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Vocabulary

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Vocabulary Powered By Docstoc
					AAC Messaging, Vocabulary

  SLA G304   Kim Ho, PhD CCC-SLP
Overview
   Quiz
   Guest speaker Paul Remy
   Questions and answers
   Discussion of “Research Article” reading
   Lecture
Vocabulary Needs
   AAC simulation
   Vocabulary provided
   Vocabulary needed
Factors That Influence
Vocabulary Needs
   Age
   Gender
   Social role
   Environment
   Type of disability
   Life experiences
   Individual differences
Conversation Contour
   Greeting
   Small talk
   Information-sharing
   Wrap-up remarks
   Farewell
Greetings
   Generic
   Signals:
       Awareness
       Friendliness
       Bid to start conversation
   Requires Social awareness
       Social status, age, gender, cultural group
       Formality affected
Small Talk
   Initiate and maintain conversation
   Cocktail party
   May transition to information sharing
   Important if partners don’t know each
    other or have shared information
   Many AAC users can’t do
   Types – generic/specific
Information Sharing
   Storytelling
   Procedural Descriptions
   Content-Specific Conversations
Storytelling
   Purpose
   Important for adults
   Especially important for older adults
   High and low tech options
Procedural Descriptions
   Detailed information
   Information must be related
    sequentially
   Timely and efficient
   Examples
Content-Specific
Conversations
   Informational give-and-take
   Not scripted
   Vocabulary varies widely
   Unique and novel utterances
   Letter-by-letter or word-by-word
   Minspeak: http://www.prentrom.com/
Wrap-up Remarks and
Farewell Statements
   Signals desire or intent to end an
    interaction
   Wrap-up examples
   Farewell examples
   See Barkley AAC Center’s WWW site
    http://aac.unl.edu/vocabulary.html
Diverse Vocabulary Needs
   Spoken versus Written Communication
       TTR lower for spoken than written words
       Written vocabulary is more diverse
        (McGinnis, 1991)
   School Talk and Home Talk
       Purposes of communication home v. school
       Vocabulary varies dramatically
   Age, gender, cultural variables
Vocabulary for Preliterate AAC
Users
   Coverage vocabulary
       Context-specific communication boards
       Themes or levels of a SGD
   Developmental vocabulary
       Not yet “functional”
       For vocabulary and language growth
       Various structures and combinations
       Semantic categories
Vocabulary for Nonliterate
AAC Users
   Functional, not developmental
    perspective
   Often use whole phrases
   Make age and gender appropriate
   Include some developmental vocabulary
Vocabulary for Literate AAC
Users
   Word-by-word or letter-by-letter
   Complete messages
       Timing enhancement
       Message acceleration
       Fatigue reduction
Timing Enhancement
   Messages that must be fast
   Examples
Message Acceleration
   Speed overall communication rate
   Acceleration vocabulary (Vanderheiden and
    Kelso, 1987)
Fatigue Reduction
   May be acceleration vocabulary
   Time of day
   Analyze vocabulary patterns during
    periods of fatigue
Core vocabulary
Empirical research or clinical reports
1. Successful AAC users

2. Specific individual

3. Natural speakers/writers in similar

   contexts
Fringe Vocabulary
   Specific or unique to the individual
   Examples
   Personalize the vocabulary
   Must be recommended by user or
    informants
Informants
   Multiple informants
   Examples
   AAC user
   High interest to the individual
   Potential for frequent use
   Range of semantic notions & pragmatic
    functions
   Reflect the “here and now”
   Potential for later multiword use
   Ease of production or interpretation

				
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