Tri-State College Recruiting Guide

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Sports Training Overview
Speed Development
Sprint Mechanics Explosion Drills Assisted Speed Development Resisted Speed Development

WHO WE TRAIN
Professional Athletes (NFL & NBA) Collegiate Student-Athletes High School Student-Athletes & Middle School Athletes in all sports

WHO WE ARE
Certified Personal Trainers Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist, Members of the National Strength and Conditioning Association former professional football players, NCAA Academic All-American

Agility Training
Change of Direction Balance Training Explosive Maneuvering Start & Stop Acceleration & Explosion

TWO LOCATION OPTIONS
Temple University – Main Campus
100 yard football field 8-lane 400m track (compressed rubber) Outdoor basketball courts 2 – 100-yard turf fields

Quickness Development
Quick Feet Drills First Step quickness Starting & stopping quickness Acceleration Development

PSTC @ Tri State Sports - Aston, PA

Power Development
Plyometrics Jumping Mechanics Jumping Drills Resisted & Assisted Jumping

80,000 square foot facility 100 yard outdoor football field 2 Indoor turf fields 6,000 sq.ft weight room Updated showering system and lockers

AGENDA
Pre-Test & Post Test Fitness level evaluation Body Composition Habit Analysis Nutritional counseling Weekly Weight Management COST $500 per player (8-weeks) $250 per player (Team Rate) Deadline: June 13th

Every Session can Include
Dynamic Warm-Up Quickness Drills Agility Drills Jumping Drills Speed Development & Sprinting Enhanced Speed Development Speed Conditioning Sport Specific Training & Drills Dynamic Cool Down

“K EYS

TO

A THLETIC S UCCESS ” by Maine Prince

In the Course of my training experience, I have met, interviewed and discussed topics with successful athletes at different levels. The keys to how those athletes became successful are necessary for every athlete if they want to be the best they can be. I did not try to reinvent the wheel; I prepared a way to learn what it takes to make it to the next level. A wise man said, “If you give a man a fish – he’ll eat for a day; but if you teach him to fish – he’ll eat for a lifetime.” This is a chance to maximize you own potential. SKILL – The body’s ability to execute a task proficiently. (Your ability to perform a precise act. i.e. pitching, cradling, dribbling, etc.) Developing your sport specific skill will improve your overall effectiveness in competitive situations with respect to you particular sport. ACTIVE LISTENING – The cognitive ability to consciously decipher verbal content. (The active efforts to hear, interpret and comprehend spoken words.) You ability to listen will help you pay more attention to vital instructions and constructive feedback by coaches, officials and teammates that can lead to improved athletics performance. ATHLETICISM – A visual indication of physical prowess. (It’s not he caliper of the athlete; it’s whether an athlete’s image reflects that caliper.) Exhibiting athleticism in every public appearance (practice, competitions, try-outs) will elude your physical capabilities without taking action. This unspoken vibe will lead to an opponent’s intimidation and increase you own self-confidence. STRENGTH – The body’s ability to exert force. (How much weigh you can move.) Increasing your strength will help you body not only absorb more physical punishment to prevent injury but increase the amount of power you are able to produce. POWER – Force divided by time. (The speed at which you can move the weight.) Improving power links together strength, speed and quickness so that you can produce more force in less time. This manifests itself in explosive and rapid sport specific movements such as sprinting, throwing, jumping, kicking, etc. Remember, power is nothing without the ability to control the action. SPEED – A measurement of the amount of time to complete a task. (How long it takes to do something i.e. seconds, minutes, mph.) Knowing the amount of time will help you to measure your progress so that you understand what adjustments need to be made in training. FAST (VELOCITY) – The act of moving your entire body from point A to point B. (Running, walking, skipping, shuffling and any other activity that takes you from one place to another.) The purpose of speed quickness and agility training is to ultimately help you decrease the amount of time it takes to get from one place to another; Thus the phrase, “I’m Getting Faster!” QUICKNESS – The rate and frequency at which you body parts move. (The number and seed of repetitions executed in a specific, rapid and movement-based fashion, i.e. 25 high knee repetitions in place for 10 seconds.) Quickness is a product of the central nervous system. When focusing on quickness drills and activities in training, an athlete can speed up the rate at which the signal moves from the brain to the muscles. The adaptation will effect not only the sports movements, but hand-to-eye coordination, memory recall and reaction. AGILITY – The ability to shift from activity to activity with minimal loss in velocity, balance, body control and momentum. (Changing direction from activity to activity without slowing down, falling, loosing the ball and others.) Most sports are based on a series of ever changing directions and activities. Speeding up the transition between activities will enable you to spend less time changing and more time doing the activity. CONDITIONING – The act of increasing your lactic acid tolerance and increasing aerobic activity. (Preparing your body to do more work in less time, with less effort and recover sooner.) Any athlete can play well at the start of a competition; however, only the athletes who are well conditioned wil play just as hard through the whole game, the end of the game and into overtime. No matter how they start a competition/practice, a champion must be able to finish stronger, harder and faster than when they started. MENTAL TOUGHNESS – The ability to provide an internal source of positive reinforcement. (To believe in your training, your coaching and you abilities, especially when you have no reason to.) To acknowledge defeat but not to accept it. Only 40% of a champion’s success comes from physical preparation, the rest is mental. Being mentally tough will give you self-assurance at all times, particularly when facing adversity. If you don’t believe in yourself…who will? COMPETITIVENESS – Non-compromising effort to strive for success while attempting to exceed all challenges. (Refusing to be defeated by anyone or anything.) In order to be the most competitive, consciously focus on the “how to’s” and not the “what if’s”. COORDINATION – The ability to accomplish multiple tasks simultaneously without compromising the quality of all actions involved. (Being able to do more than one thing at a time.) Since all sports are multi-faceted, coordination becomes necessity. Being able to run, dribble, think, eye the court, protect the ball and listen to the coach all at the same time is difficult. Coordination is a vital component and should be part of any training regiment. PROPER NUTRITION – Ingesting the appropriate food to provide energy / hydration for maximum performance on & off the field. (You are not what you eat but what you absorb.) Carbohydrates – Sugars/starches provide energy to do work thus developing muscles. (Bread, cereal, pasta, rice) Protein – The building block of muscle. (Beef, chicken, beans, fish, eggs) Fruits/Vegetables – Provide vitamins and minerals which help promote healing, repair and recover from training. Fats/Oils – Stored energy for low intensity and long duration exercise. Not used in everyday types of high intensity training. Water – Acts as the means by which cells communicate with each other: transferring waste. (Lactic acid, hydration, cools the body)

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

THE IMPORTANCE OF HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL:
What Is It Really All About?
The high school football playing experience should be one of the most enjoyable times in a student athlete's life. It should be a combination of playing at a high level of sports competition coupled with experiencing the tremendous passion that much of our country has for high school football. Playing high school football will allow you so many unique and special experiences. You may play in front of huge crowds in one of the football "hotbeds" of this country. You may play at a smaller school, with smaller crowds. You may even play 8-man football, as they do in certain places. Regardless of your own football experience, one thing is true. The great "hometown football" game can never be duplicated. High school football is about school newspapers, pep rallies, the band, the mascot and cheerleaders, being in the local paper or playing on the local cable TV station. Moreover, high school football is about playing next to a friend that you grew up with and playing in those uniforms that you've loved since you could see over the fence. High school football is something you will never forget! Along the way, you have learned the basics of the game and, hopefully, the basics of life. This will come from some of the best coaches and role models that you will ever have. You have taken your game to a very high level and are interested in college football. Your hard work on the field combined with your hard work in the classroom will determine your opportunities for the college experience. Your coach, parents, teachers, guidance counselors, and most importantly, you should all be working together to ensure that you will have the exposure, contact, and a workable plan to help you move to the college level. There are myriad colleges playing football at all levels. College football teams compete at the following levels: NCAA Division I-A, Division I-AA, Division II, Division III, NAIA, and NJCAA (junior colleges). There is a place to play for anyone serious about it and willing to work for it. The challenge is finding the right place for you! Very few players are going to receive athletic scholarships and even fewer are going to go on to play professional football. For this reason, it's very important that you have a plan to deal with the college identification and selection process. The college identification and selection process can be arduous. It requires diligent work. Understand that early in the recruiting process, you probably will have little idea where you are going and will be, at times, totally confused. Don't worry. Just make sure that you take an organized approach to the process and, most importantly, start early! In the pages that follow, we are going to try to educate you about important factors to consider when you, a high school student athlete, begin identifying and selecting a college program. We also are going to show you ways to develop your own "plan for success." Your college choice is one of the most important decisions in your life, so pay attention! This country has a tremendous passion for high school football. It is played in almost every town across the nation, regardless of size. You are fortunate in that you may have an opportunity to continue your football career beyond high school. However, the college football experience is more than just playing football. For you, as a potential collegiate student athlete, the college experience is about three very important things. First, you will have the chance to receive a meaningful degree. Second, you will, hopefully, have an opportunity to play at a championship level. And, lastly, you will have the chance to develop into a well-rounded and more complete person. We hope you play football for the love of the game, the great experiences you can have, and for the personal development and growth you will experience throughout your college years. Best of luck!

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

The ACT vs. The SAT
What's the difference between the ACT and the SAT? Both the ACT and the SAT are nationally administered standardized tests that help colleges evaluate candidates. Most colleges and universities accept either test. So as you begin to think about college and creating the best application package possible, your admissions plan should begin with the question, "Which test should I take?" When weighing your options, keep in mind that there are differences in test structure and the type of content assessed. Use the chart below to see which test makes the most of your strengths to help you determine which test might be best for you. You should take both to get an idea of what each is like, then you can make a determination which test you would like to re-take to continue towards the highest score possible. ACT Length Sections Areas Tested
3 hours, 25 minutes (including the 30-minute optional Writing Test) 4 test sections (5 with the optional Essay, known as the Writing Test) English, Math, Reading, Science, Writing (optional)

SAT
3 hours, 45 minutes 10 Sections Critical Reading, Math, Writing (includes the Essay), Experimental (unscored) Mix of Reading Comprehension and Sentence Completion questions that require vocabulary expertise Science not included Math accounts for 1/3 of overall score Topics Covered: Basic Geometry and Algebra II First thing you do; 25 minutes Factored into overall score Total score out of 2400 3 scores of 200-800 for each section 2 sub-scores of 20-80 for writing multiple choice and 0-12 for the Essay Yes, 1/4 point per wrong answer (except for Math Grid-in questions) Your entire score history will be sent automatically

Reading (ACT) / Critical 4 Reading Comprehension passages, 10 questions per passage Reading (SAT) Science Math Essay
Science Reasoning (analysis, interpretation, evaluation, problem solving) covered Math accounts for 1/4 of overall score Topics Covered: Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry (4 questions) Last thing you do (optional); 30 minutes Not included in composite score Total composite score of 1-36 (based on average of 4 tests) 4 scores of 1-36 for each test Score of 0-12 for the optional Essay

Scoring

Wrong Answer Penalty Sending Score History

No wrong answer penalty You decide which score is sent

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

COLLEGE ADMISSION TESTING IS A MUST
Are You Ready? At Philadelphia Sports Training Center our SACT Program handles the SAT / ACT Prep Training in an exclusive environment taught to athletes by athletes. Justina Prince, Director of the SACT Program is also a 2-time NCAA Academic All-American soccer player from Moravian College. Her degree’s are in Psychology & Sociology to which she is passionate about making sure that all participants in the Admission Testing Program get higher than average scores regardless of past low scores or high grade point averages. Review the tables below to see when the remaining test dates are scheduled and when PSTC College Admission Testing Prep starts prior to the test for full momentum of knowledge from training to taking the test. The first day is similar to the athletic testing where a foundation of your current abilities is done through diagnostic testing. Once the evaluation is completed then as you prepare daily with subject material explained directly towards your weakness and enhancing your strengths. The more official test that you take, the more chances you have of getting a higher score. This also appeals to college coaches whether you get a low score and build on or get a high score and make it higher. Additional test make it easier to defend the possibility to offer you an athletic scholarship showing that you are trying your best.

SAT REGISTRATION DEADLINES
2008-2009 Test Dates March 14, 2009 May 2, 2009 June 6, 2009 PSTC - SAT Prep Begins January 19, 2008 March 9, 2008 April 13, 2008 Regular T.B.A. T.B.A. T.B.A. Late (a fee applies) T.B.A. T.B.A. T.B.A.

ACT REGISTRATION DEADLINES
2008-2009 Test Dates February 7, 2009 April 4, 2009 June 13, 2009 PSTC - ACT Prep Begins NO Classes February 2, 2009 April 20, 2009 Regular January 6, 2009 February 27, 2009 May 8, 2009 Late (a fee applies) January 16, 2009 March 13, 2009 May 22, 2009

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

SPORT SPECIFIC TRAINING: DIFFERENCES?
Motivation. We all have it. We all need it to achieve our goals. Our goals differ and so too our motivations. Although training for a health/fitness benefit requires hard work, like that of an athlete, the motivation behind the training is completely different. When training to be stronger, fitter or just healthier, the outcome is generally a body image benefit. This should be the last thing to enter an athlete's mind. Sure, athletes do tend to have good bodies but this is an extra benefit, not the only one. The motivation behind sport specific training is an increase in sporting performance, not to be stronger or fitter or healthier but to gain an advantage on the sporting field. The way an athlete trains is not outrageously different to that of the local gym junkie. With respect to the weight room, the exercises may look the same, and even be the same. The use of exercises for the athlete needs to be relative to their sport. All exercises should be sport specific. If not, why is the athlete undertaking such an exercise? During the off season, an athlete may do similar exercises to that of a body builder so as to increase their muscle mass. During the pre-season, and the season itself, an athlete is not a body builder and therefore should not train like one. Which exercises are not appropriate for athletes? This depends on the sport in which the athlete participates. Generally since most sports do not involve bilateral movements, (meaning both limbs on each side of the body moving in the same planes at the same time) barbell exercises are not sport specific. These would then include barbell bench press and its' variations, military press, behind the neck shoulder press, barbell bicep curls, lying triceps extension, and the like. These exercises are helpful in off-season training and rehabilitation work in some cases, but they are not sport specific. Better exercises would involve dumbbells or alternating exercises. A single arm dumbbell bench press is far more specific than a standard barbell bench press. In any throwing movement such as athletics field events, tennis serve, volleyball spike, or racquet sports, martial arts, only one arm is moving at once. Since this is the case, why train the body to have both arms moving together? When we learn an activity, the brain remembers the movement pattern and next time we try to do the same movement, the brain remembers and executes the exact sequence of events. If we train the body in a specific way, when it comes to sport, the body will try to replicate the action we have taught it. If our work in the weight room is contradictory to that of the sport, we are likely to have technique problems and possibly even injure ourselves. Train your body in your specific movement patterns and you will achieve more in your sport. The core is also a major area. By the core, I am talking about the torso - abdominals, lower back, chest upper back and shoulders. These are the body parts in which all power is generated with the abdominals and lower back being most important. Most of the general public suffers from a back problem and since in sport we put more tension through the spine, we must look after that area. Traditional crunches on the floor and back extensions are not enough to keep the core strong. With these two exercises we are training the rectus abdominous (the six pack) and erector spinae (lower back). What about all the other muscles in this area? The way most people do crunches, they are not working rectus abdominous correctly and are recruiting the hip flexors instead. Transverse abdominous is very important in stability and posture.

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

The obliques, internal and external, rotate the upper body along with the lower back, which is a movement found in almost every sport. Back extension is a combination of not only the erector spinae but of the gluteals, hamstrings and the fine intrinsic muscles of the spine. All of these muscles are extremely functional especially for sport and therefore need to be focused on. This is where exercise balls, Dura-Discs, medicine balls, Converta-Balls and such come into play. These pieces of equipment allow for a greater recruitment of muscle and motor units. And for those who want to put on muscle, if you recruit more muscle and motor unit, you will put on more muscle mass. The skill in training athletes comes down to analysing the sport for its movement patterns and then choosing the exercise specific to the sport. This requires knowledge gained through not only courses and degrees, but through experience. Trial and error is unfortunately part of the process - some things will only work with certain athletes. Let’s take a look at each factor and determine which training methods are going to deliver optimal results. By optimal results, I mean the greatest amount of improvement, with the least amount of risk, and in the shortest amount of time. Power is one of the most important factors to an athlete.
Power = Force x Distance Time

Power can be increased three ways: 1. Increase Force (Strength) What is the most effective method of increasing strength and/or muscle tissue? In my opinion, High Intensity Strength Training is the most productive, safe, and time efficient approach available. I am not stating that one set of each exercise is the best choice. My definition of High Intensity Training is: training to momentary muscular failure, with brief and infrequent workouts in which all variables are prescribed based on the individuals: goals, age, current fitness level, fiber types, personal preference, and past experience. The purpose of strength training is to increase strength and lean body mass, not for training a specific skill or movement-that's called practice! People strength train for many reasons and there are many methods that work. For years, many trainers and coaches have had their clients and athletes perform Olympic lifts because they feel it will transfer over into the performance of their skill. Numerous studies have shown that the neurological transfer of skills is not optimal unless the skill is practiced exactly as it is performed in competition. Therefore, performing power cleans because you play football is NOT optimal. Performing power-cleans will only get you better at performing power-cleans! Focus on increasing strength and lean body mass, and practice your skill exactly as it is performed during competition. 2. Increase Speed Increasing the speed at which a skill is performed is another great way to improve power. Speed is primarily predetermined by the individual's genetic make up. However, that does not mean that you cannot improve speed by practicing the skill EXACTLY as it is performed in competition. A great deal of focus should be placed on perfecting the technique. By practicing the skill in this manner, you will improve neuromuscular efficiency, which will result in faster and more accurate performance.

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

3. Increase Distance (flexibility/range of motion) Increasing flexibility is another way to improve power. By increasing flexibility, you increase the distance that force is applied which results in an increase in power. The safest and most effective method to increase flexibility is by performing full range of motion exercises and incorporating a sound stretching routine.

Agility
Improving ones agility is another way of optimizing performance. Agility drills should be SPECIFIC to the activity or event. For example, having someone do Plyometric jumps off of boxes is NOT specific to someone who plays basketball! Yes, a basketball player jumps, but not off of boxes. Having the athlete practice jumping from the floor would be much more specific to their sport. Always ask yourself, “What is the goal?” “Is what I’m doing going to give me the outcome I desire?” “Is it optimal?”

Cardiovascular and Respiratory Conditioning
Increasing cardio/respiratory output and endurance is another factor that has a major impact on performance. This topic is one of such importance that it is beyond the scope of this article. In general, if you increase the individual's cardiovascular and respiratory output and endurance, there will be a corresponding increase in performance. Cardiovascular training should also be specifically geared towards improving the individuals conditioning in the metabolic pathway in which they compete or perform. For example, someone who plays tennis should primarily train at a slow to moderate pace and incorporate bursts of high intensity effort. Interval training would be a good choice for this individual. Keep the training specific to the individual.

Sport Skill
This is an area in which there is a lot of confusion among many athletes, coaches, and trainers. Skill acquisition and strength levels are two completely different things. Therefore, they should be trained separately, and with different methods. In order to optimize the performance of a specific skill or movement, it needs to be practiced EXACTLY as it is performed in competition. It has been shown that each activity or movement has it's own neuromuscular pathway, and that just because a movement is similar does NOT mean there will be a positive transfer or carryover of skill. In order to maximize performance the individual should attempt to perfect their movement or skill with endless hours of practice. The goal of practice should be to improve the technique, accuracy, and increase the speed at which the skill can be performed. This topic was addressed earlier in the section titled “Increase Force.”

Genetic Potential
This is the factor that I have found to have the greatest impact on human performance. Genetic potential is something many people overlook. Regardless of what methods of training I use, I will never be a world-class marathoner. I can train twice a week or I can train 5 hours a day, it still won't change the fact that my body wasn't designed to excel at endurance activities. I hear of too many coaches and trainers having people follow dangerous training programs in an attempt to drastically improve their performance. This is not to say that you cannot improve performance. When training yourself or a competitive athlete, always set realistic goals. As stated earlier, the best thing to do is utilize the most effective methods available and work hard!

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

Functional Training vs. Machine Based Training
Most, if not all of the so-called functional exercises, fail to supply constant and variable resistance. Most quality machines supply constant tension and variable resistance based on the strength curve of the particular muscle, and track proper joint function. For example, compare dumbbell bicep curls on a Swiss ball to a bicep curl on a quality machine (such as Hammer Strength.) While performing the dumbbell curl, there is no tension on the biceps in the bottom or top positions. The resistance is greatest when the dumbbell is perpendicular to the floor. The amount of stimulus is also decreased due to the fact that the individual must balance his/her self on the ball. While using a machine, there is constant tension on the biceps and the amount of tension varies during the exercise based on the strength curve of the biceps muscle. Which is going to make the individual stronger? Which is going to stimulate more muscle fibers in the biceps? In my opinion, machine based training is by far superior if the goal is to increase strength, and/or muscle tissue. Keep in mind that more muscle equates to a faster, stronger, and better athlete, providing they practice their specific skill or movement. This is not to say that functional exercises serve no purpose. There are benefits to functional exercise; just not as many as some people are lead to believe. Exercise selection and the training methods used should be based on the individual's goals. Instances where functional training may be effective would be in individuals who need to improve balance, stability, and neuromuscular coordination. The differences between Functional Training and Machine Based Training Machine-Based Training Provides constant and variable resistance Movement tracks proper joint function Effectively overloads musculature (if used properly) Safer to perform Functional Training Very effective at improving balance, stability, & coordination Does not effectively overload target musculature Does not provide optimal transfer of skill performance Very difficult to measure and monitor progress

Machines available to work every muscle in the body Higher chance of injury

Conclusion
Functional training obviously has some benefit, and can be a great addition to a well-designed strength program. However, I personally feel it should never take the place of a structured strength training routine. I recommend using a combination approach, which utilizes machines, free-weights, bodyweight, balls, bands, and anything that is going to deliver the desired results. By utilizing both at Philadelphia Sports Training Center we can assist our athletes that want to maximize their potential. We do not guarantee that an athlete will get a scholarship or that a participant will lose weight. But what we will do is give each athlete and person a unique opportunity to put them in the position to raise their own self potential.

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

COMPONENTS OF SPORTS TRAINING
There are a number of benefits that Sports Training can provide for student-athlete. Among the most recognized benefits are: Components of a Sports Specific Training Program includes: Cardiovascular Endurance Strength Flexibility Speed Power Agility Balance Strength Endurance Coordination The heart's ability to deliver blood to working muscles; the ability of the muscles to use the blood delivered by the heart. The extent to which muscles exert force by contracting against resistance. The ability to achieve an extended range of motion without being impeded by excess tissue, i.e. fat or muscle. The ability to move efficiently and quickly without wasted movement or effort. The combination of speed and strength; the ability to exert maximum muscular contraction instantly in an explosive burst of movement (plyometrics). The ability to perform a series of explosive power movements in rapid succession in opposing directions. The ability to control the body's position, either stationary (e.g. a track stand) or while moving (skiing, snowboarding, cornering on a bicycle at speed). A muscle's ability to perform a maximum contracture time after time (relentless hill climbs). The ability to integrate the above listed components so that effective movements are achieved using the correct combinations of muscles in the correct order.

An comprehensive sports conditioning program may or may not be focused primarily on resistance training in the "weight room". The combination of exercises that can be performed is almost limitless. In addition to weight machines, free weights, and cable machines, stairs, bleachers, stability balls, balance tools, and other resistance tools can be used to create a routine for a specific sport or training cycle, keeping the body challenged and preventing boredom.

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

SPORTS TRAINING OVERVIEW
Speed Development
Sprint Mechanics Explosion Drills Assisted Speed Development Resisted Speed Development

Agility Training
Change of Direction Balance Training Explosive Maneuvering Start & Stop Acceleration & Explosion

Quickness Development
Quick Feet Drills First Step quickness Starting & stopping quickness Acceleration Development

Power Development
Plyometrics Jumping Mechanics Jumping Drills Resisted & Assisted Jumping

Every Session Includes
Dynamic Warm-Up Quickness Drills Agility Drills Jumping Drills Speed Development & Sprinting Enhanced Speed Development Speed Conditioning Sport Specific Training & Drills Dynamic Cool Down

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

2009 PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Winter II Spring I Spring II Summer Fall I Fall II January 5 – February 28 March 2 – April 24 April 27 – June 19 June 22 – August 14 September 1 – October 23 October 26 – December 18

2010 PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Winter II Spring I Spring II Summer Fall I Fall II January 4 – February 26 March 1 – April 23 April 27 – June 19 June 22 – August 14 September 1 – October 23 October 26 – December 18

PROGRAM LEVELS
Type Might Mites Junior Mints Starter Rookie Elite Sports Prep All-Stars Ages 7–9 10 – 11 12 – 16 12 – 17 14 – 17 15 – 18 Weeks 8 8 4 8 16 24 Time per Session 45 60 90 90 90 120 Session per Week 1 1 2 2–3–5 3–5 Unlimited Uniform T-Shirt & Shorts T-Shirt & Shorts T-Shirt T-Shirt & Shorts Dri-Fit & Shorts Dri-Fit & Shorts

Call TODAY to schedule a tour of our 80,000 square foot sports performance training facility

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

PSTC Clients & Associates Marc Jackson (New Orleans Hornets), Brian Westbrook (Philadelphia Eagles), Shawn Andrews (Philadelphia Eagles), Eric McCoo (Philadelphia Eagles), Dexter Wynn (Houston Texans), Quintin Mikell (Philadelphia Eagles), Mike Libinjo (Miami Dolphins), Gary Brackett (Indianapolis Colts), Carlos Polk (San Diego Chargers), Calvin Booth (Washington Wizards), John Amechi (Dallas Mavericks), Matt Walsh (Miami Heat), Gus Felder (Cleveland Browns), Larry Fitzgerald (Arizona Cardinals), Rod Hood (Arizona Cardinals), Matt Ware (Arizona Cardinals), Maurice Stovall (Tampa Bay Buccaneers), Aaron Princes (Indiana Univ. of PAfootball), Jake Parsons (Kent State Univ.-football), Maurice Adams (Kutztown-football), Da’Rell Scott (Maryland-football), Gary Mack (Univ. of Connecticut-football), Dan Connor (Penn State-football), Austin Scott (Penn State-football), Maurice Adams (Kutztown-football), Stefan Adams (Bloomsburg-football), Lee Melchionni (Duke Univ.-Basketball), Rachel Link (Duke Univ-Field Hockey), Kelly Kramer (Ohio State Univ.-Lacrosse), Toby Ranck (Florida State Univ.-women’s soccer), Matt Hawksley (USA Track & Field), Josh Martin(Univ. of Albany-basketball), Brad Wannamaker (Pittsburgh-basketball), Brian Wannamaker (Central Connecticut-basketball), Kashief Edwards (Univ. of Niagara-basketball) and 5,000+ athletes in 15 years of training student-athletes, college athletes, and professional athletes. Schools represented of clients Other schools that I have assisted in getting student-athletes scholarships are: Virginia, Pittsburgh, Holy Cross, Temple, Cheyney, Minnesota, Iowa State, Univ. of Southern California, Univ. of Nevada-Las Vegas, etc. Client Testimonial Marc Jackson – F /C, New Orleans Hornets “I’ve trained with Maine full time since 2005 and improved all facets of my game and longevity. He’s a great trainer and businessman. Through 4 different NBA teams I always know where to come for speed training.” Corey Magette – F, L.A. Clippers “I needed to get my legs back in shape and Maine’s training got me back on track, at the NBA’s MBA Program at Stanford. I’ve been with trainers in LA and none of them compared to the intensity he brought out in me.” Gary Brackett - LB, Super Bowl Champion Indianapolis Colts “I first started training with Maine when I was coming out of Rutgers and I knew that being undersized I needed something extra and Prince helped me increase my speed and I’ve had a starting role the past 6 years.” Eric McCoo RB, Philadelphia Eagles “Even though I led NFL Europe in rushing and became the MVP of the league, Maine kept me at the top of my “A” game in the NFL through his technique, attention to detail, and keeping me positive in every session. Brett Dunlap, Head Coach – Berean Institute “My life gets better everyday I know Maine and his staff are working with us. Our athletes respond in ways they never have. Its been a blessing to have another passionate person about football and helping the athletes. Mr. Bradley Wanamaker, Sr. – Parent of Bradley (PITT) & Brian (Central Connecticut) “My kids have trained with Maine since they were freshman and I wouldn’t want it any other way. They both got scholarships based on academics & athletic training with Prince.”

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

Directions to Philadelphia Sports Training Center 63 Concord Road / Aston, PA 19014
Philadelphia & North - I-95 Heading South
1. I-95 South to Exit 3 Highland Avenue. 2. At the STOP, continue straight slight right at next STOP. 3. Continue straight to next STOP, Concord Road, TURN LEFT. 4. Continue for 1.5 miles to Tri State Sports on the LEFT.

Wilmington & South - I-95 Heading North
1. I-95 North to Exit 2 Market Street/Route 452. 2. At the STOP, LEFT onto Market Street/Route 452 North. 3. Continue for 2.5 miles to Dutton’s Mill Road, turn RIGHT. 4. At first light, make a RIGHT on Concord Road. 5. Continue for 1.5 miles to Tri State Sports on the RIGHT.

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

What’s the success rate of student-athletes in your programs?

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Student-athletes in our program are successful when they complete program entirely. Currently we have a 100% success rate, which we measured by athletes completing the program, graduating high school, and enrolling in their respective collegiate sport. There are approximately 32 student-athletes that are playing college sports as alumni from Philadelphia Sports Training Center.

When is the best time to start a program even if it’s already started?
A student-athlete can start a program at anytime. To receive the full benefits of the training protocols, starting at the beginning of the week is best if the program has already started. Our programs are typically 8-weeks in length and an athlete can miss up to 4 days and still receive the proper benefits of the program and increase their sports performance.

How many student-athletes are in each session?
Because we have such a large facility with wide-open space, the maximum attendance per session depends on which session and time that is selected. The typical maximum student-athletes per session are rookies (20); elite sports prep (16); all-stars (12). Even in the weight room, we have 100% supervision and each student-athlete lifting will be spotted by a PSTC certified trainer.

I’m not sure if my son/daughter will be able to keep up with the others?
Every student-athlete has their own ability. We will encourage them to raise the potential and fully succeed in completing every exercise and if needed to be comfortable to ask for help. Our properly trained certified staff will be able to notice any deficiencies that need to be corrected to reduce bad habits and reduce sports injuries throughout the training program.

What is the importance you keep making about having good grades?
As a student-athlete you should recognize that you are a “student” first and then an “athlete” second. If you do not hold yourself accountable for your education, then others will not believe you are serious about your future. The purpose of having good grades is because we want every student-athlete to want to goto college after graduating from high school and improve your quality of life.

Are there any programs that parents can do while waiting for the session to end?
Yes, parents are encouraged to bring their workout gear and either have a personal trainer or workout on your own in our fitness center while you are waiting for your son/daughter. It is important that a healthy child has the role model from parents and we will provide you the opportunity to do so at our facility. We can set up a training program catered to your needs for the time available.

Who are the trainers that will be working with my son/daughter?
All of our trainers are certified, college graduates, experienced in their field, and properly trained on sports performance training. Since we are working with student-athletes from various sports, our staff are knowledgeable on a variety of sports but more importantly on the techniques and specifics of teaching correct form and posture in sprinting mechanics.

Why should I choose PSTC when I could train with my coach?
Coaches in middle school and high school are highly qualified to coach your respective sport. Many coaches are parents, some are married, most of them serve dual roles at the school as a teacher and coach. At PSTC, we only train student-athletes in a variety of sports that want to improve their sports performance. We are professionals, certified, and work in collaboration with your needs on improving your overall sports performance. We continually study sports journals, sports medical journals, conferences, and techniques that help you increase your speed, reduce your recovery time, and improve your sports nutrition.

I’ll be going to sports camps and combines and won’t have time to train at PSTC?
Attending combines and showcases is the best way to display your athletic ability and to measure up against your peers. However, if you are not adequately prepared to be at the top of your potential then you may do more harm than good. Immediately after many combines, your statistical information is sent to colleges for preview. If you were in a more tailored sport specific program, then you can train to the peak of your sports performance and attend the next combine in top shape and really be impressive.

Philadelphia Sports Training Center 640 North Broad Street, Suite 514 Philadelphia, PA 19130-3402 267-940-PSTC Office www.PhillySportsTC.com Info@PhillySportsTC.com

Top 25 Helpful Website Addresses
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. www.PhillySportsTC.com www.FAFSA.ed.gov www.NCAAClearinghouse.net www.UPromise.org www.NowU529.com www.CollegeScholarships.com www.NCAA.org www.Ebay.com www.ACT.org www.Independent529Plan.org www.Kaplan.com www.ACTStudent.org www.MaxPreps.com www.PIAA.org www.Eteamz.com www.NJCAA.org www.NCAAStudent.org www.CollegeBoard.com www.TriStateSports.com www.LeagueLineUp.com www.DelawareCountySports.com www.NAIA.org www.ussportscamps.com www.nacacnet.org www.TheNCCAA.org

2008-09

Guide for the

College-Bound Student-Athlete
FOLLOW THE BASE PATH TO SUCCESS — AS A STUDENT-ATHLETE

Contents
The NCAA and NCAA Eligibility Center Contact Information Welcome from President Myles Brand Your Eligibility and You Division I Division II Division III Core Courses, GPA, Tests, Special Conditions Your Amateurism and You Division I Worksheet Division II Worksheet Steps to Achieving Your Eligibility Eligibility Center Registration Fee-Waiver Eligibility Recruiting Regulations List of NCAA-Sponsored Sports 2 2 3 4 4 5 5 6 9 12 13 14 15 17 18 21

NCAA, NCAA logo and NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION are registered marks of the Association and use in any manner is prohibited unless prior approval is obtained from the Association. The NCAA does not discriminate against any person regardless of race, color, national origin, education-impacting disability, gender, religion, creed, sexual orientation or age with respect to its governance policies, educational programs, activities and employment policies.

NOTICE
The information contained in this publication is provided as a service to prospective student-athletes and does not constitute binding advice on compliance with NCAA rules and bylaws. We try to provide quality information, but because this document is provided in an updated electronic form online that is subject to change as needed, we make no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information contained in this publication.

For more information, see NCAA.org.

The NCAA and NCAA Eligibility Center
How to Use this Guide…
The Guide addresses issues for three important groups of readers: High school students who hope to participate in college athletics at an NCAA college or university; Parents and legal guardians; and High school counselors and athletics administrators. In addition, if you are sending transcripts or additional information to the Eligibility Center or have questions, please use the following contact information. Eligibility Center Contact Information NCAA Eligibility Center: Certification Processing P.O. Box 7136 Indianapolis, IN 46207-7136 Package or overnight delivery: 1802 Alonzo Watford Sr. Drive Indianapolis, IN 46202 Web address: www.ncaaclearinghouse.net Eligibility Center customer service Representatives are available from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Eastern time, Monday through Friday. U.S. callers (toll free): 877/262-1492 International callers: 317/223-0700 Fax: 317/968-5100

What is the NCAA?
The NCAA, or National Collegiate Athletic Association, was established in 1906 and serves as the athletics governing body for more than 1,280 colleges, universities, conferences and organizations. The national office is in Indianapolis, but the member colleges and universities develop the rules and guidelines for athletics eligibility and athletics competition for each of the three NCAA divisions. The NCAA is committed to the studentathlete and to governing competition in a fair, safe, inclusive and sportsmanlike manner. The NCAA membership includes: 331 active Division I members; 291 active Division II members; and 429 active Division III members. One of the differences among the three divisions is that colleges and universities in Divisions I and II may offer athletics scholarships, while Division III colleges and universities may not.

When to call the NCAA
Please contact the NCAA when you have questions like these: What are the rules and regulations related to initial eligibility? What are the rules and regulations related to amateurism? What are the regulations about transferring from one college to another? What are the rules about athletics scholarships and how can they be reduced or canceled? I have an education-impacting disability. Are there any other requirements for me? NCAA P.O. Box 6222 Indianapolis, IN 46206-6222 317/917-6222 (customer service Monday – Friday, noon – 4 p.m. Eastern time)

What is the NCAA Eligibility Center?
The NCAA Eligibility Center will certify the academic and amateur credentials of all college-bound student-athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division I or II athletics. To assist with this process, the Eligibility Center staff is eager to foster a cooperative environment of education and partnership with high schools, high school coaches and college-bound student-athletes. Ultimately, the individual student-athlete is responsible for achieving and protecting his or her eligibility status.

How to find answers to your questions
The answers to most questions can be found in this guide or by: Accessing the Eligibility Center's resource page on our Web site at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net, then click on “Prospective Student-Athletes” and then “Information and Resources for Prospective Student-Athletes.” Contacting the Eligibility Center at the phone number on this page.
2 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

Dear College-Bound Student-Athlete, We designed this guide to help you and your family understand the National Collegiate Athletic Association rules for progressing from being a high school athlete to a student-athlete in college. As you engage in college sports, you’ll be inspired to develop an attitude of determination, teamwork, persistence and self-discipline. You will increase your appreciation of life-long education. Work closely with your high school counselors, recruiters and college admissions officers to prepare for your next important step as a collegiate student-athlete. It’s never too early to begin evaluating your wide range of college choices. Get all the information you need on how to choose a college wisely. NCAA institutions range from small schools to large universities, with varying commitments to financial aid and to athletics. The Association’s members total more than 1,000 schools, and they are divided into three divisions. You may qualify – by both your interest and your athletics performance – to become one of more than 400,000 students, out of 15 million enrolled nationally in America’s colleges and universities, who combine education and athletics. Your likelihood of ultimate recruitment into professional leagues is small so, for almost all of you, your years as a student-athlete in college will be preparation for life. As our public service announcements say, “Almost all student-athletes are going pro in something other than sports.” Remember, good athletics is about winning at competition in games. Good academics combined with athletics is about winning in life. So, keep education as your top priority. This new phase of your life can be a wonderful experience that will result in a lifetime of friendships, memories and happiness. Without question, obtaining your college degree is absolutely crucial – to you, to your family and to us. We wish you every success, on the field of play and in the classroom. Studentathletes are at the center of our Association. MYLES BRAND

NCAA President
COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 3

Division I Core GPA and Test Score Sliding Scale
Core GPA
3.550 & above 3.525 3.500 3.475 3.450 3.425 3.400 3.375 3.350 3.325 3.300 3.275 3.250 3.225 3.200 3.175 3.150 3.125 3.100 3.075 3.050 3.025 3.000 2.975 2.950 2.925 2.900 2.875 2.850 2.825 2.800 2.775 2.750 2.725 2.700 2.675 2.650 2.625 2.600 2.575 2.550 2.525 2.500 2.475 2.450 2.425 2.400 2.375 2.350 2.325 2.300 2.275 2.250 2.225 2.200 2.175 2.150 2.125 2.100 2.075 2.050 2.025 2.000

SAT
400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 670 680 690 700 710 720 730 730 740-750 760 770 780 790 800 810 820 830 840-850 860 860 870 880 890 900 910 920 930 940 950 960 960 970 980 990 1000 1010

ACT
37 38 39 40 41 41 42 42 43 44 44 45 46 46 47 47 48 49 49 50 50 51 52 52 53 53 54 55 56 56 57 58 59 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 80 81 82 83 84 85 86

Your Eligibility and You
Academic-Eligibility Requirements Division I
If you want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must: Graduate from high school; Complete these 16 core courses: - 4 years of English - 3 years of math (algebra 1 or higher) - 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school) - 1 extra year of English, math, or natural or physical science - 2 years of social science - 4 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy); Earn a minimum required grade-point average in your core courses; and Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core-course grade-point average and test score sliding scale (for example, a 2.400 core-course grade-point average needs an 860 SAT). Requirement to graduate with your high school class You must graduate from high school on schedule (in eight semesters) with your incoming ninth-grade class. If you graduate from high school in eight semesters with your class, you may use one core course completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic year) to meet NCAA Division I eligibility requirements. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course.

Division I Qualifier
Being a qualifier entitles you to: Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; and Play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

4 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

Division I Nonqualifier
As a nonqualifier, you will not be able to: Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; or Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need-based financial aid. You may be able to play only three seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year (to earn a fourth season you must complete at least 80 percent of your degree requirements before beginning your fifth year of college).

Division II Qualifier
Being a qualifier entitles you to: Practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; Receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; and Play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

Division II Partial Qualifier
You will be considered a partial qualifier if you do not meet all of the academic requirements listed above, but you have graduated from high school and meet one of the following: The combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68; or Completion of the 14 core courses with a 2.000 core-course grade-point average. As a partial qualifier, you: Can practice with your team at its home facility during your first year of college; Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college; Cannot compete during your first year of college; and Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

Division II
2008 - 2013
If you enroll in a Division II college and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must: Graduate from high school; Complete these 14 core courses: - 3 years of English - 2 years of math (algebra 1 or higher) - 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school) - 2 additional years of English, math, or natural or physical science - 2 years of social science - 3 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy); Earn a 2.000 grade-point average or better in your core courses; and Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.

Division II Nonqualifier
You will be considered a nonqualifier if you did not graduate from high school, or, if you graduated and are missing both the core-course grade-point average or minimum number of core courses and the required ACT or SAT scores. As a nonqualifier, you: Cannot practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college; Cannot receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need-based financial aid; and Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

2013 and Later
If you enroll in a Division II college on or after August 1, 2013, and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must: Graduate from high school; Complete these 16 core courses: - 3 years of English - 2 years of math (algebra 1 or higher) - 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by your high school) - 3 additional years of English, math, or natural or physical science - 2 years of social science - 4 years of additional core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy); Earn a 2.000 grade-point average or better in your core courses; and Earn a combined SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.

Division III
Division III does not use the Eligibility Center. Contact your Division III college or university regarding its policies on admission, financial aid, practice and competition.

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 5

Remember Meeting the NCAA academic rules does not guarantee your admission into a college. You must apply for admission.

Grade-Point Average
How Your Core-Course Grade-Point Average is Calculated The Eligibility Center will calculate the grade-point average of your core courses on a 4.000 scale. The best grades from your NCAA core courses will be used. Grades from additional core courses you took will be used only if they improve your grade-point average. To determine your points earned for each course, multiply the points for the grade by the amount of credit earned. Use the following scale unless your high school has a different scale on file with the Eligibility Center: A – 4 points B – 3 points C – 2 points D – 1 point

Core Courses, Grade-Point Average, Tests and Special Conditions
What Is A Core Course?
A core course must: Be an academic course in one or a combination of these areas: English, mathematics, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy; Be four-year college preparatory; Be at or above your high school’s regular academic level (no remedial, special education or compensatory courses); and Be completed not later than the high school graduation date of your class [as determined by the first year of enrollment in high school (ninth grade) or the international equivalent]. Not all classes you take to meet high school graduation requirements may be used as core courses. Courses completed through credit-by-exam will not be used. Check your high school’s list of approved core courses at the Eligibility Center Web site at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net or ask your high school guidance counselor. Keep Track Of Your Courses, Units and Credits By logging onto www.ncaaclearinghouse.net and clicking “General Information,” you will find the Divisions I and II worksheets, which will help you keep track of your completed core courses, units, grades and credits you received for them, plus your ongoing grade-point average. Generally, you will receive the same credit at the Eligibility Center as you received from your high school. Examples are provided in the English and math sections of both worksheets: 1 trimester unit = 0.33 units 1 semester unit = 0.50 units 1 year = 1.0 unit

Remember: The Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when figuring your core-course grade-point average. For example, grades of B+, B and B- will each be worth 3 quality points. Special High School Grades and Grade-Point Average If your high school uses numeric grades (such as 92 or 93), those grades will be changed to your high school's letter grades (such as A or B). See your high school's grading scale by pulling up your school's list of approved core courses at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. If your high school normally “weights” honors or advanced courses, these weighted courses may improve your core-course gradepoint average. Your high school must notify the Eligibility Center of such weighting. To see if your high school has a weighted scale that is being used for calculating your core-course grade-point average, visit www.ncaaclearinghouse.net for an explanation of how these grade weights are handled. Examples of total quality point calculation: An A grade (4 points) for a trimester course (0.33 units): 4 points x 0.33 units = 1.32 total quality points An A grade (4 points) for a semester course (0.50 units): 4 points x 0.50 units = 2.00 total quality points An A grade (4 points) for a full-year course (1.00 units): 4 points x 1.00 units = 4.00 quality points Calculate Your Overall Grade-Point Average To calculate your estimated core-course grade-point average, divide the total number of points for all of your core courses by the total number of core-course units you have completed. Note: Your calculation helps you keep track of your grade-point average. Should you have any questions, contact your high school guidance counselor.

6 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

ACT and SAT Tests
Test-Score Requirements
You must achieve the required score on the SAT or ACT before your full-time collegiate enrollment. You must do this whether you are a citizen of the United States or of a foreign country. You must take the national test given on one or more of the dates shown below. IMPORTANT CHANGE: All SAT and ACT scores must be reported to the Eligibility Center directly from the testing agency. Test scores will not be accepted if reported on a high school transcript. When registering for the SAT or ACT, input the Eligibility Center code of 9999 to make sure the score is reported directly to the Eligibility Center. National Testing Dates SAT October 4, 2008 November 1, 2008 December 6, 2008 January 24, 2009 March 14, 2009 May 2, 2009 June 6, 2009 ACT September 13, 2008 October 25, 2008 December 13, 2008 February 7, 2009 April 4, 2009 June 13, 2009

Taking Tests More than Once
You may take the SAT or the ACT more than one time. If you take either test more than once, you may use your best subscore from different tests to meet the minimum test-score requirements. Here is an example: SAT (10/08) SAT (12/08) Scores used Math 350 420 420 Verbal/Critical Reading 470 440 470 Total Score 820 860 890

Your test score will continue to be calculated using the math and verbal/critical reading subsections of the SAT and the math, science, English and reading subsections of the ACT. The writing component of the ACT or SAT will not be used to determine your qualifier status.

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 7

Core Courses
If you are a high school student with an education-impacting disability and have received help (for example, taken special classes or received extra time for tests) because of that educationimpacting disability, you are eligible for the following: You may use a course that your high school has designed for students with education-impacting disabilities, if it appears on your high school's list of approved core courses. You may take core courses any time before your enrollment as a full-time student in college, even during the summer after your last high school year. Remember, for Division I, you must document your education-impacting disability with the NCAA to receive this accommodation.

Nonstandard Tests
If you have an education-impacting disability, you may also take a nonstandard test to satisfy test-score requirements. Follow these guidelines: Register for nonstandard testing as described by ACT or SAT, submitting a properly documented and confirmed diagnosis. Follow procedures governed by ACT or SAT. (The test may not be administered by a member of your high school athletics department or any NCAA school's athletics department.) If you take a nonstandard ACT or SAT, you may take the test on a date other than a national testing date, but you still must achieve the required test score. Your high school counselor can help you register to take a nonstandard test.

Students With Education-Impacting Disabilities: Special Conditions
A student with an education-impacting disability must meet the same requirements as all other students, but is provided certain accommodations to help meet these requirements. If you are a student with a diagnosed education-impacting disability, you will need to let the Eligibility Center know about your education-impacting disability only if you plan on using core courses after your eighth semester of high school and you plan on attending an NCAA Division I college or university.

The GED
The General Education Development (GED) test may, under certain conditions, satisfy the graduation requirement, but it will not satisfy core-course grade-point average or test-score requirements. Contact the NCAA for information about GED submission.

Home School
Home-schooled students who plan to enroll in a Division I or II college must register with the Eligibility Center and must meet the same requirements as all other students.

To Document Your EducationImpacting Disability
Send the following documentation to: NCAA Eligibility Center P.O. Box 7110 Indianapolis, IN 46207-7110 Copy of your professional diagnosis; and Copy of your IEP, ITP, 504 plan or statement of accommodations. (One of the above documents should be dated within the last three years.) Note: Please include home address, telephone number, social security number and the year of your high school graduation.
8 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

Your Amateurism and You
If you want to participate in NCAA Division I or II athletics, you must also be certified as an amateur student-athlete. The Eligibility Center will determine the amateurism eligibility of all freshman and transfer college-bound student-athletes for initial participation at an NCAA Division I or II member institution. In Division III, certification of an individual’s amateurism status is completed by each institution, not the Eligibility Center. When you register with the Eligibility Center, you will be asked questions about your athletics participation. The information you will provide will be reviewed and a determination will be made as to whether your amateurism status should be certified or if a penalty should be assessed before certification. If a penalty is assessed, you will have an opportunity to appeal the decision. The following precollegiate enrollment activities will be reviewed: 1. Contracts with a professional team. 2. Salary for participating in athletics. 3. Prize money. 4. Play with professionals. 5. Tryouts, practice or competition with a professional team. 6. Benefits from an agent or prospective agent. 7. Agreement to be represented by an agent. 8. Delayed initial full-time collegiate enrollment to participate in organized sports competition. Additional information regarding NCAA amateurism rules is available on the Eligibility Center’s Web site by logging on to www.ncaaclearinghouse.net, then clicking on “General Information” and then “Information and Resources for Prospective Student-Athletes.”

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 9

Definition of a Professional Team.
In Divisions I and II, a team is considered professional if it declares itself to be professional or provides any player more than actual and necessary expenses for participation on the team. Actual and necessary expenses are limited to the following: (a) Meals and lodging directly tied to competition and practice held in preparation for competition; (b) Transportation (i.e., expenses to and from practice and competition, cost of transportation between home and the training/practice site at the beginning and end of the season); (c) Apparel, equipment and supplies related to participation on the team; (d) Coaching and instruction, use of facilities and entry fees; (e) Health insurance, medical treatment and physical therapy; and (f) Other reasonable expenses (e.g., laundry money). In Division II, athletics competition is considered organized if any one of the following criteria is met: (a) Any team or individual competition or training in which payment (including expenses) is provided to any participant; (b) Any competition as a result of signing a contract for athletics participation; (c) Any competition as a result of involvement in a professional draft; (d) Any competition funded by a professional sports organization; (e) Any competition funded by a representative of an institution’s athletics interest that is not an open event; (f) Any practice with a professional athletics team (excluding a 48-hour tryout); (g) Any competition or training with a team that declares itself to be professional; or (h) Any competition or training with a team that provides compensation to any of the participants (including actual and necessary expenses).

Definition of Organized Competition.
In Division I, athletics competition is considered organized if any one of the following conditions exists: (a) Competition is scheduled and publicized in advance; (b) Official score is kept; (c) Individual or team standings are maintained; (d) Official timer or game officials are used; (e) Admission is charged; (f) Teams are regularly formed or team rosters are predetermined; (g) Team uniforms are used; (h) A team is privately or commercially sponsored; or (i) The competition is either directly or indirectly sponsored, promoted or administered by an individual, an organization or any other agency.

10 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

OVERVIEW OF NCAA DIVISIONS I AND II PRE-ENROLLMENT AMATEURISM BYLAWS
Permissible in Division I? (Student-athletes first enrolling on or after August 1, 2002) Enters into a Contract with a Professional Team Accepts Prize Money No Yes. If it is an open event, and does not exceed actual and necessary expenses. Yes No No No Yes. May receive actual and necessary expenses for one visit (up to 48 hours) from each professional team. Self-financed tryouts may be for more than 48 hours. No No Tennis and Swimming & Diving: Have one year after high school graduation to enroll full time in a collegiate institution or will lose one season of intercollegiate competition for each calendar year during which you continue to participate in organized competition. Permissible in Division II? (Student-athletes first enrolling on or after August 1, 2001) Yes Yes

Enters Draft Accepts Salary Receives Expenses from a Professional Team Competes on a Team with Professionals Tryouts with a Professional Team Before Initial Collegiate Enrollment

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Receives Benefits from an Agent Enters into Agreement with an Agent (oral or written) Delays Full-Time Collegiate Enrollment and Participates in Organized Competition [If you are charged with season(s) of competition under this rule, you will also have to serve an academic year in residence at the NCAA institution.]

No No

All Sports: Must enroll at the next opportunity (excluding summer) immediately after the date that your high school class normally graduates (or the international equivalent) or you will use a season of intercollegiate competition for each calendar year or sports season (subsequent to that date) in which you have participated in organized All Other Sports: Any participation competition. in organized sports competition during each 12-month period after your 21st birthday and before initial full-time enrollment in a collegiate institution shall count as one year of varsity competition.

The chart above summarizes the Divisions I and II pre-enrollment amateurism rules.

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 11

Division I Worksheet
This worksheet is provided to assist you in monitoring your progress in meeting NCAA initial-eligibility standards. The NCAA Eligibility Center will determine your official status after you graduate. Remember to check your high school's list of approved courses for the classes you have taken. Use the following scale: A = 4 quality points; B = 3 quality points; C = 2 quality points; D = 1 quality point.

English (4 years required) Course Title Example: English 9

Credit .5

X

Grade A

=

Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) (.5 x 4) = 2

Total English Units Mathematics (3 years required) Course Title Example: Algebra 1 Credit 1.0 X Grade B

Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) (1.0 x 3) = 3

Total Mathematics Units Natural/physical science (2 years required) Course Title Credit Total Natural/Physical Science Units X Grade

Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) Total Quality Points

Additional year in English, mathematics or natural/physical science (1 year required) Course Title Credit X Grade = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) Total Additional Units Social science (2 years required) Course Title Total Social Science Units Additional academic courses (4 years required) Course Title Credit X Grade Credit X Grade Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade)

Total Additional Academic Units Core-Course GPA (16 required) Total Quality Points Total Number of Credits

Total Quality Points Core-Course GPA (Total Quality Points/Total Credits)

12 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

Division II Worksheet
This worksheet is provided to assist you in monitoring your progress in meeting NCAA initial-eligibility standards. The NCAA Eligibility Center will determine your official status after you graduate. Remember to check your high school's list of approved courses for the classes you have taken. Use the following scale: A = 4 quality points; B = 3 quality points; C = 2 quality points; D = 1 quality point.

English (3 years required) Course Title Example: English 9

Credit .5

X

Grade A

=

Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) (.5 x 4) = 2

Total English Units Mathematics (2 years required) Course Title Example: Algebra 1 Credit 1.0 X Grade B

Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) (1.0 x 3) = 3

Total Mathematics Units Natural/physical science (2 years required) Course Title Credit Total Natural/Physical Science Units X Grade

Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) Total Quality Points

Additional years in English, mathematics or natural/physical science (2 years required) Course Title Credit X Grade = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) Total Additional Units Social science (2 years required) Course Title Total Social Science Units Additional academic courses (3 years required) Course Title Credit X Grade Credit X Grade Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade) Total Quality Points = Quality Points (multiply credit by grade)

Total Additional Academic Units Core-Course GPA (14 required)

Total Quality Points

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 13

Steps to Achieving Your Eligibility
Freshmen and Sophomores
Start planning now! Work hard to get the best grades possible. Take classes that match your school’s NCAA list of approved core courses. You can receive your school’s NCAA list of approved core courses at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net.

Juniors
At the beginning of your junior year, register at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net and complete the amateurism questionnaire. Register to take the ACT, SAT or both and use the Eligibility Center code (9999) as a score recipient. Double check to make sure the courses you have taken match your school’s NCAA list of approved core courses. Ask your guidance counselor to send an official transcript to the Eligibility Center after completing your junior year. (The Eligibility Center does NOT accept faxed transcripts or test scores.) Prior to registration for classes for your senior year, check with your guidance counselor to determine the amount of core courses that you need to complete your senior year.

Seniors
Take the SAT and/or ACT again. The Eligibility Center will use the best scores from each section of the ACT or SAT to determine your best cumulative score. Continue to take college-prep courses. Check the courses you have taken to match your school’s NCAA list of approved core courses. Review your amateurism questionnaire responses and request final amateurism certification on or after April 1 (for fall enrollees) or October 1 (for spring enrollees). Continue to work hard to get the best grades possible. Graduate on time (in eight academic semesters). If you fall behind, use summer school sessions prior to graduation to catch up. After graduation, ask your guidance counselor to send your final transcript with proof of graduation.

14 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

Eligibility Center Registration
Complete the Student Release Form To register with the Eligibility Center, you must complete the Student Release Form and amateurism questionnaire online at the beginning of your junior year and send the Eligibility Center the registration fee ($60 for domestic and $85 for international students). Online registration: The only method is to register online. Go online to www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. Select Prospective Student-Athletes and then register as a U.S. or international student. Complete the Student Release Form online and include your credit or debit card information to pay the fee. Then follow instructions to complete the transaction. Print both Copy 1 and Copy 2 of the Transcript Release Form. Sign the Transcript Release Forms and give both to your high school guidance counselor. When completing the Student Release Form sections, please follow the step-by-step instructions outlined below. Section I: Student Information Enter all information accurately, including your Social Security Number (SSN) and date of birth. This information must exactly match other data the Eligibility Center receives for you (such as high school transcripts and requests from colleges seeking your eligibility status). Be sure you provide an e-mail address that will be active even after you complete high school. Section II: High School You Now Attend Enter the name, address and code number of the high school you now attend, along with your expected date of high school graduation. Get your high school code from your counselor or use the code look-up at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. Click on Prospective Student-Athletes, then List of Approved Core Courses on the left-hand side.

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 15

Section III: Schools You Previously Attended If you have attended more than one school (including summer school) during grades nine, 10, 11 or 12, complete Section III. List all schools you previously attended, starting with the most recent. Make sure to include all schools, whether or not you received grades or credits. If you attended ninth grade in a junior high school located in the same school system in which you later attended high school, do not list the ninth-grade school. Special instructions: If you need to enter more than six high schools, contact the Eligibility Center at 877/262-1492. Or, once you've registered with the Eligibility Center, select Prospective Student-Athletes, then Registered Student Login, then add information for the additional schools on your record. Section IV: Selected Anticipated Enrollment Period and Sports You Plan on Participating In Please select the semester and year that you expect to first attend a Division I or II institution. Please then select from the drop-down list the sport or sports in which you plan to compete in college. Section V: Eligibility Center Communication Method The Eligibility Center will communicate with you by e-mail. This will include most correspondence and certification reports. E-mail correspondence will require that you have submitted a valid e-mail address in Section I of your Student Release Form. You may update your e-mail address at www.ncaaclearinghouse. net. Section VI: Personal Identification Number (PIN) Create a Personal Identification Number (PIN) of four digits (numbers between 0 and 9) that you can easily remember. Do not choose a PIN that might be easily guessed (such as your birthday or street address). Record your PIN in the space provided below and keep it in a safe place. PIN

Check your file status. Once you have submitted your Student Release Form and PIN, you may check your status by: Visiting www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. On the home page, click on Prospective Student-Athletes, then Registered Student Login (enter your SSN or clearinghouse ID and PIN). Section VII: Pay Your Fee (or Submit a Fee Waiver) Your form will be eligible for processing only with payment of an application fee of $60 for U.S. students or $85 for international students (or submission of a fee waiver if you have been granted a waiver). You must pay by debit, credit card or e-check. You are eligible for a waiver of the registration fee only if you have already received a waiver of the ACT or SAT fee. Your Student Release Form fee waiver section must then be completed by an authorized high school official and include the school seal. Your waiver may also be submitted online by an authorized high school official. If you have not yet been granted a fee waiver by ACT or SAT, you are not yet eligible for a waiver of the registration fee. Section VIII: Authorization Signature Carefully examine the entire Student Release Form to make sure you have completed it correctly, included your fee payment authorization and signed it. If you are younger than 18 years old, your parent or legal guardian also must sign. You will be asked to verify your signature by checking a box to certify your identity. A similar check box and name field is also included for your parent or guardian, who must provide a signature if you are younger than 18. Transcript Release Form Completion by Your High School Your high school will complete your registration by sending Copy 1, along with your high school transcript, to the Eligibility Center. After graduation, but before your high school closes for the summer, your high school must send Copy 2 to the Eligibility Center, along with a copy of your final transcript confirming your high school graduation.

If you have forgotten your PIN, log on to www.ncaaclearinghouse.net and go to Prospective StudentAthletes to request your PIN to be sent to you via e-mail.

16 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

Fee-Waiver Eligibility
ACT In order to be eligible for an ACT fee waiver, a student must meet one of these indicators of economic need: Family receives public assistance; Student is a ward of the state; Student resides in foster home; Student participates in free or reduced-price lunch program at school; Student participates in federally funded TRIO Program such as Upward Bound; or Family income is at or below the 2008-09 Bureau of Labor Statistics Low Standard Budget. SAT You are eligible for consideration for an SAT fee waiver if you are: An American citizen or a foreign national taking the SAT in the United States, Puerto Rico or U.S. territories; or An American citizen living outside the United States; and you meet the financial eligibility guidelines for fee waivers, such as participating in the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch/National School Lunch Program at your school. Your guidance counselor will share any additional eligibility guidelines with you. If you are a home-schooled student in the United States, Puerto Rico or U.S. territories who cannot afford to pay the test fees, you must provide proof of eligibility to your local high school or agency fee-waiver administrator/counselor. Only a school or agency counselor can provide you with the fee-waiver card for the appropriate test.

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 17

Recruiting Regulations
Introduction
College coaches must follow the rules outlined in this section. You are expected to follow these rules as well.

Prospective student-athlete. You become a “prospective student-athlete” when: You start ninth-grade classes; or Before your ninth-grade year, a college gives you, your relatives or your friends any financial aid or other benefits that the college does not provide to students generally. Quiet period. During this time, a college coach may not have any in-person contact with you or your parents off the college's campus. The coach may not watch you play or visit your high school during this period. You and your parents may visit a college campus during this time. A coach may write or telephone you or your parents during this time. Unofficial visit. Any visit by you and your parents to a college campus paid for by you or your parents. The only expense you may receive from the college is three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. You may make as many unofficial visits as you like and may take those visits at any time. The only time you cannot talk with a coach during an unofficial visit is during a dead period. Verbal commitment. This phrase is used to describe a collegebound student-athlete's commitment to a school before he or she signs (or is able to sign) a National Letter of Intent. A collegebound student-athlete can announce a verbal commitment at any time. While verbal commitments have become very popular for both college-bound student-athletes and coaches, this "commitment" is NOT binding on either the college-bound student-athlete or the institution. Only the signing of the National Letter of Intent accompanied by a financial aid agreement is binding on both parties.

Recruiting Terms
Contact. A contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with you or your parents off the college's campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with you or your parents at your high school or any location where you are competing or practicing. Contact period. During this time, a college coach may have inperson contact with you and/or your parents on or off the college's campus. The coach may also watch you play or visit your high school. You and your parents may visit a college campus and the coach may write and telephone you during this period. Dead period. A college coach may not have any in-person contact with you or your parents on or off campus at any time during a dead period. The coach may write and telephone you or your parents during this time. Evaluation. An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate your academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting your high school or watching you practice or compete. Evaluation period. During this time, a college coach may watch you play or visit your high school, but cannot have any in-person conversations with you or your parents off the college's campus. You and your parents can visit a college campus during this period. A coach may write and telephone you or your parents during this time. Official visit. Any visit to a college campus by you and your parents paid for by the college. The college may pay all or some of the following expenses: Your transportation to and from the college; Room and meals (three per day) while you are visiting the college; and Reasonable entertainment expenses, including three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. Before a college may invite you on an official visit, you will have to provide the college with a copy of your high school transcript (Division I only) and SAT, ACT or PLAN score and register with the Eligibility Center.
18 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

Recruiting Calendars
To see recruiting calendars for all sports, go to NCAA.org.

National Letter of Intent
The National Letter of Intent (NLI) is a voluntary program administered by the Eligibility Center. By signing an NLI, your son or daughter agrees to attend the institution for one academic year. In exchange, that institution must provide athletics financial aid for one academic year. Restrictions are contained in the NLI itself. Read them carefully. These restrictions may affect your son’s or daughter’s eligibility. If you have questions about the National Letter of Intent, visit the Web site at www.national-letter.org or call 877/262-1492.

Summary of Recruiting Rules for Each Sport—Division I
RECRUITING METHOD Recruiting materials MEN’S BASKETBALL You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires. You may begin receiving recruiting materials June 15 after your sophomore year. You may make calls to coach at your expense. College may accept collect calls from you at end of your sophomore year. College coach cannot call you. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires. FOOTBALL You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires. OTHER SPORTS You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.

Telephone calls

SOPHOMORE YEAR

You may make calls to coach at your expense only. College coach cannot call you.

You may make calls to coach at your expense only. College coach cannot call you.

You may make calls to coach at your expense only. College coach cannot call you. Women's Ice Hockey—If you are an international prospect, a college coach may call you once in July after sophomore year. None allowed. None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. OTHER SPORTS You may begin receiving September 1 of junior year. Men's Ice Hockey—You may begin receiving recruiting materials June 15 after your sophomore year. You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Once per week starting July 1 after your junior year. Men's Ice Hockey— Once per month beginning June 15, before your junior year, through July 31 after your junior year. Allowed starting July 1 after your junior year. For gymnastics—allowed after July 15 after your junior year. None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

Off-campus contact Official visit Unofficial visit

None allowed. None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. MEN’S BASKETBALL Allowed. You may begin receiving recruiting materials June 15 after your sophomore year.

None allowed. None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL You may begin receiving September 1 of junior year.

None allowed. None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. FOOTBALL You may begin receiving September 1 of junior year.

RECRUITING METHOD Recruiting materials

Telephone calls College coaches may call you

You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Once per month beginning June 15, before your junior year, through July 31 after your junior year.

You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Once per month in April, May and June 1-20. Once between June 21 and June 30 after your junior year. Three times in July after your junior year (max. of one call per week). None allowed.

You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Once from April 15 to May 31 of your junior year.

JUNIOR YEAR

Off-campus contact

None allowed.

None allowed.

Official visit Unofficial visit

None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

None allowed. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 19

RECRUITING METHOD Recruiting materials Telephone calls College coaches may call you

MEN’S BASKETBALL Allowed. You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Twice per week beginning August 1.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Allowed. You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Once per week beginning August 1.

FOOTBALL Allowed. You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Once per week beginning September 1.

OTHER SPORTS Allowed. You may make calls to the coach at your expense. Once per week beginning July 1. Men's Ice Hockey— Once per week beginning August 1. Allowed. Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year. You are limited to one official visit per college up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. Up to seven times during your senior year. A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians not more than three times during your senior year.

Off-campus contact Official visit

Allowed beginning September 9. Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year. You are limited to one official visit per college up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. Up to seven times during your senior year. A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians not more than three times during your senior year.

Allowed beginning September 16. Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year. You are limited to one official visit per college up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. Up to five times during your senior year. A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians not more than three times during your senior year.

Allowed beginning November 30. Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year. You are limited to one official visit per college up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits. Up to six times during your senior year. A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians (including evaluating you off the college’s campus), six times. One evaluation during September, October and November.

SENIOR YEAR
Unofficial visit Evaluation and contacts How often can a coach see me or talk to me off the college’s campus?

Summary of Recruiting Rules—Divisions II and III
DIVISION II Recruiting materials Telephone calls A coach may begin sending you printed recruiting materials Sepember 1 of your junior year in high school. A college coach may call you once per week beginning June 15 between your junior and senior year. You may make calls to the coach at your expense. A college coach can have contact with you or your parents/legal guardians off the college’s campus beginning June 15 after your junior year. A college coach is limited to three in-person contacts off campus. You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits any time. You may make official visits starting the opening day of classes your senior year. You may make only one official visit per college and up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges. DIVISION III You may receive printed materials any time. No limit on number of calls or when they can be made by the college coach. You may make calls to the coach at your expense. A college coach may begin to have contact with you and your parents/legal guardians off the college’s campus after your junior year.

Off-campus contact

Unofficial visits Official visits

You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits any time. You may make official visits starting the opening day of classes your senior year. You may make only one official visit per college.

20 COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

LIST OF NCAA-SPONSORED SPORTS
Fall Sports
Cross Country (W) Cross Country (M) Field Hockey (W) Football (M) Soccer (W) Soccer (M) Volleyball (W) Water Polo (M)

Spring Sports
Baseball (M) Golf (W) Golf (M) Lacrosse (W) Lacrosse (M) Rowing (W) Softball (W) Tennis (W) Tennis (M) Outdoor Track and Field (W) Outdoor Track and Field (M) Volleyball (M) Water Polo (W)

Winter Sports
Basketball (W) Basketball (M) Bowling (W) Fencing (M&W) Gymnastics (W) Gymnastics (M) Ice Hockey (W) Ice Hockey (M) Rifle (M&W) Skiing (M&W) Swimming and Diving (W) Swimming and Diving (M) Indoor Track and Field (W) Indoor Track and Field (M) Wrestling (M)

COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE 21

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NCAA Eligibility Center
Certification Processing P.O. Box 7136 Indianapolis, IN 46207-7136 www.ncaaclearinghouse.net 877/262-1492 Customer Service Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Eastern time 317/223-0700 (international callers) 317/968-5100 (fax)

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ROOKIE SPORTS TRAINING
Student-Athletes new to sports training Ages: 12 – 16 / Sessions 2-3 days/week 60-90 minute sessions/Uniform Included 8-week program based on schedule General sports training workouts Fundamental Running Mechanics Principles of Change of Direction Strength & Conditioning Training Nutritional counseling Program Dates Spring I: March 3rd – April 25th, 2009 Spring II: April 25th – June 20th, 2009 Summer: June 22nd – August 14th, 2009
* Start at any time after a consultation & tour

ELITE SPORTS TRAINING
Previous sports training experience Ages: 14 – 17 / Sessions 3 days/week 90-minute sessions / Uniform included 8-16 week program consecutively Speed, Agility, Quickness Strength & Power Plyometrics Training Anatomy of Speed ™ Techniques College Recruiting Workshop Additional Programs ACT / SAT College Admission Testing Executive Boot Camp Mommy Time Workouts Personal Training Sports Nutritional Consultations

ALL-STARS SPORTS TRAINING
High Intensity – Competitive Peers Ages: 15 – 18 / Unlimited Sessions 90 – 120 minute sessions per day 24-week program consecutively Video Biomechanical Analysis Academic Counseling in SACT Leadership Development Dri-Fit Uniforms Included SAT/ACT Prep (juniors/seniors only) Sports Nutrition Counseling Weekly Weight Management Athletic Profile / Resume College Planning Guidance Life Coaching (Included)
*No One will be turned away for inability to pay*

PSTC Calendar
Spring II April 25 - June 20 Summer June 22 – August 14

ACADEMY Calendar
Teaching Student-Athletes about life before, during, after graduating college Weekly academic development themes based on popular college majors Instructors are certified teachers and former collegiate or professional athletes Half Day - Full Day includes equal amount of time spent on academics & athletics Student-Athletes in grades 7–11 (seniors in the upcoming fall semester), boys/girls Sports training on improving total sports performance in speed-agility-quickness Periodization training in weight lifting and biomechanics of specific sport/position Must be referred by a coach or parent prior to application process before deadline 10-week summer school program, Monday through Friday, morning or afternoon Limited to 50 student-athletes per location (Temple University & Tri-State Sports) Application Deadline Limited enrollment Candidates and Family June 6th Group Interview Letter of Intent sent for June 13th selected student-athletes Start of the program for June 22nd fall sports athletes * Scholarships available for tuition May 30th


				
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Description: For parents that want to know what it takes to help your children get into college and what it takes to get an athletic scholarship This is part of a seminar presentation that I do that will be a national tour in 2009 starting September The goal is to inform 20000 parents attending about the realities of the College Recruiting Process.