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					Salt Lake City
   Department of Public Utilities
   Water Resources & Watershed
   Management

          How Do
      You Treat YOUR
          Water?

                              www.keepitpure.com
                 Outline
• Background & History
  –   Watershed Description
  –   Hydrology
  –   Water Development
  –   Watershed Protection
• Water Quality
  – Drinking Water Source Protection - “what
    you see today you may drink tomorrow”
  – Water Quality Monitoring
• Modern Watershed Management
  –   Development Review/Inspection
  –   Recreation Management
  –   Enforcement
  –   Watershed Education
  Where does the
WATER in your HOME
   come from?
Salt Lake Valley Source Water Supply




                                  Source: Utah Department of
                                          Natural Resources
     Wasatch Front Watershed
TOTAL WATERSHED AREA
    = 200 sq mi
TOTAL AVERAGE RUNOFF =
    152,000 acre feet

OWNERSHIP:
Forest Service = 62%
Salt Lake City = 19%
Private = 19%
Salt Lake County = <1.0%
What is a Watershed?
• a geographical area of
 land (such as a canyon
from ridge to ridge) that
   catches the rain and
snow drained by a single
       river system
“Protected Watershed”
Areas
• City Creek
• Parleys
  Canyon
• Big
  Cottonwood
  Canyon
• Little
  Cottonwood
  Canyon
      Early Watershed
       Management
• 1851: Brigham Young removes cattle
  from City Creek
• 1887-1947: Land purchase in City Creek
• 1912: First Watershed Patrol Formed
• 1950: Chlorination of water supply
• 1952-1965: City Creek Canyon closed
  for water quality
  Watershed Legislation
• 1913: PL199 requires primary
  management of National Forest for
  drinking water supply water quality
• 1934: PL259 Removes southern canyons
  from mining, reserved surface estate to
  U.S.
• 1989: PL101 Bush reaffirms legislation
• State Constitution grants City of the First
  Class extraterritorial jurisdiction over
  drinking supply watershed
 Water Development
• 1847 Diversion of City Creek
• 1904 -1934 City enters into
  Agreements to exchange high
  quality Creek flows for late
  season irrigation deliveries
• 1930’s drought and well
  development
• 1960’s Deer Creek Reservoir
Watershed Statistics
 Average Valley rainfall 12” vs.
  520” (approx. 27” SWE) snowfall
  in the Wasatch Mountains
 “Great Salt Lake effect” of
  evapotranspiration (ET) increases
  mountain snowfall
 Winter snow is water “storage”
  use through hot summer months
Hydrology
Current Water Supplies
Water Quality




“what you see today
  you may drink
    tomorrow”
 Effectiveness of the
 Watershed Programs
• Canyon water supply is traditionally
  below 100 coliform/100ml
• There is a distinct difference between
  watershed and non-watershed
  canyons
• Usage in the canyons has increased
  without major changes in
  bacteriological counts
 Canyon Bacteriological
      Comparison
• Regulations
  enforced in
  protected
  watershed
  canyons

• Protected
  Watershed
  canyons are
  sewered
Seasonal Variations in Coliform

• Average
  monthly
  changed
  patterns
• After 1993
  see late
  season
  Water
  Quality
  impacts
            Water Treatment Q&A
Q: Why is Watershed Protection important?
     Watershed Protection is the first of four
     “Multiple Barriers” to pollution and disease:
       1.   Source Watershed Protection
       2.   Removal
       3.   Disinfection
       4.   System Residual Disinfection
Q: Does the Treatment Plant remove all pollution?
   –    Treatment removal based on 3 log (99.99%) removal
        per the Safe Drinking Water Act.
   –    Cleaner Source Water = Cleaner Drinking Water
Q: Why are dogs restricted from the watershed when
     wild animals roam free?
   –    Domestic animals transmit human disease
   –    We can control what we do, but not wildlife
   –    Lots of people = lots of dogs = lots of dog waste
        (Mill Creek allows dogs, with over 2 tons per week of
        dog waste hauled out of canyon
   Drinking Water
 Pollution Detection
In-Stream Early
    Warning
    Monitoring
Treatment
   Monitoring
Distribution
    System
    Monitoring
  Current Watershed
 Management Practices
• Multiple use fostered
• Water Quality primary goal
• Salt Lake City, Forest
  Service, Salt Lake Valley
  Health Dept, and Salt Lake
  County cooperatively
  manage the Front
Governing the Watersheds
• Salt Lake City – Watershed Ordinance
  & Master Plan
• USFS - 2003 Forest Plan,
  Conjunctive O&M Agreement w/City,
  EIS required for development on
  National Forest
• Salt Lake County - Foothill & Canyon
  Overlay Zone (FCOZ) Development
  Ordinances
• Salt Lake Valley Health Department -
  Sanitation regulations & enforcement
    City Watershed
Partnerships & Funding
• Cottonwood Canyons
  Foundation (Silver Lake
  Center, Public Lands IC)

• USFS Backcountry Patrol,
  Facility Improvements

• Sheriff Watershed Patrol
How Do We Impact the
    Watershed?

• Pollution (sanitary
  waste, garbage,
  chemicals, sediment)
• Erosion (Development,
  Recreation)
• Hazmat Spills
 An Ounce of Prevention
is Worth a Pound of Cure.
 SLC Watershed Regulations
• City retains rights to all Canyon water
  – SLC Surplus Water Permits for Domestic
    use and Snowmaking
  – Snowmaking results in approx 18-30%
    loss, but melts in late season when
    needed in Valley
• Class B Misdemeanor to Pollute the
  Watershed
  – No Dogs (private property owners may
    obtain permit for dog, but must keep on
    property, contain, and clean up after it).
  – Must use toilet, backcountry waste must
    buried 6” and 300 feet from watercourse
  – No Off-road Motorized Travel
  – Unlawful to pollute
 Watershed Education
       Program
• Media Campaign
  Brochures, Print, TV,
  Movie Trailers,
  www.keepitpure.com
• Education Signs (60 Sites)
• 4th & 9th Grade Curricula
• Public Outreach
Road Signs
 Watershed
Interpretive
   Signs
Regulatory
Sign Panel
Trailheads
  What You Can Do to
 Protect the Watershed
• Don’t swim in drinking water
  streams or lakes.
• Pets are not allowed in the
  protected watersheds.
  Exercise dogs in other
  designated areas.
• Pack out what you pack in.
• Plan ahead and use existing
  restrooms.
Thanks for Being a Champion
    for YOUR Drinking Water
                 Watershed!