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					PARENTING
                        POSITIVE PARENTING
                             PROVIDES
                               ref: Fahlberg



• Emotional Nurturing         • Teaching Appropriate
• A Basic Sense of              Expression of Emotions
  Acceptance                  • Encouragement for
• Times of Unconditional        Reciprocal Interactions
  Giving                      • A balance between
• Appropriate Limit Setting     Dependency and
                                Independence
• Positive Role Modelling
                              • Discipline/Correction
• Encouragement for             rather than Punishment
  Growth and Change
                              • Teaching Life Skills
• Teaching Responsibility       including Relationship
                                Skills
   AIMING FOR CHILD-
CENTRED COMMUNICTION




              Not Child- Directed
Examples of Child Directed Behaviour

                  • Criticism
                  • Commands
                  • Instructs
                  • No
                  • Negative Facial
                    Expressions
                  • Negative Touch
                  • Double Speak
                  • Questions which sound
                    like an interrogation
Examples of Child Centred Interaction

• Encouragement
• Praise
• Imitation
• Positive Touches
• Smiles
• Does not give attention to
  behaviour which needs to be
  stopped.
• Asks
• Attends
• Play
           SUPPORT


  PARENTAL BEHAVIOUR WHICH
 MAKES A CHILD FEEL ACCEPTED
  AND APPROVED AS A PERSON.

Child feels they matter – are accepted,
    loved, experience warmth and
              nurturance.
                    CONTROL
  PARENTAL ACTIONS INTENDED TO DIRECT THE
     BEHAVIOUR OF A CHILD IN A MANNER
         DESIRABLE TO THE PARENTS.

                           Methods:
Coercive control – directs behaviour through the use of
 external force or threat of force (if predominate style can
 have negative consequences).
Inductive Control – directs behaviour through the use of
 reason and explanation (helps child understand).
COMMON PARENTING STYLES

        AUTHORITARIAN
        – high coercive control
        - low inductive control
        - low/moderate support

Outcome – less socially able: when young
 more withdrawn & distrustful: older can
       be rebellious & aggressive
COMMON PARENTING STYLES

           PERMISSIVE
         – low coercive control:
         - low inductive control
     - high/moderate social support

 Outcome - can lack self-direction and
 control: young least socially competent,
        vulnerable as adolescents
COMMON PARENTING STYLES

        AUTHORITATIVE
        - low coercive control:
        - high inductive control
         - high social support
Outcome – best for promoting cognitive
development, compliance, self-control and
          social competence
                          COMPARISON

AUTHORITARIAN
– high coercive control          Less socially able
- low inductive control          When young more
- low/moderate support           withdrawn & distrustful:
                                 older can be rebellious & aggressive
PERMISSIVE
– low coercive control           Can lack self-direction & control:
- low inductive control          Young least socially competent
- high/moderate social support   Vulnerable as adolescents

AUTHORITATIVE
- low coercive control:          Best for promoting cognitive
- high inductive control         development, compliance,
- high social support            self-control & social competence
              Parenting Teenagers
FUNDAMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR HEALTHY ADOLESENCE
        David Hamburg: American Journal Psychiatry 154.6 June 1997


               •   Find a valued place in a constructive group
               •   Learn how to form close, durable relationships
               •   Feel a sense of worth as individuals
               •   Know how to use support systems
               •   Express constructively curiosity and exploratory
                   behaviour
               •   Believe in a promising future with real
                   opportunities
               •   Find ways of being useful to others
               •   Learn to live respectfully with others in
                   circumstances of democratic pluralism
               •   Cultivate the inquiring and problem-solving skills
                   that serve lifelong learning and adaptability.

				
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posted:5/2/2011
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