STARTERS by nyut545e2

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									 SIMPLE
STARTERS
 (inc prep for KS3 tests)



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7 principles

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              Don’t aim for false links with main
              lesson content
 No Blue Peter
                      Do aim for coherence
    badges
                      across starters
Kick-start learning
                                  Emphasise
                                  collaboration &
   Are great for
                                  problem-solving
  grammar
                   Avoid the
                  temptation to
                  extend the activity
Mr B’s New Year Spelling Frolics


-our words   -re endings   -able / -ible   -ous endings    Single/double
                           endings                         consonants
colour       centimetre    Available       tremendous      beginning
humour       centre        likeable        enormous        upsetting
rumour       theatre       sociable        poisonous       forgotten
armour                     considerable    mysterious      committee
flavour                    laughable       continuous      permitted
                           sensible        precious        occurred
humorous                   incredible      ferocious       visited
                           terrible        delicious       regretful
                           possible        cautious        developing
                           responsible
                                           ambitious




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-ible            -able




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Homophones
Sound of Music   Kylie          Beethoven


their            there          they’re
too              two            to
pray             prey




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Hard
 Homophones
 Freeze       Stand


 advice       advise
 practice     practise
 effect       affect


 It’s         its

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               Activity

I’ll say some sentences containing homophones. You tell me whether
it’s list A or list B.

Make up sentences – eg “The pilot of the aircraft was really rather
plain”)

A – stand up        B – under table
plain               Plane
weak                Week
steal               Steel
main                Mane
rows                Rows
fare                Fair
break               Brake
sew                 So
due                 Jew           www.geoffbarton.co.uk
whether             whether
Mnemonics

                Never eat chips - eat sausage
Necessary       sandwiches and raspberry
Separate        yoghurt

Disappearance
Fulfil




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Call My Bluff


OXYMORON
LITOTES




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WORD CLASSES BY COLOUR


       VERB
                         ADVERB
      NOUN
                     ADJECTIVE
 PREPOSITION

   The cat slept heavily on the
           old carpet
Connectives


The house was looking dark ….
(walk in … lights not working … hear a sound upstairs …
go to explore … hear a window smash ...)


       And
       But
       Or
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Word patterns


Auto -
Gh -


Who can think of most words starting with these
letter patterns …?




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Synonyms:

Who can think of most words meaning scary,
big, small, nice




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Semantic continuum:

•Think of synonyms for house / toilet /
friend
•Place them in order of formal to informal




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It was really cold. The weather
was awful. I was walking along
the edge of the cliff and I was
really scared.




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Jake began to dial the number slowly as he
had done every evening at six o’clock ever
since his father had passed away. For the
next fifteen minutes he settled back to
listen to what his mother had done that day.

      Fiction or non-fiction?
      What text-type is it (eg thriller,
      romance / autobiography, leaflet)
      How can you tell?
Seville is voluptuous and evocative. It has to
be seen, tasted and touched. The old quarter
is Seville as it was and is. Walk in its narrow
cobbled streets, with cascades of geraniums
tumbling from balconies and the past shouts
so loudly that one can almost glimpse dark-
cloaked figures disappearing silently through
carved portals.

Fiction or non-fiction?
Proud mum in a million Natalie Brown hugged
her beautiful baby daughter Casey yesterday
and said: “She’s my double miracle.”

      Fiction or non-fiction?
      What text-type is it (eg thriller,
      romance / autobiography, leaflet)
      How can you tell?
    READING

Key word or phrase                  Example
     Compare             Òcompare the w ays X and Y react to
                                  their situation É Ó
     Comment            ÒComment on the language the writer
                            uses to conv ey the reactionsÓ
     Suspense          Ò w hat ways does the writer build up
                        In
                             excitement and suspense?Ó
 Sentence structure      Ò                           s
                           Comment on .. the w riterÕ use of
                      language, including sentence structureÓ
       Mood             ÒComment on É the mood of the last
                                     paragraphÓ
     Effectiv e        ÒÉhow far you consider it an effectiv e
                               ending for a passageÓ
   Point of v iew      ÒComment on É how the w riter uses a
                                         s
                              beginnerÕ point of viewÓ
  Use of language      Comment on É how the writerÕ use of
                                                       s
                          language, including comparisons,
                           makes the passage interestingÓ
WRITING

  Mood        Ò to engage the readerÕ interest by
                try                        s
                  establishing character, mood or
                               settingÓ
  Setting     Ò to engage the readerÕ interest by
                try                        s
                  establishing character, mood or
                               settingÓ
 Tension      Ò to engage the readerÕ interest by
                try                        s
                    creating a feeling of tensionÓ
  Story        Ò Write the opening section of a story
                                  ÉÓ
  Article           ÒWrite an article for your local
                            new spaper ÉÓ
description   ÒWrite a description of a place which is
                            unw elcomingÓ
SHAKESPEARE

State of mind     ÒWhat do you learn about MacbethÕs
                changing state of mind from the w ay he
                              speaks É ?Ó
Sympathetic      ÒHow does Shakespeare make you feel
                increasingly sympathetic tow ards Juliet
                             in this sceneÓ
   Tense           ÒHow does Shakespeare make this
                   scene interesting and tense for the
                               audience?Ó
   Direct         ÒImagine you are going to direct this
                     scene for a class performanceÓ
 SIMPLE
STARTERS

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