Sculptures in the by mudoc123

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                  WCBPA-Washington Classroom-Based
                      Performance Assessment
             A Component of the Washington State Assessment System
                                       The Arts




                              Grade 8 Visual Arts
                          Sculptures in the Park (2005)
                                 Revised 2008



  Student Name/ID# _______________________________________ Grade Level _________

(circle number)               Creating Score – 4 3 2 1 0
                            Performing Score – 4 3 2 1 0
                            Responding Score – 4 3 2 1 0

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                             Directions for Administering the
              Washington Classroom-Based Performance Assessment (WCBPA)
                              Arts Performance Assessment
                                   Grade 8 Visual Arts
                           Sculptures in the Park, Revised 2008

Introduction
This document contains information essential to the administration of the Washington
Classroom-Based Performance Assessment (WCBPA) Arts Performance Assessment of Visual
Arts CBPA Title Sculptures in the Park, Revised 2008

•      Prior to administration as an assessment, all students should have received
       instruction in the skills and concepts being assessed.

•      Please read this information carefully before administering the performance
       assessment.

•      This CBPA may be used as an integral part of instruction, and/or formative
       assessment, summative assessment, culminating project, alternative education packets
       of instruction, lesson plans, pre- and -post assessment, accumulating student learning
       data, individual student portfolio item, use of data teaming and individual/district
       professional development, professional learning communities, and in whatever
       capacity the teacher finds useful to improve arts and all instruction and student
       learning.

Test Administration Expectations
   • The skills assessed by this item should be authentically incorporated into classroom
      instruction.
   • This assessment item is to be administered in a safe, appropriately supervised classroom
      environment following district policy and procedures.
   • All industry and district safety policies and standards should be followed in the preparation
      and administration of the CBPAs in dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.
   • Accommodations based upon student IEP or 504 Plan may require additional assessment
      administration modifications. (See Teacher Preparation Guidelines-page 3).
   • Culture, diversity, and religious mores/rules may require additional assessment
      administration modifications.

Description of the Performance Assessment
   • Students taking this performance assessment will respond to a performance prompt and a
       series of short answer questions.
   • Performance prompts ask the students to create an individual sculpture based on the criteria
       outlined in the prompt and to a series of short-answer questions.
   • Design concepts must be submitted as a diagram/sketch and as a three dimensional
       representation (maquette) of the design. All responses must be collect and/or photographed
       to facilitate scoring and to document each student’s performance and response.
   • Short-answer questions will ask the students to supply a response which may be in the form
       of words, pictures and/or diagrams, to facilitate scoring and to document each student’s
       performance. (See TPG guidelines for verbal responses and other accommodations).

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   •   Response sheets are provided for student work. All written work must be completed in the
       student answer spaces provided.

   •   Materials and Resources
   •   Teachers will need the following materials and resources to complete this performance
       assessment:
   •   classroom set of reproduced tasks, including the glossary of terms
   •   one copy of administration guidelines
   •   classroom set of reproduced student response sheets
   •   sketch paper, for each student, for planning
   •   1/8th sheet of poster board, approximately 11” x 7”, heavy weight tag board, or other stiff
       and bendable clean board that is one or two colors and free of printing, to make a maquette
   •   pencils
   •   scissors or other cutting tools
   •   glue (fast drying glue works best for this CBPA)
   •   tape (for temporary attachment)
   •   rulers, compasses
   •   optional materials: compasses, French curves, actual textural materials (fabric, textured
       papers, beads, etc.)
   •   audio and/or video recording device and tape (if needed for individual students)
   •   (Note: Use glue to ensure stability and to reinforce sculpture joints after assembly if
       necessary. Tape must be removed from final maquette. No base is necessary as the
       sculpture is free standing.)

Teacher Preparation Guidelines
   • This assessment requires an individual performance.
   • Reproduce a classroom set of student task directions, glossary of terms, student response
      sheets from this CBPA, and necessary sketch paper and sculpture construction materials.
   • When photographing for documentation and portfolios, the photographs should show the
      sculpture from at least four possible angles, such as front, back, right, left, as well as a
      bird’s-eye view. These views must be labeled for clear identification, grading, scoring, etc.
      The student’s name/number must be included in the photograph.
   • As an option to a written response, video or audio recording may be used to accommodate
      student needs and at the teacher’s discretion. Students being recorded need to be coached to
      face the recording device when responding. Students must have a copy of the response sheet
      if/when being recorded.
   • Students may dictate response sheet answers as necessary to meet student needs.
   • The teacher’s or transcriber’s role is to read questions. Students may use resources that are
      visible in the testing classroom, but the teacher may not prompt or coach students during the
      assessment.
   • Students should be prompted to clearly say their name/number and their current grade level
      into the recording device before they begin their response.
   • Students who respond in writing must include their name/number on all response sheets.
   • Short-answer questions will ask the students to supply a response which may be in the form
      of words, pictures and/or diagrams, to facilitate scoring and to document each student’s
      performance. (See TPG guidelines for verbal responses and other accommodations).
   • Response sheets are provided for student work. All written work must be completed in the
      student answer spaces provided.

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   •   Accommodations for special needs and limited English speakers:
       a) Students may dictate response sheet answers for transcription by an instructional aide.
       b) The student may give the written and/or recorded responses in their first language.
       c) We request a written and/or verbal English translation for consistency
          validity/reliability) in scoring the rubric.

Suggestions for Time Management
Students may have as much time as they need to complete the task. Time suggestions are a guide
and may be shortened or lengthened to meet individual school, class and student circumstances. It is
recommended and encouraged that the teacher reviews the glossary and scoring rubrics with the
students.

The following four-day model is a suggested/sample timeframe:

Day One Suggested Time:
• 15 minutes: The teacher provides the class with the task and reads it aloud.
The students may ask questions. The teacher answers any questions asked.
• 25 minutes: The students create a diagram that shows the various shapes and how the shapes may
be connected and assembled. After the completion of a detailed sketch, some students may begin
their maquette/sculpture.
• 5 minutes: The teacher collects all materials.

Day Two Suggested Time:
• 5-10 minutes: The teacher distributes materials and sculptures to the students and reviews the
prompt
• 35 minutes: The students begin their sculptures.
• 5 minutes: The teacher collects all materials and sculptures.

Day Three Suggested Time:
• 5 minutes: The teacher distributes response sheets and sculptures to the students.
• 30 minutes: The students complete their sculptures and begin the response sheets.
• 5 minutes: The teacher collects the response sheets and sculptures.

Day Four Estimated Time:
• 5 minutes: The teacher distributes materials and the response sheets to the students who respond
verbally, as needed.
• 30 minutes: The students complete their response sheets and/or sculptures. The teacher
videotapes, records or scribes student responses to accommodate student needs.
• 5 minutes: The teacher collects the response sheets and sculptures.

Note: Prior to the collection of the sculptures, photographing the sculptures with/without the
students is a successful/accurate way to document student achievement for all purposes
regarding this CBPA.

Test Administration
Students may have as much time as they need to complete the task. All students who remain
productively engaged in the task should be allowed to finish their work. In some cases, a few
students may require considerably more time to complete the task than most students; therefore, you

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may wish to move these students to a new location to finish. In other cases, the teacher’s knowledge
of some students’ work habits or special needs may suggest that students who work very slowly
should be tested separately or grouped with similar students for the performance assessment.

Provide the class with the reproduced student pages, which may include the cover page, student
prompt, response sheet, rubrics, templates, glossary, and any other required materials prior to
beginning the task. Students may highlight and write on these materials during the assessment.
Instruct the students to look at the following student pages. Have the students read the directions to
themselves as you read them aloud. Answer any clarifying questions the students may have before
you instruct them to begin. If this assessment is used for reporting purposes, circle the scoring
points on the cover page of the individual student pages.




              Say: Today you will take the Grade 8 Washington Classroom-Based
             Performance Assessment (WCBPA) Arts Performance Assessment of
                 Visual Arts entitled ―Sculptures in the Park‖ ~ Revised 2008




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Student Name/ID# _______________________________________ Grade Level _________

(circle number)                 Creating Score – 4 3 2 1 0
                              Responding Score – 4 3 2 1 0


Sculptures in the Park

 A new park in your community is going to be opened. The community park planners have
 asked the students at your school to each create a model of an abstract sculpture based on the
 idea of a kind of movement typically found in a park. This sculpture will be located in the
 entrance of the new park. Your sculpture maquette must be sturdy, free standing, viewable
 from all sides, and show visual balance. You would like your abstract sculpture to be selected
 as part of this new public park.

 The planners would like you to name this abstract sculpture. The name should reflect the
 particular movement you plan to convey in your sculpture maquette. The planners explain
 that you will need to create a preliminary diagram, illustrating how your shapes will help
 communicate your particular idea of movement in your final sculpture maquette.


The park planners explain that you must meet the following task requirements when creating
your maquette:
 • Identify the particular movement you plan to represent in your abstract sculpture.
 • Represent the theme of movement typical in a park (such as, running, dancing, playing, trees
   swaying in the wind, leaves falling and flying in the wind, kites flying, etc.). in your sculptured
   composition.
 • Draw a diagram that indicates how your free-form/organic and geometric shapes might be
   shaped, connected and assembled to help communicate your particular idea of movement typical
   in a park, for your sculpture’s maquette.
 • Indicate in your diagram, the type of visual balance you plan to use for the sculpture:
   formal/symmetrical, radial, or informal/asymmetrical
 • Cut shapes (geometric, free-form/organic) that support the theme of the specific movement
   that you have selected for your maquette. Use the materials provided.
 • Assemble your shapes to create your stable, freestanding, abstract sculpture maquette.
 • Use at least three different sculpture/construction techniques when creating your sculpture
   such as rolling/curling, twisting, bending/folding, scoring, slotting, and tabbing/gluing.
 • Construct your sculpture, using the specific type of visual balance indicated in your diagram that
   helps you communicate the idea of movement. ( formal/symmetrical, radial, or
   informal/asymmetrical)

The park planners explain that you must meet the following task requirements when
responding about your maquette:
 • Name or title your abstract maquette, identify your chosen movement, and explain how it
   relates to the type of movement depicted by your maquette.
 • Identify the parts of your maquette that are free-form/organic, geometric, or a combination of
   the two.


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• Identify the two parts of the maquette that most effectively show the idea of movement and
  explain how each of these parts communicates the idea of movement.
• Identify and describe the type of visual balance used in your maquette then justify by explaining
  how that type of visual balance helps to communicate the idea of movement you chose in your
  maquette.




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Student Name/ID# _______________________________________ Grade Level _________

(circle number)                Creating Score – 4 3 2 1 0
                             Responding Score – 4 3 2 1 0


Use the space below to draw your diagram. You are not drawing the finished product
in this space. You are drawing, indicating and planning how your cut shapes might fit
together to communicate your idea of movement typical in a park.

In designing your sculpture, you are going to represent the idea of a particular movement
typical in a park, such as, running, dancing, playing, trees swaying in the wind, leaves falling
and flying in the wind, kites flying, etc.
• Your diagram must indicate how your free-form/organic and geometric shapes might be shaped,
  connected and assembled to help communicate (show) your chosen type or idea of movement.
• Indicate in your diagram, the type of visual balance your plan to use for the sculpture:
  formal/symmetrical, radial, or informal/asymmetrical.
• When you are finished with your diagram, cut and assemble your shapes to create your sturdy,
  stable, and freestanding maquette.




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Student Name/ID# _______________________________________ Grade Level _________

(circle number)              Responding Score – 4     3   2   1   0

RESPONSE SHEET

   1) Title (name) your abstract maquette and explain how your title relates to the particular idea
      or type of movement depicted by your maquette. Title: ____________________________

        Explain how your title relates to the chosen movement: ____________________________
        __________________________________________________________________________



   2) Identify the parts of your maquette that are free-form/organic, geometric, or a combination
        of the two.
        Free form/organic: _________________________________________________________
               Geometric: ________________________________________________________
               Combination: ______________________________________________________


   3)    Identify and describe the two parts of the maquette that most effectively show your
        particular idea of movement and explain how each of these parts communicates your chosen
        type or idea of movement:

        First Part: _________________________________________________________________

        Explain how it communicates your particular movement in your maquette. _____________

        _________________________________________________________________________

        Second Part: _______________________________________________________________

        Explain how it communicates your particular movement in your maquette. _____________

        _________________________________________________________________________

   4) Identify and describe the type of visual balance you used in your maquette: (such as
      formal/symmetrical, radial, and/or informal/asymmetrical) __________________________

   5) Justify by explaining how that type of balance helps to communicate the particular idea of
      movement you chose for your maquette _________________________________________

        __________________________________________________________________________




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               Washington Classroom-Based Performance Assessment (WCBPA)
                               Arts Performance Assessment
                                           Grade 8
                            Sculptures in the Park, Revised 2008
                                   Visual Arts Glossary

abstract art—1. a style of art that refers to various types of 20th-century avant-garde art 2. abstract
also refers to images that have been so altered from their realistic/natural appearance; they have
been simplified to their basic contours/forms 3. abstract art is often based upon a recognizable
object, which is then simplified to show some purer underlying shape or form, sometimes removing
any references to recognizable objects

balance— a principle of design of visual arts; the arrangement of elements that makes individual
parts of a composition appear equally important; balance is an arrangement of the elements to
create an equal distribution of visual weight throughout the format, sculpture or composition
        types of balance include:
        asymmetrical/informal balance—balance that results when two sides of an artwork are
        equally important but one side looks different from the other; not equally arranged on
        opposite sides of a center line or center point but in overall harmony or equilibrium
        symmetrical/ formal balance —image or form equally weighted on both sides of a center
        dividing line or plane
        radial balance —image or form that is equally symmetrical and radiating from a center
        point throughout

form—an element of visual arts; a three-dimensional object that has height, width and depth

free form—a shape or form having an asymmetrical or irregular contour, often with a curvilinear,
flowing outline; sometimes referred to as “organic” or “biomorphic”, but may also include angles

freestanding—stands on its own; self-supporting

geometric —any shapes and/or forms based on math principles, such as a square/cube,
circle/sphere, and triangle/cone, pyramid, etc.

maquette—a small scale two-dimensional sketch or three-dimensional model or plan of a proposed
work, such as a sculpture or architectural form; used by architects and sculptors in designing large-
scale works

movement—a principle of design of visual arts that creates the suggestion of motion in a work of
art such as a sculpture, drawing or painting; the use of art elements to draw a viewer’s eye through
an artwork

sculpture—a three-dimensional work of art

sculptural techniques—different ways to create 3-D forms, such as cutting, folding, rolling,
twisting, curling, scoring, bending attaching, joining, carving; using additive and subtractive
processes to create three dimensional works of art



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shape— an element of art- a two-dimensional (flat) area enclosed by line; such as cutting,
rolling/curling, twisting, bending/folding, scoring, slotting, tabbing, gluing, etc.
        geometric — any shapes and/or forms based on math principles, such as a
                        square/cube, circle/sphere, triangle/cone, pyramid, etc.
        organic — shapes and/or forms similar to those found in nature, such as
                        plants, animals and rocks, often curvilinear in appearance

technique—methods of working with art materials to create artwork

texture—an element of visual arts; portrays surface quality; how something feels or appears to feel;
some drawing techniques to create texture and patterns are: stippling, hatching, cross-hatching,
scribbling, broken lines, repeating lines and shapes
types include:
        actual texture—how something actually feels when touched
        visual texture—how something appears to feel;
        also called simulated texture or implied texture

three-dimensional or 3-D—having actual height, width and depth and existing in three
dimensional space; or having the illusion of existing in three dimensions




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 Student Name/ID#: ____________________________________Grade Level _______

                                 Creating Score – 4 3 2 1 0
                               Responding Score – 4 3 2 1 0

                                            Grade 8
                             Sculptures in the Park, Revised 2008
               Rubrics Creating— (EALR 1.1.1, 1.1.2, 1.1.3, 1.1.4, 1.2, 2.1 and 2.2)

EALRs 3 and 4 are naturally and authentically embedded in the prompts and rubrics of this assessment.
 4   A 4-point response: The student demonstrates a thorough understanding of sculptural form by
     meeting all four task requirements listed below:
     • draws a diagram that indicates how their free-form/organic and geometric shapes might be
        shaped, connected and assembled to communicate a particular idea of movement typical in a
        park,
     • uses at least three different sculpture/construction techniques when creating their sculpture
        such as rolling/curling, twisting, bending/folding, scoring, cutting/slotting, and tabbing/gluing.
     • assembles shapes to create a sturdy, stable, freestanding abstract sculpture maquette that helps
        communicate their particular sculpture/idea of movement.
     • represents, abstractly, the idea of a particular movement typical in a park, in their sculptural
        composition, such as, running, dancing, playing, trees swaying in the wind, leaves falling and
        flying in the wind, kites flying, etc.
 3   A 3-point response: The student demonstrates an adequate understanding of
     sculptural form by meeting three of the four task requirements listed above.
 2   A 2-point response: The student demonstrates a partial understanding of
     sculptural form by meeting two of the four task requirements listed above.
 1   A 1-point response: The student demonstrates a minimal understanding of
     sculptural form by meeting one of the four task requirements listed above.
 0   A 0-point response: The student demonstrates no understanding of sculptural
     form by meeting none of the four task requirements listed above.




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Student Name/ID#: ____________________________________Grade Level _______

                              Responding Score – 4     3   2   1   0

                                            Grade 8
                             Sculptures in the Park, Revised 2008
                     Responding—(EALRs 2.3, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 4.3, 4.4 and 4.5)


4   A 4-point response: The student demonstrates a thorough understanding of
    how to create artwork to communicate for a selected purpose by meeting all
    of the four task requirements listed below:
    • names or titles abstract maquette, identify the movement and explain how the title relates to the
        particular idea or type of movement depicted by the maquette,
    • identifies the parts of the maquette that are free-form/organic, geometric, or a combination of
        the two.
    • identifies the two parts of the maquette that most effectively show the idea of movement and
        explain how each of these parts communicates the idea of movement.
    • identifies and describes the type of visual balance used in the maquette and justifies the choice
        by describing how that type of balance helps to communicate the idea of movement.
3   A 3-point response: The student demonstrates an adequate understanding of
    how to create artwork to communicate for a selected purpose by meeting
    three of the four task requirements listed above.
2   A 2-point response: The student demonstrates a partial understanding of how
    to create artwork to communicate for a selected purpose by meeting two of
    the four task requirements listed above.
1   A 1-point response: The student demonstrates a minimal understanding of
    how to create artwork to communicate for a selected purpose by meeting one
    of the four task requirements listed above.
0   A 0-point response: The student demonstrates no understanding of how to
    create an artwork to communicate for a selected purpose by meeting none of
    the four task requirements listed above.




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