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									OSBP
NEWS
Summer 2008

Director’s Note

OSBP serves as an advocate, counselor, trainer, and liaison to the small business community and provides guidance and technical assistance to the MAI community. These services are administered through participation in outreach activities, including interagency sponsored conferences, one-on-one counseling and group training seminars. By supporting the mission of MAIs, we expand our research base and extend EPA’s reach into underserved communities. For example, this year HBCU Southern University at Shreveport in Louisiana was awarded a $199,999 Brownfields grant for job training. This grant is designed to recruit, train and place students in environmental jobs as part of the environmental justice project. A major part of OSBP’s mission since 2007 includes oversight of the Agency’s Minority Academic Institutions (MAI) Program. All Federal Government agencies are required to comply with Executive Orders that encourage MAI participation in Federal Programs. Here at EPA, we strive to meet the goals set forth by the President’s Executive Orders through innovative programs to create mutually beneficial partnerships with Minority Academic Institutions (MAIs). In this issue, we focus on the establishment of MAIs and OSBP’s initiatives to support and partner with these vital institutions By providing Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) and Science to Achieve Results (STAR) fellowships to highly qualified applicants, we

Inside This Issue
EPA MAI Program Building Capacity at MAIs: EPA’s Role Spelman College Greening Initiative The 4th National MSIRP Conference page page page page

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expand the talent pool of trained scientists and researchers for the future. We have expanded MAI partnership opportunities through the 4th National Minority Serving Institutions Research Partnership (MSIRP) Conference hosted by Dillard University. This three-day event, focused on the theme “Broadening the Scope: Advancing the Research Agenda at Minority Institutions” and was held in New Orleans on May 12-15, 2008. Hundreds of participants from MAIs as well as major research universities convened to share information, exchange ideas, and strategically plan for future research with partners from funding agencies, small businesses, and major corporations. OSBP is very excited about our MAI initiatives. We hope that you will be as well.

The MAI Program was created to advance the development of the nation’s full human potential and to advance equal opportunity in higher education, to strengthen the capacity of minority-serving colleges and universities to provide the highest quality education, and to increase opportunities for these institutions to participate in and benefit from Federal Programs. The Program operates, in large part, under the authority of Executive Orders. President George W. Bush signed Executive Order 13256, President’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, in 2002, establishing a Federal advisory group in the Office of the Secretary of Education “to strengthen the capacity of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to provide the highest quality education and to increase opportunities for these institutions to participate in and benefit from Federal programs.” The Advisory Board must provide an annual report to the President on the results of the participation of Historically Black Colleges and Universities in Federal programs. Additionally, the board must make “recommendations on how to increase the private sector role, including the role of private foundations, in strengthening Historically Black Colleges and Universities.” For more information on the program, see http://www.whitehouse.gov/ news/releases/2002/02/20020212-3.html. Through Executive Order 13270, Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), the Federal Government reaffirmed its commitment to tribal colleges and encouraged the private sector to contribute to the colleges’ educational and cultural missions. A President’s Board of Advisors was established in the Department of Education for TCUs. This Board and The White House Initiative on Tribal Colleges and Universities (WHITCU) ensure that national policy regarding “tribal colleges is carried out with direct accountability at the highest levels of the Federal Government.” They encourage the private sector to assist tribal colleges through increased use of such strategies as:

Read and Reflect, Jeanette L. Brown, Director Office of Small Business Programs

EPA MAI Program

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This issue of the OSBP News focuses on Minority Academic Institutions (MAIs).

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matching funds to support increased endowments developing expertise and more effective ways to manage finances, improve information systems, build facilities, and improve course offerings increasing resources for and training of faculty

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Be sure to review Executive Order 13270 for more information, located at http://www.whitehouse. gov/news/releases/2002/07/20020703-16.html. Other Executive Orders expanded the scope of the MAI Program to include institutions serving the Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Asian American, Pacific Islander and Hispanic communities. Unlike HBCUs and TCUs, which were established to meet the needs of a specific minority population, these institutions are defined by enrollment percentages. In 2007, the EPA’s MAI Program was transferred to the Office of Small Business Programs (OSBP) from the Office of Civil Rights (OCR). The transfer gave EPA organizational alignment with other Federal agencies and allowed the MAI Program to benefit from the outreach resources in OSBP. MAIs have not enjoyed the same historic relationship with the Federal Government as other institutions. However, because of the range of activities needed to support the EPA’s Mission, almost every major field of study at MAIs has a correlation to an EPA office, including accounting, chemistry, criminal investigation, economics, engineering, English, environmental crime, finance, human resources, information technology, innovative technology, management and organizational development, math, nanotechnology, public administration, regulatory compliance, research and development, research methodology, science technology, and other fields.

Essential aspects of the MAI Program include developing guidelines for Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with MAIs, promoting active accountability and implementation of MOUs, coordinating Agency activities, serving as a clearinghouse of information, representing the Agency at appropriate meetings and conferences, as well as identifying and facilitating potential partners. The MAI Program, with support from the Deputy Administrator, also convened a Senior Level Steering Committee to help provide coordinated resource allocation and strategic direction for the MAI Program.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities

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Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are educational institutions established prior to 1964 whose principal mission is the education of Black Americans. HBCUs at a Glance • Established before the Civil War, Cheney (1837), Lincoln (1854) and Wilberforce (1856) are academic pioneers in the development of institutions that serve the African American population. Subsequently, many private colleges and universities were established to serve the educational needs of the freed slave population after the Civil War.
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The Morrill Land-Grant Act of 1890, specified that states using Federal land-grant funds must either make their schools open to both Blacks and Whites or allocate money for segregated Black colleges to serve as an alternative to White schools. A total of 16 exclusively Black institutions received 1890 land-grant funds. There are now 106 HBCUs throughout the country, each of which has an average enrollment of 5,741 students per year. Approximately 50 percent of all African American professionals in the country graduated from the halls of these unique institutions. Among HBCU graduates are luminaries such as: Booker T. Washington; Thurgood Marshall; Debbie Allen; Claude Organ, MD; Walter Payton; Oprah Winfrey; and U.S. Representative Jesse Jackson, Jr., among many others.

Tribal Colleges and Universities
Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) offer opportunities for Native Americans to pursue higher education within their own cultural and regional contexts. Located on or near Indian reservations, the TCUs’ mission is to preserve and communicate traditional native culture, provide higher education and career or technical opportunities to tribal members, enhance economic opportunities within the reservation community, and promote tribal selfdetermination. TCUs ensure that students receive an education that is well grounded in their native history and culture so that they can serve as leaders in the tribal community.1 Tribal Colleges and Universities serve a variety of people, from young adults to senior citizens, American Indians to non-American Indians. They are often the only postsecondary institutions within some of our Nation’s poorest rural areas. TCUs help students overcome obstacles faced elsewhere. They also provide crucial services and advancement opportunities to communities with high rates of poverty and unemployment. TCUs at a Glance • Today, there are 37 tribal colleges and universities serving over 30,000 students from more than 250 tribal nations.2 Established in Tsaile, AZ, in 1968, Diné College (formerly Navajo Community College) was the first tribally controlled college. TCUs offered a viable option for degree attainment and the pursuit of life goals. Many graduates go directly into jobs or continue in other institutions of higher education.

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The Role of HBCUs

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HBCUs provide high quality education to students regardless of race or class. They contribute to the country’s economic growth by providing a multitude of graduates to middle- and upper-income careers. HBCUs also often partner with small businesses and community-based organizations in order to improve the economic health of their surrounding neighborhoods and enrich the lives of their students.
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http://collegefund.org/downloads/FINALIHEP-rpt-TribalAlumni-4-10.pdf http://www.tribalcollegejournal.org/aihec/aihec.html

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Hispanic-Serving Institutions
When considering a career in today’s competitive labor market, a high school diploma is no longer enough. Demand for postsecondary education has grown steadily over the past 20 years. This is especially true for the rapidly growing Hispanic population. Hispanic American enrollment in colleges and universities increased by 68 percent during the 1990s. As Hispanic enrollment grows, Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) play an increasingly important role in providing Hispanic Americans with access to college education.1 The defining characteristic of HSIs is their demography, not their mission. The Higher Education Act, 20 USCA Section 1101a, defines a Hispanic-Serving Institution as an institution of higher education that (a) is an eligible institution; (b) at the time of application, has an enrollment of undergraduate full-time equivalent students that is at least 25 percent Hispanic students; and (c) provides assurances that not less than 50 percent of the institution’s Hispanic students are low-income individuals.2 Unlike HBCUs and TCUs, whose definitions relate directly to their missions and the way they were created, HSIs include colleges that were established without any thought of serving Latino students in particular — and in many cases, these colleges only recently attracted significant numbers of Hispanic students.3 HSIs encompass the gamut of degree-granting institutions from two-year colleges such as MiamiDade Community College to research institutions such as the University of Texas at San Antonio. For more information regarding HSIs and other institutions serving Hispanic populations, please contact http://www.edexcelencia.org/research/ hsi/. (Note: low income is defined as 150% of the poverty level as determined by the Bureau of the

Census at http://www.census.gov/hhes/poverty/ povdef.html.)
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http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/2002051.pdf http://www.nces.ed.gov/ipeds/glossary/?charindex=H http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/03/09/hsi

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Building Capacity at MAIs: EPA’s Role

The EPA is involved in a range of activities and programs to develop and strengthen minority institutions that, in turn, produce human capital at MAIs1. In recognition that over the next five years there will be a substantial increase in “baby boomer” retirements, the EPA is actively working to build human capital to fill its wideranging staffing needs, and emphasizing intern and career development programs. As a key part of that effort, the Agency seeks ways to contribute to the vitality of the minority presence in environmental scholarship and research, and as future leaders in the country’s governmental and regulatory institutions. The EPA’s Strategic Plan, 2006-2011, notes that, “Water program offices have established or are working to establish ties to historically Black colleges, as well as to other colleges and universities, to ensure a diverse workforce into the future.” In fact, the goal is Agency-wide as it works to develop and mentor its future cadres and leadership and ensure the continued human health and environmental

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protection of the nation over the next century and beyond. For example, to help fill coming staffing gaps, EPA offers merit-based Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) fellowships, which were designed to help build capacity in universities with limited funding for research. Evolving in 1995 from the U.S. Minority Academic Institutions Fellowship Program, each GRO fellowship provides up to $17,000 per year of academic support and up to $7,500 of internship support for the three-month summer period. Since its 1995 inception, EPA has awarded more than 2,200 fellowships to students in almost every state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Fellowship Opportunities In October 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson visited Spelman College to recognize four students, Terri Ambrose, Akosua Dosu, Juandalyn Coffen, and Elan Mitchell, for their excellence in environmental research. They are among 20 other Spelman students who have been awarded GRO fellowships. According to EPA’s National Center for Environmental Research, the college has received more of the fellowship awards than any other institution. Dr. Victor Madu Ibeanusi served as a mentor and adviser to the 24 students and currently is professor of biology and chair of the environmental science and studies program at Spelman College. He points out that, “Nationwide, Spelman is the only undergraduate institution [HBCU] that has an active environmental science program, with a strong emphasis on the sciences and its applications and has established an active research program and educational training, including a minor in environmental studies for students to realize the opportunities in this expansive field.” Dr. Ibeanusi started serving as a reviewer for the MAI fellowship program as a junior faculty member in 1992, and has been actively involved in expanding environmental research at Spelman. He notes that he “introduced the GRO and STAR [EPA’s Science to Achieve Results Program]
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programs at Spelman primarily to support the efforts of establishing the environmental science and studies program at the College.” While GROs are available to both undergraduate and graduate students, the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Graduate Fellowships are limited to graduate students in environmentally related fields of study. EPA’s STAR fellowships are designed to encourage them to obtain advanced degrees and pursue careers in environmental fields. There are a range of additional funding sources for students interested in environmental issues. EPA has numerous opportunities available within the Agency for students to gain vital career experience while contributing to its mission of protecting human health and safeguarding the environment. Internships, fellowships, and other opportunities are available in Washington, DC, at laboratories, and at regional EPA locations nationwide. For further information on these, see the EPA Web site and associated links at http:// www.epa.gov/careers/stuopp.html. EPA’s Strategic Vision The EPA’s Strategic Plan, 2006-2011, calls for the Agency to focus on five areas, including: 1) Clean Air and Global Climate Change, 2) Clean and Safe Water, 3) Land Preservation and Restoration, 4) Healthy Communities and Ecosystems, and 5) Compliance and Environmental Stewardship. More specifically, the EPA has as its objective the restoration and protection of the ozone layer, water, land, and ecosystems, as well as the enhancement of science and research in each of these key areas. As noted in the Strategic Plan, “EPA also works closely with public- and privatesector partners and stakeholders to develop tools, such as monitoring, modeling, and emission inventories, that allow states, tribes, and localities to address more localized problems.” In the area of Clean and Safe Water, the EPA aims to enhance Science and Research. Another area outlines the Agency’s goals to plan and restore land. Studies have shown that minority

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and/or low-income communities may be disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards and risks. Thus EPA can partner with MAIs, which draw from these communities as a fundamental aspect of their education mission and may be more inclined to aggressively seek ways to reduce those hazards and risks, making them an important resource for effectively dealing with this area. For example, Brownfields, which EPA defines as “real properties where expansion, redevelopment, or reuse may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants,” are prominent in minority neighborhoods. MAIs have partnered with EPA to assess them, educate the communities on the risks posed by them, and collaborate in Brownfields clean up so that these properties may be reinvested in and developed into valuable resources to the community by increasing the local tax base, facilitating job growth, utilizing existing infrastructure, and taking development pressures off underdeveloped land. There are obvious opportunities for small business cooperation in Brownfields clean up as well. Air Quality Programs To support its Air Research Program, EPA “conducts research at EPA laboratories, through extramural grants (including five Particulate Matter Research Centers), and by co-funded partnerships (for instance, with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the Health Effects Institute [HEI]).” The Agency is focusing its air research to achieve measurable improvements in two areas: 1) reducing uncertainty in the science that supports EPA in setting air standards, and 2) reducing uncertainty about the effects of air pollutants on human health. To achieve these goals, its research program plans to focus on: 1) developing data and tools to support national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS), 2) understanding the effects of air pollution on health, and 3) linking sources and effects.

New Opportunities There are a wide range of new opportunities for MAIs to support EPA in fulfilling its mission. In its Strategic Plan, the Agency notes that it faces a shortage of staff skills to implement new air program requirements, such as the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and Energy Policy Act of 2005. To implement CAIR, the EPA has identified gaps in its workforce skills to support emissions measurement, engineering technology, environmental assessment, and computer database development and administration. Similarly, to develop a national renewable fuel standard and promulgate regulations to implement it, EPA needs staff with expertise in renewable fuels, vehicle testing, refinery modeling, transportation modeling and life-cycle analysis, energy security impacts, and economic analysis. To address these gaps, EPA seeks cooperative agreements with several top engineering colleges. MAIs could serve as a key resource in fulfilling EPA’s needs in these skill set areas. To ensure a highly qualified, diverse workforce, EPA is developing relationships with MAIs to help them develop academic programs that will prepare students for environmental careers. The Agency seeks toxicologists with expertise in chemical testing, registration, and monitoring; biologists to evaluate the exposure impact of chemical releases on wetlands; specialized chemical engineers to reduce risks at chemical facilities; and modelers to evaluate risks of chemical to populations and fragile ecosystems. Additionally, EPA has identified a growing need to economists, epidemiologists, human exposure modelers, and hydrologists, to fill mission-critical scientist/ researcher positions. In the area of Compliance and Environmental Stewardship, EPA seeks skilled facilitators and communicators to improve its interaction with the regulated community. Toward that end, employees are urged to rotate to state and local levels to deal with regional and local problems that will provide them with a broader perspective. Employees are placed within research centers and other facilities and programs at MAIs to work
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with these partners to further the EPA mission. Further, students preparing for careers as civil and criminal investigators, as well as those with an administrative and judicial focus, are encouraged to serve as interns at EPA facilities to build the necessary skill sets for compliance monitoring and enforcement programs that require competent inspections, evaluations, and investigations. Varieties of programs have been developed to enhance environmental sustainability through science and research. The Science and Technology for Sustainability (STS) research program develops models, tools, and technologies toward that end. There is an increasing role for HBCU participation in this important area. So, too, the Sustainable Environmental Systems research program, which draws on economics, ecology, law, and engineering to find systems-based solutions to regional environmental problems presents a range of opportunities for HBCU participation. EPA offers an excellent workplace for aspiring scientists, as well as other professionals, interested in working on cutting-edge scientific developments as they pertain to human health and the environment. EPA’s research is crossdisciplinary, and its “core research” builds scientific knowledge of human health and ecology and informs decision making. Its researchers advance monitoring and assessment programs in support of EPA goals, including the measurement and analysis of environmental conditions, and focus on environmental stewardship, sustainability, and pollution prevention. As the EPA Strategic Plan notes, “Pollution prevention programs can provide a forum for industry and academia to exchange information on the environmental effects and benefits of innovative nanomaterials and promote environmentally responsible manufacturing processes and product design.”
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MAIs Partner with EPA in Brownfield Revitalization Efforts

EPA and MAIs are providing significant partnership results in Brownfield revitalization. In January 2002, President Bush signed into law the Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act, under which EPA provides financial assistance to eligible applicants through four competitive grant programs, including assessment grants, revolving loan fund grants, cleanup grants, and job training grants. EPA plans to continue to award competitive grants to assess and clean up Brownfields and provide job-training opportunities within affected communities. The Act requires the Agency to consider “the extent to which the grant would address or facilitate the identification and reduction of threats to the health or welfare of minority or low-income communities, or other sensitive populations,” highlighting its commitment to “environmental justice.” Toward this end, EPA is developing a methodology to assess the relationship between EPA-funded Brownfields projects and the sensitive, socioeconomically disadvantaged communities that they serve. MAIs could expand their participation in EPA-sponsored Brownfields workshops and educational events that are designed to provide forums for sharing ideas, lessons learned, and best practices.

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For FY 2008, the EPA announced that 13 communities in 10 states would share more than $2.5 million in job-training grants geared toward cleaning up contaminated properties and turning them into productive community assets. Under its Brownfields Initiative, the Agency awarded grants of up to $200,000 each to non-profit organizations, local governments, a university, and a tribe. The grants will teach environmental assessment and cleanup job skills to individuals living in low-income areas near Brownfields sites in Alabama, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Nevada, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Washington. Southern University at Shreveport (SUSLA) in Louisiana, an HBCU located in a city with approximately a 58 percent minority population and high poverty and unemployment levels, particularly near the Brownfields-impacted areas targeted by the grant, was awarded $199,999 for a job-training grant. SUSLA plans to train 37 students, place 31 graduates in environmental jobs, and track them for one year. The training program will consist of three, 121-hour training cycles comprising technical instruction in HAZWOPER, OSHA safety, asbestos abatement supervisor, CPR, and first aid. As part of the environmental justice project, students will be recruited from lowto-moderate-income populations living in areas impacted by Brownfields. Small businesses like Abatement Services, Inc., ALTEC Environmental, and SRP Environmental have expressed interest in partnering with the university and hiring trained graduates. For further information on EPA’s Brownfields grants, news and events, publications and links, and specific contacts, see the EPA Web site at www.epa.gov/brownfields.

What Special Roles Do MAIs Have in Government Contracting?

Public and private sector institutions seek to strengthen the academic programs and resources of MAIs and utilize them in the fulfillment of their missions and contracts. By Federal law, contracts with Small Disadvantaged Businesses (SDBs), HBCUs, and MAIs are awarded through the Small Business Administration Section 8(a) Program, the Department of Defense (DoD) Small and Disadvantaged Business Program, other agency programs. Through specific statutory authority in line with U.S. Government policy outlined in Executive Order 12928, all agencies and employees involved in Federal procurement “shall assist SDBs, HBCUs, and MAIs, as applicable, to develop viable, self-sustaining businesses capable of competing on an equal basis in the mainstream of the American economy.” By law (National Defense Act of 1987, Public Law 99-661, Section 1207), all DoD departments and agencies are required to establish participation goals for MAIs of not less than five percent or a greater percent where otherwise provided by law (in fact, the five percent goal is governmentwide). In recent years, actual funding for contracts with HBCUs has often exceeded the national five percent goal. Office of Federal Procurement
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Policy (OFPP) Letter No. 79-1, dated March 7, 1979, on the implementation of Section 15(k) of the Small Business Act (Public Law 85-536) requires that each Federal department and agency with contracting authority establish an OSDBU and that the OSDBU Director “be responsible only to, and report directly to, the head of such agency or to the deputy of such head.” It is strongly recommended to those interested in partnering with MAIs to win government contracts with EPA to regularly monitor the OSDBU and Office of Small Business Programs (OSBP) Web sites of Federal agencies. Approximately 34 Federal agencies participate under E.O. 13256, entering into appropriate grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements and other arrangements with HBCUs. The executive order also encourages the private sector to support and partner with MAIs. The goals are to: • Increase voluntary private-sector contributions to support endowments and the overall financial stability of the institutions Improve and enhance the quality and number of private-sector partnerships focused on academic program development Aid MAIs by improving information management and facilities as well as strengthening academic course offerings

It is widely recognized that Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, grants, and research opportunities sustain and grow MAIs’ infrastructure and research capabilities, helping these institutions better prepare students for careers in Federal agencies. The special roles of MAIs in contracting with the EPA range from the typical science and technology areas to areas such as accounting, criminal justice and investigation, research, human resources, and environmental protection. There are opportunities for MAIs to partner with the majority of EPA’s programs. The benefits are many, including increased institutional capacity of MAIs, enhanced nurturing and development of future leaders in these fields, and economic and small business growth.

Spelman College Greening Initiative

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One of the President’s Board of Advisors’ tasks is to “coordinate outreach to and consultation with the private sector … and coordinate outreach to state and local governments, as well as communities and representatives from academia and other relevant elements of society.” Many MAIs have substantial research capabilities that can be utilized by public-private partnerships.

Spelman College, a historically Black, liberal arts, women’s college in Atlanta, Georgia, joins a growing number of institutions that have started “green” (environmentally friendly) construction. Spelman will open a “green” dorm in the fall of 2008. Spelman recognizes the importance of developing behaviors and inculcating practices that foster environmental protection, resource stewardship, and energy conservation in our future leaders. New courses, conservation initiatives, and capital projects are just the beginning of Spelman’s cultural shift toward

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creating an environmentally sustainable college campus community.1 Jewell A. Harper, an EPA attorney assigned to Spelman College pursuant to the Intergovernmental Personnel Act, has been an integral part of the environmental initiatives at Spelman College for the past year. “The EPA recognizes that Spelman has taken a real leadership role among MAIs,” stated Ms. Harper. As an EPA attorney and visiting lecturer on environmental law and policy, Ms. Harper consults with Spelman through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between EPA and Spelman. She has witnessed the commitment of the college to raise environmental consciousness at every level of campus life. She is an integral member of Spelman’s Sustainability Workgroup, a working group composed of students, staff, and faculty tasked with developing a sustainability strategy for the college. Ms. Harper’s enthusiasm is palpable. “Spelman is a model for implementing ‘green thinking’ at every level of campus life. It is great to be a part of something so positive and productive.” Integrated Environmental Strategy Spelman’s commitment to environmental responsibility begins at the top. Environmental stewardship is championed by Spelman’s President, Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, as a part of her ALIVE initiative. Dr. Tatum believes that “our commitment to be ‘a choice to change the world’ for our students must include educating them and our entire community about the need to take responsibility for protecting the earth… We want Spelman College to be strong and vital far into the future, but it won’t matter if the world we live in has become uninhabitable.”2 Tatum’s vision is supported by faculty, staff, and students. Consistent efforts are being made to integrate environmental sustainability concerns into every aspect of campus life.

Beginning with the curriculum, Spelman has expanded its academic offerings in both the science and political science departments. In addition to formal environmental studies courses, Spelman’s faculty also incorporates environmental themes, examples, and impacts into biology, chemistry, mathematics, statistics, economics, and art courses. The students put environmental consciousness into practice through innovative artwork and student-based recycling challenges. The college has also implemented policies promoting water conservation, energy conservation, composting, buying locally and campus-wide recycling programs. Capital Planning and Construction In October 2006, Spelman College took a bold step toward environmental responsibility by breaking ground for its new “green” residence hall, which is expected to earn it the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification. When awarded, Spelman will be the first HBCU to earn such distinction. Slated for completion in the fall of 2008, the 201,455 square-foot facility utilizes many green building practices. It uses recycled construction materials; low-volatility glue, paints, plastics and carpet; efficient water and power conservation technologies; as well as improved wastewater management. Its plan incorporates features such as secure bicycle storage and automated water shutoff, thereby encouraging students to make eco-responsible transportation and lifestyle choices. Fundraising efforts are also underway to add an “eco-roof” to the green residence facility. The “green-roof” would use indigenous plantings on the roof, which will improve the energy efficiency of the building and reduce the urban heat island effect by 1) reducing heating and cooling loads on the building; 2) reducing stormwater runoff; and 3) filtering pollutants and CO2 out of the air. It is expected that the green roof could lower dorm energy costs by as much as 30 percent.

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EPA’s Ongoing Support The EPA has recognized and supported environmental scholarship and initiatives at Spelman College since it established the first MOU in 1993. Since then, Spelman students and faculty have participated in a variety of opportunities with EPA. Many Spelman students have been awarded internships, scholarships, and fellowships with EPA, and many have gone on to become EPA professionals. In February 2007, EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson visited Spelman’s campus to experience campus initiatives and sign a collaborative MOU re-affirming the EPA’s continuing commitment to a solid foundation of partnership. “At EPA, we believe environmental responsibility is everyone’s responsibility, and we are grateful that Spelman College is equipping our nation’s future leaders with the tools to be effective environmental stewards,” commented EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson. “Today’s agreement affirms our shared commitment to challenge our best and brightest to help build a healthier America.”3
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The advantage of teaming with a small business on environmental issues is that these entities are often intimately familiar with their surroundings and immediate environment. Further, often they specialize in areas that are complementary to the EPA’s overall goals. The advantages of teaming with an HBCU are many. The infusion of fresh ideas occurs when HBCU students in environmentally related programs are involved in such partnerships. Recent and accurate research and resources are also available to these teams. Teaming with an HBCU, a small business may embark upon a lengthy, powerful, and rewarding relationship that can make a difference in the environment.

The 4th National Minority Serving Research Institutions’ Partnership Conference
This year’s conference, hosted by Dillard University in New Orleans, LA, May 12-15, had as its theme, “Broadening the Scope: Expanding Research Competitiveness in Minority Institutions.” Nearly 1000 representatives from government, academia, and private industry explored possibilities for expanding collaborative research initiatives and partnerships. So, too, representatives from Minority Academic Institutions (HBCUs, TCUs and HSIs) as well as major Research Universities, were brought together to exchange ideas, share best practices, and plan to conduct future research with partners from funding agencies, small businesses, and corporations. For more information, please contact Mr. Theodore Callier, (504) 816-4261, tcallier@dillard.edu. Additional information is available at http://www.msirp2008.com.

http://www.theweekly.com/news/2006/October/19/Spelman_College.html http://www.spelman.edu/about_us/news/pdf/Inside_SpelmanF07W08.pdf

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EPA and Small Business: Teaming on Environmental Issues
Clean water, air pollution, toxic waste, pesticide use, hazardous lead, Brownfields, acid rain, ozone destruction, oil spills, radon, agriculture, and recycling are all areas of environmental science that concern HBCU students. Many of these topics are also of concern to communitybased organizations and small businesses.
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Calendar of Events
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OSBP has identified meetings, conferences, and forums being provided across the country that may be of interest to the small business community. Events where OSBP will sponsor or support are identified in blue with the lead OSBP staff person who can be contacted for additional information. The Calendar of Events is maintained by Elnora Thompson. Elnora can be reached at (202) 566-2709. The Calendar is also available on EPA’s website at www.epa.gov/osbp (click on the calendar).

July / August
DATE EVENT LOCATION CONTACT

July 7-10

4th Annual National Veterans Small Business Conference & Expo League of United Latin American (LULAC) National Convention Social Security Administration Small Business Conference & Expo National Council of La Raza Annual Conference 99th Annual NAACP Nation Convention Federally Employed Women (FEW) National Training Program American Airlines and SCORE Business Matchmaking Conference EPA OSBP Small Business Counseling HubZone Businesses National Black Chamber of Commerce 16th Annual Convention National Urban League (NUL) National Convention Organization of Chinese Americans (OCA) National Conference

Las Vegas, NV

www.sellingtoarmy.info

July 7-12

Washington, DC

www.lulac.com

July 10

Baltimore, MD

Liz Hood / 800-878-2940

July 12-15

San Diego, CA

www.nclr.org

July 12-17

Cincinnati, OH

www.naacp.org

July 14-18

Anaheim, CA

www.fewntp.org

July 23 July 24 July 23-26 July 30August 2 July 31August 3

New York, NY Washington, DC New Orleans, LA Orlando, FL Washington, DC

www.businessmatchmaking.com Lamont Norwood / 202-564-0928 www.nationabcc.com www.nul.org www.ocanati.org

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www.epa.gov/osbp

OSBP NEWS

Calendar of Events
August / September
DATE EVENT LOCATION CONTACT

August 1

ProBiz 2008 Black in Government (BIG) National Training conference Social Security Administration Awareness Day Chicago 2008 Minority Enterprise Development Week 11th Annual South Texas Contracting Opportunities Conference 5th Annual Elite SDVOB National Convention Association of Small Business Development Centers Annual Conference MED Week 2008 Conference Hispanic Women’s Corporation Conference – Latina Power 4th Annual Service Disabled and Veterans Small Business Conference American Airlines and SCORE Business Matchmaking Conference Black Caucus Foundation, Inc. 37th Annual Legislative Conference US Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 29th Annual National Convention & Business Expo

Silver Spring, MD

Malcolm Beech / 301-593-0527

August 11-15 August 12

New Orleans, LA Baltimore, MD

www.bignet.org Nicole McCracken / 800-878-2940

August 14-15

Chicago, IL

www.chicagomedweek.com

August 14-15

South Padre Island, TX

www.stxbizone.com

August 20-22

Annapolis, MD

www.mdsdvobn.org

September 2-5

Chicago, IL

www.asbdc.org

September 3-5

Washington, DC

www.medweek.com

September 13-14

Phoenix, AZ

www.hispanicwomen.org

www.epa.gov/osbp

September 17-18

Albuquerque, NM

Susan Chavez / 505-248-8255

September 24

Boston, MA

www.businessmatchmaking.com

September 24-27

Washington, DC

www.cbcfinc.org

September 24-27

Sacramento, CA

www.ushcc.com

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OSBP NEWS

Calendar of Events
October / November / December
DATE EVENT LOCATION CONTACT

October 9-12

National Society of Hispanic MBAs Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award Corporation Annual Conference Society for Advancement of Chicanos & Native Americans In Science Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities – 22nd Annual Conference EPA OSBP Small Business Counseling Session/Environmental Cleanup/Brownfields Business Spelman college 2008 Collegiate Environmental Sustainability Conference 31st Annual Society of Mexican American Engineers & Scientists (MAES) International American Airlines and SCORE Business Matchmaking Conference American Indian Science Engineering Society (AISES) American Airlines and SCORE Business Matchmaking Conference Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Inc. Conference EPA OSBP Small Business Counseling Session/Service Disabled Veterans Small Business NASA 1st Annual Small Business Symposium & Awards Deep East Texas Economic Opportunities Conference 2008

Atlanta, GA

www.nshmba.org

October 9-12

Houston, TX

www.henaac.org

October 9-13

Salt Lake City, UT

www.sacnas.org

October 11-13

Denver, CO

www.hacu.net

October 16

Washington, DC

Lamont Norwood / 202-566-2933 www.epa.gov/region4/ greencolleges

October 23-24

Atlanta, GA

October 23-25

Las Vegas, NV

www.maes-nati.org

October 29 October 30November 1 November 12

St. Louis, MO

www.businessmatchmaking.com

www.epa.gov/osbp

Anaheim, CA Los Angeles, CA

www.aises.org

www.businessmatchmaking.com

November 12-16

Phoenix, AZ

www.oneshpe.shpe.org

November 13

Washington, DC

Lamont Norwood / 202-566-2933

November 17-19

Washington, DC

Truphelia Parker / 202-358-1820

December 4

Lufkin, TX

Assistance Center / 936-633-5432

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OSBP NEWS

Program Activities
Direct Procurement
Description The Office of Small Business Programs (OSBP) develops, in collaboration with the Director of the Office of Acquisition Management Division (OAM), the Office of Administration and Resources Management (OARM), and EPA senior-level officials, programs to stimulate and improve the involvement of small business, minority business, labor surplus areas and women-owned business enterprises in the overall EPA procurement process. OSBP monitors and evaluates Agency performance in achieving EPA goals and objectives in the above areas, and recommends the assignment of EPA Small Business Representatives of the Small Business Administration to carry out their duties pursuant to applicable socioeconomic laws and mandates. Activities • • Develops policy and procedures impacting socioeconomic businesses Establish and monitor direct procurement and subcontracting goals for: • Small Business • Small Disadvantaged Business 8(a) • Minority 8(a) Business • Women-Owned Businesses • Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business • Veteran-Owned Small Business • Hubzone Business Compile, collect and assemble statistical data on socioeconomic programs Mentor-Protégé Program Subcontracting Reviews and Approvals Outreach Efforts (Economic Development Programs for Selected Urban Centers) Educational Training Programs-Cosponsorship of Workshops, Seminars and Trade Fairs Provide technical and management assistance to small, disadvantaged business enterprises and women-owned entities, and HBCUs, TCUs and HSIs Liaison with Trade Associations, and Federal Agencies, including: Small Business Administration, Minority Business Development Agency of Department of Commerce, Office of Federal Procurement Policy, OMB, Congress, General Services Administration, on Socioeconomic matters

www.epa.gov/osbp
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• • • • • • • •

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OSBP NEWS

Program Activities Cont.
Indirect Procurement
Description The OSBP is also responsible for establishing policy and providing procedural guidance for the utilization of small, minority and women-owned businesses under the Agency´s financial assistance programs. It is EPA’s policy (40 CFR Sec. 31.36(e)) that recipients of EPA financial assistance through grants and cooperative agreements award a “fair share” of subagreements to small, minority and women-owned businesses. Since each is a separate entity, the objective is to assure that each of three business entities is given the opportunity to participate in subagreements awards under EPA financial assistance agreements. This policy applies to all subagreements for supplies, construction and services under any EPA grant or cooperative agreement. Additionally, OSBP is responsible for the collection of data, monitoring the effectiveness of the program and serves as the principal focal point between EPA and the Minority Business Development Agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Activities • • • • • • • Develops and monitors policy and procedures Regions establish “Fair Share” objectives with recipients of financial assistance Recipients report to delegated States or to Regional Offices EPA reports data to the Cabinet council for Commerce and Trade through the Minority Business Development Agency Provides technical and management assistance to minority and women-owned businesses Compile, collect, analyze and assemble data on DBEs, HBCUs and IAGs Report on financial assistance program to various entities, including Congress

EPA/OSBP Mission
The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Small Business Programs is to support the protection of the environment and human health by fostering opportunities for partnerships, contracts, subagreements, and grants for small and socioeconomically disadvantaged concerns

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www.epa.gov/osbp

OSBP NEWS

Agency Goals
Fiscal Year 2008 and 2009 Agency Goals The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) goals for Fiscal Years (FY) 2008/2009 are based on a estimated contract obligations of $1.2 billion for direct and $200 million for subcontracts. EPA FY 2008/2009 AGENCY GOALS
Estimated Obligations Direct Small Businesses 8(a) Businesses* Non 8(a) Small Disadvantaged Businesses Women-Owned Businesses HUBZone Businesses Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses Subcontract Small Businesses Small Disadvantaged Businesses Women-Owned Businesses HUBZone Businesses Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses Negotiated Dollar Value $477.6M $90M $36M $60M $36M $36M Dollar Value $100M $40M $15M $60M $60M Goal 39.8% *7.5% *3.0% 5.0% 3.0% 3.0% Goal 50.0% 20.0% 7.5% 3.0% 3.0%

NOTE: Subcontracting goals are subject to increase in individual solicitations in an effort to meet overall Agency goals.

www.epa.gov/osbp
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*Since 8(a)s are SDBs, EPA in essence has an SDB goal of 10.5%.

The Federal Government purchases billions of dollars in goods and services each year that range from paper clips to complex space vehicles. It is the policy of the United States, as stated in the Small Business Act, that all businesses have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in providing goods and services to the government. To ensure that small businesses get their fair share, the SBA negotiates annual procurement preference goals with each Federal agency and reviews the results.

osbp news • summer 2008 • www.epa.gov/osbp

OSBP NEWS

OSBP Employee Contact List
Jeanette L. Brown, Director Cassandra R. Freeman, Deputy Director Kimberly Patrick, Attorney Advisor Lamont Norwood, Program Analyst Angela Suber, Program Analyst Paula Zampieri, Program Analyst Teree Henderson, Program Analyst Tammy Thomas, Management Analyst Denean Jones, Information Specialist Bridgette Dent, Program Assistant Elnora Thompson, Office Automation Assistant (202) 566-2075 (202) 566-1968 (202) 566-2605 (202) 566-2933 (202) 566-2827 (202) 566-2496 (202) 566-2222 (202) 566-1209 (202) 566-1578 (202) 566-2819 (202) 566-2709 brown.jeanettel@epa.gov freeman.cassandra@epa.gov patrick.kimberly@epa.gov norwood.lamont@epa.gov suber.angela@epa.gov zampieri.paula@epa.gov henderson.teree@epa.gov thomas.tammy@epa.gov jones.denean@epa.gov dent.bridgette@epa.gov thompson.elnora@epa.gov newton.jonathan@epa.gov

Jonathan Newton, Minority Academic Coordinator (202) 566-1981

SEE Enrollees
Samuel Peterson, Advisor Thelma Harvey, Secretary Barbara Overton, Secretary Esther McCrary, Secretary Tom Nakley, Civil Engineer Joseph Albright, Biologist (202) 566-1510 (202) 566-0334 (202) 566-1509 (202) 566-2824 (202) 566-2826 (202) 566-2817 peterson.samuel@epa.gov harvey.thelma@epa.gov overton.barbara@epa.gov mccrary.esther@epa.gov nakley.thomas@epa.gov albright.joseph@epa.gov

www.epa.gov/osbp

OSBP Main Number OSBP Toll Free Number Ombudsman Hotline Number

(202) 566-2075 (866) 618-7870 (800) 368-5888

OSBP@epa.gov

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OSBP NEWS

Small Business Vendor Profile System
EPA’s Small Business Vendor Profile System is designed to collect and display information concerning businesses registered with EPA’s Office of Small Business Programs (OSBP). The system captures information on small; small disadvantaged; 8(a) certified; women-owned; Hubzone; veterans; service disabled veterans; and Tribal businesses (Federally or State recognized). Information is also available on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) and Minority Academic Institutions (MAIs). If you would like to be included in EPA/OSBP’s automated database, go to: cfpub.epa.gov/sbvps, or complete the form located on page 21 and fax it to Denean Jones at (202) 566–0548.

www.epa.gov/osbp
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osbp news • summer 2008 • www.epa.gov/osbp

OSBP NEWS

Small Business Vendor Profile System

Date: Company Name*:
 Contact*:
 Title:
 Address*:
 City*: Phone #*: E-mail Address*:
 Internet Address: NAICS Code(s)*: State*: Fax #:
 Zip Code*:


Capabilities:

Have you done business with the EPA before*
Classification Large Mid-Size Small SDB Small WOB 8(a) Certified

NO

Yes, as a Prime

Yes, as a Subcontractor

www.epa.gov/osbp

Ethnicity African American Asian-Indian Asian-Pacific Caucasian American Female Hispanic

Service Disabled Veteran HUBZone

Tribal Federally Recognized State Recognized

HBCU HSI Native American Tribal College/ University Other Minority Other Minority None

The fields marked by * are required and must be filled in.
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OSBP NEWS

Small Business Ombudsman
Regulatory Assistance and Outreach Program

Major Functions/Products:
• Serve as a port of entry “gateway” for small businesses to EPA • Advocate for small business regulatory issues and relief inside EPA • Coordinate small business issues with program offices, regions, and states • Focus on asbestos regulatory requirements/handle questions • Operate and maintain a Small Business hotline • Participate on regulatory development workgroups representing small business interests • Semi-annual Newsletter • Facilitate annual meeting between the Deputy Administrator and Small Business Trade Associations • Prepare an annual report to Congress on the status of CAAA State Section 507 Programs • Sponsor annual Small Business Regional Liaison Conference • Develop guidance and policies for small businesses • Resolve disputes between small businesses and EPA dealing with policies and regulations • Distribute small business publications, regulations, guidance, and tools

Customers:
• Small Businesses/Small Business Trade Associations • State Small Business Ombudsman and Small Business Environmental Assistance Programs • EPA senior managers, media offices and Agency staff, EPA regions and states • Private Citizens • EPA Administrator and Deputy Administrator • Congressional representatives and staff, Governors, Environmental Council of the States (ECOS) • Assistance providers, i.e., EPA Compliance Centers, Pollution Prevention Programs (P2), Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs), Manufacturing Extension Partners (MEPs)

www.epa.gov/osbp

Small Business Ombudsman Contact Info:
Toll Free Hotline: Fax: (800) 368-5888 (202) 566-1505

22

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OSBP NEWS

Request For Publications
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Small Business Programs 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW (1230T) Washington, DC 20460 (202) 566-2075 (202) 566-0266 (Fax)

Name: Firm: Address:

City: Phone #: Fax #:

State:

Zip Code:

Please Check Publications Requested
Mentor-Protege Program Forecast of Contract Opportunities

www.epa.gov/osbp

Contract Opportunities Under Superfund (five basic categories) The 8(a) Program HUBZone Fact Sheet

osbp news • summer 2008 • www.epa.gov/osbp

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OSBP NEWS

Regional DBE Coordinators

REGION I 
 (CT, ME, RI, MA, NH, VT)
 Valerie Bataille (617) 918-1674
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 New England Region
 One Congress Street (MGM), Suite 1100
 Boston, MA 02114-2023
 REGION II 
 (NJ, NY, PR, VI)
 Michele Junker (212) 637-3418
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 290 Broadway- 27th Floor
 New York, NY 10007-1866
 REGION III
 (DE, VA, MD, PA, DC, WV)
 Romona McQueen (215) 814-5155
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 1650 Arch Street
 Philadelphia, PA 19103
 REGION IV 
 (AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN)
 Josephine Brown (404) 562-9634
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 61 Forsyth Street, S.W.
 Atlanta, GA 30303-8960
 REGION V 
 (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI)
 Adrianne Callahan (312) 353-5556
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 77 West Jackson Boulevard (MC-10J)
 Chicago, IL 60604-3507
 REGION VI 
 (AR, LA, NM, OK, TX)
 Debora N. Bradford (214) 665-7406
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 First Interstate Bank Tower at Fountain Place
 1445 Ross Avenue, 12th Floor, Suite 1200
 Dallas, TX 75202-2733
 REGION VII
 (MO, NE, IA, KS)
 Chester Stovall (913) 551-7549
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 901 North 5th Street
 Kansas City, KS 66101
 REGION VIII
 (CO, MT, WY, SD, ND, UT)
 Marshell Pullman (303) 312-6499
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 999 18th Street, Suite 500
 Denver, CO 80202-2405
 REGION IX 
 (AZ, HI, CA, NV)
 Joe Ochab (415) 972-3761
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 75 Hawthorne Street (PMD-1)
 San Francisco, CA 94105
 REGION X 
 (AK, ID, OR, WA)
 Greg Luchey (206) 553-2967
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 1200 Sixth Avenue (OMP-145)
 Seattle, WA 98101
 CINCINNATI Juan Common (513) 487-2024
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Contracts Management Division
 26 West Martin Luther King Drive
 Cincinnati, OH 45268
 NORTH CAROLINA Jerry Dodson (919) 541-2249
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Contracts Management Division
 Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
 HEADQUARTERS Veronica Squirrell (202) 564-5347
 U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Grants Administration Division
 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue (3903R)
 Washington, DC 20460


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