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					I Compound And Complex Sentences
Compound Sentences
1. Use a Comma and a Joining Word.
[Joining Words (coordinating conjunctions): For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, and So]

The teacher lectured for over an hour, and his students slept soundly.
The old man wanted hide his money, for he feared his children would steal it from him.
The student had a test the next day, so she studied all night long.

Pattern:      Sentence, joining word sentence.
            Subject + Predicate, joining word Subject + Predicate.

2. Use a Semicolon.

The teacher lectured for over an hour; his students slept soundly.
The old man wanted hide his money; he feared his children would steal it from him.
The student studied all night long; she had a test the next day.

Patterns:     Sentence ; sentence.
            Subject + Predicate ; Subject + Predicate.

3. Use a semicolon and a transition word.
[Transition words (adverbial conjunctions): however, therefore, in fact, on the other hand,
nonetheless, besides, instead, then, instead, moreover, similarly, nevertheless, still, etc.]

The car had a V-8 engine and a new paint job; however, it had no brakes.
The Pit Bull had quite a bite; in fact, its bite was "outlawed" in seven states.
Larry studied for the test all weekend; therefore, he expected a good grade on the test.

Patterns:    Sentence ; transition word, sentence.
            Subject + Predicate ; transition word, Subject + Predicate.



Complex Sentences
Use one of the two patterns illustrated below.
[Joining words (subordinating conjunctions) : As, As if, Because, Since, Although, Even though,
When, While, Until, Unless, Where, etc. ]

When I looked into the mirror, I saw an old man.
I saw an old man when I looked into the mirror.
Until Josh attended Merced College, he had no focus in life.
Josh had no focus in life until he attended Merced College.
Pattern:     1. Joining word subject + predicate, subject + predicate.
           2. Subject + predicate joining word subject + predicate.

Compound-Complex Sentences
Create a sentence which is a combination of a compound and complex sentence.

When I looked into the mirror, I saw an old man, and I was surprised.
As I look out the window, I see no clouds, but the weather report predicted rain.
Whenever the old man walked around the mansion, he wanted hide his money, for he feared his
children would steal it from him.

Pattern:
Subordinating conjunction subject + predicate, subject + predicate, coordinating conjunction
subject + predicate.
Compound-Complex Sentences

      A compound-complex sentence is made from two independent
      clause and one or more dependent clauses.

      Some examples:

      1. Although I like to go camping, I haven't had the time to go
      lately, and I haven't found anyone to go with.

      independent clause: "I haven't had the time to go lately"

      independent clause: "I haven't found anyone to go with"

      dependent clause: "Although I like to go camping... "

      **********

      2. We decided that the movie was too violent, but our children,
      who like to watch scary movies, thought that we were wrong.

      independent clause: "We decided that the movie was too violent"

      independent clause: "(but) our children thought that we were
      wrong"

      dependent clause: who like to watch scary movies



      Compound-complex sentences are very common in English, but
      one mistake that students often make is to try to write them
      without having mastered the simple sentences, compound
      sentences, and complex sentences first.
Here are some examples of complex sentences:




 If Barack Obama is the nominee
 for the Democratic Party, he'll
 run against John McCain, but it
 won't be an easy contest to win.

 independent cause: he'll run
 against John McCain

 independent cause: it won't be
 an easy contest to win.

 Dependent clause: If Barack
 Obama is the nominee for the
 Democratic Party




 Even though he prefers to eat
 with a fork, he chooses to use
 chopsticks in Chinese
 restaurants; however, they aren't
 easy to use.

 independent clause: he chooses
 to use chopsticks in Chinese
 restaurants

 independent clause: they aren't
 easy to use.

 dependent clause: Even though
 he prefers to eat with a fork
I usually use a pick whenever I
play the guitar, or I just use my
fingers.