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					iPh to on includ e3 e G
Everything You Need to Know

Up da ted

About Your iPhone

an

Personal Technology eBook

contents] [
Everything You Need to Know About Your iPhone This content was adapted from Internet.com's SmartPhoneToday and Datamation Web sites. Contributors: Gerry Blackwell, Damon Brown, James Miller, Michael Gartenberg, Mike Elgan, and James Maguire.

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iPhone 3G: What's Not to Like?
Gerry Blackwell

Discover the iPhone's Hidden Goodness
Damon Brown

Keyboard Tips & Tricks
SmartPhoneToday Staff

Double Tap Home Button for Favorites, Music Controls Web Search: Google or Yahoo!? It's Your Choice How to Set Any Picture as Wallpaper Generate Custom iPhone Ringtones from iTunes Song Samples MegaPhone Brings Disc Mode to iPhones Access 160 (And Counting) iPhone Applications Troubleshooting Wi-Fi Connection Problems Get iPhone Widgets to Use on Any Phone
Mike Elgan

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64 Seriously Cool iPhone Applications
James Maguire

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iPhone 3G: What’s Not to Like?
By Gerry Blackwell
pple's iconic iPhone 3G may be the only mobile device you'll ever need -- heck, the only device, period. (Until Apple comes out with a 4G version, of course.) The new iPhone is available from AT&T for $199 with a two-year voice-data plan ($70 to $130 a month), and from Rogers in Canada for the same price with a three-year plan ($60 to $115). If you bought the original iPhone last year, the new one offers significant inducements to trade up, especially for enterprise users. Chief among them is broadband-speed Web surfing, downloading, and e-mail on the mobile network -- the new iPhone works on UMTS/HSDPA networks as well as GSM/EDGE, including overseas. If you somehow missed iPhone mania last year, but you're now in the market for an electronic Swiss army knife, this is the deluxe model without a deluxe price. It does everything, and most of it well: voice, e-mail the new iPhone? In truth, very little, although the non-corporate e-mail experience -- at least in our testing of a Rogers iPhone -- isn't a patch on BlackBerry. The onboard navigation

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(including push), 3G, and Wi-Fi Web surfing, music, video, 2-megapixel still and video photography, GPS navigation. And it features a brilliantly designed touchscreen user interface, the hands-down coolest of any smart phone we've seen. What else is new in the iPhone 3G? Improved sound quality, Apple says. Support for Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync, which means secure push e-mail, contacts, and calendars for enterprise users. There's also a built-in virtual private network with strong two-factor authentication. And access to scores of new applications written by third-party developers, and available at the wildly popular new Apple AppStore. What’s not to like about

If you somehow missed iPhone mania last year, but you're now in the market for an electronic Swiss army knife, this is the deluxe model without a deluxe price.

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software and GPS is definitely nitpickable. And the absence of a physical keyboard or keypad does present some constraints. Some of these are more than quibbles, but none comes close to being a deal-killer. Let's start with the good, though. The big thing is 3G connectivity. So what does it mean in real life? We tested the iPhone on the Rogers HSDPA network in Canada. A dedicated YouTube application, linked by default from the iPhone home page, was our first testing ground. With a moderately strong connection (three bars of five according to the phone) at off-peak hours, the video was pretty good: motion smooth, audio more or less synched. Images were a little fuzzy but clear enough in most cases to be able to make out what was going on. With weaker connections and at peak times, images got fuzzier, but video never hiccupped. YouTube is a good test because the application automatically adjusts video quality according to bandwidth available in order to avoid pauses for rebuffering. When we switched to Wi-Fi connectivity over a home office network with multi-megabit Internet service, video was sharp as a tack -- well, as sharp as it would be on a PC -- and smooth as silk. We also tried two online Internet speedometers, one operated by McAfee, the computer security software company, and one operated by DSLreports.com, an online telecom journal. The DSLreports speedometer is designed specifically to measure iPhone 3G performances. (Note: many other online speedometers won't work because they're based on Flash, which is still not available for iPhone, although Adobe says it will be.) Results? In different tests with signal strength, ranging from two to four bars on the phone, and at different times of day and week, we were getting connection speeds from just under 500 Kbps to just under 900 Kbps.

Is the iPhone Suitable for Business Use? Yes
t's a question that's been around since Apple announced the device way back in January of 2007. With the release of the 2.0 software release and the iPhone 3G, some folks have weighed in. Some say NO. Others say, sort of. I say, absolutely. The reasons are clear. It's a Top Down Device. The iPhone is a top down device not a bottom up device. That's just a fact of life and something many IT departments are going to need to accept. If the CEO buys an iPhone and takes it to work and says "make it work." It's now a de-facto business device. Period.

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By Michael Gartenberg

Sync

The iPhone supports that which most businesses need supporting, namely Exchange Active/Sync. Is it the best implementation of Exchange sync? No but it more than does the job for what most users want, namely OTA access to their calendars, contacts mail, and the ability to view office attachments. This one will no doubt be debated over and over. Short of not exposing your Exchange server to the Internet (which is secure but makes life a pain for users) there's always going to be some level of risk. The key is balancing risk vs. keeping users happy. It's always easy to say no to users. The smart IT folks (as IT is essentially a service org in many places) will learn to say yes more often (while at the same time keeping things as secure as possible). Is the iPhone the most secure device on the market? No. Is it more than good enough for most organizations? Absolutely. Prior to the 2.0 software release, it was difficult to think of the iPhone as a business device in terms of management. After all, the ability to remotely configure, administer and in case of emergency, the ability to wipe a device from afar are all important features. One of the most important parts of the 2.0 release was Apple giving IT folks exactly these type of tools for management. Once again it's not as comprehensive as other tools but it more than meets the needs of what most folks want to get done. continued

Security

Support

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That's similar to, or slightly better than, other 3G mobile devices we've tested, and better than some entry-level DSL services. Nothing apparently has changed significantly from the first-gen iPhone Web surfing experience -- other than the speed, that is. The Safari browser worked well in my testing. Double tapping the screen enlarges the image. In most cases, this makes pages with otherwise unreadable small text readable. This is one area where the iPhone (and iPod Touch) touchscreen interface really pays dividends. Scrolling down a long Web page -- or across it if you've enlarged it -- is a simple matter of flicking with your finger up, down, or across the screen. And if you tap the overlapping page icon at the bottom of the Safari screen, which also shows the number of Safari tabs you have open, you get a thumbnail filmstrip of open pages, which you can scroll across using the same flicking motion.

Are there other issues? Sure, AT&T as sole carrier, lack of removable battery and other things are potentially issues for users, but that's the point. Those are user issues and should not factor into the business decision. While it's important for IT to support a core mobile framework for devices, there's no reason for that framework not be broad and inclusive. It's a user decision as to whether issues such as battery life, keyboard style, or even color get factored into a decision. At this point, there's no reason why a business using Exchange would not let the iPhone on their approved list and frankly, some very good reasons as to why they should consider doing exactly that. I

Fetch New Data, in which you can toggle Push on or off. This allows the phone to support Exchange and other push e-mail services. If Push is set to Off in the Fetch New Data tab, or if the software doesn't support push, the phone uses the schedule you select -- every 15 minutes, every 30 minutes, hourly -- or only retrieves data when you tap the connect button. Only Active Sync mail applications, Apple's Mobile Me and Yahoo mail work in push mode, according to Apple. But my Rogers POP mail account, which is Yahoo, did not work in push mode. Also, at least with Rogers service, the phone appears to only download headers, at least sometimes. On a few occasions, when we opened a message, the software went back out to the server to get the body, but was unable to get it for some reason. This, we assume, is a Rogers problem and nothing to do with the iPhone mail software. The good? Messages look great and are easy to read. Return addresses appear as easy-to-tap buttons in open messages. Setting up the iPhone to receive messages from our POP account was easy. The phone automatically downloaded account information based on e-mail address and password - but then our ISP is, um, Rogers, so that was perhaps no great achievement. And setting up the iPhone to send messages did

Improved Sound Quality?
We didn't have a first-generation iPhone to compare, but this one sounds remarkably good, significantly better than the music-playing BlackBerry and Motorola smartphones we've tested recently -- clearer, fuller-bodied, and more realistic. It's similar in quality to an iPod Nano. The included earbuds appear to be standard iPod issue -- i.e., not bad sounding, not great. (We tested sound quality with audiophile headphones.) If you want to jog while listening to tunes on your iPhone, you'll probably have to buy different earbuds - these ones will fall out unless you have very tiny lugholes. For iPhone users who don't work for a company with a Microsoft Exchange e-mail system, nothing, apparently, has changed in the e-mail experience. If your company uses Microsoft Exchange, it looks to be fairly simple to set up an Exchange account and receive true push e-mail, which you couldn't do with the first-generation product. We weren't able to test the Exchange functionality, however. In the iPhone's Settings menu, you'll find an option for 4

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require a second step: turning on the Rogers SMTP server in the iPhone Account settings, which was not done automatically. We had to contact Rogers to clear up the problem. It's a small thing, but perhaps Apple (or is it Rogers?) should configure the mail settings so that the SMTP server toggle switch is set to on by default, and then give users a warning during set-up that it's on until they turn it off. The bundled Google Maps and routing application works nicely with the built-in GPS. This is not a real-time, turn-by-turn navigation system it's simply a route finder, which is pretty useful on its own. Major navigational software makers such as TomTom and TeleNav have announced full navigational systems for iPhone 3G. We did experience some problems with the routing function. If the software doesn't recognize the street address or place name you've input because you used the wrong format or a variant of a name, it will sometimes find the nearest match and give you directions to the entirely wrong place. We've said little here about the interface or basic functions such as voice and photography, which have apparently changed little or not at all from the first-generation product. The App Store, widely covered in the mainstream media, we'll also pass over, though it's certainly one of the strong inducements to consider iPhone. The number of applications available doesn't rival the number available for Symbian, for example, or Windows Mobile, but iPhone is catching up faster than anyone might have expected. And this is a great, easy-to-use store for buying (or downloading free) applications. The touchscreen interface, also widely covered elsewhere, is obviously a feature that helps put this product into a category by itself. It's simple, elegant, attractive, easy to learn and for the most part works well. The only drawback is the reliance on an onscreen keyboard. Even though the iPhone's virtual keys are larger than the physical keys on a BlackBerry or other key-

board-equipped smartphones, we found it too easy to miss the letter or character we were aiming for. Maybe it just takes more practice. As a phone, the iPhone is excellent. Voice quality, presumably because of superior audio componentry to support the music functions, is the best of any smartphone we've tested recently. And the ability to set up voice mail to automatically appear in e-mail is a very nice feature - though not unique to iPhone. Bottom line: if you need a smartphone and want one with good music and video playback abilities, this should come near the top of your list of products to explore further. It's not perfect -- no product is -- but it comes closer than most. And it has that Apple design extra, that je ne sais qua that turns the iPhone into something very pleasing. I

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Discover the iPhone’s Hidden Goodness
By Damon Brown

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n August, Apple started holding classes in its Apple Music Stores to help people operate the iPhone. As many of you know, the iPhone doesn't come with an instruction booklet. Instead, there is a little pamphlet, 12 or so pages, with drawings like something from IKEA. A National Public Radio program interviewed me about the phenomenon — Apple teaching classes instead of just including instructions like everyone else — but I was never able to attend the classes myself. It may have been for the best, the author of the first book on the iPhone sitting in. In all honesty, even so-called experts are learning more about the iPhone every day. Apple updates the iTunes and/or iPhone software as often as twice a month, so the capabilities are literally evolving as they are learned. There is plenty of hidden goodness within the iPhone, including tips and tricks that are undocumented and often undiscovered. Some of these you may already know. All of them are simple.

Silence is Golden
Like many cell devices, the iPhone has a silent/buzz function. Unlike other companies, Apple doesn't actually tell you about it. Take your iPhone and look on the left side. There is a small, all-black switch above the volume buttons. Flip the switch and a red dot will appear. The iPhone screen will show a bell with a line through it a la Ghostbusters. Now all calls will buzz, not ring. Flip the switch again and the screen will flash a regular bell, indicating that rings are normal now.

Battery Power
Another area that has not been discussed is battery power. Some users err on the paranoid side, wary from all those short battery life concerns six months ago, and connect their iPhone to a nearby power outlet as soon as the "20 percent power" warning flashes. (I would be in this category.) The iPhone will warn you twice, at 20

Some users err on the paranoid side, wary from all those short battery life concerns six months ago, and connect their iPhone to a nearby power outlet as soon as the "20 percent power" warning flashes.

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percent and again at 10 percent. It will then shut down. No beep. It will cut off a phone call or any other activity immediately. The phone will not function at all until it is charges for roughly 15 minutes. Press any button and a Mac-like set of icons will appear on the screen: the current battery power followed by a powerplug and an arrow pointing to a lightning bolt. Expect to see this screen for about an hour. Call it poor design, but once the iPhone juice runs out, it requires a long time to power up again. (Connecting it to the computer doesn't help, either.) Consider investing in a car charger if you're planning a long road trip.

tapping the onscreen iPod button.

iPod Mode
A simple, often neglected music control is actually in the iPod mode. Press the iPod icon on the main menu, find a song and press play. The album art will appear as the music starts. (If it has no art, a grey music note will appear instead.) Now tap the center of the album art. A nice list of options will pop up at the top of the art. The first icon is a loop. Press the loop once and the current playlist or album will repeat. The icon will turn blue. Tap it again and a small "1" will appear on the bottom-left corner of the loop. Now the current song will repeat. In the middle is the current song number within the current album or playlist (four out of 14, for instance). Above the song number is the song time elapsed, song time remaining and a silver-and-blue line identical to the other menus. However, the line here represents the song track. Move the ball with your finger to rewind or fast-forward the song. The last icon is two arrows twisted together. Tap it once to randomize the current album or playlist.

Music @Home
There is "Home", the square button located at the bottom of the iPhone's face. Its main purpose is to take you back to the default menu screen, but it can also make controlling your music easier. Let's say you are listening to one of your favorite songs on the iPhone, for instance, James Brown's classic "Funky Drummer." Press the sleep button at the top of the iPhone to make the screen lock. It will say, "slide to unlock" at the bottom, along with the current time and song. Now double tap the "Home" button. The music controls will appear immediately under the time. Press rewind, fast-forward or pause as you would normally do, or use your finger to adjust the volume by sliding the silver ball along the blue line below. A similar "Home" technique can be used on the main menu screen. Press the "Home" button to get to the main screen. Now tap "Home" again. Music info will pop up, including performer, song and album, as well as the volume ball. Unlike the previous mode, you remove the information — by hitting the onscreen Close icon — or move to the actual iPod menu -- by

Last But Not least
As a final hidden goody, look in the upper-right hand corner when in iPod mode. You'll see a series of three lines. Tap it. The icon will "flip," turning into a miniature version of the current album art, and the large album art will turn into a list of the current album songs. (It will always list the current album, even if you are playing from a playlist.) Click on another song to hear it. The list icon is always available in iPod mode. I

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Keyboard Tips & Tricks
By The SmartPhoneToday Staff

1. A letter isn't entered until you lift your finger off a key. So if you touch a wrong key by accident when typing, simply slide your finger to the one you meant to type. Let go when the correct letter or symbol appears. 2. While Apple's auto-correction feature is useful, many iPhone users often find themselves accidentally accepting a suggested word when they didn't mean to. There are two things to keep in mind to prevent this from happening: a) To accept a suggested word you either type a space, punctuation mark, or hit return. b) To reject the keyboard's correction finish typing the word your want and then tap on the word itself. I know that's a little inconvenient, but it works. Do that twice and the iPhone adds the word to its dictionary. If you want to start from scratch with the dictionary, if for example it has accepted and is now suggesting a number of wrongly spelled words, you can reset it. To

do this go into settings from the home page, hit general, and tap reset. Once there, tap Reset Keyboard Dictionary. This will erase all the words you've added. 3) It's easy enough to capitalize a letter, right? Simply hit the up-arrow (Shift) key next to the letter Z before you tap a letter. But what if you want to capitalize a whole word? a) To do that you must first go into Settings on the home page, hit General, and then Keyboard. b) Turn Enable Caps Lock on. Now when you double tap the Shift key before typing, all letters you type will be uppercase. The Shift turns blue in this mode. A single tap will still only cause a single letter to be capitalized.

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4) This is also where you can turn off AutoCapitalization, which is on by default to capitalize the first word of every sentence, off.

A letter isn't entered until you lift your finger off a key. So if you touch a wrong key by accident when typing, simply slide your finger to the one you meant to type.

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5) The keyboard automatically appears when you enter text into a form on a Web page in the iPhone's Safari Web browsers. Conveniently, you can hit the blue Go or Search key, whichever appears depending on the type of form, when you're finished entering the text to submit what you've entered. Sometimes you may want to close the keyboard before submitting the information in the form. To do this, simply tap the Done key just above the keyboard on the

6) If you hold down the E, Y, U, I, O, A, S, L, Z, C, or N key for more than a couple of seconds, the keyboard will offer up anywhere from two to nine additional characters for you to choose from. These additional characters mostly include these letters with various forms of accents. I

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Double Tap Home Button for Favorites, Music Controls

lthough the most obvious thing (aside from bricking unlocked iPhones and causing thirdparty apps to disappear) about firmware update 1.1.1 is the addition of iPod Touch-like access to the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store — after all, a bright purple iTunes icon is placed on the home screen — it is not the new feature you will likely use the most. That honor will probably go to the expanded responsibilities Apple has given the otherwise underused Home button — the only button on the iPhone. All the Home did before the upgrade was take you back to the Home screen -- the center of the iPhone universe -with a single tap from within any application. While it still does that, the Home button now has a second, context-sensitive purpose to take you to your favorite contacts or bring up iPod music controls.

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When no music is playing on the iPhone, a double tap of the Home button brings up the Favorites menu within the smartphone's phone application; all the better to make a quick phone call. However, if you've got music playing, a double tap will bring up translucent iPod playback controls over whatever application you happen to be in; except, that is, the iPhone's iPod software, which would be kind of redundant, right? From there, you're taken to the Favorties menu just as the double tap does when no music is playing at all. The translucent music controls box tells the name of the track playing, the album it comes from, and the artist. You can also pause then restart audio playback, skip to the next or previous song, or bring up the full iPod application. Simply hit the Close button to exit out of the music controls and return to what you were doing before. I

Here’s how it works:

All the Home did before the upgrade was take you back to the Home screen -- the center of the iPhone universe -- with a single tap from within any application.

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Web Search: Google or Yahoo!? It's Your Choice
ou can't beat the iPhone's Safari browser for basic Web surfing from a mobile device. It allows you to view full Web pages on the iPhone's sharp, bright, and large display. Zoom in on a section you want to read with a pinch of two fingers on the touch screen and zoom out by pulling them apart. A flick of your finger and you're quickly scrolling through a page. Another nice feature of Safari is how easy Apple makes it to perform an Internet search. Tap the Address Bar to open up a small Search Window. Tap that Window and type in your search term(s) or phrase and hit the Blue Button on the lower right-hand side of the iPhone's keyboard, which popped up back when you first tapped the Address Bar. And while Google is the default search engine for Safari, Apple makes it simple enough for you to go with Yahoo! instead, if that's your preference. To change from Google to Yahoo!, simply push your iPhone's Home button to go to the Home screen > Touch the Settings icon > Select Safari > Select Yahoo! That's it.

How to Set Any Picture as Wallpaper
ith the iPhone, you can use any picture that you've synced through iTunes or taken with the built-in camera as wallpaper. It is a great and simple way to add a little bit of your personality to your iPhone. Here's how to do it: • Press the home button to get to the iPhone's home screen • Select Settings • Select Wallpaper • Choose the folder from which you want to select your wallpaper image. You'll see one labeled Wallpaper at the top with pre-loaded wallpaper pictures from Apple. Next up is Camera Roll, where all the pictures you take with the iPhone are stored. Underneath that is the general Photo Library folder and then all the folders you've synced from your desktop. • Select an image • What you'll see next is how the image you selected will look as wallpaper • Thankfully, you can move and adjust the picture as much as you like with your fingers through Apple's multi-touch interface. Use one finger to move an image around. Use two fingers, pinching them together and widening them apart, to shrink and enlarge the picture. • Once you're satisfied with how the image looks, select Set Wallpaper The next time you turn your iPhone on, you'll be greeted by the picture of your choice. Unfortunately, that's just about the only place you'll see wallpaper with the iPhone. It doesn't even appear on the home screen, which remains a dull black no matter what. And, annoyingly, there doesn't appear to be an easy way to go back to not having wallpaper once you start using it. It seems you have to stop syncing or delete that image from your iPhone. All you can easily do, apparently, is change the wallpaper to another picture. In addition to your own pictures, there are free wallpaper sites out there that have images you can download already formatted to fit smoothly on the iPhone's 320 x 480 pixel resolution display. Simply download them to your computer and sync them to your iPhone. I

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The next time you launch Safari and tap on the Address Bar, instead of seeing the word Google in the Search Window that opens, you'll see Yahoo!. And when you tap on the Search Window, the Blue Key on the keyboard that says Go in Address Bar mode, will now say Yahoo! instead of Google in Search mode. A Yahoo! search takes you to a results page that has been optimized for the iPhone. Performing a Google search, however, takes you to the same results page you'd see if you did the same search on a desktop. I

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Generate Custom iPhone Ringtones from iTunes Song Samples
ith this hack, you'll be able to use almost any of Apple's free 30-second song previews in iTunes, which happen to be available for every track in the vast music store, to create custom ringtones for your iPhone. Here's a brief outline of the steps involved: The first step is to create a new playlist of un-purchased songs, export that playlist, and then save it as text. When you open it up, locate the URLs for the audio files you want as ringtones; using those Web addresses, download the 30-second snippets of the songs.

MegaPhone Brings Disc Mode to iPhones

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egaPhone, formerly called iPhoneDrive ($9.95), from Ecamm Network, allows you to use your iPhone for file storage, something you can't do with Apple's iPod/smartphone combo out-of-the-box, as there's no disk mode for iPhones like there is for iPods. Launching MegaPhone brings up the utility's browser window and toolbar. It is from there you can transfer files and folders back and forth between your Mac OS X computer and iPhone. There are two ways to perform transfers to an iPhone: Drag and drop content from the Mac Desktop or a Finder window into the MegaPhone browser or click the "Copy To iPhone" button on the toolbar. To do the reverse, you can either click the "Copy From iPhone" button on the toolbar to move highlighted files or folders to a location of your choosing on the computer; drag content directly from the MegaPhone browser window into a Finder window or onto the Desktop; or simply double-click a file to download it to your Documents folder. With MegaPhone, you can also create folders on and delete files or folders from your iPhone. You can't view content you've transferred from your computer on the iPhone with MegaPhone, however, as the software is for storage purposes only. I

The first step is to create a new playlist of un-purchasedsongs, export that playlist, and then save it as text.

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Once the audio samples are downloaded, rename the tracks — giving them a name (while keeping the .m4p file extensions) that's more meaningful to you than Apple's obscure file designations. That way the tracks will be more easily recognizable for the songs they represent when you go to use them as a ringtone. You'll be able to do that last bit after loading the files onto the iPhone. Once they're on the device, you simply pick the file you want to use as a ringtone just like you would with the ringtones Apple pre-loaded. The 30-second song previews you just added are now listed in Settings --> Sound --> Ringtone along with these other tones. I

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Access 160 (And Counting) iPhone Applications
Phone users should check out www.iphoneappr.com through the Safari Web browser on their device. They'll find a site that lists and delivers access to 160 (and counting) applications that are iPhone compatible. The interface is easy to navigate and software is divided by categories, including Business & Finance, Email & Chat, Games, Miscellaneous, Multimedia, News & Sports, School, Search Apps, Shopping, Social Networking and Tools. It also compiles a list of the Top 10 Apps and allows users to search the entire application database. Right now, the only third-party applications that are available for the iPhone run through Safari and are accessible when connected to the Internet—either through Wi-Fi or AT&T's EDGE network. They do not run on the iPhone itself. Because of this, most of the software listed at www.iphoneappr.com should run on most any smartphone or desktop computer. They've been specifically formatted for the iPhone's display, however. Typically, a listing offers a short description of the application, a live demo, user ratings, and a button to launch the title on your iPhone. Launching the application means you'll be led to the Web site where the software is being hosted. I

1. Tap Settings > Wi-Fi Networks, then pick the network you are trying to connect to. 2. In the DHCP panel, select the Renew Lease button. If that doesn't work, see iPhone Basic Troubleshooting at http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=305740 It then leads into a couple of tips that involve the iPhone's cellular-data EDGE capability. For example, Apple explains what to do if your Wi-Fi connection keeps reverting to EDGE. That's when your iPhone looks like it is connected to the Internet over Wi-Fi, but goes to EDGE when you try to access a Web page. This can happen when the wireless router is using MAC Address Filtering and the iPhone's MAC address hasn't been entered into the filter list or when you've entered a WEP password wrong. Here's what Apple suggests: If MAC Address Filtering is enabled on the wireless router, make sure iPhone's Wi-Fi address (in Settings > General > About) is entered into the router's filter. See the documentation that came with your wireless router for additional information. If you experience this and use a WEP Password, on the iPhone tap Settings > Wi-Fi. Then tap More Info ( > ) next to the Wi-Fi network name and tap Forget this Network. Then try accessing the Wi-Fi network again. Alternatively, turn off WEP encryption on the wireless router. Additional tips include what to do if there's a weak iPhone Wi-Fi signal, you receive the "unable to join Network Failure (error -3)," and when there's no Internet access when switching networks. I

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Troubleshooting Wi-Fi Connection Problems
pple has posted a series of tips to help you manage Wi-Fi connections with an iPhone or iPod Touch, which is essentially the same as the former, but without phone features and some other functions. The first tip offers advice on what to do when you're having trouble connecting with a wireless connection to a paid commercial hotspot, such as the ones available at Borders and Starbucks. It suggests renewing the hotspots DHCP lease. To do that:

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Get iPhone Widgets to Use on Any Phone
By Mike Elgan

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he Apple iPhone is a breathtaking departure from the stale smartphone market. Everyone loves the iPhone's huge screen and eye-candy user interface. But many expressed disappointment when Steve Jobs announced that the iPhone applications environment would not follow the PC model of software installed on the phone, but instead a "thin-client" model of Web-based applications launched through the phone's wireless connection to the Internet.

tent and application experience can be really great -far better than either phone browsing or phone-based applications. I know this because I've been using iPhone-like widgets -- first on my Treo, then on my BlackBerry Pearl -- for a year now. My source for widgets is a service called Plusmo. I use Plusmo not only for instant access to Web content (without browsing), but also to "mobilize" my personal blog, The Raw Feed. Here's how it works: go to plusmo.com with your phone's browser to install the application on your phone, then visit the site with your Web browser to choose from among Plusmo's 20,000 widgets -- yeah, that's right: 20,000 -- and they just show up on your phone. (You can also Jupiterimages choose widgets using just the phone.) You can pick stuff like Dilbert cartoons; a cheap-gas locator; games galore; video sites like YouTube; big-name news sources like CNN or BBC;

I think the focus on Web-based applications and widgets, rather than directly installed on the phone, is one of the best things - possibly THE best thing -about the iPhone. The reason people were lukewarm about the idea is that most smartphone users hate using the Internet on their phones. It's slow, the content is hard to read, navigation is a pain and typing URLs is frustrating. What iPhone users will learn over the next year as new Web-based widgets come on-line is the Internet con-

I think the focus on Web-based applications and widgets, rather than directly installed on the phone, is one of the best things -- possibly THE best thing -- about the iPhone.

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many thousands of blogs; and a lot more widgets. For most phones, these widgets can update themselves all at once. Later, when you've got some time to kill or need some information, the information is already there. It takes you about three minutes of using Plusmo to realize that getting content and using widgets like this is far superior to "browsing" on a cell phone.

Best of all, Plusmo works on the major "smartphones" and most "dumb" phones, too. And if you're an iPhone user, you're in luck, too. Plusmo has a new service for the iPhone, and the icons even look like Apple designed them. It's time to stop wasting your time slogging from site to site on your cell phone's browser, and embrace the new widget movement. I

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64 Seriously Cool iPhone Applications
By James Maguire

O

K, you've bought your iPhone, showed it to all your friends, and learned to love it. The thing's cool. But now you want more. You want your iPhone to sing and dance and play with you. You want more functionality – and more fun – and you want tons of freebies.

to your iPhone (or iPod). It's simple: type in an URL, click "Save it now," and chose "Add bookmark." Also available as the iWebSaverFavlet. 4) 911 Help (http://www.usa-links.com/911help/) Turn your iPhone into a safety device: this app displays a big bold red 911 sign visible dozens of feet away from the device. It flashes to help others realize you need assistance. 5) Can I Drive Yet? (http://www.canidriveyet.com/) Helps you calculate if you're sober enough to operate a motor vehicle; enter your relevant data (how many drinks, your body weight, etc.) and it spits out an answer, using national blood alcohol standards. 6) BarCheck (http://barcheck.net/) When you're shopping in your neighborhood store, enter the numbers on an item's bar code to get review and prices from Amazon, Google and Yahoo. Yup, it's smart shopping. 7) Widgetop (http://www.widgetop.com/mobile.html)

With that in mind, peruse this list of iPhone apps. Lots of cool tools. Weather, sports, news, games, music, an eBook reader, even time management apps: they're all here. Check 'em out...

Personal Productivity
1) Befree 4 iPhone (http://www.ewe-software.de/ en/download.html) Enables remote control of your PC from your mobile device. It's freeware, but the paid pro version allows you remote access to all the files stored on your PC hard drive. 2) iBay (http://iphone.computerfaq.be/ibay/) Search eBay on your iPhone. (You bought that handheld to help you shop, didn't you?) 3) iWebSaver (http://iwebsaver.com/) Lets you save your favorite Web sites and applications

You want your iPhone to sing and dance and play with you. You want more functionality – and more fun – and you want tons of freebies.

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Helps you manage your collection of widgets. (A widget is a software app that lets you do something. An example is a menu bar or a toggle switch, but there are zillions.) 8) Dictionary (http://dictionary.aapl.org.uk/#_0) Not just a dictionary, but also a thesaurus. Comes in handy when you're typing that business e-mail and you want to seem suave. 9) Calorie Counter (http://iphone.trebitowski.com/Calculate/ DailyCalorieIntake/) Calculate your daily Calorie intake based on age, weight and exercise level. If you're feeling disciplined, it also gives you a number to shoot for to lose weight. (Cupcake, anyone?) 10) Currency Exchange (http://rates.speedymarks.com/) Keep track of the relative value of the world's major currencies. Watch the dollar's precipitous fall right there on your handheld. You might also try eSignal's Currency Exchange Calculator. In theory the two apps should produce the same numbers. 11) Mortgage Payment Calculator (http://calcnexus.com/mortgage-payment-calculator.php) Calculate your monthly payment on that monstrously expensive house that you can't afford. (I haven't yet found an iPhone app that calculates foreclosure costs.) 12) ModGuitars.com Tuner (http://modguitars.com/tuner/) Helps you tune your guitar. Very useful for those lunchtime gigs that help you pay for your pricey gadgets.

Three Sites for Information at Your Fingertips
By Damon Brown Several third-party companies are stepping up their iPhone support, making special versions of their Web sites for the iPhone so you won't have to use their regular sites for the iPhone. What you get are miniature sites formatted for the iPhone's screen and touch controls. Google has been the default Internet search system on the phone, but just recently adapted its Reader function. Basically a custom RSS feeder, Google Reader allows you to subscribe to your favorite Web sites and blogs and have the latest posts delivered to one easy-to-read screen. (The same service is available through Google on a regular desktop/laptop.) To visit your Reader, press the Safari icon to launch the Web browser. Google is the default homepage, so you should be looking at it right now, but just type in www.google.com if it's not. Once on the Google page, press the new option, Reader. It will then ask you for your e-mail address and password, or, if you don't have one, it will ask you to sign up for free. The next screen will have a link to Add Subscriptions. Press it. You'll find two options: Search and Browse or Feed Bundles. If you already have a favorite Web site to add, use Search and Browse to type in the URL and add the subscription. You can also use Search and Browse to look for a particular subject -- say, "Iceland" -- and Google will deliver all the Reader-compatible Web sites related to the topic. Find the appropriate site and press the Subscription link. You can now view the posts from the site, starting with the most recent. The easier, if more generic method is to use feed bundles, which are groups of like-minded sites mashed together under one selection. For instance, the News bundle has six different feeds: BBC News (World), Christian Science Monitor, ESPN.com, Google News, MarketWatch.com, and NPR Podcast. Google Reader offers more than a dozen different feed bundles, from Cars to Technology, and the number of bundles, as well as the number of feeds included in each bundle, will likely grow quickly. The full list of Feed Bundles is below the Search and Browse option. Press the plus button to subscribe to a bundle or touch the feed listing to see

]

Google News Reader

Fun and Enjoyment
13) iDoodle (http://www.idoodleapp.com/) Let's face it: you're too productive. But with iDoodle, you can wile away the hours drawing on your iPhone –circles, polygons, many colors. Designed specifically for the iPhone. 14) xRay (http://www.usa-links.com/ixray/) No, it's not real, but it might fool some of the people some of the time. Tap the screen, hold it over a friend's hand (someone who scoffs at the iPhone, for example) 17

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and tell them you'll X-ray their hand. A stock photo of an X-ray will show up. Very juvenile, and very cool. 15) Free-Tunes.net (http://www.free-tunes.net/us/) A collection of the free songs on iTunes. Sure, they're little-known bands now, but the price is right, and you might discover a real gem. 16) Podcaster (http://podcaster.soprotech.com/ login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fDefault.aspx) An incredibly useful program to stream audio and video podcasts, using an iTunes-styled control panel. 17) Stripr (for Comics Fans) (http://dbelement.com/index.php?site=st) Helps you manage and view all those online comics you enjoy. Plus: give feedback on comics. Thumbs up or thumbs down on Marmaduke? 18) iPhones Wallpaper (http://iphone.interfacelift.com/#_Samples) Give your iPhone a forest background, or urban, or sunset, or psychedelic. Those pretty flowers are nice, but then there's also that mountain view… 19) MacLight (http://www.gundersondesign.com/i-phone/ i-light/flashlight.html) Turn your iPhone into a flashlight, or give it a "campfire" flickering look, or a strobe light. Might be useful the next time the power grid goes down. 20) The Illusionist (http://iphone.computerfaq.be/Illusionist/ Strange, trippy visuals on your iPhone: rolling cylinders, brain conflicts, Escher-like optical mind-twisters. Don't look at it after your daily double espresso. Games 21) Castle Feud (http://www.underclouds.com/iphone/castlefeud/) Slaughter your opponents and leave them dismembered on the field of battle. Cool! A multiplayer game. 22) iSudoku (http://isudoku.janjanousek.cz/) Having this app means never having to be away from your Sodoku addiction. Hey, you can quit whenever you want to, you just don't want to…

what feeds are included in the package.

Encyclopedia Britannica

Equally valuable is Encyclopedia Britannica's new portable website, i.eb.com. Based on the popular knowledge series, Britannica Mobile iPhone Edition is kind of like a hand-held Wikipedia with credentialed contributors. They keep it simple: Press the small, subtle grey Search icon in the upper right hand corner. Type in a topic or item -- say, "Akira" -- and it will give you a listing of all entries: director Akira Kurosawa, scientist Akira Fujishima, and so on. In this case, there is no mention of the groundbreaking 1988 anime Akira -- pop cultural milestones aren't Britannica's strength -- but clicking on the Kurosawa, the famed director of Ran and The Seven Samurai, will give you a thorough, accurate biography, one perhaps a little too long to read on the iPhone.

Finally, Yellow Pages has created a special Web site for the iPhone, www.yellowpages.com. (It is literally www.yellowpages.com/yphone, but the site will automatically detect your device.) If your experience is anything like mine, the iPhone Google Maps search engine can be less than reliable when it comes to smaller locations, out-of-theway towns and, most notably, directions. After testing it, Yellow Pages seems to have solid number information, map details, and even information on store hours, billing practices (cash only, etc.), and user ratings. I

The Yellow Pages

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23) Speed Type (http://mac-gratuit.fr/iphone/speedtype/) Measures your typing speed, with the top 200 scores saved. This game is not only fun but also improves your iPhone e-mailing skills. 24) iConnect4 (http://38i.biz/iconnect4/) If you like Connect, you'll be happy to see iConnect. Can you connect four chips in a row before the iPhone does? 25) mobileLife (http://mobilelife.cinnamonthoughts.org/) A cellular automation game, "Game of Life," has been developed specifically for the iPhone and iPod touch. 26) Madelinette (http://38i.biz/madelinette/) In this game (originally European) you attempt to block your foe from moving. Who will goof up first? 27) Mines (http://imines.janjanousek.cz/) Find all the mines that are hidden underneath the boxes – or else. 28) Gumball Bingo (http://www.fatfreegames.com:2112/gameServer/Bingo) A multiplayer game that lets you chat with others while you wait for your winning combo. Plus: play three bingo cards at the same time. 29) iget4 (http://freenet-homepage.de/lars.nordmeyer/iget4/) Play against your iPhone – and your computer opponent will always shift moves. This game forces you to think. 30) Olympic Sports (http://www.dseffects.com/iphone/games/ OlympicSports/OlympicSports.php) Compete virtually against the Olympic greats to see if you can capture the gold. Earn glory without the sweat (except for a few cramped fingers).

32) PressDisplay (http://www.pressdisplay.com/pressdisplay/viewer.aspx) Access dozens and dozens of magazines and newspapers from across the globe. Zoom in or zoom out on images. 33) Politicker (http://38i.biz/politicker/) Scandal, polls, results, breaking news – all the developments about politics. 34) Sticher Radio (http://www.stitcher.com/iphone/) Pick a radio station and start streaming: comedy, sports, news, finance, and more.

Manage Your Life
35) TouchMail (http://www.tm.comvalid.com/index/) Manage and read your e-mail from any of your accounts, including Gmail, Yahoo, or MSN. Lets you read your e-mails even if you're stuck behind your company's firewall. 36) Goal Tracker (http://limeade.com/iphone/) Monitor your progress toward your personal goals, focusing on using your time more effectively. 37) BudgetBuster (http://www.tippytops.net/iphone/budgetbuster/) Track your daily-weekly-monthly expenses. How deep in debt are you today? 38) ezMemorize (http://www.ezmemorize.com/) Helps you remember all those pesky little factoids that enable you to navigate through life. 39) Noter (http://dbelement.com/index.php?site=nt) A to-do list application that works offline or online. In theory, it helps you list all those things you need to do. But do you ever get past item No. 4?

Information Retrieval/Search
40) Phone Number Trace (http://www.phone-number-trace.com/iphone.php) Learn the identity of who just called you by entering their phone number into this search box. The free info includes location and type of line (landline, cell phone); actually finding the name will cost you $15. 41) Free Stuff Times (http://www.freestufftimes.com/)

Information/Updates
31) iNews (http://www.ceneda.net/inews/) Scan and read the news from high-profile publications, read RSS feeds, and take a Quick Look at the most critical news. In English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, and other languages. 19

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A list of free stuff on the Internet that's constantly updated. Yeah, a lot of it's junk (c'mon, it's free) but you never know what you might find. How about a free Journal of Accountancy Calculator Calendar (thrills!) or a free Clear Wood Finish shirt? (snazzy!) 42) Song Lyric Search (http://www.motorcyclelife.net/lyricsearch/) You just can't get that tune out of your head – but what the heck are the words to the verse? 43) About People Search (http://people.aapl.org.uk/#_0) Use your iPhone or iPod Touch to look up anyone in America by phone number or by name. A useful little app. 44) Pinpoint Location Search (http://iphone.toughturtle.com/pinpoint/) Quickly find a gas station, restaurant, Wi-Fi hotspot, or a residence. Plus: get traffic updates to help you avoid the rush. 45) Background Check (http://www.spontaneous-insight.com/) Check out an individual's background, based on public records. The summary result is free, the real dirt costs.

(http://www.phonemeeter.com/all/index.html) Share photos, text chat with friends, find a location on a Google map, check out events posted by bars and nightclubs. Think of PhoneMeeter as a mobile network community builder. 50) Fluther (http://www.fluther.com/) Got a question you need answered? Post it to Fluther and get an answer from the crowd. Recent examples: What's a good place to take pictures in Chicago? What should I get for my birthday?

Sports
51) ScoreMobile iPhone Edition (http://iphone.thescore.com/) All the sports scores, instantly. NBA, NCAAB, NFL, MLB, NHL. The moment the ball/puck/birdie goes in the hole/hoop/goal, you'll know about it. Or, you can also use Live Scores (http://www.streamingscores.com/iphone/Scores.htm), which is updated every 30 seconds. 52) iphodmeter (http://iphodometer.com/) Find out how many calories your workout is burning, and send all your stats by e-mail. Plus: measure walking mileage. 53) iTeeMaster (http://www.teemaster.com/iteemaster/itm.html) Where's the nearest golf course? iTeeMaster will clue you in, and with one touch you can call the proshop. 54) NASCAR Schedule (http://sprintcup08.dustinmcgrew.com/) Keep track of all the auto racing events, as well as results. Vroom, vroom! 55) Madness2Go Basketball Bracket (http://madness2go.com/) A men's basketball bracket game specially formatted for the iPhone. Choose and follow your bracket right from your handheld. Play for free, and if you're lucky (and talented) there's a chance to win prizes.

Social Networking
46) Facebook for iPhone (http://iphone.facebook.com/login.php?next=http%3A %2F%2Fiphone.facebook.com%2F) Allows you to access the version of Facebook that's optimized for the iPhone and iPod Touch. 47) Floort – We Know What You're Thinking (http://www.floort.com/) A site where you can share your opinions with the world – on any topic – and start a dialogue. "Think of it as your own personal brain blog," says Floort. 48) webChattr – Live Chat Rooms (http://webchattr.com/go/thelounge) Easy and free, webChattr is your own personal chat room, whenever you need one. Chat with your whole crew instead of texting each person. The webChattr app is on Bebo and Facebook. 49) PhoneMeeter

Traveling to New and Interesting Places
56) Taxi Please, for the iPhone (http://72.47.215.64/taxiplease/)

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Kind of funny little app, Taxi Please flashes the word TAXI in big bold black-on-yellow letters, to help you attract a cabbie on a busy city street. 57) Learnit Lists (http://widget.learnitlists.com/iphone) Teach yourself a new language, in a manageable 10 words at a time. Each day the app offers a list built from the 1,000 most common English words. (Is "iPhone" one of those words yet?) 58) iTinerary (http://www.mdmalin.com/webapps/itinerary/) Manage all your flight information, including arrival gate, weather, and maps to the airport. 59) WORLDview for iPhone (http://www.longfingers.com/) Provides all kinds of pertinent factoids for countries all across the globe: history, essential phone numbers, capital city, and more. Don't be an Ugly American, learn about the culture ahead of time. (Then go visit the McDonald's like you always do…) 60) Pocket Express Travel Edition (http://express.handmark.com/index.php?r_id=ggl_ download) A cornucopia of travel aids: airline schedules, flight status, hotel information, reservation services – it's like have a personal assistant built into your phone.

Because it covers only Japan, this is a niche app. But it still earns a spot on a list of noteworthy apps – its combination of forecast with an updated photo is so cool, I'm hoping the idea spreads to all locations. Just a matter of time, surely. 62) Weather Made Simple (http://www.briansutton.com/wx/) Enter a city or a zip code and get current conditions plus a 10-day forecast. Quite useful. 63) The Weather Channel (http://www.weather.com/iphone/) The classic powerhouse of weather information, right on your iPhone. Tons of current information, from any location, in an interactive format.

An iPhone Reader
64) iReading for iPhone and iPod Touch (http://iphone.norbsoft.com/iReading/#_home) A free online eBook reader for your favorite handheld. Search for book by author or title, then add it to your favorites list. Bonus: the software remembers where you last stopped reading. (Wait, didn't Steve Jobs say that people don't read anymore? Yikes, he needs to check out this nifty app.) I This content was adapted from Internet.com's SmartPhoneToday and Datamation Web sites. Contributors: Damon Brown, Gerry Blackwell, Michael Gartenberg, James Miller, Mike Elgan, and James Maguire.

Weather
61) Weather Forecast with Live Camera (http://iphone.alice.gs/WEATHER/)

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