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					         Exam Review
         Winter 2010
- Discussion of tentative exam format
- Handout on review categories of
lectures. Note: Lecture 17 is NOT on
exam
             Tentative Exam Format
• When and Where: April 19. 7:00 pm - 9:30 pm. Sobey 260
• Chronological: themes of questions on exam reflect where they
  are in the course – the first lectures will be reflected in the first
  questions, and so on.
• Parts: Four sections and one bonus question on last page:
PART 1 Multiple choice and matching 20% (twenty questions
  worth one point each)
PART 2 Lists and short answers 20% (four questions worth five
  points each)
PART 3 Medium answers 30% (two questions worth fifteen
  points each)
PART 4 Essays (choose 2 out of 3) 30% (two questions worth
  fifteen points each)
Bonus Question: Optional. Worth up to 2 points which is added
  to the total final exam mark; marked in 0.5 increments
            Lectures on Exam: 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21
•   Lecture14 Mon., Mar. 1     Reading Bye, C.G. (2005). I like to hoe my own row: A Saskatchewan farm woman’s
                               notions about work and womanhood during the Great Depression. Frontiers: A Journal
                               of Women Studies, 26 (3), 135-67.

•   Lecture 15 Wed., Mar. 3    Reading 1 Handout Brown, T. and Morgan, B. (1984). Tom Brown's field guide to living
                                           with the earth (pp. 19-27, 193-197, 204-205). New York, NY: Berkley Books.
                               Reading 2 NET Becoming an Outdoors Woman® Nova Scotia.
                                           http://www.gov.ns.ca/natr/outdoor/default.htm

•   Lecture 16 Mon., Mar. 8    Reading Murray, D. (2007). The civilized homosexual: Travel talk and the project of gay
                                          identity. Sexualities, 10 (1), 49-60.

•   Lecture 18 Mon., Mar. 15   Reading 1 Marshall, L. (2005). Were women raped in New Orleans? Off Our Backs,
                                           35 (9/10), 14-15.
                               Reading 2 NET Mehta, M. (2007). Gender and natural disasters: New challenges for
                                           mountain development. Sustainable Mountain Development, 52, 17-19.
                                           http://www.icimod.org/uploads/ newsletter/nl52/gender.pdf

•   Lecture 19 Wed., Mar. 17   No assigned reading. Lecture on: Curry, P. (2006). Ecological ethics: An introduction (pp.
                                            71-89, 95-99). Malden, MA: Polity Press.

•   Lecture 20 Mon., Mar. 22   Reading Tindall, D.B., Davies, S. and Mauboules, C. (2003). Activism and
                                           conservation behaviour in an environmental movement: The contradictory
                                           effects of gender. Society and Natural Resources, 16 (10), 909-932.

•   Lecture 21 Wed., Mar. 24   Reading 1 NET Gender and the Animal Rights Movement.
                                           <http://www.utanimalrights.com/gender.htm>
                               Reading 2 NET People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Draggin' ‘Ladies’ Prove That
                                           There's Nothing Glamorous About Fur.
                                           http://www.furisdead.com/feat-dragginladies.asp
                         Lecture 14 Mon., Mar. 1
Nature Timelines
Reading Bye, C.G. (2005). I like to hoe my own row: A Saskatchewan farm woman’s
notions about work and womanhood during the Great Depression. Frontiers: A
Journal of Women Studies, 26 (3), 135-67.
• You have a handout for this lecture
• Nature Timelines: recall your own nature timeline data
• Bye Reading:
    – Some key factors leading up to Great Depression
    – Bye’s research question, her methodology, and her reasons for
      her research
    – Kate’s (Bye’s great-grandmother) internalization of the norm
      that men were heads of households and owned the farm and
      had the most rights concerning the farm and the family
    – “Double-Standard Value System” in farming re: gender, heads of
      families when men left farms to find work, family property and
      task divisions, reproductive challenges, and other key findings of
      Bye’s research that are included on your handout 
    Summary of Ideals presented in Bye’s article (on handout):
•    Women married into farming; it was ideal for women to marry in their teens and take their husbands’
     names
•    Property/Farms/Crops were owned by men and not women
•    Large families were desired (to work…just as in Roman times, for soldiers)
•    Men were heads of farm families and women were to be subordinate to men; they could legally override
     their wives’ wishes at any time
•    Men’s work was more valuable than women’s work (Kate worked 17 hours/day into her 70s); women’s
     pension money was spent altruistically
•    Women put their husbands’ needs ahead of their own
•    Men made most major and minor decisions on the farm and in government
•    Sask. Farm families held major positions in Protestant Church of Canada
•    Women were resourceful and valued their own work according to personal satisfaction and social ideals;
     however, they denied themselves “luxuries” such as trips to visit family or radios
•    Women reinforced their feminine identity according to dominant gender ideals
•    Land was divided among males in the family; things like dishes went to daughters
•    “Work was the sum of a good woman’s life” (Bye, 2004, p. 142). Does this apply to men?
•    Women were often isolated on farms, even when pregnant and raising children
•    Women were responsible for teaching the moral, religious, and social values to their families
•    Gender boundaries were work boundaries: Women and men did each other’s gender-ascribed tasks ONLY
     if someone was away or ill
•    Farm families were strongly connected to religion
•    Canadian Government: women’s work was just what they did as part of their gender role and was worth
     little to no monetary value
•    Women were denied land and farm equipment if they were married, keeping men as the head of families
•    Christine Bye (author): her ideals about being a productive and meaningful member of her family were
     severely disrupted when she attempted to purchase part of her family’s farmstead and was refused on
     the basis of her gender; her parents wanted to “keep it in the family” so they only sold/gave the land to
     males in the family.
                            Lecture 15 Wed., Mar. 3
Reading 1 Handout Brown, T. and Morgan, B. (1984). Tom Brown's field guide to
living with the earth (pp. 19-27, 193-197, 204-205). New York, NY: Berkley Books.
 Reading 2 NET Becoming an Outdoors Woman® Nova Scotia.
http://www.gov.ns.ca/natr/outdoor/default.htm

• You have a handout for this lecture
• Gender implications in nature education
    – The ability and access to nature education can differ between women
      and men, mainly due to how women have less disposable income, less
      flexibility to leave work, more childcare issues than men
• Brown and Morgan Reading:
    – gender-laden language in the quotes on the slides from the reading 
    – counterculture against Tom Brown, as shown in the link on Slide 8;
      does it matter if Stalking Wolf/Grandfather existed?
• Becoming an Outdoor Woman Reading:
    – BOW website link on Slide 9; what are the main differences
      (concerning language used and types of skills and workshops offered)
      between that and the website for Tom Brown’s Tracking School? 
                                     Lecture 16 Mon., Mar. 8
    Reading Murray, D. (2007). The civilized homosexual: Travel talk and the project of gay
    identity. Sexualities, 10 (1), 49-60.
•    You have two handouts for this lecture; one contains the lecture notes; the other contains
     a tourism flyer
•    Tourism:
            GENERAL
•    1. Material culture of tourism and Foucault’s concept of “genealogy” – example: suitcase
•    2. “Tourist gaze”
•    3. Tracking tourism - government
•    4. Locals and tourism – can have both positive and negative effects on locals; locals often
     view their environments differently than tourists; local cultures and societies can be
     altered or even wiped out
•    5. Ecotourism – Slide 15 – the main tenets of the International Ecotourism Society:
     conservation, community, sustainability, responsible travel, and improving well-being of
     locals and their environments
•    6. Critiques of tourism - mainly through the “commodification of nature” 
•    7. Social construction of nature – mainly through selecting aspects of
     nature/environments so we can reflect on them later when we’re back home
•    8. “Wilderness ideal” - we re-design nature in order to fulfill Romantic human ideals
     about what nature means at the time
•    9. “Ghosts of place” – travel to places in search of the symbolic remnant of a person,
     event, or thing.

•    Continued...
        SPECIFIC Examples
• 10. Rosie’s Cruises – gay travellers stay longer, spend more than non-
  gay travellers; Mayor Kelly welcomes Rosie to Halifax;
        - differences between mainstream Carnival Cruise Line and Rosie
  Family Cruise ads 
• 11. Sexuality and tourism in Canada – Canada is a big draw for
  international travellers because it combines two robust social
  institutions: marriage and tourism; a Canadian-based marriage is
  usually recognized under International Law, even if a couple’s home
  base does not – this is problematic and highly political
• Murray Reading: 
    – Main findings (on handout); complexity of gay travel – not “just gay
      people travelling;” gays often driven underground to gain local knowledge
      and enjoy themselves safely, particularly at non-gay-friendly destinations
      where laws (such as the Barbados Law) are anti-gay practices (and anti-
      gay assumptions of practices); gay travellers, like non-gay travellers,
      might impose their own cultural ideals and practices on local culture and
      are not exempt from negatively impacting local culture
                           Lecture 18 Mon., Mar. 15
 Reading 1 Marshall, L. (2005). Were women raped in New Orleans? Off Our
 Backs, 35 (9/10), 14-15.
 Reading 2 NET Mehta, M. (2007). Gender and natural disasters: New
 challenges for mountain development. Sustainable Mountain Development,
 52, 17-19. http://www.icimod.org/uploads/ newsletter/nl52/gender.pdf

• You have a handout for this lecture on Marshall, Mehta,
  and Were Women Raped in New Orleans?
• You also have a class group work handout sketching out
  several contexts during a natural disaster; you were
  asked to apply Marshall and Mehta’s findings on gender
  implications and will be expected to do a similar exercise
  on exam
• Canada responds to natural disasters: armed forces;
  financial donations; prayer; volunteerism; and, policy re-
  formatting
• Be VERY familiar with several of Marshall and Mehta’s
  findings 
                               Lecture 19 Wed., Mar. 17
  No assigned reading. Lecture on: Curry, P. (2006). Ecological ethics: An introduction
  (pp. 71-89, 95-99). Malden, MA: Polity Press.

• You have a handout for this lecture
• Ethics – main description and how they apply to environmental concern
    – Using sex(uality) and politics (such as Earth Day) to “sell” environmental
      ethics to the public
         • Links on Slide 6 – Ecology Action Centre underwear fundraiser; naked on glacier
• Three main theories on environmental concern within environmental
  sociology
    – Postmaterialism
    – Paradigm Shift
    – Ecological Modernization 
• Compassion fatigue features of compassion fatigue; how those features
  might be implicated with social class and gender
• From Curry reading (2006). Ecological ethics: An introduction (pp. 71-89,
  95-99). Malden, MA: Polity Press:
    – Deep Green Movements – main tenets/ideals
         • Arne Naess and Deep Ecology be familiar with several of the principles of Deep
           Ecology (on handout); refer to sample exam question on handout concerning one-child
           policy
                               Lecture 20 Mon., Mar. 22
 Reading Tindall, D.B., Davies, S. and Mauboules, C. (2003). Activism and conservation
 behaviour in an environmental movement: The contradictory effects of gender. Society
 and Natural Resources, 16 (10), 909-932.

• You have a handout for this lecture
• Ecofeminism:
    – be familiar with some reasons why ecofeminism emerged
      from 1970s politics and research
    – be familiar with the comparison (typology) between
      ecofeminism and Deep Ecology 
    – be able to suggest which of the two might best be applied to
      different phenomena and why
• Tindall, Davies, and Maboules reading:
    – be familiar with several of the authors’ literature review
      findings and several of their own research findings; the first
      influence the latter concerning major gender differences
      between women and men, particularly as men have more
      resources, time, and opportunities to participate in
      environmentalism
                              Lecture 21 Wed., Mar. 24
  Reading 1 NET Gender and the Animal Rights Movement.
  http://www.utanimalrights.com/gender.htm
   Reading 2 NET People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Draggin' ‘Ladies’ Prove That
  There's Nothing Glamorous About Fur. http://www.furisdead.com/feat-dragginladies.asp
• You have a handout for this lecture
• Wolves:
    – How mixed messages about wolves bombard us through pop culture ideals,
      materials, and practices (scary, mythical, comical, powerful, sacred,
      cultural...)
    – Wolf Hunting: some materials, ideals, and practices involved in booking a
      wolf hunt (Slide 33 link); the main tension in the Sarah Palin/Ashley Judd
      debate over wolf hunting 
• Gender and Animal Rights – some social facts about how gender is
  implicated in the way animals are treated in the home and how women
  are objectified as sexist imagery in some Animal Rights Movements,
  such as PETA
• Sexuality and Animal Rights Movements – within some movements,
  gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual, transvestite people sometimes form
  collectives and layer their sexuality with their concern for the ethical
  treatment of animals, such as that sketched out in the link on Slide 37

				
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