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VIEWS: 21 PAGES: 27

									                                                                                      Topic Content
                                                                 Developing Structured Activity Tools


            Developing Structured Activity Tools
             Aligning Assessment Tools to identified Assessment Methods
             Developing:
                o Role Play assessment tools
                o Case Study assessment tools
                o Simulation assessment tools
                o Work-based Project assessment tools
             Reviewing and trialing Structured Activity Tools

Aligning Assessment Tools to identified Assessment Methods

After you have
 unpacked the Unit of Competency to identify the evidence requirements
 selected the most appropriate assessment methods and
 identified the assessment tools that align with each of the assessment methods
the next step is to develop the identified assessment tool containing both the instrument
and the procedures for gathering and interpreting the evidence, and then to review and
trial the tool.

Structured Activities        Tools to support Role Plays, Case Studies and Simulations
Often used where real        Scenario + scripts for participants (if applicable) + sample
work / real time evidence    responses + instructions for learner and assessor (including advice
is not available /           on interpreting evidence)
observable                   Tools to support Work-based Projects:
                             Project Brief / instructions + sample responses +instructions for
                             learner and assessor (including advice on interpreting evidence)


There are many situations where it is not possible to get real work / real time evidence.
In these cases, assessors develop tools to support evidence gathering activities that
can be undertaken in “on” or “off-the-job” settings. These structured activities include
role plays, case studies, simulations, and work-based projects.


When planning and conducting a Structured Activity:
 check that the method complies with the requirements of the Training Package and
  the Unit of Competency (including the Range Statement, Elements and Performance
  Criteria, and Evidence Guide. Note that some Units of Competency will specify
  appropriate and inappropriate assessment methods.)
 ensure materials, equipment, procedures and conditions reflect current industry
  practice
   focus on the whole workplace task rather than separate components
   set realistic expectations (eg time limits and quality specifications)
   share the criteria upon which the assessment is based with the learner and relevant
    others

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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                      Topic Content
                                                                 Developing Structured Activity Tools




     Assessment Tool(s)                Developing Role Play Assessment Tools
                                     When you decide to use Role Play as a structured
The instrument/s and
                                     activity, your assessment tool will need to include:
procedures used to gather and
interpret evidence of                 A scenario or outline of the situation (with
competence:                              associated role cards if applicable)
    (a) Instrument – the specific
                                      Scripts for the people involved (if applicable)
        questions or activity used
        to assess competence          Questions and/or Checklist. Questions can be
        by the assessment                included within a checklist, or as a separate
        method selected. An              document
        assessment instrument
        may be supported by a         Supporting documentation:
        o Sample responses
        profile of acceptable
        performance and the
        o Instructions to learners
        decision making rules or
        o Instructions used assessor, including:
        guidelines to befor theby
                 the
        assessors. steps involved in preparing the activity
    (b) Procedures – the
                 the procedure for conducting the activity
        information or
                 the materials required to conduct the activity
        instructions given to the
                 and the
        candidate a strategy for debriefing the learner
                 advice on the
        assessor about how interpreting the evidence
        assessment is to be
An important component of the tool development and the Registered Training
        conducted and recorded.
Organisation’s (RTO) continuous improvement process is to:
        (AQTF)
 review the tool with other assessors and trial the tool with sample learners prior to
    use
 evaluate the effectiveness of the tool following use


Excerpts from Role Play tools are provided on the following pages. Please note these
are provided as samples used by assessors NOT as “best practice” exemplars.

The Scenario and Script
A scenario is a story describing an event or situation or interaction. Like any good story
it will have a realistic plot with a beginning, a middle and an end and follow a sequence
of plausible events that make it realistic and believable. Where appropriate scripts may
be included with the scenario for a role play.


The scenario is often presented on a series of cards outlining the situation to the learner
and any other key participants. It may involve:
 an oral presentation
 a written response


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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                            Topic Content
                                                                       Developing Structured Activity Tools


 an interview with the assessor
or a combination of these strategies.


Example 1:
CHCCDP5011A: Liaise with employers to provide flexible work practices
Role Play Scenario- Learner 1: The Career Development mentor (excerpt)
A young woman whose career development you have been supporting over the last three months has
advised that she intends to tender her resignation because she is unable to work the 9 – 5 hours that are
established by company policy. She loves her work and does not wish to leave the company, but she can
no longer work her 37.5 hours within those times. You have set up a meeting with the HR Director to
recommend the adoption of more flexible work place practices. You are required to persuade the director of
the advantages of such a change. You have only recently joined the company yourself and the career
development role is a new role.

Leaner 2- The HR Director (excerpt)
You advocated for the appointment of a career development mentor to the company, against the wishes of
some of your fellow executive team members. The company has a long tradition of working between the
hours of 9-5 and you believe there is little appetite for change. You have agreed to meet with the career
development mentor to discuss flexible working hours, but have given the matter little consideration. You
have seen little evidence to date of the need for change, but are willing to listen carefully and if the
arguments are compelling to take the matter forward for consideration by the Executive.
……(continues)




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                             Topic Content
                                                                        Developing Structured Activity Tools


Example 2:
RUHHRT341A: Install Concrete Structures and Features
Role Play Scenario– Learner 1 (excerpt)
The local Caravan Park needs a new concrete hard stand area for machinery storage installed. The slab is
to be 10.2m long by 6.4m wide. The owner must decide who to award the job to and wants to talk to you
before he makes a decision. He wants to be sure you know what to do.


Prepare for the interview with the potential client:
       List in sequential order the steps necessary to complete the job including planning and gaining
        approval for the work.
       List the materials and quantities that will be required to complete the job.
       Consider -- If the slab is to be set at ground level, how much loose excavated soil will have to be
        taken from the site? Why is this information important?


Organise a time and meet with the Caravan Park owner to explain how you would complete the job.
…….(continues)


Role Play Scenario– Learner 2 (excerpt)
You are the owner of the local Caravan Park. You need a new concrete hard stand area for machinery
storage installed. The slab is to be 10.2m long by 6.4m wide. There are 2 local firms you could use so you
have decided to interview each concreter who would be doing the work.
You are particularly interested in:
     The sequencing of the job - including particularly the planning and approval processes that will be
        used.
     The materials and quantities that will be required to complete the job.
     How much loose excavated soil will have to be taken from the site if the slab is to be set at ground
       level
    Workplace Health and Safety – particularly in relation to Caravan Park residents
Organise a time and meet with the concreter to determine if you would employ him/her to do the job.
…….(continues)




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                            Topic Content
                                                                       Developing Structured Activity Tools



Questions and/or Checklist
A series of questions and/or checklist:
 enables focussed observation
 is based on workplace contexts and written in workplace language (is not a
   reiteration of the Elements and Performance Criteria from the Unit of Competency)
 allows the assessor to gather evidence in relation to the learner’s understanding and
   the dimensions of competency
 provides a prompt for the assessor and a guide for the learner


Example:
RUHHRT341A: Install Concrete Structures and Features

PERFORMANCE – (excerpt)
                                                            Yes   No                 Comments
During the activity did the learner satisfactorily cover:

1.    Techniques and processes –
      Calculating volumes ……
2.       Underpinning knowledge
         Concrete strength
         The curing process
3.       Organisation and Planning
         Labour requirements for concrete jobs
         Communication with others
         Ordering ready mixed concrete ……
4.       Problem Solving
         …….(continues)
RESPONSES TO QUESTIONING
Satisfactory response - Yes           No       
…….(continues)


The complexity of the questions and/or checklist will mirror the complexity of the
scenario and the purpose of the role play.

Supporting Documentation
In addition to the Scenario and Questions and/or Checklist, the assessor must include in
the tool:
    Sample responses
    Instructions to learners
    Instructions to assessors /observers and advice on interpreting the evidence



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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                             Topic Content
                                                                        Developing Structured Activity Tools


Sample responses
The sample responses (sometimes called marking guides or benchmarks or ghost
markers) identify the performance indicators and answers to the knowledge questions
for the Role Play.


Example:
RUHHRT341A: Install Concrete Structures and Features
Sample Responses (…..excerpt from Checklist)
Explain concrete construction techniques
Outline legislation relating to footings and foundations
Describe concrete properties and characteristics ………..
……Set out the landscape works
Construct the form work with sufficient rigidity and otherwise prepare the site
…….Calculate volume of concrete required for the job
Plan and organise activities effectively……:
…….Take account of the duration of curing process
Assemble sufficient labour to complete the job without undue stress.
Work and communicate with colleagues and customers:
…….Outline safety issues relating to work with concrete
…….(continues)


Instructions to learners
As part of the assessment tool the assessor must provide clear instructions to learners -
so that they know exactly what is expected of them. These instructions may be written
as part of the checklist or included as a separate document (sometimes called an
Assessment Cover Sheet or Assessment Criteria Sheet).


Good assessment instructions:
 identify the tasks which are to be performed
 are comprehensive, covering the who, what, when, where and how of the
  assessment situation (eg materials required, timeframes, assistance available,
  specific location)
 are aligned to the correct AQF level
 are written in plain English using standard industry terminology




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                               Topic Content
                                                                          Developing Structured Activity Tools


To ensure learners are confident with the Role Play assessment, it is good practice to:
 give learners a pre-assessment briefing outlining the assessment method, process
   and tools
 give learners adequate information about the role they are to undertake and the
   significance of the event
 discuss the criteria against which their performance is to be assessed
      o Learners may fear their dramatic ability may affect the assessment result. To
           ensure the validity of the assessment process it is important to distinguish
          between knowledge and capacity in relation to the Unit of Competency and
          learner’s acting ability.
        o If you plan to use any recording instruments, such as videos or tape
          recorders, learners need to be prepared for this so that they can be as
          relaxed as possible during the assessment.


The instructions may be written as part of role play materials or included as a separate
document (sometimes called an Assessment Cover Sheet or Assessment Criteria
Sheet).

Example:
RUHHRT341A: Install Concrete Structures and Features
Instructions to Learners (excerpt)
This unit deals with installation of concrete structures and features as a part of landscape project work. It
involves setting out the work, preparing the site for the concrete, mixing, placing and finishing the concrete
and then removing the formwork and cleaning up the work area.
It is important that the client is satisfied with your work so one of the assessment items requires you will to
participate in a role play (as either the concreter or the client) to demonstrate your understanding of this
unit.
       The job and the scenario for the role play is provided on the next page
       Your assessor will tell you whether you will be playing the role of the concreter or the client
       You will have 1 week to prepare for the interview
       15 minutes of class time has been allocated for the interview
       You may bring with you any materials to assist you with your role
       The assessment will be based on you demonstrating your understanding of
              o concrete construction techniques ………
              o concrete properties and characteristics ………..
              o constructing the form work ………
              o calculating volume of concrete required for the job ………
           o communicating with customers ……..
     This is not an assessment of your dramatic ability
Please contact your assessor if you believe you will have any difficulty in completing this assessment.
…….(continues)

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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                              Topic Content
                                                                         Developing Structured Activity Tools


Instructions to assessors
Assessors need advice on how to conduct the assessment and how to interpret the
evidence provided by the Role Play when making a decision of satisfactory / not
satisfactory.


Example:
RUHHRT341A: Install Concrete Structures and Features
Notes for Assessors: (excerpt)
Ensure that there is a quiet room for the conduct of the role play and that learners are as comfortable as
possible with their part in the role play activity. Negotiate with the learners involved and determine if there
are any concerns relating to presenting the role play with their peers as audience. It is not a requirement
that there is an audience for the activity.


Allow 15 minutes for the role play – be guided by the Checklist provided in relation to adequacy of
performance. Question the learners if satisfactory information has not been provided.
Questioning could focus on:
Techniques and processes
    Calculating volumes …….
Underpinning knowledge
    Concrete strength
    The curing process …….
Organisation and planning
    Labour requirements for concrete jobs
    Communication with others
    Ordering ready mixed concrete ……
Problem solving
   Unforeseen weather conditions during the job
   Health, safety and security
   Safety issues specific to this type of work …..
…….(continues)




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                      Topic Content
                                                                 Developing Structured Activity Tools



Developing Case Study Assessment Tools
When you decide to use a Case Study as a structured activity, your assessment tool
will need to include:
 A scenario or outline of the situation
 A series of questions based on the scenario to test learner understanding
 Supporting documentation:
       o Sample responses
       o Instructions to learners
       o Instructions for the assessor, including:
              the steps involved in preparing the activity
              the procedure for conducting the activity
              the materials required to conduct the activity
              a strategy to provide feedback to the learner
              advice on interpreting the evidence


An important component of the tool development and RTO continuous improvement
process is to:
 review the tool with other assessors and trial the tool with sample learners prior to
   use
 evaluate the effectiveness of the tool following use


Excerpts from Case Study tools are provided on the following pages. Please note these
are provided as samples used by assessors NOT as “best practice” exemplars.

The Scenario
A scenario is a story describing an event or situation or interaction. Like any good story
it will have a realistic plot with a beginning, a middle and an end and follow a sequence
of plausible events that make it realistic and believable.


The scenario will outline the situation to the learner and any other key participants. It
may involve:
 an oral presentation
 a written response
 an interview with the assessor
or a combination of these strategies.




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                            Topic Content
                                                                       Developing Structured Activity Tools


Example 1:
SFIAQUA204A Carry Out on Farm Post-harvest Handling
Case Study Scenario (excerpt)

You are working on a large farm that processes stock on site for sale. A large order has arrived for various
amounts and grades of crayfish. The order is required in two weeks time. You have been asked to arrange
all aspects of the order.




THHGGA08A: Plan and Establish Systems and Procedures
Case Study Scenario (excerpt)

You work in a busy booking agency at a major transport terminal. The business takes bookings for a wide
range of local tourism products (tours, cruises, accommodation etc). You are constantly inundated with
information from local operators. Sometimes you run out of the brochures you need, sometimes you are
oversupplied. You have brochures and procedural booking information all over the place, including from
operators for whom you do not make bookings.



Questions
A series of questions:
 enables focussed consideration of the scenario
 is based on workplace contexts and written in workplace language (is not a
   reiteration of the Elements and Performance Criteria from the Unit of Competency)
 allows the assessor to gather evidence in relation to the learner’s understanding and
   the dimensions of competency
 provides a prompt for the assessor and a guide for the learner


The complexity of the questions will mirror the complexity of the scenario and the
purpose of the case study.


Example 1:
SFIAQUA204A Carry Out on Farm Post-harvest Handling
Questions (excerpt)

   What tasks need to be performed before the order is packed?
   How would the produce be packed correctly?
   How should the produce be stored after packing?
   What tasks are performed to monitor and maintain the storage facility?
   What would happen to stock that does not meet the order specifications or enterprise quality
    standards?




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                           Topic Content
                                                                      Developing Structured Activity Tools


Example 2:
THHGGA08A: Plan and Establish Systems and Procedures
Questions (excerpt)

   Outline your recommendations to introduce a more effective information system (you may use a
    flowchart if appropriate)
   Comment on the:
     factors to be considered when introducing a change like this
     possible implications if comprehensive planning is not undertaken
   Are there any legal issues that might impact on the implementation of a new system?
   What are some of the issues to be taken into consideration when communicating change to
    colleagues?


Supporting Documentation
In addition to the Scenario and Questions the assessor must include in the Case Study
tool:
   Sample responses
   Instructions to learners
   Instructions to assessors and advice on interpreting the evidence


Sample responses
The sample responses (sometimes called marking guides or benchmarks or ghost
markers) identify the performance indicators and answers to the knowledge questions
for the Case Study.
Example 1:
SFIAQUA204A Carry Out on Farm Post-harvest Handling
Sample Responses (excerpt)
 What tasks need to be performed before the order is packed?
    Suggested responses:
    tasks to monitor and maintain the storage facility temperature, humidity, light, salinity, dissolved
    oxygen, ammonia, nitrite and solid wastes

   How would the produce be packed correctly
    Suggested responses:
    quantity, size, weight or grade of produce, hygiene standards, contaminants or pests, customer
    requirements temperature requirements and species

 How should the produce be stored after packing?
  Suggested responses
  knowledge of environmental and biological requirements of a species important in post-harvest
  handling
  To ensure the product or stock is kept in an optimum environment during such practices as depuration
  or washing and that the quality and appearance of the stock is maintained. These conditions must be
  checked on a regular basis to ensure they are within guidelines.
…….(continues)

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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                           Topic Content
                                                                      Developing Structured Activity Tools




Example 2:
THHGGA08A: Plan and Establish Systems and Procedures
Sample Responses (excerpt)
Has the learner:
 outlined the basic principles of planning (eg. clarifying objectives, action planning, evaluation
   mechanisms)
 detailed the operation of the area in which systems / procedures are to be introduced
 outlined the legislative framework within which the workplace must operate (eg. any operational
   restrictions as a result of regulations).
    Identify and clarify system and procedural requirements through workplace monitoring and
        ongoing consultation with colleagues and customers
    Introduce systems and procedures to the workplace in a manner which causes minimum
        disruption to customers and colleagues
    Monitor efficiency and effectiveness of systems in the workplace
    Identify problem areas and take prompt action
    Identify and develop possible responses in consultation with colleagues.
    Ensure responses take account of immediate operational needs and workplace goals
 taken human and financial resources issues into consideration.


Instructions to learners
As part of the Case Study assessment tool the assessor must provide clear instructions
to learners - so that they know exactly what is expected of them. These instructions
may be written as part of a checklist or included as a separate document (sometimes
called an Assessment Cover Sheet or Assessment Criteria Sheet).


Good assessment instructions:
 identify the tasks which are to be performed
 are comprehensive, covering the who, what, when, where and how of the
    assessment situation (eg materials required, timeframes, assistance available,
    specific location)
   are aligned to the correct AQF level
   are written in plain English using standard industry terminology


To ensure learners are confident with the case study assessment it is good practice to:
 give learners a pre-assessment briefing outlining the assessment method, process
   and tools
 discuss the criteria against which their performance is to be assessed
   give learners adequate information about the activity they are to undertake and the
    significance of the event




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                            Topic Content
                                                                       Developing Structured Activity Tools


Example:
SFIAQUA204A Carry Out on Farm Post-harvest Handling
Instructions to Learners (extract)
In the scenario which forms the basis of this Case Study you are to assume you are working on a large
crayfish farm with the responsibility for organising orders.
Read through the scenario provided and demonstrate your understanding of the role by answering the
questions which follow.
       The assessment will be based on you demonstrating your understanding of:…..
           o How to carry out on farm post-harvest handling of stock
           o Post-harvest treatments
           o Product quality
           o Enterprise procedures
           o Storage facility operations
     You may use any of the set reference materials to help you with the answers……..
Please contact your assessor if you believe you will have any difficulty in completing this assessment.
…….(continues)


Instructions to assessors
Assessors need advice on how to conduct the Case Study assessment and how to
interpret the evidence provided when making a decision of satisfactory / not satisfactory.


Example:
THHGGA08A: Plan and Establish Systems and Procedures
Instructions for Assessors: (excerpt)
This Case Study may be undertaken as an individual or group activity at the discussion phase however an
individual response to the questions is required.
Ensure learners understand the requirements of the case study via a pre-assessment briefing which
covers:
 the assessment method, process and tools
 the criteria against which their performance is to be assessed
Allow 15 minutes for group/class discussion – be guided by the questions in the checklist provided to
ensure a good coverage of the theory.
Once the discussion phase is completed allow 30 minutes of individual writing of responses.
Oral questioning of the learner is appropriate if clarification of written responses is required.
A verbal response or scribe-assisted response is appropriate if required.
…….(continues)




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                      Topic Content
                                                                 Developing Structured Activity Tools



Developing Simulation Assessment Tools
Simulation is a form of evidence gathering that involves the learner completing or
dealing with a task, activity or problem in an off-the-job situation that replicates the
workplace context.


Simulations vary from recreating realistic workplace situations (consider the use of flight
simulators in pilot training and the reconstruction of business performance in financial
modelling).


In developing simulations, the emphasis is on creating situations in which the learner
can demonstrate:
 technical skills
 underpinning knowledge
 generic skills such as decision-making and problem-solving
 workplace practices such as effective communication and compliance with
    Occupational Health and Safety procedures.


Simulations can be used to demonstrate aspects of work that are:
 difficult or costly to observe in the workplace (eg troubleshooting with a computer
   system that has been specially configured to generate faults)
 difficult to reproduce in a workplace (eg the application of a disaster plan in a
   simulated disaster area, for example a flooded hospital)
 difficult to reproduce in a specific workplace (eg demonstration of silver service for
   hospitality learners)
 a risk to personal / public safety (eg emergency survival at sea strategies)
   conducted on a seasonal basis (eg planting crops)
   performed in a wide variety of circumstances not able to be reproduced in the
    workplace in realistic timeframes (eg sailing vessel in a variety of weather
    conditions)


Planning the Simulation – general considerations
Before making a decision to use simulation, consider:
 Training Package requirements and industry views on the use of simulation
   the benefits and limitations of using a simulation
   learner characteristics and needs
   available workplace opportunities
   the cost of establishing and using simulated environments


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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                      Topic Content
                                                                 Developing Structured Activity Tools


   how the simulated assessment can be combined with other forms of evidence
    gathering such as Third Party reports, portfolios or work placements
   if the simulation meets the principles of assessment (validity, reliability, flexibility and
    fairness)

Planning the Simulation – the assessment event
   If you are assessing within an RTO, consider forming a partnership with local
    enterprises. They may be able to provide access to a workplace or equipment,
    authentic workplace documents and/or advice on how to create a realistic simulated
    environment.
   Review the whole qualification or Units of Competency to be assessed to build in
    opportunities for assessing whole work tasks or clusters of competencies.
   Where appropriate include opportunities to assess relevant employability skills and
    generic competencies such as teamwork, communication, Occupational Health and
    Safety and leadership.
   Include contingencies as part of the assessment design (eg learners might be
    required to deal with the pressures of telephones, time constraints and interruptions
    to workflow). Focus the assessment activity on processes as much as the end
    product.
   Apply operational procedures and occupational health and safety requirements as
    they would exist in a real work setting.
   Validate methods, contexts and concepts with industry/workplace representatives to
    ensure the accuracy of the assessment approach.
   Prepare an observation checklist that clearly outlines the critical aspects of the
    assessment.

Planning the Simulation - preparing the physical location
   Consult with workplace/industry experts on what should be included.
   Check real workplaces to ensure you reflect current practice and layout/set-up of
    work spaces and equipment.
   Where practical, alter the training environment so that it reflects a real workplace.
    Use equipment and other facilities that are as close to those used by industry as
    possible.




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 The State of Queensland (Department of Education and Training), 2009
                                                                                       Topic Content
                                                                  Developing Structured Activity Tools


When you decide to use Simulation as a structured activity, your assessment tool will
need to include:
 A scenario describing the situation
 Questions and/or Checklist to use in assessing the learner’s performance during
   the simulation. Questions can be included within a checklist, or as a separate
   document
 Supporting documentation:
      o Sample responses
       o Instructions to learners
       o Instructions for the assessor, including:
              the steps involved in preparing the activity
              the procedure for conducting the activity
              the materials required to conduct the activity
              a strategy for debriefing the learner
              advice on interpreting the evidence
Excerpts from Simulation tools are provided on the following pages. Please note these
are provided as samples used by assessors NOT as “best practice” exemplars

The Scenario
A scenario for a Simulation will be as simple or complex as is required to prepare the
learner for the activity. It could be presented as a simple outline of a work situation
(demonstrate safe procedures for…….), to a description of complex series of events
over a considerable time period (prepare a response to a natural disaster – fire / flood).

Example 1:
PRMWM11B Respond to waste emergency
Scenario (excerpt)
You are working as a member of a small team cleaning out materials left in an abandoned warehouse when
a hazardous contaminant is spilled. You must work with your team to clean up the spill.
Example 2:
THCMAN05A: Install LP Gas Systems in Recreational Vehicles
Scenario (excerpt)

This assessment will be conducted in the RTO workshop.

You work for a local operator and a customer brings in his caravan and wants you to install:
    the LPG system
    a cooktop
On completion of the installation of the LPG system and cooktop, make sure you carry out all required
checks and tests.
…….(continues)


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Questions and/or Checklist
The series of questions and/or a checklist:
 enables focussed observation
 is based on workplace contexts and written in workplace language (is not a re-
   iteration of the Elements and Performance Criteria from the Unit of Competency)
 allows the assessor to gather evidence in relation to the learner’s understanding and
   the dimensions of competency
 provides a prompt for the assessor and a guide for the learner


The complexity of the questions and/or checklist will mirror the complexity of the
scenario and the purpose of the simulation.




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Example:
 PRMWM11B Respond to waste emergency
 Checklist (excerpt):
 Learner Name:

 Assessor Name:
 Unit/s of competency                         PRMWM11B Respond to waste emergency

 Date of Assessment
 Location
 PERFORMANCE
                                                               Yes   No                   Comments
 During the activity did the learner satisfactorily:
    determine the source and stop the flow of the liquid
     as soon as possible
    check safety precautions on the relevant Material
     Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for next steps?
    determine the source and stop the flow of the liquid
     as soon as possible?
    contain the spill effectively and safely?
    cover drains that could be contaminated?
    use the correct booms to contain spill?
    wear appropriate personal protection equipment
     (PPE) at all times?
    cover the spill with absorbent and allow sufficient
     time to soak up the contaminant?
    place contaminated absorbent in a fit for purpose
     drum or plastic bag?
    mop area and tip liquid into the drum or bag with
     contaminated absorbent?
    dispose of waste using the established procedure?
    complete an Environmental Incident Investigation
     Report?
    work effectively in a team situation with other staff?
 The learner’s performance was:


 Satisfactory                                                        Not Satisfactory

 Feedback to learner:




 Learner’s Signature:

 Assessor/Observer’s Signature:


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Supporting Documentation
In addition to the Scenario and Questions and/or Checklist the assessor must include in
the Simulation tool:
 Sample responses
 Instructions to learners
 Instructions to assessors /observers and advice on interpreting the evidence


Sample responses
The sample responses (sometimes called marking guides or benchmarks or ghost
markers) identify the performance indicators for the task activity and requirements of
answers to the knowledge questions.


Example:
 THCMAN05A: Install LP Gas Systems in Recreational Vehicles
 Sample Responses (excerpt)

 Planning
  steps in setting out a LPG piping system in accordance with AG 601.
  characteristics of LP Gas and the associated hazards when with this product
  correct gas load / design requirements, storage capacity, regulatory size and size of piping
  consultation with appropriate stakeholders with when planning
  consideration of safety hazards Health, safety and security

 Installation
 …….(continues)



Instructions to learners
As part of the Simulation assessment tool the assessor must provide clear instructions
to learners so that they know exactly what is expected of them. These instructions may
be written as part of the checklist or included as a separate document (sometimes
called an Assessment Cover Sheet or Assessment Criteria Sheet).


Good assessment instructions:
 identify the tasks which are to be performed,
 are comprehensive, covering the who, what, when, where and how of the
    assessment situation (eg materials required, timeframes, assistance available,
    specific location)
   are aligned to the correct AQF level
   are written in plain English using standard industry terminology


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When using a simulation, it is good practice to:
 give learners a pre-assessment briefing outlining the assessment method, process
  and tools
 discuss the criteria against which their performance is to be assessed
 give learners adequate information about the role they are to undertake and the
  significance of the event


Example:
THCMAN05A: Install LP Gas Systems in Recreational Vehicles
Instructions to Learners (excerpt)

The assessment for this unit requires you to complete a work activity in the RTO workshop under typical
workplace conditions as detailed in the Scenario (attached).

You will be observed by your assessor while you are undertaking the activity. The skills and knowledge
to be assessed are described in the assessment Matrix in your Learner Guide, and in the Learner Log
or Supervisor Checklist in your Training Record Book for this unit. These assessment activities are
detailed below:
Simulation
You will be observed by your assessor as you apply knowledge and skills to instal a gas system and
cooktop in a caravan.
The Observation / Performance Checklist will be used.
Verbal questions
You will be asked a series of questions by your assessor to assess your underpinning knowledge.
The Questioning Checklist will be used

Procedure
…….(continues)




Instructions to assessors
Assessors need advice on how to conduct the Simulation assessment and how to
interpret the evidence provided when making a decision of satisfactory / not satisfactory.




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Example:
PRMWM11B Respond to waste emergency
Assessor instructions for hazardous spill response simulation (excerpt)

Hazardous spill response simulation
This activity is based on the following elements from the Unit of Competency PRMWM11B Respond to
waste emergency from the Certificate III in Waste Management
     PRMWM11B.1 Identify nature of emergency
     PRMWM11B.2 Respond to emergency
     PRMWM11B.3 Review emergency response
     PRMWM11B.4 Assist with clean-up
     PRMWM11B.5 Document and report emergency

Scenario
Working in a team situation, learners are to demonstrate safe procedures for cleaning up a small
hazardous spill.

Instructions to the assessor
Location: This exercise is to be carried out in a contained area designated for the simulation and with all
safety equipment and facilities provided. This includes a shower designed for washing contaminants into a
sealed drainage point.

Resources required:
Spill response kit
Containment device such as booms
20 litre drum about half full of water (contents labelled as a detergent)
200 litre drum (unmarked, for clean up waste container)
Drain cover
Absorbent material
‘Hazardous waste’ label
MSDS for the particular detergent
Marker pen
Sets of appropriate personal protection equipment (PPE) (face shield, rubber boots, gloves, apron).

Procedure to follow:
1. Explain the purpose of the simulation and remind candidates of the assessment criteria.
2. Outline the scenario to the candidates.
3. Instruct the ‘clean up crew’ to put on the appropriate PPE.
4. When ready, spill the ‘detergent’ by tipping the drum on its side and removing the small screw-on lid.
5. Start with the first two steps of the procedure: ‘What to do ... ’ and ‘Initial action ... ’
6. Use the checklist for ‘Correct procedure’.




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Developing Work-based Project Assessment Tools
A work-based project can be a good way to assess work activities over a period of time.
A project will usually require the learner to perform a number of different tasks or
activities around one theme. Projects can be designed for individuals or groups to
complete.


Examples of work-based projects are:
 writing a workplace document (eg an induction manual, a policy or a procedure)
   solving a work-based problem (eg how to rearrange an office to improve work flow)
   researching information (eg finding out about workplace procedures)
   writing progress reports (eg reports of research, interviews or stages in a process)
   conducting a verbal presentation (eg doing a presentation of research or a proposal,
    or conducting a training session)
   designing and producing a product (eg a merchandise stall or a tool for metal work)

Designing the work-based project
   Identify a relevant workplace activity that is based on the Unit(s) of Competency to
    be assessed
   Identify the required end product, such as a model, report, presentation or a service
   Identify the steps needed to complete the task or make the product
   Develop a realistic timeframe for achieving the end product
   Identify feedback points
   Prepare a set of clear instructions for the learner
   Provide the criteria against which the learner will be assessed


When you decide to use a Work-based Project as a structured activity, your
assessment tool will need to include:
 A project brief/instruction sheet
 Supporting documentation:
      o Sample responses
      o Instructions to learners including the timeframe and any other pertinent
          information
      o Instructions for the assessor
Usually the instructions to the learner are included in the project brief or instruction
sheet of the work-based project.




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Excerpts from work-based project assessment tools are provided on the following
pages. Please note these are provided as samples used by assessors NOT as “best
practice” exemplars.


Project brief / instruction sheet
The project brief will identify:
 the purpose of the project
 resources the candidate might use
   any particular performance expectations
   who will observe the performance or assess the product
   instructions to the learner


Example 1:
CHCPR2A Organise experiences for children
Project instructions

This project will allow you to demonstrate competency for the first two elements of the Unit of
Competency CHCPR2A Organise experiences for children
 Establish a stimulating and positive environment
 Encourage children’s involvement in experiences.

Instructions to Learners
How to prepare
In consultation with your supervisor, assist in setting up the physical environment for a group of children
in age groups: 0-2 yrs, 3-5 yrs or 6-12yrs. This should remain set up for one week.
You will have to consider the placement of furniture and equipment, the accessibility of toys and play
materials, visual stimulation, lighting, ventilation and other relevant factors.
Readings that can help you with this project are:
 Introduction to Play and Leisure, Units 2 and 3
 Play and Development, Units 4 and 5.

How to perform
Your environment, as well as your interactions with the children, must show that you can organise
experiences for children that are safe, stimulating and positive and that encourage the children to be
involved in experiences.
This project enables you to demonstrate your understanding of the issues and procedures as well as
your practical skills on-the-job.




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Evidence gathering
1. Self-assessment
    At the end of the week, evaluate the environment you have set up by answering the following
    questions:
     Is the environment safe?
     Is the environment non-threatening?
     Is the environment stimulating?
     Is the environment challenging?
     Is the range of experiences sufficient for the child to make choices?
     Did your interactions with children support children’s play?
     You should provide examples that illustrate your answers.
2.   Observation
     Your work for this project will also be observed over the week by your supervisor.
     …….(continues)
Example 2:
THHGFA02A: Maintain Financial Records
Work based Project Brief (excerpt)
It is month end at your travel agency.
According to enterprise procedures, prepare reconciliations and adjusting journals for the following
accounts:
    bank account(s)
    purchases
    petty cash
    office materials
    commission
…….(continues)



Supporting Documentation
In addition to the project brief the assessor must include in the Work-based Project tool:
 Sample responses
 Instructions to learners
 Instructions to assessors /observers and advice on interpreting the evidence




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Sample responses
The sample responses (sometimes called marking guides or benchmarks or ghost
answers) identify the performance indicators for the task activity and requirements of
underpinning knowledge.


 Example 1:
THHGFA02A: Maintain Financial Records
Instructions to Assessors (excerpt)
Look for the following in workplace project response – did the learner:
 Describe typical record keeping systems as appropriate to industry sector
 Interpret bookkeeping terminology
Technical skills / procedures to the standard required by the enterprise, including correct use
of any equipment:
 Select the correct journal for an intended entry
 Make accurate entries in the correct location
 Cross reference journal entries to support documentation and / or explanation
 File source documents
 Check transaction documentation and account balances to ensure matching
 Record data on nominated system.
Plan and organise activities
 Complete journal entries and reconciliations within designated timelines
 Obtain and organise all information required for making journal entries and completing
    reconciliations
 Complete accurate recording during busy periods.
Work and communicate with colleagues and customers:
 Communicate in a polite and friendly manner
 Work effectively with others to ensure accurate and timely financial records
 Obtain authorisation for journal entries where appropriate
 Report reconciliation discrepancies and errors.
Respond to problems that may occur with the work activity:
 Note and action irregularities in journal entries within designated timelines
 Identify, investigate and rectify reconciliation discrepancies within scope of individual
    responsibilities
 Report and rectify errors in documentation.
Integrate health, safety and security procedures:
 Follow appropriate enterprise security procedures for financial documentation.
…….(continues)



Instructions to learners
As part of the Work-based Project assessment tool the assessor must provide clear
instructions to learners - so that they know exactly what is expected of them. Often
these instructions will be a key component of the Project Brief although they may be
included as a separate document (sometimes called an Assessment Cover Sheet or
Assessment Criteria Sheet).

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When using a work-based project, it is good practice to:
 give learners a pre-assessment briefing outlining the assessment method, process
  and tools
 discuss the criteria against which their performance is to be assessed
 give learners adequate information about timeframes and workplace protocol


Usually the instructions to the learner are included in the Project Brief/Instruction sheet
of the work-based project.


Instructions to assessors
Assessors need advice on how to conduct the Work-based Project assessment and
how to interpret the evidence provided when making a decision of satisfactory / not
satisfactory.


Example 1:
THHGFA02A: Maintain Financial Records
Instructions to Assessors (excerpt)


Focus on demonstrated understanding of:
Techniques and processes
 key steps in the bookkeeping process for a small business operation
 process of entering transactions into a journal
 importance of accuracy in the process and why

Underpinning knowledge
 terminology ‘financial records’.
 key principles of bookkeeping
 source documents

Organisation and planning
 information needed to record a financial transaction efficiently
…….(continues)




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                                                                 Developing Structured Activity Tools



Reviewing and Trialing Structured Activity Tools
Before you use your Structured Activity Tools it is important that you review the tools
with other assessors and trial them with relevant stakeholders to confirm validity and
reliability and to obtain advice on fairness and flexibility.


Focus particularly on whether the tools satisfy the needs of learners and the
requirements of the Unit of Competency, if the instructions are clear and if other
assessors can reliably use the tools you have developed.


Stakeholders could include:
 trainers
 other assessors
 a sample group of learners
 supervisors / industry representatives
 language, literacy and numeracy advisors


You can use information provided by the reviewers to target potential problems with the
tools and highlight areas for improvement. It is up to you to modify the tools based on
their responses and depending on the magnitude of the revisions, you may feel it is
necessary to go back to the reviewers to seek further feedback.


To demonstrate evidence of continuous improvement it is important to keep a record of
the trial/s including:
 the stakeholders involved
 their recommendations
   the revisions you made

Don’t forget to maintain version control on your tools to ensure you (and other
assessors) use the most current version.



            Developing Structured Activity Tools
             Aligning Assessment Tools to identified Assessment Methods
             Developing:
                o Role Play assessment tools
                o Case Study assessment tools
                o Simulation assessment tools
                o Work-based Project assessment tools
             Reviewing and trialing Structured Activity Tools


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