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GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT PLAN

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					GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT PLAN
          2005/06 – 2007/08



   State University of New York College at Cortland




                   November 2005
                                                             TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Introduction and Background Information ........................................................................................................... 3

II. Cortland Proposed 2005/06 – 2007/08 GE Assessment Plan ..........................................................................3-21

           A. Timetable .................................................................................................................................................... 4

           B. Course Sample .........................................................................................................................................4-5

           C. Implementation Procedures ........................................................................................................................ 5

           D. Validity and Reliability Indices .................................................................................................................. 6

           E. Category Learning Outcomes, Instruments, and Rubrics............................................................................ 6
                   1. Mathematics .................................................................................................................................. 7
                   2. Natural Sciences ............................................................................................................................ 8
                   3. Social Sciences .............................................................................................................................. 9
                   4. American History ........................................................................................................................ 10
                   5. Western Civilization ................................................................................................................... 11
                   6. Other World Civilizations ........................................................................................................... 12
                   7. Humanities .................................................................................................................................. 13
                   8. The Arts ...................................................................................................................................... 14
                   9. Foreign Language ....................................................................................................................... 15
                   10. Basic Communication: Writing ............................................................................................16-17
                   10. Basic Communication: Oral Presentations ................................................................................ 18
                   Competency 1: Critical Thinking (Reasoning) ..........................................................................19-20
                   Competency 2: Information Management ....................................................................................... 21

III. Dissemination, Programmatic Change, and Evaluation of the Assessment Process ..................................... 22

Appendices

           Appendix A: SUNY Cortland Presentation Skills Assessment ................................................................23-27

           Appendix B: Information Management General Education Assessment Part A: Clip Worksheet ................ 28

           Appendix C: Information Management General Education Assessment Part B: Research ......................29-30
           SUNY CORTLAND GENERAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT PLAN
                            2005/06 – 2007/08

               I. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND INFORMATION

SUNY Cortland has a long history of systematic general education (GE) assessment (SUNY
Cortland General Education Assessment Plan, April 2002). Initial assessment of the Cortland
GE Program began in 1996 and used students' self-reported perceptions regarding quality and
achievement of program goals. These data were fruitful for gaining a better perspective on
student opinions; however, no objective information was collected or was used to make
programmatic changes. During 1997/98 the GE Committee and faculty who taught in the
program developed the uniform approach of using standardized essays and rubrics to assess the
GE program; the Cortland Faculty Senate later endorsed this approach. In 1999, a pilot study
was implemented to assess validity and reliability of the essays and rubrics, and these data were
used to make several changes to the GE assessment process at Cortland.


Starting in 2002/03, Cortland began a three-year assessment cycle of the SUNY GE knowledge,
skill, and competency areas (SUNY College at Cortland 2004–2005 General Education
Assessment Report). Campus strengths that emerged from this three-year cycle included
administrative and faculty acceptance of and support for the GE assessment process, favorable
student outcomes in the majority of areas assessed, and a validated assessment process.
Weaknesses related to providing faculty with adequate planning time for implementing the
assessment in their courses, the need for uniform implementation procedures, and dissemination
of outcomes. The 2005/06 - 2007/08 cycle of GE assessment at SUNY Cortland is built on these
strengths and addresses these weaknesses, and is described in the remainder of this document.

        II. CORTLAND PROPOSED 2005/06 – 2007/08 GE ASSESSMENT PLAN

The GE Committee and the Director of the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment
(OIRA) developed this assessment plan, with input and support from ad hoc faculty groups, the
Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, the Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, and the
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Primary responsibility for implementation of
the plan lies with the GE Committee and the OIRA, with support from the aforementioned
administrative offices. The Cortland Faculty Senate endorsed this plan on November 15th, 2005.
                                                3
A. Timetable
   The order in which categories will be assessed in the proposed three-year cycle (Table 1) has
been changed from the previous cycle to allow ongoing refinement of assessment instruments.
Specifically, ad hoc faculty groups, the GE Committee and the OIRA are considering alternative
measurement options and curricular issues for the Strengthened Campus-Based Assessment
categories (i.e. Mathematics, Basic Communication: Writing, and Critical Thinking) and the
other categories scheduled for assessment in 2006/07 and 2007/08.


                         Table 1. Proposed three-year GE Assessment Schedule

       Proposed Assessment Date                   SUNY GE Area                   Last Assessment
        Spring 2006                2. Natural Sciences                               2003/04
        Spring 2006                3. Social Sciences                                2003/04
        Spring 2006                5. Western Civilization                           2003/04
        Spring 2006                6. Other World Civilizations                      2002/03
        Spring 2006                7. Humanities                                     2003/04

        Fall 2006                  1. Mathematics                                    2002/03
        Fall 2006                  4. American History                               2003/04
        Spring 2006 or Fall 2006   10. Basic Communication: Writing                  2002/03
        Fall 2006                  Competency 1: Critical Thinking (Reasoning)       2004/05

        Fall 2007                  8. The Arts                                       2004/05
        Fall 2007                  9. Foreign Language                               2002/03
        Fall 2007                  10. Basic Communication: Oral Presentations       2004/05
        Fall 2007 or Spring 2008   Competency 2: Information Management              2004/05



B. Course Sample
   The OIRA will continue to take responsibility for selecting the sample of courses to be
included in the assessment. The categories that are course-embedded will use a stratified random
sampling procedure to ensure that the samples are representative of the population of students
enrolled in GE courses in any semester. Specifically, this will be a two-level process: (1) a
course-level cluster sampling procedure will be used to identify 25% of courses per knowledge,
skill, or competency area; (2) a stratified random sampling approach (stratified according to
course level, class size, time of class, and course content) will be used to identify and assess at
least 20% of all students taking courses in a GE category in the assessment semester. The
content validity is achieved by making sure that courses are represented according to enrollment.
For example, if there were only two courses that represented a particular category, but one

                                                   4
offered 20 sections and comprised 80% of the enrollment while the other only had 5 sections and
20% of the enrollment, the first course must be weighted accordingly.


The two GE competency areas (i.e. Critical Thinking and Information Management) that are not
course-embedded will be assessed according to the following: (a) Critical Thinking will be
assessed in the Cortland GE2 (Prejudice and Discrimination) and Cortland GE7 (Science,
Technology and Human Affairs) categories for two reasons; first, a Cortland Critical Thinking ad
hoc committee determined that this competency is explicitly addressed in these two categories,
and second, few courses in these categories are assessed in other areas of the SUNY GE
Assessment Program; (b) the Information Management sample is to be determined based on
forthcoming recommendations from the GE Information Management ad hoc committee.


C. Implementation Procedures
   Before the end of the semester prior to the assessment, the OIRA will notify all faculty
scheduled to teach courses in a category that their course may be selected for assessment in the
following semester. This will provide faculty with the maximum lead time for inclusion of the
assessment activity in course planning and syllabi, and will provide an opportunity to remind all
faculty who teach courses in a GE category of that category’s learning outcomes. The actual
sample selection of course sections to be assessed will be made when enrollments have
stabilized, and selected faculty will be informed prior to the start of the semester.


Faculty will be required to participate in the assessment if selected, and will need to schedule the
assessment activity in a class period in the last month of classes of that semester. Faculty will be
encouraged to give course credit or extra credit to their students for completing the activity;
results from the 2002-2005 assessment cycle showed that students rarely gave their best effort
when no course credit was offered. Faculty will be encouraged to devote a full fifty minutes of
class time to the assessment activity; results from the 2002-2005 cycle showed that this was the
norm among faculty administering the activity and the assessment has more validity if all
students work with the same time limit. The OIRA will be responsible for producing and
distributing assessment materials, and the OIRA and the GE Committee will recruit and train
groups of faculty to grade the assessments.

                                                  5
D. Validity and Reliability Indices
    Validity and reliability information has been collected since the start of Cortland’s GE
Assessment Program. Expert opinion by faculty teaching in specific GE categories has been
used to assess content, construct, and face validity issues; similarly, the SUNY Discipline-
Specific Panels on Strengthened-Campus Based Assessment are using expert opinions to develop
rubrics for Mathematics, Writing, and Critical Thinking. Correlation of students’ performances
in the assessment with their course grades has been used to assess convergent validity.
Reliability has been primarily assessed at the scoring level by considering intra- and inter-rater
reliabilities. Some instruments permitted running internal consistency measures such as
Cronbach’s Alpha to assess student reliability in responses.


E. Category Learning Outcomes, Instruments, and Rubrics
    Standardized essay questions and rubrics have been a staple in the Cortland GE Assessment
Program to gauge students’ acquired knowledge, skills, and/or competencies in many of the GE
categories. These are summarized below (Table 2) for each category and are detailed, along with
the learning outcomes for each SUNY GE category, in the remainder of this section.

                      Table 2. Proposed GE Assessment Instruments & Rubrics

               SUNY GE Area                             Assessment Instrument                   Rubric
 1. Mathematics                                  ETS Academic Profile Math Module SUNY panel rubric
                                                    with Cortland-specific questions
 2. Natural Sciences                             Essays                                 Cortland rubric
 3. Social Sciences                              Essays                                 Cortland rubric
 4. American History                             Essays or TBD                          Cortland rubric
 5. Western Civilization                         Essays                                 Cortland rubric
 6. Other World Civilizations                    Essays                                 Cortland rubric
 7. Humanities                                   Essays                                 Cortland rubric
 8. The Arts                                     Essays or TBD                          Cortland rubric or TBD
 9. Foreign Language                             Essays or TBD                          Cortland rubric or TBD
 10. Basic Communication: Writing                Original & revised argumentative       SUNY panel rubric
                                                    research essay
 10. Basic Communication: Oral Presentations     Multiple-choice exam or TBD            Cortland rubric or TBD
 Competency 1: Critical Thinking (Reasoning)     Short essays                           SUNY panel rubric
 Competency 2: Information Management            Multiple-choice exam or TBD            Cortland rubric or TBD
Note: Instruments and rubrics labeled as To Be Determined (TBD) may be modified from the materials presented in
  the following pages based on ongoing development of these areas by ad hoc faculty groups.




                                                       6
1. Mathematics


                                              LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will demonstrate the ability to: (a) interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as
formulas, graphs, tables, and schematics; (b) represent mathematical information symbolically, visually,
numerically, and verbally; (c) employ quantitative methods such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics to
solve problems; (d) estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness; and (e) recognize the limits of
mathematical and statistical methods.

                                         QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

Objectives a – d above will be assessed with Educational Testing Services nationally normed Academic Profile
Mathematics Module. The module consists of between 35 – 45 multiple-choice items and takes approximately 30
– 40 minutes to complete. Objective e will be assessed by presenting students an option to complete one of two
short answer/essay questions and will be assessed using the SUNY Discipline-Specific Panel rubric found below.

Essay/Short-Answer Draft Example Question #1. The acceleration of an object in free fall due to gravity is 32 feet
per second squared. Using this information, the velocity of the object can be described by the equation V = 32T,
where V is the velocity (in feet per second) and T is the time in seconds. For what reasons might this equation
fail to give exact velocity of an actual falling object?
OR
Essay/Short-Answer Draft Example Question #2. A research study finds that children living within 200 meters of
high-voltage power lines are 70% more likely to develop leukemia than similar children living further away. The
study was conducted over a 5 year period in a town with a population of 100,000 children. The total number of
leukemia cases reported was 27, with 17 of these occurring in children who live within 200 meters of power lines.
Why is this information insufficient to conclude that exposure to high-voltage power lines causes leukemia?

   DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC PANEL RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting     Not Meeting Standard        Approaching Standard            Meeting Standard            Exceeding Standard
Category
Panel           Incorrect Solution            Partially Correct            Generally Correct           Completely Correct
Rubric                  (IC)                        (PC)                          (GC)                          (CC)
            • Student does not           • Student articulates only   • Student articulates most   • Student clearly
            articulate any               some of the assumptions/     of the assumptions/          articulates the
            assumptions/                 simplifications made in      simplifications made in      assumptions/
            simplifications made in      developing a                 developing a                 simplifications made in
            developing a                 mathematical/statistical     mathematical/statistical     developing a
            mathematical/statistical     model or implementing        model or implementing        mathematical/statistical
            model or implementing        method(s) or                 method(s) or                 model or implementing
Standard
            method(s) or                 technique(s).                technique(s).                method(s) or technique(s).
            technique(s).                • Student indicates that     • Student provides a         • Student provides an
            • Student fails to realize   the conclusions drawn        generally correct            accurate description how
            that the results are not     from the model differ        description of how the       the results from the model
            contextually appropriate.    from real life but is        results from the model       might differ from the real
            • There was no response      unable to articulate the     might differ from the real   life situation it models.
            at all.                      cause(s).                    life situation it models.




                                                             7
2. Natural Sciences


                                              LEARNING OUTCOMES

 Students will demonstrate: (a) understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena,
 including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of
 evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis; and (b) application of scientific data, concepts, and models
 in one of the natural sciences.

                                            QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

 1. For your choice of a scientific discipline (biology, chemistry, geology or physics), discuss briefly one or two
 basic concepts and describe how those concepts can be applied to everyday life.
 OR
 2. For any scientific discipline (biology, chemistry, geology or physics) identify something that was once held to
 be true (by that science) and describe the developments in that science that led to the abandonment of the idea.
 OR
 3. For your choice of a scientific discipline (biology, chemistry, geology, or physics), briefly discuss one basic
 concept and describe how that concept was developed and became accepted through the scientific method.

               CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

 Reporting     Not Meeting              Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
 Category       Standard                                                   Standard
 Cortland           1                   2                   3                  4                5                 6
 Rubric
             Provides            Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
             minimal or no       confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
             evidence of         inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
             understanding;      understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
             makes no            the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
             connections         material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
             between Goals,      to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
             Assumptions, &      Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
 Standard
             Objectives of the   Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
             GE Category;        the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
             and makes           but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
             unclear or          unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
             unwarranted         unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
             connections to      connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
             the assigned        the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
             task.               task.




                                                             8
3. Social Sciences


                                             LEARNING OUTCOMES

 Students will demonstrate: (a) understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena,
 including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of
 evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis; and (b) knowledge of major concepts,
 models and issues of at least one discipline in the social sciences.

                                           QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

 1. Draw on at least one model, theory, or paradigm that has been examined in this course and use it to explain
 how it provides insight into the condition of the nation or world.
 OR
 2. Drawing on information from this course, discuss why conflict is such an important concept in the study of the
 social sciences.
 OR
 3. Describe one of the major issues or concepts in the social sciences, and explain how social scientists have used
 methods such as observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation,
 evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis to explore that issue or
 concept.

               CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

 Reporting     Not Meeting            Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
 Category       Standard                                                 Standard
 Cortland           1                  2                  3                  4                5                 6
 Rubric
             Provides          Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
             minimal or no     confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
             evidence of       inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
             understanding;    understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
             makes no          the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
             connections       material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
             between Goals,    to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
             Assumptions, &    Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
 Standard
             Objectives of     Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
             the GE            the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
             Category; and     but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
             makes unclear     unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
             or unwarranted    unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
             connections to    connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
             the assigned      the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
             task.             task.




                                                           9
4. American History


                                           LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will demonstrate: (a) knowledge of a basic narrative of American history: Political, economic, social,
and cultural, including knowledge of unity and diversity in American society; (b) knowledge of common
institutions in American society and how they have affected different groups; and (c) understanding of America’s
evolving relationship with the rest of the world.

                                         QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

1. Pick a period in American History and explain strategies used by particular ethnic groups to empower
themselves, economically, politically, and/or socially. Include in your answer a discussion of the international
milieu in which this event is embedded.

              CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting     Not Meeting            Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
Category       Standard                                                 Standard
Cortland           1                 2                   3                  4                5                 6
Rubric
            Provides          Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
            minimal or no     confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
            evidence of       inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
            understanding;    understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
            makes no          the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
            connections       material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
            between Goals,    to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
            Assumptions, &    Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
Standard
            Objectives of     Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
            the GE            the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
            Category; and     but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
            makes unclear     unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
            or unwarranted    unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
            connections to    connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
            the assigned      the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
            task.             task.




                                                         10
5. Western Civilization


                                             LEARNING OUTCOMES

 Students will demonstrate: (a) knowledge of the development of the distinctive features of the history,
 institutions, economy, society, culture, etc., of Western civilization; and (b) relate the development of Western
 civilization to that of other regions of the world.

                                           QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

 1. Identify one major political, social, economic, cultural, or intellectual change or event in the period of the
 course. Explain its causes and significance.
 OR
 2. Choose a major event or individual studied in the course, and explain the impact that the event or person had
 on history. How did the event or person you chose cause history to change?

               CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

 Reporting     Not Meeting             Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
 Category       Standard                                                  Standard
 Cortland           1                  2                   3                  4                5                 6
 Rubric
             Provides           Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
             minimal or no      confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
             evidence of        inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
             understanding;     understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
             makes no           the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
             connections        material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
             between Goals,     to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
             Assumptions, &     Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
 Standard
             Objectives of      Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
             the GE             the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
             Category; and      but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
             makes unclear      unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
             or unwarranted     unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
             connections to     connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
             the assigned       the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
             task.              task.




                                                           11
6. Other World Civilizations


                                             LEARNING OUTCOMES

 Students will demonstrate: (a) knowledge of either a broad outline of world history; or (b) the distinctive features
 of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc., of one non-Western civilization.

                                           QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

 1. What is (a) culture? What is ethnocentricism? Give specific examples of ethnocentric views a person from the
 United States might hold. Also, discuss some positive and negative consequences of the global spread of western
 culture.
 OR
 2. How might people differ across cultures (e.g. world views, traditions, cultural institutions, values, social
 systems, languages, and means of communication of cultures) and what factors explain these differences?
 Discuss implications of such differences.

               CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

 Reporting     Not Meeting             Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
 Category       Standard                                                  Standard
 Cortland           1                  2                   3                  4                5                 6
 Rubric
             Provides           Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
             minimal or no      confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
             evidence of        inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
             understanding;     understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
             makes no           the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
             connections        material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
             between Goals,     to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
             Assumptions, &     Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
 Standard
             Objectives of      Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
             the GE             the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
             Category; and      but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
             makes unclear      unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
             or unwarranted     unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
             connections to     connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
             the assigned       the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
             task.              task.




                                                           12
7. Humanities


                                           LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will demonstrate: (a) knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in
addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.

                                         QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

1. Choose one work of literature you have been assigned in this course and, using the conventions and methods
we have discussed, analyze the work as completely as time allows.
OR
2. Choose one work of literature you have been assigned in this course and illustrate how the work treats a major
human concern.

              CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting     Not Meeting            Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
Category       Standard                                                 Standard
Cortland           1                 2                   3                  4                5                 6
Rubric
            Provides          Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
            minimal or no     confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
            evidence of       inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
            understanding;    understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
            makes no          the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
            connections       material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
            between Goals,    to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
            Assumptions, &    Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
Standard
            Objectives of     Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
            the GE            the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
            Category; and     but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
            makes unclear     unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
            or unwarranted    unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
            connections to    connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
            the assigned      the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
            task.             task.




                                                         13
8. The Arts


                                             LEARNING OUTCOMES

 Students will demonstrate: (a) understanding of at least one principle form of artistic expression and the creative
 process inherent therein.

                                           QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

 1. Please explain one principle that demonstrates artistic expression and the creative process, and how that has
 affected your understanding of the arts.

               CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

 Reporting     Not Meeting             Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
 Category       Standard                                                  Standard
 Cortland           1                  2                   3                  4                5                 6
 Rubric
             Provides           Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
             minimal or no      confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
             evidence of        inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
             understanding;     understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
             makes no           the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
             connections        material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
             between Goals,     to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
             Assumptions, &     Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
 Standard
             Objectives of      Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
             the GE             the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
             Category; and      but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
             makes unclear      unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
             or unwarranted     unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
             connections to     connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
             the assigned       the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
             task.              task.




                                                           14
9. Foreign Language


                                           LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will demonstrate: (a) basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language; and (b)
knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.

                                         QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

1. Please write or communicate in the target language a description of yourself, your friends and family, and your
routine activities.
AND
2. Please write an essay in your native language summarizing the unique features of the culture(s) associated with
the language that you are studying.

              CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting     Not Meeting            Approaching Standard               Meeting              Exceeding Standard
Category       Standard                                                 Standard
Cortland           1                 2                   3                  4                5                  6
Rubric
            Provides          Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a           Reveals an in-
            minimal or no     confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough            depth analysis
            evidence of       inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of    of the course
            understanding;    understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course          material;
            makes no          the course          few or             material;        material; makes     makes
            connections       material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and           insightful
            between Goals,    to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit            connections
            Assumptions, &    Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections         between the
Standard
            Objectives of     Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the         Goals,
            the GE            the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,              Assumptions,
            Category; and     but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &      & Objectives
            makes unclear     unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of the   of the GE
            or unwarranted    unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     GE Category         Category and
            connections to    connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned    the assigned
            the assigned      the assigned                           task.            task.               task.
            task.             task.




                                                         15
10. Basic Communication: Writing


                                                  LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will: (a) produce coherent texts within common college-level written forms; (b) demonstrate the ability
to revise and improve such texts; and (c) research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details.

                                           QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

Students will write an initial essay that is then revised according to the principles, knowledge, and skills acquired
during the course. Essays will be assessed using the three SUNY Discipline-Specific Writing Panel rubrics.

   DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC PANEL RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting           Not Meeting Standard           Approaching Standard        Meeting Standard          Exceeding Standard
Category
Panel Rubric                    1                              2                         3                          4
                Writer fails to present a          Writer presents a         Writer presents an        Writer presents an
                controlling purpose or thesis;     wandering, vague, or      identifiable and          easily identifiable,
                consequently it is difficult to    unfocused controlling     focused controlling       focused, original, and
                identify exactly what the          purpose or thesis. The    purpose or thesis. The    thought provoking
                thesis is. The essay moves         paper moves               paper moves               controlling purpose or
                from an unsatisfactory             awkwardly from a          coherently and            thesis. The paper moves
                introductory paragraph to an       weak introduction to a    logically from a          coherently, logically,
                ending that does not serve as a    conclusion that does      satisfying introduction   and even creatively
                conclusion, thus conveying         not adequately            to a solid conclusion.    from an engaging
                the sense that much of what        represent the body of     Paragraphs fit within     introduction to a well-
                has been presented is              the paper. Basic          this structure and        demonstrated
                unresolved. Sentence structure     paragraphing exists,      present examples and      conclusion. Paragraphs
                is often awkward and               but often fails to        evidence to support       fit within this structure
                transitions are ineffectual        support or even           the ideas presented.      coherently and present
                and/or abrupt or simply            recognize a central       For the most part,        pertinent examples and
                missing. Diction, tone, and        idea, and the use of      sentences are well        evidence to support
                word choice are not                evidence and examples     constructed and           central and subsidiary
Standard a:
                appropriate for the subject or     is inadequate.            transitions are sound -   ideas. Sentence
students will
                for the implied audience.          Sentence and              though the sequence of    structure displays
produce
                Mechanics (grammar,                paragraph transitions     ideas may occasionally    sophistication and
coherent
                punctuation, spelling and          are often unclear,        be awkward. The           variety; transitions add
texts within
                documentation, if needed)          awkward, indirect,        essay exhibits some       to the logical
common
                disrupt reading and often          and/or illogical. Tone    degree of control over    development of the
college-level
                obscure meaning.                   and diction are often     the tone and diction      topic. The essay
written
                                                   inconsistent and/or       appropriate for the       exhibits a solid
forms
                                                   inappropriate for the     subject and its implied   command of word
                                                   subject and its implied   audience. Mechanics       variety and a tone and
                                                   audience. Mechanics       (grammar,                 diction appropriate for
                                                   (grammar,                 punctuation, spelling     the subject and its
                                                   punctuation, spelling     and documentation, if     implied audience.
                                                   and documentation, if     needed) are mostly        Mechanics (grammar,
                                                   needed) are not well      accurate and paragraph    punctuation, spelling
                                                   executed and may, at      transitions are sound,    and documentation, if
                                                   times, obscure            but the sequence of       needed) are nearly
                                                   meaning.                  ideas may occasionally    flawless.
                                                                             be awkward.




                                                               16
Reporting            Not Meeting Standard            Approaching Standard          Meeting Standard           Exceeding Standard
Category
Panel Rubric                     1                               2                           3                           4
                 Writer demonstrates a lack of       Writer demonstrates a       Writer demonstrates        Writer demonstrates
                 ability to revise at the level of   lack of ability to revise   the ability to revise by   clear evidence of an
                 content of structure. Either        in any substantial way.     refining the content,      ability to revise by
                 changes do not improve these        Whatever revision has       sharpening the focus,      altering content and
                 features or are focused almost      been done has not           and improving              approach, by
                 solely on mechanics.                been sufficient to          structure, clarity, and    reorganizing material,
                                                     improve the content,        coherence. Refining        or by clarifying and
                                                     focus, structure,           content may include        strengthening the
                                                     clarity, and coherence      clearer presentation of    coherence of ideas.
                                                     of an earlier draft.        evidence, shifting of      Alterations may include
                                                     Such revision may           emphasis to                the addition of new
Standard b:
                                                     very well be limited to     foreground the most        material, the deletion of
students will
                                                     sections of the essay       relevant material,         unhelpful material, the
demonstrate
                                                     and demonstrate a lack      providing improved         substitution of more
the ability to
                                                     of awareness of how         transitions that keep      relevant material for
revise and
                                                     even small changes          the focus evident, and     less relevant material,
improve
                                                     can affect the entire       reworking the              the strengthening of
such texts
                                                     paper. Mechanics            introduction or            transitions,
                                                     (grammar,                   conclusion as well as      introductions, and
                                                     punctuation, spelling       rewriting individual       conclusions, and the
                                                     and documentation, if       sentences. The             rewriting of individual
                                                     needed) have either         mechanics (grammar,        sentences. The
                                                     not improved                punctuation, spelling      mechanics (grammar,
                                                     significantly or appear     and documentation, if      punctuation, spelling
                                                     to be the only focus of     needed) are mostly         and documentation, if
                                                     the revision.               accurate and rarely        needed) of the final
                                                                                 impede meaning.            revision are nearly
                                                                                                            flawless.
                 Writer indicates/presents little    Writer indicates/           Writer indicates/          Writer indicates/
                 sense of a controlling purpose,     presents either a           presents a clear           presents a clearly
                 failing to respond to the           shifting or unclearly       controlling purpose,       evident, original, and
                 assignment prompt. There            articulated purpose,        responding                 sophisticated
                 may be inadequate reference         perhaps failing to          intelligently to the       controlling purpose,
                 to outside sources, selected        focus on the                assignment prompt          responding creatively to
                 sources may show little             assignment prompt.          with evidence drawn        the assignment prompt
                 apparent connection to the          Outside sources may         from appropriately         with evidence drawn
                 assignment, or paraphrases          be inappropriate to the     selected sources,          from carefully selected
                 may be unclear, quoted              topic, or information       documented in              sources, documented in
Standard c:
                 material may seem not to            from sources may be         accepted style.            accepted style.
students will
                 relate to the topic, and/or there   presented without           Conclusions                Conclusions are based
research a
                 may be significant problems         careful analysis, and it    demonstrate the            on thoughtful
topic,
                 with documentation. The             may be inadequately         writer's conscious         integration of the
develop an
                 paper may consist largely of        documented. The             attempts to integrate      students' own thinking
argument,
                 quotations and paraphrases          conclusions may             his or her own             and careful analysis of
and organize
                 from sources with few               demonstrate little          thinking with an           the outside sources.
supporting
                 connections between and             evidence of the             analysis of outside        Mechanics (grammar,
details.
                 among them. The conclusions         students' own thinking,     sources. Mechanics         punctuation, and
                 may demonstrate no evidence         presenting mainly a         (grammar,                  spelling) are nearly
                 of the students' own responses      summary of the              punctuation, and           flawless.
                 to the outside sources and          sources. Mechanics          spelling) are mostly
                 may merely restate some of          (grammar,                   accurate and rarely
                 the ideas presented.                punctuation, and            impede meaning.
                 Mechanics (grammar,                 spelling) are not well
                 punctuation, and spelling)          executed and may, at
                 disrupt reading and often           times, obscure
                 obscure meaning.                    meaning.




                                                                  17
10. Basic Communication: Oral Presentations


                                            LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will: (a) develop proficiency in oral discourse; and (b) evaluate an oral presentation according to
established criteria.

                                          QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

An instrument was developed that contained a purpose/direction statement, demographics, and 44 multiple-choice
items (see Appendix A).

              CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting     Not Meeting             Approaching Standard               Meeting             Exceeding Standard
Category       Standard                                                  Standard
Cortland           1                  2                   3                  4                5                 6
Rubric
            Provides           Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a          Reveals an in-
            minimal or no      confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough           depth analysis
            evidence of        inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of   of the course
            understanding;     understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course         material;
            makes no           the course          few or             material;        material; makes    makes
            connections        material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and          insightful
            between Goals,     to the Goals,       connections        connections      explicit           connections
            Assumptions, &     Assumptions, &      between the        between the      connections        between the
Standard
            Objectives of      Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           between the        Goals,
            the GE             the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Goals,             Assumptions,
            Category; and      but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Assumptions, &     & Objectives
            makes unclear      unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        Objectives of      of the GE
            or unwarranted     unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the GE Category    Category and
            connections to     connections to      task.              the assigned     and the assigned   the assigned
            the assigned       the assigned                           task.            task.              task.
            task.              task.




                                                          18
Competency 1: Critical Thinking (Reasoning)


                                             LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will: (a) identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments as they occur in their own or others' work; and (b)
develop well-reasoned arguments.

                                        QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

Students will read a short article and then answer the following three short essay questions:
1. Describe the central argument of the article. Be sure that you state the author’s key point and separate it from
the supporting arguments and evidence.
2. What is the author’s supporting evidence and what are the assumptions, if any, that the author has made?
Evaluate the reasonableness of the author’s arguments and supporting evidence.
3. What is your opinion on this topic? Present and justify your opinion using logical arguments, and consider
some alternative points of view.

   DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC PANEL RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting     Not Meeting Standard       Approaching Standard            Meeting Standard            Exceeding Standard
Category
Panel                   1                           2                             3                            4
Rubric
             The students’ work         The students’ work           The students’ work           The students’ work
             does not isolate the       identifies the target        identifies the target        identifies the target
Standard     argument(s) from           argument(s) but includes     argument(s).                 argument(s) and clearly
for Essay    extraneous elements in     extraneous elements such                                  distinguishes it from any
Question 1   the text.                  as expressions of opinion                                 extraneous elements such
                                        and descriptions of                                       as expressions of opinion
                                        events.                                                   and descriptions of events.
             The students’ work 1)      The students’ work 1)        The students’ work 1)        The students’ work 1)
             does not distinguish the   distinguishes the            distinguishes the            carefully articulates the
             argument’s premises        argument’s premises          argument’s premises          argument’s premises,
             from the conclusion and    from the conclusion, but     from the conclusion and      clearly distinguishes them
             little or no effort is     little effort is made to     some effort is made to       from the conclusion and
             made to identify           identify relevant            identify relevant            identifies most relevant
             relevant definitions or    definitions and/or hidden    definitions and/or hidden    definitions and/or hidden
             hidden assumptions, 2)     assumptions, 2) attempts     assumptions, 2) correctly    assumptions, 2) clearly
             does not address           to assess whether the        assesses whether the         and correctly assesses
             whether the argument’s     argument’s premises          argument’s premises          whether the argument’s
             premises provide           provide sufficient logical   provide sufficient logical   premises provide
             sufficient logical         support for the              support for the              sufficient logical support
             support for the            conclusion,                  conclusion,                  for the conclusion,
Standard
             conclusion,                independently of whether     independently of whether     independently of whether
for Essay
             independently of the       the premises are true, 3)    the premises are true, 3)    the premises are true, 3)
Question 2
             truth of the conclusion,   attempts to assess the       correctly assesses the       clearly and correctly
             3) does not consider       reasonableness of the        reasonableness of the        assesses the
             whether the premises       argument’s premises, but     premises, including the      reasonableness of the
             are reasonable to          little effort is made to     credibility of their         premises, including the
             believe, independently     consider the credibility     sources, independently of    credibility of their sources
             of whether they support    of the premises’ sources.    whether they support the     (e.g., observation,
             the conclusion or else                                  conclusion.                  testimony, measurement,
             no effort is made to                                                                 experiment, etc.),
             evaluate the credibility                                                             independently of whether
             of the premises’                                                                     the premises support the
             sources.                                                                             conclusion.



                                                           19
Reporting     Not Meeting Standard        Approaching Standard          Meeting Standard             Exceeding Standard
Category
Panel                   1                           2                            3                             4
Rubric
             The students’ work 1)       The students’ work 1)       The students’ work 1)        The students’ work 1)
             does not clearly state a    states a conclusion or      presents an argument         develops a clearly
             conclusion or point of      point of views but does     using evidence and /or       articulated argument,
             view or else little or no   not organize the evidence   logical reasoning in         using evidence and/or
             supporting reasoning or     or reasons in a logically   support of a point of        systematic logical
             evidence is presented,      adequate way, 2) does       view, 2) identifies some     reasoning in support of a
             2) makes no attempt to      not clearly identify or     qualifications or            conclusion or point of
             recognize or respond to     respond to relevant         objections or alternative    view, 2) identifies relevant
Standard     objections or alternative   objections or alternative   points of view, 3)           qualifications or
for Essay    points of view, 3)          points of view, 3) does     describes the broader        objections or alternative
Question 3   makes no attempt to         not adequately describe     relevance, significance of   points of view and
             describe the broader        the broader relevance or    context and/or applies       prioritizes evidence and/or
             relevance or                significance or apply the   the reasoning to a novel     reasons in support of the
             significance or to apply    reasoning to a novel        problem.                     conclusion, 3) describes
             the reasoning to a novel    problem.                                                 the broader relevance,
             problem.                                                                             significance or context of
                                                                                                  the issue and/or applies
                                                                                                  the reasoning to a novel
                                                                                                  problem.




                                                            20
Competency 2: Information Management


                                           LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will: (a) perform the basic operations of personal computer use; (b) understand and use basic research
techniques; and (c) locate, evaluate, and synthesize information from a variety of sources.

                                         QUESTION(S)/INSTRUMENT(S)

Objectives #1 and #2 above were assessed using a 27-item instrument (see Appendix B) and objective #3 was
assessed using a 17-item instrument (see Appendix C).

              CORTLAND RUBRIC ALIGNED WITH SUNY REPORTING CATEGORIES

Reporting     Not Meeting            Approaching Standard               Meeting              Exceeding Standard
Category       Standard                                                 Standard
Cortland           1                 2                   3                  4                 5                 6
Rubric
            Provides          Conveys a           Conveys a basic    Conveys a        Conveys a            Reveals an
            minimal or no     confused or         understanding of   basic            thorough             in-depth
            evidence of       inaccurate          the course         understanding    understanding of     analysis of
            understanding;    understanding of    material; makes    of the course    the course           the course
            makes no          the course          few or             material;        material; makes      material;
            connections       material; alludes   superficial        makes implicit   clear and explicit   makes
            between Goals,    to the Goals,       connections        connections      connections          insightful
            Assumptions, &    Assumptions, &      between the        between the      between the          connections
Standard
            Objectives of     Objectives of       Goals,             Goals,           Goals,               between the
            the GE            the GE Category     Assumptions, &     Assumptions,     Assumptions, &       Goals,
            Category; and     but makes           Objectives of      & Objectives     Objectives of the    Assumptions,
            makes unclear     unclear or          the GE Category    of the GE        GE Category and      & Objectives
            or unwarranted    unwarranted         and the assigned   Category and     the assigned task.   of the GE
            connections to    connections to      task.              the assigned                          Category and
            the assigned      the assigned                           task.                                 the assigned
            task.             task.                                                                        task.




                                                         21
  III. DISSEMINATION, PROGRAMMATIC CHANGE, AND EVALUATION OF THE
                          ASSESSMENT PROCESS

The OIRA will be responsible for analyzing the results of the assessment. These analyses and
the assessment results will be shared with the GE Committee, who will then work with the OIRA
to interpret and disseminate the results and to collaboratively draft the final report. At all stages
of dissemination, data will be treated in aggregate form and anonymity of students, faculty
members, and courses will be maintained.


The final report will be disseminated as follows. (a) The OIRA will meet with representative
faculty from the assessed categories to gain a context for the results and to consider faculty
interpretations and concerns. This informational meeting may result in additional analyses being
conducted by the OIRA and/or alternative interpretations being added to the final report. (b) The
report then will be shared with the Provost for review and a meeting held to clarify any issues. If
additional report modifications are necessary, the document will again be reviewed by the GE
Committee and resubmitted to the Provost. If there are no additional concerns, the Provost will
bind the report for formal submission to Provost Salins office. (c) The final SUNY-submitted
report will then be shared with the Deans, the Department Chairs, the SUNY Cortland Faculty
Senate, and made available to the campus at-large via the OIRA website.


Programmatic change based on the assessment results may be initiated by the GE Committee, or
by recommendations from the Provost, the Deans, the Department Chairs, or other faculty
groups. Faculty governance at SUNY Cortland requires that any changes to the GE Program are
considered by the GE Committee and submitted to the Cortland Faculty Senate for approval.


To evaluate the assessment process, each year faculty who taught GE courses included in the
assessment will be provided with the opportunity to meet as a group with the OIRA to discuss
the findings and to provide feedback regarding possible changes to the assessment procedures.
Information derived from these meetings will be reported to the GE Committee, which will have
responsibility for recommending specific changes in the assessment procedures. In addition, the
chairperson of the GE Committee will make an annual report to the Faculty Senate regarding the
assessment process.

                                                  22
                                                               Appendix A
                                                         SUNY CORTLAND
                                                  PRESENTATION SKILLS ASSESSMENT

Dear Student,

As you know, presentation competence is one of the graduation requirements in SUNY colleges effective this semester. The purpose of this
survey is to assess your experience and knowledge of presentation skills in this course.

Please answer all the questions as honestly as you can. The information you provide is confidential and will be used only for assessing
presentation competence. In addition, once the answers are coded, all these surveys will be destroyed to ensure further confidentiality.

Please return the completed surveys to your instructor who will then forward them to the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment.

If you’ve any questions about this survey, please contact one of the following individuals:
Dr. Thomas O. Mwanika, Communication Studies, 225 Dowd Fine Arts Center, (607) 753-4099, or e-mail: mwanika@cortland.edu.
Dr. Merle Canfield, Institutional Research and Assessment, 404 Miller Building, (607) 753-5565, or e-mail: canfieldm@cortland.edu.


                                                    PRESENTATION SKILLS ASSESSMENT

     Today’s Date: ___________________                   ID (C-number or SSN) C___________________________

     Course Prefix, Number & Title: __ __ __ __ __ __: _____________         Department Offering this Course: ________________________

     Please read each question carefully, then select one option for your best answer, and circle that option:

     1.    How many presentations did you make in this class?
           a. None; b. One presentation; c. Two presentations;            d. More than two presentations

     Answer questions 2-6 in the table below based on this scale: No = 0, Yes = 1

2     Did you submit an outline for your presentation?                                                               0            1
3     Did you submit a source list for your presentation?                                                            0            1
4     Did you evaluate your own presentation?                                                                        0            1
5     Did you evaluate a presentation made by any of your peers?                                                     0            1
6     Did you have an opportunity to respond to questions and comments following your presentation?                  0            1


     Read the following speech excerpt to answer questions 7-12:



    In Connecticut, a 15-year-old boy was sexually assaulted by his wrestling team. They savagely forced the handle of a plastic
    knife into his rectum. In Texas, a student was urinated on and repeatedly thrown against the wall. He was sent to the hospital
    with multiple head injuries and fluid in his lungs. In Minnesota, a female high school sophomore was ordered to put her face on
    the ground while 100 drunken seniors taunted her and the other sophomores. The seniors poured vinegar into the girl's eyes,
    smeared dog food all over them, and broke bottles over their heads.
                Each year, according to Christian Science Monitor, September 21, 2000 , "1.5 million American high school students
    undergo some form of humiliating abuse when they join a group." These escalating patterns of abuse are not called assault or
    harassment. Instead we cover-up the truth with the euphemism: hazing. Now, I know what you are probably thinking. "Hazing?
    That is nothing new." You're right. That is why it must be stopped. It has been around for years, and yet we consistently ignore
    it. According to CNN, August 28, 2000, "48% of all students reported being subjected to violent hazing." Think about it: half of
    the people in this room have been victimized. No one is immune. U.S. News & World Report, September 11, 2000, pointed out
    that hazing occurs in music, art, theater organizations, and even church groups. Even in a church this beautiful, peer persecution
    exists. Coaches have told me that even on their speech teams they endured hazing. Joining a group should be a good experience.
    We all have a responsibility to make sure hazing is seen as a dangerous, unbearable ritual; not just an unfortunate side effect of
    the need to belong. In an effort to abolish violent hazing for good, I will first define the severity of the problem, then discuss the
    causes of the problem, so that I can finally offer practical solutions that will stop these incidents and create safer organizations
    for all of us. (Excerpt from a speech by Manuel Goni, Glendale Community College)




                                                                        23
    Appendix A (Continued)

    7.    The speaker’s description of hazing incidents in Connecticut, Texas, and Minnesota, is based on which organization pattern?
               a.         Topical
               b.         Spatial
               c.         Temporal
               d.         Cause-effect
    8.    The speaker’s documentation of the hazing incidents reported by the Christian Science Monitor, CNN, U.S. News & World Report,
          and coaches of speech teams suggests that the speaker has which of the following presentation skills?
               a.         Verbal
               b.         Nonverbal
               c.         Listening
               d.         Research

    9.    In stating that hazing “must be stopped”, the speaker is about to present which type of speech?
                a.          Informative speech
                b.          Persuasive speech
                c.          Inspirational speech
                d.          Speech of praise & tribute

    10.   In saying “I will first define the severity of the problem, then discuss its causes, and finally offer practical solutions”, which
          organizational pattern is this speaker using?
               a.          Spatial
               b.          Topical
               c.          Temporal
               d.          Cause-effect

    11.   The speaker’s announcement of the points which the presentation will cover is an example of which of the following?
               a.         Speech preview
               b.         Speech outline
               c.         Speech organization
               d.         Thesis statement

    12.   Which of the following would be the accurate title for this speech?
              a.          Hazing: When Wrongs Become Rites
              b.          Hazing: When Rites Become Wrongs
              c.          Hazing: When Wrongs Become Rights
              d.          Hazing: When Rights Become Wrongs

In this section, choose your best answer for each of the multiple-choice questions 13-36:

    13.   Four speech-centered patters of organization are:
                a.       Familiarity-acceptance, elimination, chronological and spatial
                b.       Causal, spatial, question/answer and topical
                c.       Demographics, problem/solution, inquiry and chronological
                d.       Chronological, spatial, causal and topical

    14. Elimination, familiarity-acceptance, and inquiry are all examples of what type of pattern of organization?
               a.         Speech-centered
               b.         Audience-centered
               c.         Technique-centered
               d.         Example-centered

    15. Aggression, defense, authority, fear and autonomy are the five appeals in what cluster:
               a.        Motive
               b.        Power
               c.        Shock
               d.        Affiliation

    16. To convince audience members with your presentation, you would need to focus your attention primarily on which of the following?
             a.   Visual aids
             b. Substance or content of the presentation
             c.   Verbal and nonverbal delivery
             d. Organization of your presentation




                                                                         24
Appendix A (Continued)

17. A speech on language acquisition divided into four main stages of infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood would be best
    organized according to which of the following patterns?

           a.    Temporal
           b.    Spatial
           c.    Cause-effect
           d.    Topical

18. What technique includes making a startling statement, fact or opinion in an introduction?
          a.    Shock technique
          b. RRA technique
          c.    Primacy technique
          d. Motive technique
19. When choosing an example for your speech, what is one thing your example must be?
          a. Detailed
          b. Lengthy
          c. Concise
          d. Vague

20. Which of the following is the concrete goal to achieve with a particular presentation?
        a.    General purpose
        b. Specific purpose
        c.    Idealized purpose
        d. Hypothetical purpose

21. Which of the following is the presenter’s concern when deciding a sequence of main points and their corresponding sub-points in a
    pattern that suggests their relationship to each other?
          a.    Organization
          b. Outlining
          c.    Delivery
          d. Language

22. The arrangement of materials around the main points of a presentation refers to which of the following presentation skills?
         a.   Organization
         b. Outlining
         c.   Listening
         d. Research

23. A college recruiter wants to convince a group of high school graduates to choose a major in physics, which type of speech will this
    recruiter need to present?
          a.    Informative speech
          b. Persuasive speech
          c.    Inspirational speech
          d. Praise and tribute speech

24. Which of the following captures the essence of the information or concepts which the speaker wishes to communicate to the audience?
        a.    Thesis statement
        b. General purpose statement
        c.    Introductory statement
        d. Entertaining statement

25. A competent presenter grabs audience attention at which of the following presentation stages?
        a.   Beginning of presentation
        b. Middle of presentation
        c.   End of presentation
        d. When listeners are visibly uneasy

26.   Which of the following are the illustrative and persuasive materials that rely primarily on sight to enhance listener comprehension and
      memory?
          a.    Words
          b. Statistics
          c.    Outlines
          d. Visual aids




                                                                  25
Appendix A (Continued)

27. A speaker who uses effective transitions to bridge the main points during a presentation has developed which of the following
    presentation skills?
         a.    Listening
         b. Research
         c.    Verbal
         d. Nonverbal

28. Maintaining adequate eye contact with all sections of the audience throughout the presentation refers to which of the following
    presentation skills?
         a.    Listening
         b. Research
         c.    Verbal
         d. Nonverbal

29. This occurs when you put your ideas into words:
     a.          Enunciation
     b.          Encoding
     c.          Forecasts
     d.          Proxemics


30. The crispness and precision with which you form your words:
     a.          Dynamics
     b.          Pronunciation
     c.          Enunciation
     d.          Grammar

31. Which cluster of motivational appeal focuses on individual urges, desires, or goals such as the desire for success or personal
    excellence?
          a.   Affiliation motives
          b. Achievement motives
          c.   Power motives
          d. Speech motives

32. Which cluster of motivational appeal focuses on the desire for acceptance or approval?
         a.    Affiliation motives
         b. Achievement motives
         c.    Power motives
         d. Speech motives
         e.
33. A speaker with ______ demonstrates good sense, good will and good morals while delivering a presentation.
          a. Ethics
          b. Ethos
          c. Pathos
          d. Experience

34. In which of the following modes of presentation does the speaker have advance plan for a speech and uses minimal notes with words
    to jog the memory?
          a.    Impromptu
          b. Extemporaneous
          c.    Manuscript
          d. Memorized

35. A speaker who has adequate background information about the topic has developed which of the following presentation skills?
         a.   Listening
         b. Research
         c.   Verbal
         d. Nonverbal

36. Which of the following is your primary concern when deciding to choose a topic that would interest your classmates?
        a.    Audience
        b. Timeliness
        c.    Grade
        d. Dress style




                                                                  26
Appendix A (Continued)

In this section, please provide information on each of the following items. This information is needed for analyzing the responses:

37. Which of the following is your age category?
        a.    Less than 18 years
        b. 18-21 years
        c.    22-25 years
        d. Over 25 years

38. Your gender:
         a.   Female
         b. Male

39. What is your college year?
        a.    Freshman
        b. Sophomore
        c.    Junior
        d. Senior
        e.    Other

40. Your racial category:
         a.    African American/Black
         b. Caucasian/White
         c.    Latina/Latino
         d. Other



Answer questions 41 - 44 in the table below based on the following scale:

1 = School of Arts & Sciences
2 = School of Education
3 = School of Professional Studies
4 = Not Applicable


                                 If you’ve one or more majors/minors:
        41. In which school is your first major?                            1   2    3    4
        42. In which school is your second major?                           1   2    3    4
        43. In which school is your first minor?                            1   2    3    4
        44. In which school is your second minor?                           1   2    3    4


                                     THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION!




                                                               27
                                                 Appendix B

Information Management General Education Assessment: Part A: CLIP Worksheet

Name                                                                 Instructor
Class/Section CPN                                                    Date

    1. Search the Memorial Library catalog for a book about materialism.
       What is the call number?

        What floor is it located on in the Library?

        Who is the Author?

        Is it available?

    2. Articles are found in scholarly journals and magazines. At your computer, you will find a scholarly
       journal (J) and a magazine (M). Please review these material and answer A and B.
           A. Identify which item has the respective characteristics. Write J for journals or M for
                magazines after each characteristic
       Lots of advertisements
       Plain paper, few or no photographs
       Articles have references and footnotes
       Written in standard, non-technical English
       Time, GQ, Vogue, Sports Illustrated, Ladies Home Journal
       Sold in Stores
       Articles written by reporters or staff journalists, author’s name isn’t always provided
       Reviewed by experts in a research field
       Often written in technical language or jargon
       Contains abstract, research methods, literature reviews, conclusions, bibliography
                B. Based on the above criteria, which item is better suited for research paper or project?

    3. Go to the following subject specific databases. Match the database with its subject.

SUBJECTS                                                             DATABASES
1. Psychology              _____                                     a. Art Abstracts
2. Health                  _____                                     b. Education Abstracts
3. Sociology               _____                                     c. Physical Education Index
4. Art                     _____                                     d. Literature Resource Center
5. English                 _____                                     e. America History & Life
6. History                 _____                                     f. Health Reference Center
7. Education               _____                                     g. PsychInfo
8. Physical Education      _____                                     h. Sociological Abstracts

    4. You have an assignment to write a paper on Lewis & Clark Expedition. Please use a subject database
       to find an article in a scholarly journal.
                A. What database did you use and why?
                B. From the article you found, create a citation using MLA format (HINT: SFX/Find
                    full text button).

    5. Your instructor wants you to use a specific journal for your assignment, for example History Today.
       Using the Periodical Holdings link, write down where the journal is located and if it is available in full
       text.

                                                       28
                                                                 Appendix C

Information Management General Education (GE) Assessment Part B: Research
Student ID or SSN (While providing your ID or SSN is voluntary, it will be kept strictly confidential, and it is very important to help us correlate
your responses with other important indicators of our GE Program):

C#: _____________________ or SSN: _________________

Purpose: The purpose of this instrument is to collect information that will help assess the quality of Cortland's GE Program. Your best-effort on
this assignment is very important because your answers will help provide information to improve the quality of our General Education Program
for future students. The General Education Faculty extends their graditute for your participation in this important assessment initiative.

Directions: Use a pen/pencil/marker to circle the best choice, circle all that apply, or place a check mark in the appropriate box.

Questions:
    1. The best way to identify current information for a research paper on a new or recently identified topic is (circle one):
            a.   Search the world wide web
            b. Check an encyclopedia
            c.   Consult a book
            d. Use a periodicals index
            e.   Don't know
            f.   None of the above

     2.    For each information category in the left column, find the one best resource for finding the information (check one box per row):

   Item     Information                    NY        Journal      Encyclopedia       Statistical    World        Internet       Don't      None of
   #                                       Times     Database                        Abstract       Atlas        Resources      Know       the
                                                                                     of the US                                             Choices
   2a.      Number of NYS highway
            fatalities in 2002
   2b.      Borders of Peru
   2c.      Current research on
            cloning
   2e.      Unemployment data for
            2000
   2f.      Short biography of
            Andrew Jackson

     3. Can a book's location be determined from the following call number (RM 930.G43 1978):
                      a. Yes
                      b. No

     4.    If you were writing a paper on crime in New York State, and you found a newspaper article with statistics indicating there was a 10%
           decline in 1997, which of the following is the next best step (circle one):
                 a.    verify the accuracy of the figure by comparing with another newspaper
                 b. check the statistics in a government resource
                 c.    use the data, being sure to cite your source
                 d. don't know
                 e.    none of the above

     5.    If your keyword search in the library's online catalog on 'elementary education in the United States' retrieves 1197 books, what would
           be the next best step (circle one):
                 a.   add terms to the search and try again
                 b. try searching within or under the original 1197 books identified
                 c.   scan the list and pick the most relevant
                 d. don't know
                 e.   none of the above

     6.    You are writing a research paper and you read an article on your topic. In which of the following instances would you write a footnote
           in your paper (circle one):
                a.    when you copy a whole paragraph
                b. when you write it over in your own words
                c.    when you quote one sentence from the article
                d. A & C
                e.    all of the above
                f.    don't know
                g. none of the above

                                                                         29
Appendix C (Continued):
   7.         For your history class, you must select a primary source and write a brief paper placing it in historical context. From the list below,
              choose the one primary source on which to base your paper (circle one):
                   a.    chapter in your text book
                   b. journal article
                   c.    scholarly monograph
                   d. critical biography
                   e.    collection of letters
                   f.    don't know
                   g. none of the above

   8.         In an online database such as Lexis Nexus, which search would retrieve the greatest number of records (circle one):
                    a.   cognition and emotion
                    b. cognition or emotion
                    c.   cognition not emotion
                    d. don't know
                    e.   none of the above

   9.         From the citations below, decide whether or not the citation refers to book, a website, or a journal article (check one box per row):

        Item        Citations                                                                    Book      Journal     Website      Don't      None of
        #:                                                                                                 Article                  Know       the
                                                                                                                                               Choices
        9a.         Oaklander, C. I. (1992). Pioneers in folk art collecting. Folk Art
                    17:48-55.
        9b.         Bay, C. Human needs and political education. In Fitzgerald, R., Ed.
                    Human needs and politics, 1-21.
        9c.         Birks, L. S. Electron probe microanalysis. Wiley-Interscience, 1971.

        9d.         University of Chicago Library. Slavic and East European Studies.
                    http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/LibInfo/SourcesBySubject/Slavic



   10. You perform a subject search in the library online catalog on the 'French revolution' and the computer retrieves zero results. Which of
       the following best applies (circle one):
             a.   the library has no books on the subject
             b. adding more terms to the search will retrieve more items
             c.   the library's books on the topic are listed under different terms
             d. the system is down
             e.   don't know
             f.   none of the above




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