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Community-Infrastructure-Funding-Guidelines

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									    NEIGHBOURHOOD RENEWAL
COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE FUNDING
           GUIDELINES




           Round Two, 2008-09




              October 2008
                                                 Contents


1.     Background: Neighbourhood Renewal and the Urban Form ..................... 3
2.     Neighbourhood Renewal Funding for Community Infrastructure ............. 3
3.     Funding ................................................................................................... 4
   3.1     Planning Grants ..................................................................................... 5
   3.2     Infrastructure Building Grants ................................................................. 5
   3.3     Infrastructure Equipment Grants ............................................................. 6
   3.4     Community Gardens Grants .................................................................... 6
4.     Funding Eligibility and Parameters .......................................................... 6
   4.1     Project Design ....................................................................................... 7
     4.1.1 Environmentally Sustainable Design Principles .......................................... 7
       Energy Conservation .................................................................................... 7
       Water Conservation ..................................................................................... 7
       Building Materials Conservation ..................................................................... 8
       Waste Minimisation ...................................................................................... 8
       Enhancement of Indoor Environmental Quality ................................................ 8
           Appropriate Landscaping ........................................................................ 8
     4.1.2. Crime Prevention .................................................................................. 9
     4.1.3 Shade ................................................................................................. 9
     4.1.4 Disability Compliance ............................................................................. 9
   4.2     Project Implementation .......................................................................... 9
   4.3     Land Availability .................................................................................... 9
   4.4     Exclusions ........................................................................................... 10
5.     Funds Access ......................................................................................... 10
6.     Business Cases and Selection ................................................................ 10
   6.1     Business Cases..................................................................................... 10
   6.2     Selection Process .................................................................................. 11
7.     Reporting and Project Management ...................................................... 11
8.     Project Promotion ................................................................................. 11




                                                         2
1.     Background: Neighbourhood Renewal and the Urban
       Form
Enhancing the physical environment is a core tenet of Neighbourhood Renewal. The
2002 policy document, Neighbourhood Renewal: Growing Victoria Together, states that:

     Neighbourhood Renewal is creating more vibrant communities by:
            enhancing the standard and environmental sustainability of
             housing and open spaces
            reducing concentrations of disadvantage by increasing home
             ownership and creating more diverse communities
            improving housing management, including increased tenant
             participation.

In an effort to improve the amenity of degraded community facilities, Neighbourhood
Renewal has entered into partnerships with other parts of the Department of Human
Services, the Department of Planning and Community Development, the Department of
Sustainability and Environment, Local Government Authorities, other authorities and
community organisations. This has resulted in: the development and expansion of
community facilities such as integrated hubs, Job Shops, Neighbourhood Houses,
training facilities and community contact places; the upgrading of parks and nature
reserves; and the establishment of social enterprise facilities and community gardens.
In the last three years over 100 projects have been funded by the Neighbourhood
Renewal Fund and Neighbourhood Renewal Urban Design Fund combined.


2.     Neighbourhood Renewal Funding for Community
       Infrastructure
Well functioning places and spaces are part of the mix that makes communities strong,
resilient and sustainable. A total of $7.5M has been available over four years, with up to
$2.03M set aside in the fourth year, 2008-09, to act as a catalyst for driving the renewal
and development of degraded community spaces and places.

                        Community Infrastructure Funding
  2005-2006        2006-2007     2007-2008     2008-2009                    Total
 $0.67 million    $2.75 million $2.02 million $2.03 million              $7.5 million

In Round Two of 2008-09, funds are again available to facilitate interventions that
improve safety, amenity and services to the targeted communities and stimulate
investment in previously degraded areas.

The specific objectives of the funding are to:
 encourage a partnership investment approach to the physical rejuvenation of
  Neighbourhood Renewal areas
 improve community environments, resources, infrastructure and environmental
  sustainability
 support the planned development of community infrastructure, open spaces and
  activity areas
 assist in providing greater access to services, including health, learning and
  employment services
 strengthen access to spaces for community use, including community centres,
  sporting, recreation and arts facilities
 provide opportunities for resident learning and employment in the implementation of
  funded initiatives.




                                            3
Facilities in this context relates to buildings and spaces from which services are provided
to communities and/or that provide dedicated environments in which communities can
engage in activities. These include: integrated community centres and hubs; youth
spaces and senior citizen centres; and multi-purpose facilities, sports venues and arts
centres. More broadly, community infrastructure describes buildings and environments,
including parks, community gardens and nature reserves used by communities.



 Examples of community infrastructure projects that could attract funding:
        Establishment of community contact points that accommodate the Neighbourhood Renewal team on
         site
        Redevelopment of community centres that house meeting spaces for residents groups
        Expansion of community service provision outlets that accommodate a greater, more tailored, range
         of human services
        Local employment and learning infrastructure, including social enterprise and Job Shops
        Regeneration of nature reserves and local parks
        Creation of community gardens




Long term plans that consider all community infrastructure development requirements
for sites should be progressed in partnership with stakeholders based on Action Plan
priorities and related community infrastructure needs assessments. Such plans should
provide a basis for Community Infrastructure Fund submissions and support project
development and coordination with stakeholders. To assist with planning for community
infrastructure across the State, the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit is liaising with all sites
in relation to community infrastructure needs over the life of each Neighbourhood
Renewal initiative.

3.       Funding
As a vehicle to drive stakeholder investment in degraded infrastructure and the physical
environment, a partnership approach to revitalising neighbourhoods is mandatory. To
attract Neighbourhood Renewal Community Infrastructure funding, projects are required
to have significant funding contributions for both planning and implementation phases
from other stakeholders. These could include Local Government Authorities, other
Department of Human Services Divisions, other government departments, community
service organisations, businesses or philanthropic organisations. The exception is works
to Office of Housing owned properties.

More specifically, the fund cannot act as the major funding source for projects. Nor is it
intended as a top up for the infrastructure responsibilities of other stakeholders but
rather as a catalyst for attracting new investment into Neighbourhood Renewal areas. In
addition, the fund will not resource the operational components of projects, including
staffing, maintenance and ongoing costs such as rent.

Funding requests:
   that are in a general form will not attract funding
   are required to be linked to specific deliverables and clearly identify the aspects of
    the project afforded by the funding request
   must relate to a specific project (e.g. a park redevelopment, a building renovation)
    rather than a precinct or series of projects.




                                                      4
Funding for individual projects is capped at $250,000 due to budget constraints and
equity considerations.

Four funding components: Planning Grants, Infrastructure Building Grants, Equipment
Grants and Community Garden Grants are available in 2008-09.

3.1     Planning Grants

The hallmark of successful community infrastructure projects are that they are built,
maintained and owned by the community.           Successful community infrastructure
implementation is underpinned by sound project planning.

In 2008-09, grants are again available for planning purposes to enable the development
of project plans that respond to community needs. A planning grant may be used for:

   building condition reports
   business planning
   financial modelling
   building concept plan development
   quantity surveying
   architectural and landscaping plans
   engineering plans
   town planning requirements.

Funds are not available for:
   service mapping
   service needs analysis
   service planning
   community consultation
   unspecified feasibility related activities.

Accessing Planning Grants is neither a pre-requisite for, nor a guarantee of, receiving
Infrastructure Building Grants. However, for larger and more complex projects, such
grants will assist in developing a business case for the project capital requirements,
including quantification of community need and clarifying project objectives, viability and
costs. In addition, the grants can assist to deliver the physical plans for projects.
Ultimately, sound financial and physical plans should provide the platform to attract the
reciprocal funding necessary to implement the project. Larger, more complex projects,
such as community hubs and social enterprises are unlikely to receive Infrastructure
Building Grants funding without well developed building, business and investment plans.
This is particularly the case for projects that require staffing commitments and
infrastructure maintenance arrangements in place to operate into the future.

3.2     Infrastructure Building Grants

Infrastructure Building Grants are available for capital works that deliver on-the-ground
results. In general terms, the primary needs of communities should be the focus of
projects.   However this should be balanced by the capacity to achieve project
implementation over the next two years and acknowledging the relative importance of
smaller projects, such as community garden developments, to communities.

It is recommended that Department of Human Services regions consider a range of
initiatives with a mix of both ‘straightforward’ and ‘complex’ projects. In this context,
complexity relates to: the nature of ownership and management arrangements; use of
the facility or asset; land ownership arrangements; scale and cost of the project; and
the number of partners involved in project implementation.            For example, the
redevelopment of a degraded park is straightforward in comparison with the building of a
new multi-purpose community facility.


                                                  5
Consideration should be given to implementing straightforward projects over the short
and medium term. More complex projects should be planned for the longer term.

Works to Office of Housing owned properties will not require significant funding
contributions from partner organisations. Project endorsement will however be required
from the Director of Property Services and Asset Management (or a delegate) prior to
business cases being considered for funding.

3.3    Infrastructure Equipment Grants

Projects to fit out community spaces with furnishings and equipment are eligible for
grants. This includes: funding for furniture; information communication technology; and
tools and equipment for community hubs and social enterprises. Funding will be limited
and will require significant funding contributions from other stakeholders. Generally
speaking funding requests should be made in instances where:
 items are required for operationalising a new activity in an existing or new space
    (e.g. operating a social enterprise from a workspace that requires tools and
    equipment)
 the existing equipment is no longer able to be used and is hampering community
    involvement in activities
 other sources of funding or in-kind contributions are not readily available to fully
    cover costs to furbish or equip a facility.

3.4    Community Gardens Grants

A limited, but discreet, budget is available for the development of community gardens.
The funding process for community garden projects has changed for 2008-09.

The Neighbourhood Renewal Unit will now seek Expressions of Interest from
Neighbourhood Renewal Place Managers to assess site readiness for community gardens
projects, prior to receiving Community Infrastructure Fund submissions. This change
has been implemented to ensure that future investment in Neighbourhood Renewal
Community Gardens is sustainable.

Projects that are deemed to be viable will be provided with Community Infrastructure
Fund community gardens specific guidelines and will be invited to submit a Community
Infrastructure Fund business case.      The Neighbourhood Renewal Unit will support
projects to complete the business case template for capital funds requests.

Expressions of Interest should be lodged by Friday 28 November 2008. For further
information on Neighbourhood Renewal community gardens funding please contact
Alyssa Fava, Project Manager Employment and Learning on Ph: 9096 1200.

4.     Funding Eligibility and Parameters
Requests for funding must be made by Department of Human Services Regional
Directors, with regions to play a central role in coordinating the project planning phase.
This does not preclude other agencies taking the lead role in project development.

Projects will be required to operate according to Neighbourhood Renewal principles. In
particular, community infrastructure projects must adhere to community development
principles. This requires the active engagement of residents and stakeholders in the
project evolution. In addition, projects should be consistent with the priorities expressed
in an area’s Neighbourhood Renewal Action Plan.




                                            6
4.1    Project Design

4.1.1 Environmentally Sustainable Design Principles

Community facilities in disadvantaged areas have been characterised by poor design,
poor quality and disrepair. Neighbourhood Renewal in partnership with other
organisations has progressively changed this situation to provide facilities that are well-
designed, good-quality and well-maintained.

Developing issues, particularly climate change and related water shortages, place new
demands on communities which require new and appropriate responses. The evidence
shows that disadvantaged communities are at higher risk of adverse impacts from
climate change than other Victorians.

The Victorian Greenhouse Strategy stresses the need for adaptation to climate change
and notes the benefits of early action to help reduce the need for, and cost of, remedial
action. Environmentally Sustainable Design principles have been introduced to the
Community Infrastructure Fund Guidelines to reflect this policy emphasis and respond to
climate change in an appropriate and timely manner. Many projects have already
incorporated similar principles into their design, with high-value sustainability outcomes
achieved for communities as a result. Environmentally Sustainable Design principles will
build on and reinforce the principles applied in these projects. Furthermore, introducing
these principles into the guidelines will formalise the application of these principles in
future Community Infrastructure Fund projects such that the practice of Environmentally
Sustainable Design becomes an embedded and expected component of the provision of
community assets throughout Neighbourhood Renewal.


Environmentally Sustainable Design Principles
The ecological impact of capital works is to be reduced by incorporating the following
design principles:

Energy Conservation
   Incorporate passive solar design principles to maximise day-light and passive
    heating opportunities.
   Incorporate energy efficient design principles to minimise active heating and cooling
    requirements.
   Specify energy efficient equipment and lighting systems.
   Provide efficient control and effective maintenance systems, including monitoring of
    energy consumption.
   Optimise opportunities to use renewable energy sources and incorporate renewable
    energy technologies wherever possible.
   Minimise embodied energy in construction materials.

Water Conservation
   Facilitate opportunities for on-site treatment and reuse of grey-water and black-
    water (sewage) streams.
   Minimise water consumption through practices such as:
             installing rainwater and storm water collection tanks
             installing reuse systems for grey water
             providing water efficient facilities and equipment
             providing effective monitoring and maintenance systems.




                                            7
Minimisation of Fossil Fuel Usage associated with Transport
   Facilitate staff access to public transport.
   Encourage cycling by providing showering and storage facilities.
   Facilitate the use of appropriate communication technologies, such as
    teleconferencing and video conferencing facilities.
   Minimise on-site car parking facilities. Minimise transport distances involved in the
    demolition, recycling, construction, fit-out and operational phases of the project


Preserve Natural Features of Site
   Avoid development on sites or sections of sites of high ecological value.
   Minimise disturbance to site and regional ecosystems during construction and
    operation.
   Restore land equivalent to the area disturbed by the building and where possible the
    ecological footprint associated with operational activities.

Building Materials Conservation
   Modify existing facilities to serve new requirements and reuse existing materials.
   Minimise building materials produced from limited or ecologically unsustainable
    natural resources.
   Minimise building materials that have damaging ecological effects during harvesting,
    manufacturing and/or construction.
   Minimise the use of building materials with high embodied energy.
   Minimise life cycle costs through using materials and equipment requiring minimal
    maintenance and with maximised expected useful life.
   Maximise the use of recycled content material where there is a cost difference of less
    than five per cent.

Waste Minimisation
   Maximise building longevity through creation of flexible and readily adaptable
    designs.
   Provide facilities to assist office waste separation into reusable, recyclable,
    compostable and landfill components.
   Minimise construction waste going to land fill through a material tracking system.
   Incorporate organic and water-based site waste disposal systems into landscaping
    design.

Enhancement of Indoor Environmental Quality
   Minimise all work spaces exposed to glare and excessive lighting.
   Provide all building occupants with a view to the outside.
   Maximise natural ventilation (e.g. convection cooling and cross breezes).
   If necessary, use air conditioning systems that allow for the supply of fresh outside
    air.
   Shield all building occupants from Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR) sources.
   Minimise indoor pollutants by use of 90 per cent low-Volatile Organic Compound
    internal paints, polishes, varnishes, composite timber products and carpets.

Appropriate Landscaping
   Design landscaping to facilitate year round moderation of the internal climate.
   Design landscaping to be low in water use and make use of captured storm water or
    grey water.
   Minimise erosion potential.
   Plant indigenous flora, and where appropriate, food-generating plants.
   Design landscaping to allow external meeting and break out areas.

                                             8
   Maximise the reuse on site of all rock and topsoil emanating from excavations work.
   Maximise the use of recycled compost, soil conditioners and mulches.


4.1.2. Crime Prevention
Safer Design Guidelines for Victoria have been developed to facilitate the planning of
safer urban environments for all Victorian communities. All Victorian planning schemes
have been amended to require consideration of safety in the design of new proposals.
The Guidelines are referenced in Clause 19.03 of the State Planning Policy Framework
which sets out State planning policy objectives and design principles for the design and
built form of development.

The Safer Design Guidelines for Victoria can be accessed through the Department of
Planning and Community Development website: www.dse.vic.gov.au.

4.1.3 Shade
Consider incorporating shade (built or natural) within infrastructure plans and designs,
especially in children’s activity centres/spaces.

4.1.4 Disability Compliance
It is also imperative that project design and implementation complies with current
disability access standards to ensure complete participation and inclusiveness of people
with a disability in community life. This approach is consistent with A Fairer Victoria:
Creating Opportunity and Addressing Disadvantage (Section 10.6: Make Victoria a More
Accessible Place for People with a Disability).

4.2    Project Implementation

The delivery of community infrastructure provides an opportunity to create employment
and training outcomes for local residents. Neighbourhood Renewal funded projects
should seek to maximise opportunities by:
 direct contracting or sub contracting to local enterprises that employ local people
 contracting or sub contracting to businesses that includes a contract clause to
   employ local people
 linking the delivery of infrastructure (or components of the project) to State or
   Commonwealth funded employment and training programs, including: Workforce
   Participation Partnerships Program; Work for the Dole; apprenticeships; traineeships;
   and school based new apprenticeships
 making arrangements with local training agencies or group training companies.

4.3    Land Availability

Land availability is a prerequisite of funding and should be confirmed by the land
holder/s. In unusual circumstances where public land (i.e. municipal land, Crown
reserve, land owned by a public authority, land held for public purposes by trustees) or
land owned by a community agency or philanthropic organisation cannot be secured,
funding for land purchase will be considered. However this would only be in a small
number of cases where the project is crucial to the sustainability of the community and
the project planning and capital aspects are fully funded by partner contributions.




                                           9
4.4     Exclusions

Funding is not available for the following:

    projects that require funding to be directed to individuals or organisations that do not
     have legal status
    infrastructure that is outside designated Neighbourhood Renewal area boundaries
     (except in exceptional circumstances)
    projects that have been completed
    projects that are in a general form and not linked to specific deliverables
    requests that relate to precincts or a series of projects
    staff and management costs required for day-to-day operations
    routine facilities maintenance, or operating costs, such as rent or utilities
    damages normally covered by insurance, such as fire and vandalism
    projects that require ongoing capital funding or operating funding from the
     Neighbourhood Renewal Unit beyond the initial planning and building phases
    dwellings for which the primary purpose is as homes, either private, public or
     community agency owned
    service mapping; service needs analysis; service planning; community consultation;
     and unspecified feasibility related activities.



5.      Funds Access
Business case submissions to the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit are required in order to
access funding.   When lodging a project business case, Regions must use the
Community Infrastructure Fund Business Case Template (Appendix A).
Funds can only be accessed following the endorsement of the project business case by
the Director Neighbourhood Renewal.
In 2008-09, funds for out-years cannot be allocated.
Round Two, 2008-09 - Timeline for Business Case Submissions

For Round Two, 2008-09, business cases are to be received by the Neighbourhood
Renewal Unit by Friday 19 December 2008.

6.      Business Cases and Selection
6.1     Business Cases

As previously mentioned, it is a requirement that the Community Infrastructure Fund
Business Case Template (Appendix A) is used for lodging submissions. The template
covers six main aspects: project details; project summary; financial details; project
planning and implementation; and risk assessment and management. Not all sections of
the template will be relevant to all projects. This is particularly the case for requests for
Planning Grants.

Business cases are required to be accompanied by a memorandum from the relevant
Regional Director to the Director Neighbourhood Renewal formally requesting funds.
Business cases require the endorsement of the relevant Regional Director before an
assessment for funding will be undertaken.

Business cases are to be provided to the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit both electronically
and in hardcopy form.




                                              10
6.2    Selection Process

Business case assessment will be undertaken by a panel. Project selection will focus on:
 project merit in the context of community need
 demonstrated capacity to attract (and/or plan to attract) significant partnerships to
   projects
 sound project planning
 demonstrated consistency with Neighbourhood Renewal objectives and wider
   government policies
 capacity to identify and manage project risks
 environmentally sustainable design, sensitivity to disability accessibility & crime
   prevention principles
 employment and training outcomes in the delivery of capital works.

Funding requests for new projects will be prioritised ahead of those that augment
funding for existing projects. This is consistent with the intent of the fund as a catalyst
to drive infrastructure development.

Following assessment on a project-by-project basis, business cases will be ranked and
allocations made based on available funds and project merit.

Further information may be requested by the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit or the
assessment panel convened to consider business cases in order to determine the merit
of individual submissions. Queries arising from submitted business cases will require
resolution prior to a determination regarding funding.

In instances where funds are available from other sources not considered in the business
cases (such as other government departments), the Region may be requested to seek
alternative/complementary funds from the appropriate sources as part of the project
plan.

Regions are encouraged to contact the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit (Giuseppe Scollo on
Ph: 9096 8981 or John Lauricella on Ph: 9096 8676) to discuss project ideas and
possible funding sources prior to lodging a submission. For advice on community
gardens, contact Alyssa Fava on Ph: 9096 1200.

7.     Reporting and Project Management
Once funds are allocated for projects, progress against milestones is required to be
reported in quarterly reports. In addition, progress of funded projects is required to be a
standing item at NR Project Control Group (PCG) meetings and reported in PCG minutes.

At project completion, Regions are required to provide the Neighbourhood Renewal Unit
with a brief assessment report documenting the project outcomes, benefits and
disadvantages.



8.     Project Promotion
As a part of project planning and implementation, promotional opportunities for
Neighbourhood Renewal arising from Community Infrastructure funding should be
considered. Once specific opportunities have been considered, liaison should occur in
relation to event planning. Funding announcements are not to be made prior to a plan
having been put in place in relation to project announcements.




                                            11
                                                      APPENDIX A



COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE/COMMUNITY GARDEN
BUSINESS CASE – 2008-09

 1.    PROJECT DETAILS

 FUNDS REQUESTED




 PROJECT TITLE


 PROJECT CONTACT


 PROJECT SITE
 ADDRESS

 NEIGHBOURHOOD
 RENEWAL SITE

 REGION


 PROJECT SITE        Provide property
 OWNERSHIP           ownership details
 ARRANGEMENTS


 PROPERTY OWNER(S)   Confirm owner(s)
 CONSENT             consent for
                     project
                     implementation


 PROJECT LOCATION    Confirm that the      Yes / No
                     project is located
                     within the
                     Neighbourhood
                     Renewal
                     boundaries




                                          12
  2. PROJECT SUMMARY

PROJECT
DESCRIPTION

(Location map to
be attached)

Note: The question
that should be
answered in this
section is:
What is the
project?




                       13
PROJECT MERIT

Briefly describe the
projected benefits to
the community,
including the
projected social and
economic benefits.

Note: the questions
that should be
answered in this
section are: Why do
you want to
undertake the
project?
What is the current
problem? What
solution/s will the
project deliver?


CONSISTENCY WITH
NEIGHBOURHOOD
RENEWAL
OBJECTIVES /
OTHER
GOVERNMENT
POLICIES

Briefly describe
project consistency
with relevant
Neighbourhood
Renewal objectives
& other government
policies.




                        14
ENVIRONMENTAL         Energy Conservation
FACTORS                   Incorporate passive solar design principles to
                            maximise day-light and passive heating opportunities.

Indicate the                Incorporate energy efficient design principles to
incorporation of             minimise active heating and cooling requirements.
Environmentally
Sustainable Design          Specify energy efficient equipment and lighting
Principles by                systems.
placing an X in the
check box that              Provide efficient control and effective maintenance
corresponds to the           systems, including monitoring of energy consumption.
aspect that has
been included in            Optimise opportunities to use renewable energy
the project                  sources and incorporate renewable energy
                             technologies wherever possible.

                            Minimise embodied energy in construction materials.

                      Water Conservation
                          Facilitate opportunities for on-site treatment and
                            reuse of grey-water and black-water (sewage)
                            streams.

                            Minimise water consumption through practices such
                             as:
                                  installing rainwater and storm water
                                    collection tanks
                                  installing reuse systems for grey water
                                  providing water efficient facilities and
                                    equipment
                                  providing effective monitoring and
                                    maintenance systems.

                      Minimisation of Fossil Fuel Usage associated with Transport

                            Facilitate staff access to public transport.

                            Encourage cycling by providing showering and storage
                             facilities.

                            Facilitate the use of appropriate communication
                             technologies, such as teleconferencing and video
                             conferencing facilities.

                            Minimise on-site car parking
                             facilities.

                            Minimise transport distances involved in the
                             demolition, recycling, construction, fit-out and
                             operational phases of the project.

                      Preserve Natural Features of Site
                            Avoid development on sites or sections of sites of
                             high ecological value.

                            Minimise disturbance to site and regional ecosystems
                             during construction and operation.

                            Restore land equivalent to the area disturbed by the
                             building and where possible the ecological footprint
                             associated with operational activities.
ENVIRONMENTAL         Building Materials Conservation
FACTORS
                            Modify existing facilities to serve new requirements
                             and reuse existing materials.
Indicate the
incorporation of
                            Minimise building materials produced from limited or
Environmentally
                             ecologically unsustainable natural resources.
Sustainable Design
Principles by
                            Minimise building materials that have damaging
placing an X in the
                             ecological effects during harvesting, manufacturing,
check box that
                             and/or construction.
corresponds to the
aspect that has
                            Minimise the use of building materials with high
been included in
                             embodied energy.
the project
                            Minimise life cycle costs through using materials and
                             equipment requiring minimal maintenance and with
                             maximised expected useful life.

                            Maximise the use of recycled content material
                             where there is a cost difference of less than 5%.

                      Waste Minimisation
                            Maximise building longevity through creation of
                             flexible and readily adaptable designs.

                            Provide facilities to assist office waste separation
                             into reusable, recyclable, compostable and landfill
                             components.

                            Minimise construction waste going to land fill
                             through a material tracking system.

                            Incorporate organic and water-based site waste
                             disposal systems into landscaping design.

                      Enhancement of Indoor Environmental Quality
                            Minimise all work spaces
                             exposed to glare and excessive
                             lighting.

                            Provide all building occupants
                             with a view to the outside.

                            Maximise natural ventilation
                             (e.g. convection cooling and
                             cross breezes).

                            If necessary, use air
                             conditioning systems that allow
                             for the supply of fresh outside
                             air.




                                          16
COMMUNITY SUPPORT

Describe the
community support for
the project, including
from residents, Local
Government,
community groups,
community agencies
and other stakeholders.

Demonstrate that the
project is a
Neighbourhood Renewal
Action Plan priority.




                          17
OTHER INFORMATION




                    18
3. FINANCIAL DETAILS
3A. Total Costs

  ITEMISED TOTAL           Item / Component       Cost
  PROJECT BUDGET
                                              $
  Note: This section                          $
  should incorporate all
                                              $
  costs (itemised) and
  in-kind contributions                       $
  necessary to                                $
  implement the project.
                                              $
                                              $
                                              $
                                              $
                                              $
                                              $
                                              $
                           Total Cost         $
3B. Community Infrastructure Funds Request

  COMMUNITY                  Component                               Cost
  INFRASTRUCTURE                                                     $
  FUNDS ITEMISED ($)                                                 $
                                                                     $
  Note: this section
                                                                     $
  should outline the
  itemised components                                                $
  of the project for                                                 $
  which funds are                                                    $
  requested. These                                                   $
  should be consistent       Total Cost                              $
  with components
  outlined in 3A for
  which funds are
  sought.

   FUND REQUEST TYPE         funding request type

 Note: ‘capital’ is for
 works delivered by the
 Office of Housing and
 ‘capital grant’ for funds
 allocated to NGO, local
                                                               capital                       capital grant
 governments and non
 government other
 parties. An ‘X’ should
 be placed next to the
 type of funding
 required.

   GRANT TYPE                grant request type

 Note: An ‘X’ should be
                                                    planning grant          building grant        equipment grant
 placed next to the grant
 type requested.




                                                         20
3C. Project Partner Funds Contributions


   3C.1 PARTNER FUNDS
                                                             Funds Committed
   CONTRIBUTION(S)                         Agency                                       Year            Funds to be/being            Year
                                                             to Date
                                                                                                           Sought
   Note: Project partner                                       $                                        $
   funds should be                                             $                                        $
   outlined in this                                            $                                        $
   section.
                                                               $                                        $
   These should be                                             $                                        $
   consistent with                                             $                                        $
   components outlined
                                                               $                                        $
   in 3A.
                                                               $                                        $
                                                               $                                        $
                                                               $                                        $
                             Total Funds                      $                                         $

   3C.2 PARTNER IN-          Agency                         Description of In-kind Commitment         Description of In-Kind Commitment Sought
   KIND                                                     Secured (including financial value)       (including financial value)
   CONTRIBUTION(S)

   Note: Project partner
   in-kind contributions
   should be outlined in
   this section.

   These should be
   consistent with           Total Financial Value of In-
   components outlined       kind Contributions
   in 3A.                                                     $                                   $




Please note that the funds total at 3A should equal the totals of 3B, 3C.1. and 3C.2 combined.


                                                                         21
4. PROJECT PLANNING & IMPLEMENTATION
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN         Key Task        Task Owner   Implementation Timeline
(detailed plan may be
attached).

Note: this section should
address the question:
How is the project being
implemented?




EMPLOYMENT AND
LEARNING
OPPORTUNITIES
(description of the
employment and learning
activities as part of the
implementation of capital
works projects, eg: local
enterprise opportunities,
links to labour market
programs).




                                       22
INVESTMENT PLAN
(detailed plan may be
attached)

Outline investment plan
for the project (ie for
planning grants and
requests for some
equipment / building
grants) that require
further partnerships
development and financial
investment into the
project.




FEASIBILITY AND BUSINESS PLANS              List of the relevant planning documents
                                            (including feasibility, business &
For complex projects that involve ongoing   investment plans) attached (as required)
maintenance and/or an operational           for complex projects for which funds for
component and/or complicated auspice        equipment / building grants are sought.
and management arrangements (such as
social enterprises & hubs) feasibility
plans, financial modelling and business
plans are of importance.


GOVERNANCE
ARRANGEMENTS

Describe project
management
arrangements (not
mandatory for planning
grants).




                                                                      23
PROJECT RECURRENT
COSTS

Describe project recurrent
costs requirements and
the plan / commitments
to fully funding these
costs




                             24
5. RISK ASSESSMENT & MANAGEMENT

 RISK ASSESSMENT           Risk / Issue   Impact / Effect   Risk Mitigation Plan

 Risks assessment and
 mechanisms for
 managing risks,
 including financial and
 operational viability
 risks.




                                           25
6. OTHER INFORMATION

OTHER INFORMATION




7. ATTACHMENTS
LIST OF
ATTACHMENTS




                       26
Business Case proposed by:




NR Manager




Business Case endorsed by:




Regional Director




                             27

								
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