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PRE-CALL PLANNING

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					PRE-CALL RESEARCH

  Doing Your Homework
     PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 PRECALL RESEARCH IS THE BASIS FOR
 YOUR SALES APPROACH:

  – It provides the facts that make you better informed of
    the market from the advertiser’s point of view.

  – It enables you to share significant facts and trends with
    customers and prospects, and in turn gathering
    meaningful information to help your sales efforts.
      PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 WHY RESEARCH?

  – The specific objective of pre-call research is to position
    yourself as a valuable and reliable source of
    information — someone your advertisers can turn to
    when they need marketing and advertising facts and
    information.

  – For local merchants, this research must be translated
    into retail-oriented benefits that relate to problem-
    solving and profit-improvement strategies.
     PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 STEPS TO RESEARCHING AND PROFILING
 YOUR MARKET

  – First, define the market.

  – Your market should be subdivided into two or more of
    the following market definitions:

     •   Total survey area (TSA)
     •   Area of dominant influence (ADI)
     •   Designated market area (DMA)
     •   Metropolitan statistical area
     •   Metropolitan survey area
     •   Retail trading area
     •   City trading zone
     PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 STEPS TO RESEARCHING AND PROFILING YOUR
 MARKET

  – Second, gather the information.

  – Sources:

     •   State, county and local chambers of commerce
     •   Banks and savings and loans
     •   Newspapers; public/business libraries
     •   Merchant associations
     •   Business/trade organizations
     •   The Internet
     •   Publications from the Census Bureau and U.S. Commerce Dept.
     •   Advertising, marketing and media research organizations
      PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 STEPS TO RESEARCHING AND PROFILING YOUR
 MARKET

  – Third, develop a list of points that would be of interest
    to the retailer.

  – Trends and comparisons in the following:
     •   Population
     •   Households
     •   Consumer spendable income
     •   Total retail sales
     •   Retail sales per household
     •   Annual sales by major store types
     •   Passenger car registrations
     •   Farm data (where applicable)
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 STEPS TO RESEARCHING AND PROFILING
 YOUR MARKET

  – Your area’s economic base – past, present and
    projected future:

     •   Employment (major employers)
     •   Employment trends
     •   Median work-force age
     •   Military personnel in the area
     •   Working hours and shift changes for major companies
     •   Payroll days
     •   New industry
     •   Zoning changes and investment in rundown areas
     •   Pending new construction that will enhance the area
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 STEPS TO RESEARCHING AND
 PROFILING YOUR MARKET

 – Area analysis:

    •   Major shopping areas;
    •   Transportation
    •   Days and hours of week when traffic is heaviest
    •   General/night-time store hours
    •   National/local holidays
    •   Local sports franchises and other activities
     PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 STEPS TO RESEARCHING AND
 PROFILING YOUR MARKET

 – Fourth, put it all together:

     • Develop a format for the research so that it serves as
       a crucial part of your presentation.

     • Consider a publishable format. Don’t underestimate
       the value of publishing a market profile done
       exclusively by your station.
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 RESEARCHING COMPETITIVE
 MEDIA

 – A study of competitive media and how
   consumers use them should be an integral part
   of your research package.
     PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 RESEARCHING COMPETITIVE
 MEDIA

 – Many retailers are confused when it comes to choosing
   the best medium or mix of media. Your research should
   make this choice easier for them.

 – Competitive media research must be cloaked under the
   general retailer question, “What’s in this for me and
   how does it apply to my business?”
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 RESEARCHING COMPETITIVE
 MEDIA

 – Studies exist proving that each medium is better
   for reaching certain groups.

 – You must understand the strengths and
   weaknesses of all media, including TV, and
   realize how they interact with each other in a
   mixed media campaign.
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 RESEARCHING COMPETITIVE
 MEDIA

 – Each station should prepare a competitive
   media analysis at least once a year, including
   newspaper, radio, TV, cable TV, outdoor and
   any applicable magazines.

 – This analysis should include audience,
   demographics, advertising rates and the benefits
   each medium delivers.
      PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: NEWSPAPERS

  – Circulation, not readership, is the basis for newspapers’ advertising
    pitch.

  – Newspaper readership is consistent throughout the year.
    Circulation even during the holidays is about the same as in any
    other month.

  – Newspaper reading tends to be a ritual that takes place the same
    time each day in the same manner -- e.g., skipping about the paper
    reading favorite sections and/or features.

  – Newspaper advertising functions like a product catalogue,
    informing people about price, availability and specifications.
      PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: NEWSPAPERS

  – Not everyone who gets the newspaper reads it, or reads it all the
    way through. A large percentage of newspaper readers completely
    miss even the largest ads. Circulation figures don’t tell the retailer
    the number of people who read or even just note the ad.

  – When people read a paper, they choose what to note, read and
    remember, and what to ignore. Newspaper ads aren’t intrusive —
    that is, they don’t demand the attention of the audience, as
    broadcast commercials do.

  – Newspapers do an excellent job of reaching established customers,
    but a retailer’s mission is the reach new customers. Newspapers
    lack the intrusiveness needed to reach these otherwise disinterested
    consumers.
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: NEWSPAPERS

 – Broadcast now surpasses newspapers in keeping a
   good part of a market’s populace informed on a
   daily basis, including the basic function of
   disseminating the news.
      PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: MAGAZINES

  – As competitors, magazines are not much of a factor except with
    independent stores and large chains with more than $5 million
    in sales. Magazine distribution tends to be too wide for stores
    with only a few outlets.

  – Usually, the magazines that do compete with electronic media
    are targeted at local audiences — e.g., city magazines in
    metropolitan areas, tourist and theater magazines, college and
    high school publications, magazines for members of local
    organizations or church groups.
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: MAGAZINES

 – Magazines are continually emerging to serve
   special audiences. New ones appear whenever a
   new fad or hobby takes hold.

 – Magazine reading is of a casual nature and occurs
   at no set time. People browse and look at whatever
   catches their interest.
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: RADIO

 – Radio listening often accompanies other activities
   in both work and leisure.

 – Advertising on radio can easily involve people and
   can be ―visual‖ in stirring the imagination.

 – Price and location for purchases are important
   points of information.
    PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: DIRECT
 ADVERTISING

 – Direct advertising and broadcasting can be a very
   effective mix for retailers. A broadcast schedule
   can call attention to important tie-in mailings
   (―Watch for the circular coming to you by mail‖).

 – The continual rise in postal rates can turn retailers’
   attention to increasing their electronic media
   budget.
      PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPETITIVE MEDIA: OUTDOOR
 ADVERTISING

  – Outdoor advertising is a unique form of direct advertising,
    in that the audience is actually delivered to it, rather than the
    other way around.

  – It’s most often used by local and national advertisers to
    reinforce other media messages.

  – Transit advertising is one form of outdoor advertising. It’s
    placed on the inside and outside of almost every type of
    public transportation, and in stations.
      PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 COMPARING COMPETITIVE MEDIA WITH
 TELEVISION

  – TV viewing takes place by individual choice based on what the
    person has decided to watch. The viewer anticipates being
    absorbed or is viewing to relax, and is in a highly receptive mood.

  – People feel they can get everything they need from TV in terms of
    what they want in media.

  – TV advertising arouses interest in the product and informs by
    demonstrating not only the product’s specific values but also the
    effect the use will have on the user in terms of pleasure or
    satisfaction. People relate strongly to the person delivering the
    commercial.
   PRE-CALL RESEARCH
 SUMMING IT UP

 – Pre-call research is the foundation of all good
   sales presentations.

 – Include all of the information about your local
   area — economic, demographic and industry.

 – Conduct a competitive media analysis of your
   area as well, including the advantages and
   disadvantages of all of the local media.

				
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