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“ 'A Fantastic Voyage'_ Funk Music in Dayton_ Ohio and Politics of

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					           The Center for Africanamerican Urban Studies and the
                            Economy (CAUSE)

                                                         Department of History
                                                        Carnegie Mellon University

                                                                    Presents

                                                             Dr. Scot Brown


                                             “ ‘A Fantastic Voyage’:
                                          Funk Music in Dayton, Ohio
                                                   and Politics
                                              of African American
                                          Community ­ From the Ohio
                                          Players to Roger Troutman”
                                                        Friday, 26 September 2008
                                                          4:30 p.m. refreshments
                                                     5-6:30 p.m. lecture and discussion

                                                  Steinberg Auditorium, Baker Hall A53
                                                       Carnegie Mellon University
Scot Brown is an associate professor of history at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the
author of various articles, including "African American Soldiers and Filipinos: Racial Imperialism, Jim
Crow and Social Relations," a winner of the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and
History's Graduate Essay Contest. Professor Brown’s most recent publication is the book Fighting For
Us: Maulana Karenga, The US Organization and Black Cultural Nationalism.

Abstract: Funk, a fusion of jazz, rhythm and blues, and rock, was a national trend in African American
music during the mid-1970s through the early 1980s, with regionally specific styles and forms of
expression. A disproportionately large number of commercially successful funk bands came from
Dayton, Ohio during the 1970s and early 1980s—a period in which African Americans comprised over
one-third of a population of approximately 200,000. Artists such the Ohio Players, Lakeside, Slave,
Aurra, Heatwave, Sun, Roger, Steve Arrington’s Hall of Fame and Zapp were products of a deeply
embedded, local funk music culture—buttressed by an array of interlocking social institutions. This
talk will explore key elements of the ‘pedagogy of the funk’ in Dayton, a community-driven pedagogy,
sustained by a host of networks between teachers, students, and the local public sphere.

				
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Description: The so-called "funk"is in fact "FUNKY" the evolution of the word, is a kind of black dance was first created under the FUNKY music, the "funk"is a fusion of elements of HIP-HOP and JAZZ A Dance. Dance, hip and neck in the action sports a lot. And compared, and jazz dance, movement requirements are less strict and elegant.