as required, according to
thatch build up and steminess of the turf type.
          (7). Greens will be mowed # times a week according to
growing season on days mowed here. Height will be set at HOC inch.
Additional mowing may be necessary due to special events.
          (8). Aprons will be mowed # times a week at HOC inch
height on days mowed here.
          (9). Cups and tee markers will be changed four to seven
times a week determined by play, weather conditions and tournament
requirements.
          (10). Aerification of greens and tees will be
accomplished in months you aerate with hollow core or deep tine
equipment. Water jet aeration and/or quad-tine aeration of greens
will be done once in the months of months you do this process.
          (11). Topdressing will be done during each tined aerating
process and again lightly during each of the growing months.
          (12). Soil samples will be taken in October of
alternating years to see how the fertilizer plan is working.
          (13). Greens and tees are to be watered as required to
insure a firm but healthy turf.
          (14). Tees are to be mowed three times a week at HOC inch
height on days mowed here.


                                14
     f. Fairway Maintenance Program.
          (1). Fairways are to be rolled in early spring before the
first mow.
          (2). Application of a pre-emergent crabgrass control will
be applied as needed in month you apply.
          (3). Reseeding, if needed, is to be accomplished in when
you reseed.
          (4). The fertilizer program is planned for monthly
feedings over the growing season to insure even growth. The plan
will be reviewed and updated annually.
          (5). Fairways are to be mowed days you mow at HOC inch
height beginning time of day such a morning or afternoon.
          (6). Dragging (if done) of fairways will be done
everyday, if possible due to weather and personnel, during the
growing season to knock down morning dew.
          (7). Fairways will be sliced or thatched as required
starting in Month except for any newly seeded areas.
          (8). Fairways will be aerated in Month as required.
          (9). Insecticides will be applied on fairways where
and/or when grubs, sod webworms, or other insects appear.
          (l0). Fairways will be watered as required to insure firm
and healthy your turf type turf.
          (12). Soil samples will be taken at the same time as
greens and tees.
          (13). Fairway 1st cut and walk path will be mowed at HOC
inch height on days mowed. (if you do these processes)
          (14). Broad leaf weed control will be done on an as
needed basis.
     g. Rough Maintenance Program.
          (1). Mowing will be maintained at a height of HOC inches.
Mowing will begin as growth begins and end when growth stops.
Mowing will be continuous with all areas being mowed once each week
and fast growing sections being mowed extra as needed.
          (2). Fertilizer will be applied once a year in Month
using a 3-1-2 ratio fertilizer applying at the rate of lbs. of N
you use pound of nitrogen per 1000 square feet.
          (3). Weed Control will consist of a late winter or early
spring application of a pre-emergent herbicide for crabgrass; and
post emergent control of broad leaf weeds during the spring or any
time a weed infestation is present.
          (4). Trimming around all greens, tees, bunkers and trees
will be done weekly at HOC inch height.
          (5). Overseeding will be done on an as needed basis.
     h. Sand Bunker Maintenance Program.
          (1). Bunkers will be raked to fill in depressions and
footprints # times a week on days raked.
          (2). Edges will be hand raked up on days process is done.
          (3). Bunkers will be mechanically edged as needed during
the playing season.
          (4). Bunkers will/may have major reconstruction every
three years, during the off-season, to modify edges or to improve
drainage and playability.
                                15
          (5). New sand will be added as needed.
          (6). A minimum of two hand rakes per bunker will be
placed on the course, more for larger bunkers. Broken rakes will be
replaced as soon as found.

    i.    Driving Range and Practice Area Maintenance Program.
          (1). The driving range will be closed and mowed on day
          mowed morning. The tee will be mowed on days mowed with
          the type mower used mower.
          (2). Overseeding and topdressing the teeing area will be
          as needed.
          (3). The short iron practice area will be mowed on Day
          mowed. (if you have one)
          (4). The putting green/s will be maintained on the same
          schedule as the regular greens.
     j. Routine Maintenance Work:
          (1). Ballwashers will be checked for water and
cleanliness daily during the playing season. They will be drained,
flushed and refilled with fresh towels on every day process is done
during the playing season.
          (2). Wastebaskets will be emptied daily, or as needed.
Litter will be picked up as needed.
          (3). Flag colors, if used, will be changed according to
the daily cup rotation plan.
          (4). Tree and shrub work will include trimming,
fertilizing, mulching and weed control around bases.
          (5). Tee sign and bench areas will be mulched in the
spring and kept free of weeds.
          (6). Flowerbeds will be planted, mulched, maintained free
of weeds, and cleaned out at the end of the season.
          (7). Edging of flowerbeds and tee sign/bench areas will
be done before the spring mulching.
          (8). Leaves will be blown off greens, tees, and fairways
into the rough. Then they will be mulched into the rough turf by
mulching machines or collected and composted each fall.
     k. Non-Routine Maintenance Work:
          (1). Storm damage, flood debris, and limbs will be
cleaned up and removed as soon as possible.
          (2). Irrigation breaks and problems will be repaired in a
timely manner as not to cause turf injury. Clean up and turf repair
of these areas will be done as soon as possible.
          (3). Vandalism of any type will be corrected as soon as
possible and proper reporting will be made.
          (4). In season equipment breakdowns will be repaired as
soon as possible as to not affect the maintenance programs.
     l. Winter Program:
          (1). Inside Work:
               (a). Take in, repair and paint ballwashers, spike
brushes, tee markers, flag poles, practice green markers, signs,
benches, and waste containers.
               (b). Steam clean and repair/rebuild all maintenance
equipment as needed.
                                16
               (c). Grind, lap in, grease and adjust all mowing
equipment used on golf course.
               (d). Clean and paint golf course equipment as
needed.
               (e). Review and update all plans, programs and OI's
associated with golf course maintenance.
          (2). Outside Work:
               (a). Apply fungicide for snow mold protection by
specific date, weather permitting. (if you do this process)
               (b). Winterize irrigation system, (if done) check
out and repair all leaks, and replace bad coupling valves.
               (c). Cut winter cups in greens and prepare tees for
winter play. (if this process is done)
               (d). Clean up and police entire golf course.
               (e). Snow removal responsibilities include walk
paths, clubhouse, club parking area, and any other area as deemed
necessary. (if this process is done)
               (f). Repair all freeze, frost, and erosion damage.
               (g). Remove dead trees and stumps. Prune and trim
trees and shrubs as needed.
               (h). De-winterize irrigation system in early spring.
(if done) Make sure all irrigation equipment is in proper working
order.
               (i). Continue with items not completed on the master
improvement plan of the golf course.




                                17

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Grounds Maintenance Work Order Templates document sample