Art Education Lesson Plan Secondary by wanghonghx

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        Art Education Lesson Plans

               Laura Biray

ARE 4352—Teaching Art in Secondary School

               Dr. Brewer

              April 19, 2010
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                    Ceramics Lesson—James Klueg (Grades 9-12)




                 Acquired Taste, Ceramic. (2000)   Conjunction Ceramic (2009)

                                          Objectives

   Students are to examine the narrative work of James Klueg. His work is a visual

  representation of the phrase ―There are two sides to every story‖. Students will create

  a narrative vessel with hand building techniques. After firing, students will paint a

  scene on one of the sides of the vessel. On the other side, students will write or

  stencil at least one word that would describe the scene that is taking place on the other

  side of the vessel. This will help students realize the linkage between the visual and

  written language, and will help students become more comfortable with talking about

  their work—it would be best used as an introductory assignment to lead to a Feldman

  Model Discussion.

                                   Sunshine State Standards

(VA. B. 1. 4) The student creates and communicates a range of subject matter, symbols,

         and ideas using knowledge of structures and functions of visual arts.
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3.   Understands some of the implications of intentions and purposes in particular

     works of art

                                            Procedure

1.       Students will receive a brief PowerPoint lecture on the work of James Klueg. A

         discussion will soon follow, as students will be asked to examine how his work is

         ―narrative‖, and what it means to have ―two sides to every story‖. (Day 1)

2.       Students will then receive their clay, and will hand-build their own vessels. After

         completion, the pieces will be fired in the kiln (Days 2-4)

3.       While the pieces are being fired, students will be asked to plan in their

         sketchbooks one image side and one text side to their vessels. The sketches

         should be personal and the content should reflect something that has happened to

         them. The sketches would be signed off by the teacher, as an agreement.

4.       The kiln will be unloaded, and then students will paint their scenes using acrylic

         paint on one side, and on the reverse side, students will write or stencil on their

         text. Students can also use a glossy fixative spray to ―glaze‖ their pots, if they

         wish.

5.       After all the pieces are complete, students will be assigned small groups of about

         4-5 students, and the students will take turns explaining how the image relates to

            the text on their vessels, and how they relates to ―two sides to every story‖.

                                             Assessment

Students will be graded on the following criteria:

          Discussion Participation: 5 points

          Sketchbook Proposal: 10 points
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      Craftsmanship of Vessel: 20 points

      Similarity to Sketchbook Proposal: 20 points

      Participation in Small Group Discussion: 5 points

       Total= 60 points

                                   Statement of Origin

   This lesson was inspired by the narrative and thought-provoking work of James

   Klueg, and by the George Szekely article ―New Approaches to Secondary School

   Art Education—A Program for the Artist of the Future‖. I enjoyed what he said

   about all students having personal memories and observations, and I wanted them

   to incorporate that through the interplay of text and image.

                                       References

 Klueg, James. (2001) Acquired Taste. Ceramic. Retrieved April 11, 2010 from

http://www.viewpointceramics.net/viewpoint_2000/klueg.l.htm

   Klueg, James. (2009) Conjunction. Ceramic. Retrieved April 11, 2010 from

http://www.d.umn.edu/tma/exhibitions/faculty.html

 Szekely, G. (1990). ―New Approaches to Secondary School Art Education—A

Program for the Artist of the Future‖. In B. E. Little (Ed.), Secondary Art Education:

An Anthology of Issues (pp. 223-242). National Art Education

Association, Reston, VA.
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                     Drawing Lesson—Ashley Bickerton (Grades 9-12)




                      Tormented-Self Portrait (Susie at Arles), Mixed Media, (1987-88).

                         Abstract Painting for People 4 (Bad), Mixed Media (1987).

                                               Objectives

   Students will examine how Ashley Bickerton uses symbols in her work, and how

   much symbols affect our everyday lives. Students are to choose five pre-existing

   symbols from a list and they are to re-create them, making them more reflective of the

   product/commodity that the symbol is assigned to, which would incorporate social

   commentary into the lesson plan. Some suitable examples would be making the

   McDonald’s arches ―fat‖, or making the Marlboro Man have lung cancer.

                                     Sunshine State Standards

(VA. D. 1. 4) The student assesses, evaluates, and responds to the characteristics of

works of art.

   3. Knows the differences between the intentions of artists in the creation of original

       works and in the intentions of those who appropriate and parody those works.
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                                           Procedure

1.       Students will receive a brief lecture and PowerPoint presentation on the work of

         Ashley Bickerton. A brief discussion will follow, and students will be asked to

         examine what symbols we notice in our everyday lives (share examples), and

         what they mean to us. What is the difference between safety symbols (such as

         traffic signs) and brand name logos?

2.       Students will then receive a handout of logos and symbols they receive everyday.

         They will be asked to pick five of them, and sketch at least three variants of each

         symbol chosen in their sketchbooks (so there are fifteen sketches total). They

         will then get their sketches signed off and checked by the teacher for completion,

         and the sketching proposals will allow students to think more in-depth. Their

         first sketch may not necessarily be their best. Their sketches must incorporate

         some form of social commentary based upon the product/commodity that the

         symbol is representing—how is this conveyed through your symbol?

3.       Students will then be handed out Bristol board, black pens, and ink. They will be

         given one week to complete their five symbol commentaries.

4.       After completion, the students will be asked to present their favorite symbol

         drawing to the class, and explain what they are trying to convey with their re-

         designed symbols.

                                          Assessment

Students will be assessed based on the following criteria:

          Effective Commentary Symbol: 50 points

          -20 points for similarity to the original symbol
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       -20 points for utilizing their own personal style in the appropriation

       -5 points for Sketchbook Proposal

      Participation in classroom discussion: 10 points

      Skillful and safe usage of the materials: 10 points

       Total=70 points

                                    Statement of Origin

   This lesson plan was inspired by the work of Ashley Bickerton. Her thoughtful

   usage of symbols puts a new, thoughtful twist on what we pass by every day. I

   was also inspired by Sherry Klein’s article about the feminist face in contemporary

   art. I find Bickerton’s work very self-aware and humorous, and I would love to

   incorporate that in the classroom.

                                         References

   Bickerton, Ashley. (1987-88) Tormented-Self Portrait (Susie at Arles), Mixed

Media. Retrieved April 10, 2010 from

http://clancco.com/wp/2008/03/04/concealment-and-law-in-the-work-of-carey-young/

   Bickerton, Ashley. (1987) Abstract Painting for People 4 (Bad), Mixed Media.

Retrieved April 10, 2010 from http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/15541/ashley-

bickerton/

   Klein, S. R. (2008): Comic liberation: the feminist face of humor in contemporary

art. Art Education, 61(2), 47-52.
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                   Sculpture Lesson—Mona Hatoum (Grades 9-12)




                  Map, Marbles and Basel (1998)   Hot Spot, Mixed Media. (2006)

                                         Objectives

Students will learn that art is commonly used to raise awareness in the community.

Mona Hatoum uses her art to raise awareness on topics such as global warming and

the unsteady global relations. They will be assigned four groups and will be asked to

create a sculpture out of found materials that best exemplifies the idea of ―going

green‖, a topic that is quite popular nowadays. Students will also learn that art can be

created through various materials when assembled creatively, and they will also work

on their teamwork skills. There will be an exhibition at the end, and will be graded

on how effectively their intent is conveyed to the viewers.

                                Sunshine State Standards

(VA.E.1.4) The student makes connections between the visual arts, other disciplines,

and the real world.

1.   Knows and participates in community-based art experiences as the artist or

     observers.
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                                           Procedure

1.       Students will receive a brief PowerPoint lecture on the work of Mona Hatoum,

         and be asked to participate in a brief discussion. What is the meaning Hatoum’s

         work? How does Hatoum use the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design

         to convey this?

2.       Students will then be broken up into groups of four or five and will be presented

         with the overarching theme of ―going green‖. Students will discuss how they

         will convey the theme of going green through the usage of found materials—

         NOT conventional art materials, just like Mona Hatoum.

3.       Students will then formulate a plan together, and the plan will be signed off by

         the teacher as a visual agreement.

4.       Students will create their pieces in the span of one week.

5.       Time permitting, students will display their finished pieces, and a mini art

         exhibition will take place in the classroom. Students will choose one piece that

         they have not worked on, and write a short paragraph about what they think the

         message of their classmate’s piece is.

                                          Assessment

Students will assessed on the following criteria:

         10 Points for Classroom Discussion

         90 Points for the ―Green‖ Sculpture

                           -30 points for the preliminary sketches

                           -30 points for craftsmanship

                           -30 points for teamwork
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         10 Points for participation in classroom exhibition/reflection paper

          = 100 points total

                                    Statement of Origin

      This lesson was inspired by the work of Mona Hatoum. Her work is very

      content-rich, and she uses her work as a means to spread awareness about

      many universal, world issues. I have found that a lot of the media is focused

      on the attempt to ―go green‖, and I think this would be a relevant issue for the

      students to explore, especially through the usage of found materials and things

      that are inexpensive and would normally be discarded. This lesson was also

      inspired by the Heather Anderson article about making women artists more

      visible. I think it is important to incorporate woman artists into the curriculum,

      because it shows that artists are not just old, dead while males.

                                         References

       Anderson, H. ―Making Women Artists Visible‖, Art Education, 44(5), 10-19.

   Hatoum, Mona. (2006) Hot Spot. Mixed Media. Retrieved April 10, 2010 from

http://www.bbc.co.uk/collective/gallery/2/static.shtml?collection=monahatoum

  Hatoum, Mona. (1998) Maps. Marbles and Basel. Retrieved April 10, 2010 from

http://www.orbit.zkm.de/?q=node/14
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                         Painting Lesson—Hung Liu (Grades 9-12)




      Women Warriors II, Oil on Canvas, 2004    Unofficial Portrait: The Bride, Oil on Canvas. (2001)

                                  The Trophy. Oil on Canvas, (2001).

                                               Objectives

Students will bring in a photograph of themselves and be asked to ―revisit‖ the photo.

They will create a painting that reveals a contrasting mood to what the photo

suggests through the usage of color and symbols. How did they feel while the photo

was being taken? At the time the photo was taken, what was important to them?

Students will think about color theory and paint application in terms of mood—darker

colors and heavy brushstrokes would contrast a lot to a joyful photograph.

Essentially, what does the photo not convey—create juxtaposition in the style of

Hung Liu.
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                                Sunshine State Standards

(VA. A. 1. 4 The student understands and applies media, techniques, and processes.

1.   Uses two-dimensional and three-dimensional media, techniques, tools, and

     processes to communicate an idea or concept based on research, environment,

     personal experience, observation, or imagination.

                                       Procedure

1.   Students will receive a brief lecture on the work of Hung Liu. Students will

     learn about the subject matter that Liu incorporates, and discuss why her color

     palette and ―light‖ painting style contrasts with a heavier, darker subject matter.

2.   Students will then be asked to choose a photo that is important to them. What

     photo of them evokes a certain memory? They will be asked to bring the

     photograph or a copy of their photograph to class, and the teacher will sign off

     on them for bringing it.

3.   Students will be asked to write a short poem about the overall mood of their

     photograph. How did they feel when the photograph was taken? What was

     going on in their lives at the time the photo was taken? What was important to

     them at the time? Students will answer those questions, and determine what

     color palette and style represents the opposite of the overall mood of the

     photograph. Students will share their poems, and explain their juxtapositions to

     the class.

4.   After sharing their poems, students will receive their supplies (acrylic paint and

     Bristol board) to work on their paintings. They will have one week to complete
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            their works, and must include at least one form of symbolism in the style of

            Hung Liu.

   5.       We will then have a critique, in which students will present their work, and their

            classmates will try and guess the origin of the painting. What is the original

            mood?

                                             Assessment

   Students will assessed on the following criteria:

            10 Points for Classroom Discussion/Bringing in Photograph

            90 Points for the Juxtaposition Painting

                              -30 points for the preliminary poem

                               -30 points for craftsmanship

                               -30 points for content/clear intent

                10 Points for participation in critique participation

                 = 100 points total

                                      Statement of Origin

This lesson was inspired by the work of Huang Liu. Her work is very aware, and places

and interesting contrast between subject matter and technique, and I thought it would be

challenging for students to revisit old photographs that were meaningful to them. This

lesson was also inspired by the Heather Anderson article about making women artists

more visible. I think, once again, it is important to have a woman, Asian artist in the

curriculum, as it gives more variety and diversity into the curriculum.



                                           References
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        Anderson, H. ―Making Women Artists Visible‖, Art Education, 44(5), 10-19.

    Liu, Hung. (2001) Unofficial Portrait: The Bride. Oil on Canvas. Retrieved April 10,

2010 from

http://blog.oregonlive.com/visualarts/2007/10/in_praise_of_bolder_women.html

    Liu, Hung. (2001) The Trophy. Oil on Canvas. Retrieved April 10, 2010 from

http://asuartmuseum.asu.edu/collections/contemporary/index.php

    Liu, Hung. (2004) Women Warriors II. Oil on Canvas. Retrieved April 10, 2010 from

http://www.renabranstengallery.com/Liu_WomenWarII.html



                               Miscellaneous—Nikki S. Lee (Grades 9-12)




Ohio Project, Photograph, (1997–2001) Hip-Hop Project, Photograph, (1997–2001) Seniors Project, Photograph, (1997–2001)
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                                       Objectives

Students are to examine how the clothes that they wear define them as individuals--do

you wear the clothes, or do the clothes wear you? How do we classify and stereotype

others based on the clothes that they wear? How accurate are the stereotypes? After

writing an artist’s statement, students are to create (using drawing, painting, collage,

graphic design, etc) an opposite self-portrait, depicting them wearing clothes that is

the opposite of what they would normally wear/their normal identity. How does it

feel to be in someone else’s shoes? Overall, students will understand that the concept

of identity is something that is fluid, ever-changing, and our outward appearances do

not define who we are as individuals with personalities.

                                 Sunshine State Standards

(VA.E.1.4) The student makes connections between the visual arts, other disciplines,

and the real world.

2.    Understands and identifies the skills that artists use in various careers to promote

      creativity, fluency, flexibility, and elaboration within the arts and across life.

                                         Procedure

1. Students will receive a brief lecture on the work of Nikki S. Lee. Some students

     will have curiosity as to why her work constitutes as ―art‖, so the class will be

     divided in half, and there will be a short mock ―debate‖ as to why/why not Lee’s

     work should be defined as art, based on what was seen/heard in the

     lecture/PowerPoint presentation.

2. After the lecture/mock debate, students will write a short paper describing the

     type of clothes they wear/their personal style. What do they think their style says
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   about them? Does it reflect how they feel inside, or not? Bearing these questions

   in mind, the ideas and themes of juxtaposition continued from the painting lesson

   are going to be examined once again, this time in terms of identity. Students will

   portray themselves in a different set of clothes, clothes that are the opposite of

   their emotions or roles in society. For example, students who dress up very nicely

   to school each day can portray themselves in sweatpants, or students can portray

   themselves as the teacher rather than the student.

3. Students will then make a proposal of what they plan to do for their identity

   change assignment. The assignment is purposely left open, and students are

   allowed to work with photography, drawing, painting, graphic design…as long as

   they propose their ideas to the teacher so they can get signed off on, anything

   goes.

4. Students will be given one week to work on their assignments independently.

5. There will be a group critique in which students will be asked to explain their

   opposite self-portrait to the class. What makes it opposite, and how does it relate

   to the work of Nikki S. Lee?

                                    Assessment

Students will assessed on the following criteria:

      10 Points for Classroom Discussion/Mock Debate Participation

      90 Points for the Opposite Self Portrait

                -30 points for the sketchbook proposal/short paper

                -30 points for craftsmanship

                -30 points for creativity
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              10 Points for participation in critique participation

               = 100 points total

                                     Statement of Origin

   This lesson was inspired by the work of Nikki S. Lee. I found her work to be

incredibly aware, thought-provoking, and hilarious! I feel that students would find it

incredibly relevant given their age group and their preoccupations with physical

appearances, and I thought it would be a fun and mind-expanding exercise to place

students outside of their comfort zones. Furthermore, this lesson was inspired by the

Sherri Klein article. I think humor is a great way to get teenagers and adults alike into

thinking about deeper issues of identity and self-image, and it will help students realize

that art is not always so serious.

                                         References

    Klein, S. R. (2008): Comic liberation: the feminist face of humor in contemporary

art. Art Education, 61(2), 47-52.

   Lee, Nikki S. (1997-2001) Hip-Hop Project, Photograph. Retrieved April 10, 2010

from http://baxterunderground.blogspot.com/2009_01_01_archive.html

   Lee, Nikki S. (1997-2001) Ohio Project, Photograph. Retrieved April 10, 2010 from

http://baxterunderground.blogspot.com/2009_01_01_archive.html

   Lee, Nikki S. (1997-2001) Seniors Project, Photograph. Retrieved April 10, 2010

from http://baxterunderground.blogspot.com/2009_01_01_archive.html
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