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					                               Workforce Investment Act of 1998

          Two-Year Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth

                     for the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area

                                                July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2009




                                                   Approved 1/28/2007




                                                         Presented for the
                                       Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board


                                                         Prepared by the
                                          Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency
                                                    222 S. Westnedge Avenue
                                                Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007-4628
                                                         (269) 349-1533




The Michigan Works Area is an Equal Opportunity Employer/Program funded through the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth
                            Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities
                                         Michigan Relay Center 1-800-649-3777 (Voice and TTY)
                                    Workforce Investment Act of 1998

                      Two-Year Plan for Adults and Dislocated Workers
                         for the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area

                                                    2007 – 2009


                                    Revisions for PY2007-PY2008

The following revisions have been incorporated into the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area’s Two-Year
Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers and Youth. The revisions made to this plan continue to support the overall
goals in the Strategic Plan for the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area. Specifically, the following goals in
the Strategic Plan for Career Development are addressed:

Goal 1. Enhance workplace readiness skills. Data from the environmental scan indicates that employers view
some workplace skills as weakening in entry-level employees and find it difficult to recruit proficient employees.

Goal 2. Improve employment and income circumstances for workforce development program participants.
Data from the Environmental Scan indicates that persistent poverty levels, less-than-desirable growth in per capita
income levels and less-than-desirable wages for lower-income workers are long-standing problems in the two-
county area.

The Two-Year Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth includes numerous options and strategies that will
result in the enhancement of job seeker workplace readiness skills. Through an individuals’ participation in these
activities, they have the opportunity to learn and demonstrate those skills identified by the employment community as
required to successfully secure a job, maintain it for an extended period of time, and to move to progressively higher
levels of performance.

                                           SUMMARY OF REVISIONS

Planning Document: This two-year plan has incorporated the youth plan with the WIA Adult and Dislocated
Worker two-year plan. These were previously presented as two separate documents.

Formatting: The document was formatted to reflect the order and presentation in the MDLEG planning instructions.

Labor Market Information: All labor market data and information is updated to reflect the most current
information available for the two-county region.

Business Services Team: A new section was added to describe a new strategy to provided enhanced services to
employers. The strategy encompasses a “business as a primary customer” philosophy that will directly enhance the
outcomes for job seekers.

Memorandum of Understanding: The plan identified specific areas of the current Memorandum of Understanding
between One-Stop Service Center partners that will be revised in 2008. This action will result in full compliance with
newly established MDLEG guidelines for the Memorandum of Understanding document. A copy of the current
MOU template was incorporated into the two-year plan (Attachment A)

WIA Performance Measures: Local goals for the WIA Performance Measures are updated for PY2007.

No Worker Left Behind (NWLB): Portions of the two-year plan were revised to incorporate descriptions of
implementation activities related to the Governor’s No Worker Left Behind Initiative implemented August 1, 2007.
This includes revisions to local policies that were made to comply with NWLB guidelines.
Assessment: Descriptions of assessment tools described the MWAs expanded use of WorkKeys.

Targeted Youth Activities: The youth plan described a targeted activity focus for youth involved in the juvenile
justice system.

Rapid Response Process: Revisions made to the local Rapid Response procedures were made to comply with
revised state policy and the introduction of the Business Services Team strategies noted above.

Funding Allocation Process: The process used by the MWA for the allocation of workforce development resources
to specific program activities was clarified to incorporate current procedures and WDB Policies.

Workforce Development Board Policies: A summary of the program policies established by the Kalamazoo-St.
Joseph Workforce Development Board incorporated into the two-year plan (Attachment B)
                                                                  SECTION I

                                     Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area
                                         Workforce Investment Act of 1998
                                  Two-Year Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth
                                                       2007 – 2009
                                                      (Revised and updated November 2007)


The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 was implemented in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area on
July 1, 2000. While the Workforce Investment Act provides a framework for a comprehensive and integrated
workforce delivery strategy for “one-stop” employment and training services, it is only one component of a multi-
faceted statewide workforce structure in Michigan known as the Michigan Works System.

The Michigan Works System is based on the fundamental premise that in order for the state’s employers to compete
successfully in the international marketplace, they need better workers, better educated by our school system and
better trained by our public and private training providers. Through the Michigan Works System we will be able to
better match employer needs with training provided to workers.

The Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth (MDLEG) is the lead agency in the implementation of
the statewide Michigan Works System. The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board is the lead agency
for the implementation of the Michigan Works System in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area (MWA)
that consists of the County of Kalamazoo and the County of St. Joseph.

The County of Kalamazoo (Board of Commissioners) is designated as the “Grant Recipient” for the MWA. The
W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research (Michigan Works) is designated as the “administrative entity” and
“fiscal agent” (referred to as the “Michigan Works Agency”). These designations are made in accordance with
Public Act 8, “Intergovernmental Transfers of Functions and Responsibilities Act of 1967.”

Workforce Development Board (WDB) members include individuals representing the private sector. Private sector
representatives comprise, as a minimum, more than fifty percent of the WDB membership. During the process of
recruiting members for the WDB, strong emphasis is placed on the appointment of individuals who are community
leaders interested in the investment and the development of workforce and economic development policy from their
respective area of representation.

No Worker Left Behind
In August 2007 the State implemented the Governor’s No Worker Left Behind Initiative. The initiative supports
accelerated training to assist workers transition to good-paying jobs in high-demand and emerging fields; support the
state’s employers and economic development needs by filling job vacancies in areas that foster growth; and align the
use of existing training resources to meet the needs of employers and Michigan’s economy.

No Worker Left Behind (NWLB) impacts all existing workforce development programs and resources including
those supported with funding under the Workforce Investment Act, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
(TANF), and Wagner-Peyser by establishing standardized guidelines for job seeker eligibility and administrative
procedures.

In support of this initiative the local Workforce Development Board and the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works
Agency have revised policy and procedures to adapt to the NWLB initiative. Data developed for the NWLB is used
frequently in the development of this comprehensive plan.

Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development System Structure
The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board has established guidelines that provide the fundamentals
for the structure of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development System. The WDB Policies are generated in
part from specific requirements of state and federal guidelines, and in part as a basis for addressing the vision of the
Board.

The policies of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board are provided in summary format as
“Attachment B” to this Two-Year Workforce Development Plan for WIA Adults, Dislocated Workers and Youth
programs.

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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                  Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                            PY2007 - PY2009


I.   LABOR MARKET ANALYSIS OF THE MICHIGAN WORKS AREA (MWA)
     Population
     The growth rates and demographic changes in population have clear implications for a region's workforce
     development. Steady population growth can produce the continued labor force expansion that is so critical to
     meeting the labor demands of area employers. The age structure of the population is also critical as an
     imbalance of workers entering and leaving the workforce can result in shortages or oversupply of workers in
     specific occupations or entire industries. The racial and ethnic makeup of the population also has workforce
     implications, impacting regional labor force participation rates and the diversity of available workforces.

     Over the last five years, the population in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area (MWA) has held
     relatively flat. Between 2000 and 2005, the population in the two-county MWA inched up by 2,495 or 0.8
     percent, while Michigan’s population grew by 1.8 percent. According to the Census Bureau, the number of
     births exceeded deaths in the area, which resulted in the modest increase. The population in the MWA was
     estimated to be 303,520 in 2005.

     Labor Force
     Information on the size of a region's labor force and the relative trends in employment and unemployment are
     key local economic indicators. The widely cited unemployment rate provides a good measure of the relative
     utilization of labor in a region. These measures are "residency-based,” providing current information on the
     labor force status of the residents of a county or region. Additionally, the characteristics of the employed and
     unemployed, as well as persons out of the labor force, provide additional clues of key factors affecting labor
     market success.

     Labor force and employment trends in the MWA were opposite the statewide pattern. Between 2002 and 2006.
     The area’s labor force expanded by 3.8 percent, much faster than the state increase of 1.5 percent. Employment
     in the MWA inched upward by 3.4 percent, considerably more than the 0.6 percent increase recorded statewide.

     Unemployment
     The jobless rate in the MWA at 5.4 percent was below the statewide average of 6.8 percent in 2006. The
     unemployment rate in the MWA continues to be impacted by layoffs in the manufacturing sector. The area’s
     unemployment rate moved up rapidly since 2000 peaking at 5.9 percent in 2004. The rate of unemployment in
     the MWA for 2006 was 5.4 percent…still an increase of 2.3 percent from 2000. The rate of employment may
     not accurately reflect the true impact in the region. From 2005 to 2006 the actual number of individuals
     unemployed edged upward by 2.8%.

     Labor Supply
     Data on labor supply is increasingly important given several consecutive years of strong economic growth and
     future demographic trends that may limit labor force growth. Potential labor supply includes the unemployed,
     new workers entering the labor force, and persons reentering the labor market. It is also impacted by factors
     such as rates of labor force participation and migration. Potential labor supply may vary by occupation and
     skill level, resulting in specific regional labor shortages or surpluses.

     High school and community college graduates in the region, and indicator of potential new entrants to the labor
     force, declined 3.02 percent between the 2003-04 and 2004-05 school years. Data from the Michigan
     Department of Education indicates that a total of 3,934 persons graduated from area high schools and
     community colleges in 2005. (Figure A)




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                                  Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                            PY2007 - PY2009




                                                                      FIGURE A
                                                     Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA
                                          High School & Community College Graduation Levels
                                                          2003/04 – 2004/05
                                                                           2004/05        Annual    Present
                                                Indicator
                                                                          Graduates       Change    Change
                                         High School Graduates              2,627          -248      -8.6%

                                      Community College Graduates           1,307          106       8.8%

                                       Total HS and CC Graduates            3,934          -142     -3.02%

                                        Source: MDLEG, APIR 2007, April 2007, Tables 13 & 14


     Data from the Michigan Talent Bank (September 2007) reveals that 15,642 individuals are available and seeking
     work in the two-county Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA. Over 28 percent of the applicants are concentrated in
     production and administrative support occupations. (Figure B)


                                                             FIGURE B
                                           Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area
                                                    Michigan Talent Bank

                  Distribution of Job Seeker Resumes` & Employer Job Orders by Industry (September 2007)

                                                                                               Resumes`        Job Orders
                                          NAICS Industry                                             % of             % of
                                                                                             No               No
                                                                                                    Total            Total
             11-0000 Management Occupations                                                 1,467    9%       6       3%
             13-0000 Business and Financial Operations Occupations                          360      2%        8      5%
             15-0000 Computer and Mathematical Occupations                                   99      1%        1      1%
             17-0000 Architecture and Engineering Occupations                               277      2%        6      3%
             19-0000 Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations                          44      0%        -      0%
             21-0000 Community and Social Services Occupations                              179      1%        2      1%
             23-0000 Legal Occupations                                                       46      0%        1      1%
             25-0000 Education, Training, and Library Occupations                           170      1%        -      0%
             27-0000 Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations             209      1%        3      2%
             29-0000 Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations                     289      2%       18      10%
             31-0000 Healthcare Support Occupations                                         1,128    7%       10      6%
             33-0000 Protective Service Occupations                                         290      2%        1      1%
             35-0000 Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations                       1,249    8%        3      2%
             37-0000 Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupations              1,569   10%       13      8%
             39-0000 Personal Care and Service Occupations                                  312      2%        3      2%
             41-0000 Sales and Related Occupations                                          1,285    8%       15      9%
             43-0000 Office and Administrative Support Occupations                          2,347   15%       11      6%
             45-0000 Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations                              57      0%        -      0%
             47-0000 Construction and Extraction Occupations                                1,089    7%        3      2%
             49-0000 Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations                      360      2%        7      4%
             51-0000 Production Occupations                                                 1,809   12%       42      24%
             53-0000 Transportation and Material Moving Occupations                         1,007    6%       19      11%
                                                                                  Total    15,642             172
           Source: MDLEG, Office of Labor Market Information and Strategic Initiatives




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                   Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                             PY2007 - PY2009




     Industry Structure
     A complete review of the nature of jobs in a region is critical to understanding the area’s labor market
     dynamics. One key example is an examination of the broad industrial sectors in a region and their relative
     concentrations of jobs. Different industries have varying growth rates, occupational staffing, seasonal and
     cyclical employment patterns, and wage and income potential. The degree of industrial job diversification or
     dependence a region displays has important economic implications.

     Despite employment growth across all industries in the last decade, a disproportionate number of jobs in the
     Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA are supplied by the manufacturing sector. In 2006 manufacturing accounted for
     23.5 percent of all regional private industry jobs, above the state at 18.1 percent and among the highest
     manufacturing shares of any Michigan region.

     Key manufacturing employers in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA include: transportation equipment,
     machinery, plastics and rubber products, fabricated metal products, and paper manufacturing.

     Industry Employment Trends
     Information on the sources of employment growth in a region is critical for successful workforce and economic
     development. This includes knowledge of regional trends in industry employment. Industries recording the
     fastest employment growth rates or the largest net increase in jobs represent current engines behind economic
     and employment growth in a region. Long-term industry growth trends provide clues as to the changing
     structure of area jobs, and to the current and future demand for jobs in a variety of occupations.

     Between 2004 and 2006 private industry jobs in the MWA region increased only minimally (681). Job losses of
     -0.5 percent or more occurred in several industries: Retail trade (-1.4%), and manufacturing (-1.0%).

     In contrast some sectors continued to register job gains between 2004 and 2006: Health care and social sciences
     (1.0%), wholesale trade (0.5%), accommodations and food services (0.5%), financial and insurance (0.3%) and
     administration and waste services (0.3%).

     The average weekly wage in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA region increased slightly 2.7 percent ($15)
     between 2004 and 2006 . The 2006 average weekly wage rate of $706 for the MWA which is still below the
     statewide average of $807.

     Occupational Employment Forecasts
     Future trends in job growth by occupation are of interest to students and job seekers, employment and training
     professionals, employers, and educators. The MDLEG, Bureau of Labor Market Information & Strategic
     Initiatives, publishes occupational employment forecasts for Michigan and 18 state regions. These forecasts
     provide information on jobs with the highest expected growth rates, occupations that produce the highest
     numbers of regional jobs and the number of annual openings expected by occupation. They are vital in career
     exploration, education and training program development, and strategic regional economic development.

     There are primarily two ways to analyze the total number of jobs that will be added in the Kalamazoo region
     between 2004 and 2014: (1) Look at jobs with high forecast growth rates (i.e., percent growth), or (2) look at the
     occupations adding the most jobs (numerical growth).

     Under the first option, percent of growth minimizes some of the differences in industries of significant
     employment. On the other hand, percent growth among industries with small levels of employment may provide
     a less than accurate comparisons among all sectors. In these instances examining numerical growth provides
     some clarification to many of the discrepancies that may occur.

     When examining growth, one may also wish to evaluate the factors of year-to-year activity by examining
     whether the growth is a result of replacing existing jobs when vacancies occur as a result of natural attrition
     (retirement, death, etc.) or through growth (i.e., new jobs) within an expansion of the industry.

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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                                          Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                                    PY2007 - PY2009




      Between 2004 and 2014, jobs in the Kalamazoo region are expected to increase by 11,225 or 7.0 percent.
      Among occupations with above-average numerical employment growth in the region, the top 10 are: Registered
      Nurses (630 jobs), Customer Service Representatives (395) and , Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor Trailer
      (215), Sales Representatives (195), Business Operations Specialists (185), General Managers (180 jobs),
      Nursing Aids, Orderlies & Attendants (150), Automotive Service Technicians/Mechanics (130), Medical
      Assistants (125), and Maintenance & Repair Workers, General (125), and Hairdressers/Hairstylist/
      Cosmetologists (115). (Figure C)

      The increase in health care primarily reflects expected gains in Registered Nursed (630 jobs), Nursing Aides
      (150), and Medical Assistants (125). Even though the other occupational categories in the Kalamazoo region
      will record modest rates of job growth, they will generate job openings due to the need to replace existing
      workers. All occupational sectors are expected to add jobs over the decade with the exception of farming which
      is expected to decline by 3.8 percent.

      Topping the list with the fastest growth rate in the Kalamazoo region is home Network systems & Data
      Communication Analysis with a projected increase of 44.0 percent between 2004 and 2014.

                                                                        FIGURE C
                      Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA                                                        Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA
             Fifteen Fastest Growing Occupations by Number                                   Fifteen Fastest Growing Occupations by Percent
                                2004-2014                                                                       2004-2014

                                                   2004-2014 Change                                                                  2004-2014 Change
              Occupational Title                                                              Occupational Title
                                                 Number       Percent                                                              Number        Percent

Registered Nurses                                   630         18.3          Network Systems & Data Communication Analysts           45          44.0
Customer Service Representatives                    395         16.5          Network & Computer Systems Administrators               35          30.8
Truck Drivers, Heavy & Tractor-Trailer              215         13.8          Computer Software Engineers-Applications                20          26.5
Sales Reps, Wholesale/Mfg, Ex Tech/Sc Product       195         12.9          Computer Software Engineers-Systems Software            20          26.3
Business Operations Specialists-All Other           185         13.6          Medical Assistants                                     125          24.2
General and Operations Managers                     180         12.5          Social & Human Service Assistants                       50          22.7
Nursing Aides, Orderlies, & Attendants              150         11.2          Paralegals and Legal Assistants                         25          21.8
Automotive Service Technicians/Mechanics            130         11.3          Pharmacy Technicians                                    55          21.5
Medical Assistants                                  125         24.2          Public Address System and Other Announcer               20          21.1
Maintenance & Repair Workers, General               125         9.0           Directors, Religious Activities & Education             45          20.9
Hairdressers/Hairstylists/Cosmetologists            115         15.2          Special Ed Teachers, Pre/Kinder/Elementary              30          20.6
First-Line Sup/Mgrs: Food Prep/Service Workers      105         12.4          Sales & Related Workers, All Other                      85          20.3
Accountants and Auditors                            105         9.8           Dental Hygienists                                       90          19.7
Teachers & Instructors, All Other                   100         16.8          Community and Social Service Specialists,               35          19.7
Carpenters                                          100         9.5           Dental Assistants                                       45          19.2


Source: MDLEG, Office of Labor Market Information & Strategic Initiatives, 2004-2014 Demand Occupations with Above Average Job Openings (Jobs
that require moderate training through masters degree; are in the top 60 percent of occupations in employment size; the 2004-2014 growth rate is positive;
and are in the top 25 percent of openings meeting the above criteria.)


      Earnings and Wages
      The sources and levels of earnings and wages in a regional labor market are of vital interest. The earnings
      produced in a labor market are primarily spent locally. This spending generates additional jobs and income
      throughout the region. Therefore, it is crucial that key industrial sources of local earnings are identified
      because their health is central to the region's economic vitality. Similarly, information on occupational wages
      is important to employers, job seekers, and economic developers. Wage rates can be compared across
      occupations or for individual occupations across areas.




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                                            Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                                      PY2007 - PY2009


     Although the manufacturing sector in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA has not recently recorded significant
     employment growth, it is clearly still the primary source of earnings for area residents. The manufacturing sector
     generated $1.6 billion in earnings to area workers in the two-county region, or 36.3 percent of the region’s total
     private employment. (Figure D)

                                                                         FIGURE D
                                                        Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA
                                            Top Ten Industries (Percent Employment and Earnings)
                                                                2004 and 2006
                                                                                                                  % of Average Monthly
                              Industry                            % of Annual Earnings (Rank)
                                                                                                                   Employment (Rank)

                                                                        2006                 2004                 2006                 2004
           Manufacturing                                      36.3             (1)    38.7          (1)    23.5          (1)    24.6          (1)
           Healthcare & Social Assistance                     15.0             (2)    14.3          (2)    15.1          (2)    14.1          (3)
           Retail Trade                                           7.7          (3)    8.7           (3)    12.8          (3)    14.2          (2)
           Construction                                           6.0          (4)    5.7           (4)    4.9           (6)    5.0           (6)
           Financial & Insurance                                  6.0          (5)    5.5           (5)    4.3           (7)    4.0           (7)
           Wholesale Trade                                        5.1          (6)    4.5           (7)    3.8           (9)    3.3           (8)
           Professional & Technical Services                      4.6          (7)    4.1           (6)    3.5           (10)   3.3           (9)
           Administrative & Waste Services                        4.4          (8)    4.1           (8)    7.4           (5)    7.1           (5)
           Accommodation & Food Services                          3.3          (9)    3.1           (9)    10.6          (4)    10.1          (4)
           Other Services, except Public Administration           2.6          (10)   2.5           (10)   3.9           (8)    4.0           (7)
           Transportation & Warehousing                           2.5          (11)   2.4           (11)   2.4           (11)   2.3           (10)

           NOTE:      Utilities data for wages and employment arte suppressed to protect the identity of the establishments. While utilities may
                      represent a significant industry in the local area, the lack of data prevents their inclusion in this table.
           Source:    MDLEG, ES202, Total Private Employment (Annual) 2004 and 2006


     Of additional interest is the relative wage rate paid for specific occupations. The top 25 percent of jobs with
     above average annual job openings and above average wages in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph region for the 2004-
     2014 period includes occupations with wages of $28.31 and above. This includes a large number of
     management, professional, and technical jobs as well as skilled positions such as electrical power line
     installation/repair and sheet metal workers, and transportation/storage/distribution positions.

     The second 25 percent ($20.17-$27.39) of occupations with above-average wages include a pretty even
     distribution of jobs that require work experience, moderate and long-term training, associates and bachelor
     degree training. . The third 25 percent ($15.57-$19.08) with above-average wages includes various occupations
     that require mostly moderate-term training, post-secondary vocational training, and work experience in the
     related field. (Figure E)




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                                    Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                              PY2007 - PY2009



                                                                  FIGURE E

                                                  Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA
                                High Growth, High Openings, High Wage Occupations by Skill Level
                    (Ranked according to percent of growth (10% +), average annual job openings (10+), average annual wages
                                             ($18 + an hour), and less than post-graduate education.

                                                                                                                       Hourly
                                                                                           Growth        Annual
                                               Occupation                                                               Wages
                                                                                            Rate        Openings
                                                                                                                       (MWA)

                   Requiring at Least a Bachelor’s Degree (5)
                   Industrial Engineers                                                      17.1           18          $29.33
                   Teachers & Instructors, All Other                                         16.8           18             *
                   Engineers, All Other                                                      14.5           11          $32.89
                   Business Operations Specialists-All Other                                 13.6           42          $23.46
                   Education, Training, and Library Workers,                                 12.9           15             *
                   General and Operations Managers                                           12.5           45          $40.30
                   Education Administrators: Postsecondary                                   10.1            9             *
                   Mechanical Engineers                                                      10.0           22          $32.76


                   Requiring an Associates Degree (6) or Vocational Certificate (7)
                   Dental Hygienists                                                        19.7%           13          $26.88
                   Registered Nurses                                                        18.3%           135         $28.31


                   Requiring Work Experience in Related Occupation (8); Long-term (> 1 year); or Moderate-term
                   Training (9) (1-12 Months)
                   Medical Assistants                                                        24.2           22          $13.63
                   Social & Human Service Assistants                                         22.7            9          $13.04
                   Sales & Related Workers, All Other                                        20.3           17          $17.78
                   Truck Drivers, Heavy & Tractor-Trailer                                    13.8           47          $15.85
                   Musicians and Singers                                                     13.4           13          $29.71
                   Sales Representatives, Wholesale/Mfg, Ex Tech/Science Product             12.9           60          $25.88
                   Coaches and Scouts                                                        12.9           12             *
                   Food Service Managers                                                     11.0           14          $20.17
                   Sales Reps, Wholesale/Mfg, Tech/Science Products                          11.0           11          $26.53

                   SOURCE: MDLEG, Office of Labor Market Information & Strategic Initiatives, “2004-2014 Demand
                   Occupations with Above Average Job Openings” (Jobs that require moderate training through masters
                   degree; are in the top 60 percent of occupations in employment size; the 2004-2014 growth rate is positive;
                   and are in the top 25 percent of openings meeting the above criteria.)


     Workforce Investment Needs
     Within the nine-county southwest Michigan region including the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area,
     tight labor markets have been the recent norm. Moderate employment growth, coupled with modest population
     gains has kept the region’s unemployment rate low during the 1990’s.

     In July 2007 the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research prepared an Economic Scan and Workforce
     Development Profile for a two-MWA region including the counties of Barry, Branch, Calhoun, Kalamazoo and
     St. Joseph. With respect to workforce development issues, this report evaluated 503 employer responses to
     determine their impressions of the local workforce, and current and future workforce needs.




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                     Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                               PY2007 - PY2009


     While differences to individual responses reflect that diversity of the size and industry of the businesses
     surveyed, the report offered some broad conclusions with respect to workforce issues:

     –     Regional workforce development needs are similar across employers and traditional in nature. The
           largest share of respondents was concerned about screening new hires and the basic skills of workers.
           Overall these findings suggest that workforce development efforts should focus on helping employers find
           workers and screen new hires. Interest in training and concern about technical skills was mixed. Only a
           small percentage of respondents selected job training issues as most important or difficult to their
           organization; however, training also was also most frequently reported as a concern, which suggest that
           although the issue is not the most important workforce problem faced by employers, it is the most widely
           felt concern.

     –     Assistance needed by employers varies greatly depending on the type of worker they are utilizing.
           Although employers has issues with the basic job skills and screening necessary for hiring general workers,
           most reported that entry-level and clerical workers were easy to find. Conversely, nearly half of respondents
           (who employ these types of workers) reported that skilled workers and professional employees are difficult
           to find. This issue will need to be addressed if the area is to add employment in areas such as high tech or
           professional services.

           Findings reported in the Economic Scan and Workforce Development Profile reflect many of the findings in
           a study of Workplace know-how skills in 1998 and validated again in 2001. That study asked employers
           their assessment of the workplace know-how skills possessed by entry-level workers. Their conclusions
           appear to reflect those in the more recent study: An inadequate supply of workers with abilities to
           demonstrate a practical application of reading, writing, and basic math that are in-tune with the occupations
           for which they are making application.

           The "most important" workplace know-how skills that workers and labor market entrants should develop:

           –     Basic Academic Skills: Basic reading; Basic verbal/speaking; Writing; Listening; Basic Math

           –     Personal Characteristics: Honesty, integrity; Responsibility; Lifelong learner, willingness to learn;
                 Initiative, self-starter, motivation

           –     Task Achievement Competencies: Attendance; Punctuality; Flexibility; Problem solving; Common
                 sense; Time management; Consistently accurate, quality concept

           –     Behaviors with Respect to Organization: Understands and embraces mission, understands "big
                 picture", takes ownership, empowered

           –     Interpersonal Skills: Teamwork skills, works well with co-workers, customer orientation,
                 interpersonal, sociability, respects diversity


II. MICHIGAN WORKS SYSTEM
    A. Michigan Works Service Centers
       The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area supports two certified Michigan Works Service Centers,
       one in each county. The center in the Kalamazoo County is located in the City of Kalamazoo. The MWSC
       in St. Joseph County is located in the City of Three Rivers.




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                           PY2007 - PY2009




                                                        KALAMAZOO COUNTY                       ST. JOSEPH COUNTY
                  MWSC Site Address                 1601 South Burdick Street            218 Enterprise Drive
                                                    Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001            Three Rivers, Michigan 49093
                                                    1-800-285-WORKS (9675)               Voice:      269 273-2717
                                                    or:   269 383-2536                   FAX:269 273-3002
                                                    FAX: 269 385-3785
                  Site Contact                      Contact: Cincy Sullivan              Contact: Karen Carlisle
                  Hours of Operation                      8:00 AM - 5:00 PM daily except for State-recognized holidays.
                  Service Capacity (Daily)                         90                                      25


           Service Center Enhancements (Plans for Expansion and/or Improvement)
           The MWA is currently evaluating several options for the Three Rivers Service Center site. They include,
           but are not limited to acquiring a larger facility within the same general locations (Three Rivers) or
           replacing the current single-site operations with multiple “satellite” sites located throughout St. Joseph
           County. It is anticipated that the final decision on these options will not be made until mid-2008.

           Continuous Improvement of Eligible Providers
           Within the context of continuous improvement, the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board
           and Michigan Works Agency has established measures that promotes, tracks progress and report results of
           service provided by the Michigan Works System as a whole, individual service providers. Some of these
           measures include:

           –     Assessment: Identification of specific workforce needs of the customers – employers and job seekers.

           –     Treatments: Translate these needs into strategies that will address the needs – systemic or
                 programmatic - in such a manner that the identified needs are minimized or eradicated. The Business
                 Services Team Concept is one example of such a strategic move.

           –     Implementation: Based on the strategies identified for addressing the needs, undergo the processes of
                 identifying the manner in which the strategies may be implemented. This occurred through the
                 identification of a range of eligible providers in both the private and public sectors with the
                 demonstrated ability to successfully comprehend the needs and strategies and devise specific
                 methodology for implementing the strategies.

           –     Evaluation: Timely and continuous review of eligible provider results is the key to assessing that the
                 needs are being addressed as planned. In consideration of ascertaining positive progress towards the
                 goal, specific performance indicators are established. Measuring progress on an ongoing basis is
                 essential to achieving the end goals. The Workforce Development Board implemented a “mystery
                 shopper” strategy to enhance local service center customer service.

           Data and information is acquired through a number of means and methodologies. Through a review of such
           information, the MWA administrative office and Workforce Development Board has the ability to review
           performance and program delivery on an on-going basis. A number of mechanisms are used for data and
           information collection:

           –     Narrative reports prepared quarterly by each service provider for each program.

           –     Annual monitoring for both contract compliance and program delivery. The Workforce Development
                 Board’s Evaluation Committee performs on-site visits for each program annually. During the visits
                 both staff and participants are interviewed regarding their experiences within the system and the
                 identification of areas for improvement.


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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                               PY2007 - PY2009


           –     “Mystery Shopper” activity is used to assess the quality of customer service and service delivery.

           –     Monthly and quarterly partner meetings that include MWA administrative staff. These are used as
                 opportunities not only to exchange program information, but to prepare for state or federal policy
                 changes and to obtain feedback and recommendation on service delivery options, barriers to continuous
                 improvement, etc.

           Quality Management of Service Delivery: Meeting Needs of Customers
           The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board and Michigan Works Agency is responsible for
           the assessment of workforce development needs in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area.
           Workforce needs are identified through data review, participation in partnership organizations, and through
           the ongoing evaluation of the local economic and labor market structure. This process is enhanced through
           the conduct and review of special studies such as the Economic Scan and Workforce Development Profile
           identified earlier in this plan..

           Additionally, to ensure that the needs are properly addressed through resources for which the Workforce
           Development Board has management responsibility, the Michigan Works System incorporates procedures
           to assure that eligible providers meet the needs of employers. Some of the key components of this process
           include:

           –     Development of Request for Proposal (RFPs) that clearly define workforce development needs and the
                 expected performance outcomes.

           –     Identification of eligible providers who have the demonstrated capability of providing quality training
                 and/or workforce development services such as those required in the Board’s Strategic Plan.

           –     Ongoing monitoring of performance by the Workforce Development Board, including on-site reviews.

           –     Ongoing dialogue among all partners of the Michigan Works System to ensure clear communications
                 of goals and desired results and identification of any situations that may impact the achievement of
                 these goals.

           –     Enhancement of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA website to inform potential vendors and service
                 providers of the Workforce Development Board programs and a process for interested parties to make
                 application to be included in the MWAs Inventory of Service Providers.

           Coordination of Michigan Works System Services
           The Michigan Works System is a structure of many partners. All of the partners support a common vision.
           Each partner contributes differently. Some provide specialized services. Some focus on specific population
           groups. Many partners may provide the same or substantially equivalent services, not as duplication of one
           another, but in coordination with one another to ensure maximum impact is achieved.

           Resources under the direct control of the Workforce Development Board may support partners within the
           Michigan Works System. Others may be supported by resources under the indirect auspices of the WDB
           (e.g., the Michigan Prisoner Re-entry Initiative). Yet others may be supported by resources totally external
           to the Workforce Development Board. Coordination of workforce development services among partner
           agencies is accomplished by:

           –     Incorporating specific language in sub-contractual agreements requiring coordination between agencies
                 under contract with the Workforce Development Board.



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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                               PY2007 - PY2009


           –     Development of a Memorandum of Understanding among agencies participating in the Michigan
                 Works Service Center(s) that describes partner services, roles & responsibilities, expectations for
                 sharing of financial resources in support of the One-Stop Service Center, etc.

           –     Participation of WDB members and MWA staff on partner agency boards, committees, councils, and
                 task force/work groups, etc. (to ensure good communications of activities of workforce development
                 community).

           –     Regularly scheduled (quarterly, monthly, weekly as needs require) dialogue among all partners of the
                 Michigan Works System and MWA staff to ensure clear communications of goals and desired results
                 and identification of any situations that may impact the achievement of these goals.

           Business Services Team: A Demand Driven Strategy
           The Business Services Team (BST) concept is one key strategy that will move our workforce development
           system towards a more demand-driven system, and provide greater value to our customers…job seekers and
           businesses. The BST concept has three key features:

           –     A focus on business as the driver and primary customer,
           –     A team of workforce development professionals committed to relationship development with
                 businesses,
           –     Strategic collaboration with regional economic development and education partners to provide business
                 solutions to businesses.

           Additionally, successful execution of this strategy requires the implementation of several critical operational
           components:

           Philosophical Change: Businesses as the Primary Customer
           The best way for us to serve a job seeker is to help them find a job. The more jobs that are available, the
           better chance we have of helping job seekers obtain and retain jobs. If we can help attract, retain and
           expand businesses, we significantly increase our chances to place people into jobs.

           The BST concept requires the workforce development system to place Businesses as our primary
           customer. Establishing strong relationships with businesses through which we provide business solutions
           will leverage an increasing number of jobs for people we serve, thereby serving the needs of both supply
           and demand. Key objectives of a successful workforce development system relationship with businesses
           include:

           –     Assess where jobs are and will be in the near and long-term future
           –     Assess skills required to fill jobs available today and in the future
           –     Provide individualized business solutions in partnership with other local, state and federal workforce
                 development, economic development and education partners
           –     Provide industry sector-based business solutions in partnership with other local, state and federal
                 workforce development, economic development and education partners

           A focus on businesses as a primary customer does not minimize attention to excellent customer service to
           job seekers. A focused strategy to engage with businesses around the BST objectives will enable the system
           to better direct job seekers to appropriate training and stable job placements that lead to financial self-
           sufficiency.




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                              PY2007 - PY2009




           Operational Change: Workforce Development Team Committed to Businesses
           The BST concept calls for a coordinated, systematic, team approach to business outreach and engagement.

           The BST is comprised of full-time Business Outreach Specialists and support staff who represent our entire
           Michigan Works system, not individual programs, as they develop relationships with regional businesses.
           The BST will have the sole responsibility for representing our Michigan Works system to businesses and
           partners, thereby increasing accessibility to our system as well as accountability for our services.

           Strategic Collaboration with Regional Business Services Partners
           The BST will be responsible for developing relationships with the many other local, state and federal
           partners that can also provide solutions for regional businesses, including but not limited to:

           –     Kalamazoo Valley and Glen Oaks Community Colleges
           –     Southwest Michigan First
           –     St. Joseph County Economic Development Corporation
           –     Kalamazoo Regional, Vicksburg, Sturgis and Three Rivers Chambers of Commerce
           –     Local governments
           –     Unions
           –     Michigan Economic Development Corporation
           –     The Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth.

           Considering the unique role the Michigan Works System plays among region’s business solution providers,
           the BST seeks to begin it’s evolution by strengthening relationships with businesses with the greatest
           potential for our supply of workers. While strategic outreach to businesses that meet our mission is the goal,
           it is understood that the BST outreach strategy will develop and evolve over time.

     B. Memorandum of Understanding with MWS Partners
        The Michigan Works System encourages the active participation of a number of agencies charged with the
        responsibility for the management of critical workforce development programs. This is especially true for
        the programs that are co-located at each Service Center.

           To ensure that a common understanding is achieved among partners, the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan
           Works Service Center partners have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding that addresses key
           issues:
           – Mission of the Partnership
           – Purpose of the Michigan Works System Partnership
           – Partnership Principles and Goals
           – Service Center Coordination and Support

           During program year 2007, the Michigan Works Agency will be revising the Memorandums of
           Understanding with each partner agency. The revisions will incorporate the following additional elements:
           – Specific services provided by each partner (at the One-Stop Service Centers)
           – Customer referral process,
           – Duration and process for amending the MOU,
           – Responsibilities of each partner in sharing financial support for the Service Center, and
           – Local Grievance and Complaint process as applicable to each Partner.

           A facsimile of the standard MOU currently in effect is provided at Attachment A to this Comprehensive
           Plan. Please note that portions of this current MOU will undergo revisions, as noted above, by January 31,
           2008.


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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                                   PY2007 - PY2009




III. LOCAL PERFORMANCE MEASURES
     Performance measures under the Workforce Investment Act have been negotiated between the Workforce
     Development Board and the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth. Local measures have been
     established as a result of these negotiations; however, these change annually. Performance benchmarks for 2007-
     2008 are as follows:

                                                                            PY2007                           PY2008 Preliminary
                                                                                     Dislocated                          Dislocated
                                                               Adult                                       Adult
                    Performance Measure                                               Worker                              Worker
                                                              Program                                     Program
                                                                                     Program                              Program
         Entered Employment Rate                                  88.0%                94.0%               89.0%             95.0%
         Employment Retention Rate                                84.0%                90.0%               85.0%             92.0%
         Average Earnings                                         $ 8,500             $ 13,200             $ 9,000          $ 13,400
         Employment and Credential Rate                           80.0%                83.0%               82.0%             84.0%
         Participant Customer Satisfaction                                   91.0                                    91.0
         Employer Customer Satisfaction                                      86.0                                    86.0


     Source: MDLEG Policy Issuance 07-16, September 14, 2007



IV. ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER SERVICES & ACTIVITIES
    A range of WIA supported workforce development services are available for adults and dislocated workers. The
    ranges of services available to any eligible applicant are based on an assessment of the individual’s needs and
    individual service strategies. Specific activities incorporated into the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works
    System include:

     A. Core Services
        1. Determination of eligibility to receive assistance, including establishing eligibility for welfare-to-work
           activities (as appropriate)

           2.    Outreach, intake, and orientation to Michigan Works System information

           3.    Initial assessment of skill levels, aptitudes, abilities, and supportive service needs

           4.    Job search and placement assistance and, where appropriate, career counseling

           5.    Provision of employment statistics information

           6.    Provision of performance information and program cost information on eligible providers of training
                 services, eligible providers of youth activities, providers of dislocated worker education activities, post-
                 secondary vocational education activities, and vocational rehabilitation program activities

           7.    Provision of information regarding how the local areas are performing on Michigan Works Area
                 performance measures

           8.    Provision of accurate information relating to the availability of supportive services

           9.    Provision of information regarding filing claims for unemployment compensation




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                               PY2007 - PY2009


           10. Assistance in establishing eligibility for programs of financial aid for training and education that is not
               funded under the WIA, and

           11. Follow-up services for participants who are placed in unsubsidized employment for not less than 12
               months

           Once it has been determined that an eligible individual is unable to secure substantial employment through
           “self-serve” job search and the core services for placement, referral may be made to “intensive services.”

     B. No Worker Left Behind Orientations
        Individuals seeking training as an option of enhancing their marketable skills are offered an opportunity to
        invest in the State No Worker Left Behind (NWLB) Initiative, a three year program implemented in August
        2007, the purpose of which is to enable individuals that seek training to access any one of a number of local
        workforce development programs, including the adult and dislocated worker programs supported by the
        Workforce Investment Act (WIA).

           The process is initiated by an individual expressing an interest in training. They are offered the opportunity
           to attend an orientation that provides specific information on the No Worker Left Behind Initiative,
           including eligibility requirements, eligible training and training institutions, process for submitting an
           application for Federal Financial Student Aid (FFSA) through the community colleges or other training
           institution, etc.

           Individuals that continue to pursue their interest in this option, and complete the required follow-up steps,
           are received by a local case manager and processed through the activities described below.

     C. Intensive Services
        Individuals referred from core services must meet certain eligibility criteria for adults or dislocated workers.
        Intensive services will be provided to eligible individuals who require more assistance in obtaining
        employment than is allowed for within core services alone. The MWA staff providing intensive services and
        Employment Services staff providing core services jointly make the determination of this level of need.

           Eligibility and Registration
           Registration is required in order to receive intensive services and will be completed upon referral. That is,
           specific eligibility criteria must be addressed in order to participate in intensive and training services. To
           establish eligibility, an individual must:

           For adults,
           – Meet the definition of an adult (18 or older)
           – Meet applicable selective service requirements
           – Must be unemployed or underemployed, and
           – Have received at least one core service, and
           – Be unable to obtain employment or retain employment that leads to self-sufficiency (employment that
               pays at least the current lower living standard income level (LLSIL)).

           For dislocated workers,
           – Have been terminated or laid off, or has received notice of termination or layoff from employment, and
           – Be eligible for or has exhausted entitlement to unemployment compensation; and
           – Be unlikely to return to a previous industry or occupation, or
           – Be displaced homemakers




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                              PY2007 - PY2009




           Assessment
           The assessment process plays a large part in the selection of training. Assessment results will also be used
           to indicate whether or not the participant would be able to successfully participate in the training option
           selected.

           Assessments are used to establish benchmarks for a number of area and such instruments are chosen by case
           managers based on the specific area in need of additional information. Assessment instruments use for
           selection must meet specific criteria (e.g., standardized, validated, and normed). Assessment instruments
           used include but are not limited to:

           –     The Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) will be used to test reading and math levels

           –     ACT (American College of Testing) WorkKeys ® is used to measure basic skills in the context of work
                 application

           –     Career interests, aptitudes, and values will be measured using the Career Occupational Preferences
                 System (COPS) including the COPS Interest Inventory, the Career Ability Placement Survey (CAPS),
                 which is an aptitude test, and the Career Orientation Placement and Evaluation Survey (COPES), a
                 values measurement

           –     The Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT) will be available to measure an individual’s ability to learn,
                 solve problems, and be trained

           –     The Employee Reliability Inventory (ERI) screening system assesses the work readiness status of
                 participants

           –     ASSET measures reading level, math level, and English skills

           The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area has initiated initial steps for implementing WorkKeys ®
           and KeyTrain as significant assessment supporting developmental resources for the local workforce
           development. The implementation of these resources will be initiated with the WIA youth programs and,
           over time, expanded to other programs.

           Individual Service Strategy
           The individual service strategy developed for each participant, and subsequent updates, document the need
           for training and the basis for assignment into any particular training option. Assessment results, former
           work experience, educational levels, and barriers to employment, along with recent and present efforts at
           finding and retaining employment, will be considered when developing the individual service strategy.
           Customers may be required to participate in additional intensive services prior to being approved for
           training.

           All participants will be assessed using the ACT Work Keys ®, TABE or ASSET, and the COPS system. A
           case manager or case manager assistant will meet individually with participants to jointly develop an
           individual service strategy (ISS). The ISS identifies the participant’s assessment results, work and training
           history, employment interests and goals, appropriate achievement objectives, and the appropriate
           combination of services for the participant to achieve the employment goals.

           Following the development of the ISS, individuals may be referred to training or remain in intensive
           services.



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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                                 PY2007 - PY2009


           Pre-vocational Services
           Short-term prevocational services will be offered through a workshop format. Topics include:

                  –   decision making                             –   communication skills
                  –   applications                                –   positive attitudes
                  –   resumes´                                    –   teamwork skills
                  –   cover letters                               –   diversity awareness
                  –   thank-you letters                           –   problem solving skills
                  –   interviewing skills                         –   conflict resolution
                  –   job sources and leads                       –   time management
                  –   developing a job search plan                –   money management
                  –   attendance and punctuality issues           –   goal setting
                  –   employer expectations                       –   self-esteem


           The purpose of the workshops is to empower participants with the skills required to identify and solve their
           own challenges, develop life skills, identify strengths, to understand the value of stepping-stone job
           opportunities, to create career and life goals, to learn not only how to retain employment but also develop
           skills to advance, and to value life-long learning.

           Counseling, Guidance and Case Management
           Case management is provided to ensure participant progress, to ensure goals and objectives of the
           individual service strategy, to review future needs, and to refer, coordinate and track services provided by
           Michigan Works partners or other community agencies. Case management staff will stress principles of
           self-sufficiency.

           Case management occurs monthly and may be accomplished in person or over the telephone. Counseling
           needs may be identified at this time.

           Counseling services will be available during all phases of participation and include employment and career
           planning and short-term personal counseling for support and problem solving. Counseling services will be
           available to facilitate individual success and often address issues that interfere with services, training, or
           placement. Personal counseling will be offered on a short-term basis and will include referral to appropriate
           community resources for long-term treatment.

           Job Development and Placement Services
           Job development and placement services are available to participants who have successfully completed
           training, are unable to complete training, or who are receiving intensive services only. A job search
           roundtable is scheduled weekly to assist participants in the job search process. Case managers or case
           manager assistants also meet individually with participants to assist in job search. All participants are
           introduced to Employment Services as one of their job search resources.

           Retention Services
           Retention services are provided to participants and employers as necessary to assist in the maintenance of
           employment and on-the-job training (OJT) placements. The majority of this assistance will be in the form
           of counseling or case management.

           Follow-up Services
           A minimum of twelve months of follow-up for participants placed in employment is coordinated with the
           MWA services provider for core services.




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                PY2007 - PY2009




     D. Training Services
        Training services are made available to adults and dislocated workers who meet the following criteria
        thresholds:

           –     Have met the eligibility requirements for intensive services
           –     Have received at least one intensive training service and are unable to obtain or retain employment
                 through intensive services alone, and
           –     Have been determined to be in need of training services to achieve their employment objective

           Following compliance with these primary criteria, customers begin the process of identification of training
           services that best address their individual needs. A series of additional criteria is examined at this juncture:

           –     The customer has the qualifications and skills to successfully complete the selected training program,
           –     The chosen training area is in an occupation determined to be in demand in the local area, or in another
                 area to which they are willing to relocate, and
           –     The customer is unable to obtain financial assistance from other sources to pay the cost of their training
                 or requires assistance beyond what is available from other sources.

           As these considerations are satisfied, customer choice is the primary deciding factor in the selection of a
           training provider. Customers are introduced to the state list of certified WIA eligible providers of training
           services and a description of their programs. Performance, cost, and training program information for
           eligible providers is provided when available.

           Participants in training services maintain ongoing contact with the MWA staff through case management
           and counseling services. Case managers or case manager assistants will maintain monthly contact with each
           participant enrolled in training. Contact may be over the telephone, or in person. The training site or the
           customer may initiate additional contact.

           The individual service strategy is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary. Attendance and grade
           report information is secured from the training institution. Case management sessions are conducted before
           the beginning of each new semester or session.

           When participants are nearing the completion of training, or if they find it necessary to end training before
           completion, they will be contacted by a case manager or case manager assistant who will conduct short-term
           prevocational training, lead a job search roundtable, and assist in job development and job placement.
           Retention services will be made available to training sites, OJT employers, employers, and participants.

           A range of training services is available in the dislocated worker and adult services program:
           – occupational skills training
           – on-the-job training
           – programs that combine workplace training with related instruction
           – training programs provided by the private sector
           – skill upgrading and retraining
           – entrepreneurial training
           – job readiness training
           – dislocated worker education and literacy activities, and
           – customized training (as needed)




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                PY2007 - PY2009


           It is anticipated that the large majority of training resources will be focused in the area of occupational skills
           training. A limited number of on-the-job training (OJT) resources are anticipated. Other options are
           considered on a case-by-case basis. It is not anticipated that customized training will be implemented during
           the transition year.

           Occupational Skills Training
           The primary goal of occupational training is to provide customers with marketable job-specific skills to
           enable them to obtain entry-level employment in occupations of their choice and provide for the maximum
           opportunity for the advancement to high-wage, high-skill occupations.

           The Individual Training Account (ITA) and Voucher System will be used to issue ITA Vouchers to state-
           certified eligible training providers identified through the Michigan Career Education Consumer Report
           System (CECR). The Workforce Development Board has established a number of conditions that will
           provide for the effective and efficient management of the ITA system (See Attachment B, “Summary of
           Workforce Development Policies”, Policy number 13, Individual Training Account System”). The No
           Worker Left Behind Initiative will be managed through the use of this system, which has been modified to
           conform to NWLB guidelines.

           On-the-Job Training (OJT)
           Training given to an individual while on the job, in the public or private sector, is the program's working
           definition of on-the-job training. The participant is hired first by the employer and is then trained for
           specific occupational skills or skill levels not previously acquired. Training occurs while the participant is
           engaged in productive work.

           The employer may be reimbursed for extraordinary costs of training. The amount of reimbursement, up to a
           maximum equivalent of fifty percent (50%) of beginning level hourly wage rate, is using the skill
           requirements identified through the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) and the skills possessed
           by the participant.

           Training for which reimbursement is offered may not exceed six (6) months in duration for any individual
           participant. The training period is reduced from this maximum level depending on the skill level of the
           participant and the specific entry-level skill requirements of the job.

           In addition to employer reimbursements for OJT, employers may be reimbursed for actual cost incurred for
           approved classroom training not normally provided to employees. The Workforce Development Board
           guidelines pertaining to the use of OJT provides the mechanism for managing the activity to ensure its
           compliance with program guidelines (See Attachment B, “Summary of Workforce Development Policies”,
           Policy number 12, “On-the-Job Training”)

     E. Individual Training Account (ITA) System
        ITA System Process
        The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area’s ITA System includes the identification of occupational
        areas for which trained workers are needed (based on occupational demand and/or specific growth industry
        in the Kalamazoo-Michigan Works Area), identification of eligible providers through whom training may
        be provided, and identification of cost and performance of each eligible provider in the area of chosen
        training. The ITA System will incorporate several features to assure quality training is received.

           Agencies and organizations will submit applications to the state’s designated agent for inclusion on the
           State Eligible Provider List (Career Education Consumer Report [CECR]). The completed application
           information is reviewed and approved by the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency. The WIA
           Eligible Provider Application includes:


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           –     Description of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works System including the Individual Training
                 Account (ITA) System.

           –     Initial Eligibility Application. Required information:
                       Description of area of training
                       Performance information
                       Cost information

           –     Subsequent Eligibility Renewal. Required information for all students (general public and WIA
                 participants) in each program of training:
                  Program completion rate of all students, and
                  Percent who obtained unsubsidized employment, and
                  Percent who obtained unsubsidized employment in occupational field related to program of
                      training, and
                  Wage at placement in employment of all individuals participating in the applicable program, and

           –     For WIA participants only, in each program of training:
                  Percent who completed training and who are placed in unsubsidized employment, and
                  Retention rates in employment 6 months after placement in employment, and
                  Wages 6 months after placement in employment, and
                  (As appropriate) Rate of licensure or certification, attainment of degree or equivalent or other
                     measure(s) of skill attainment.

           –     Additional Required Information: Description of Administrative Procedures
                  Description and use of ITAs
                  Processing of ITAs
                  Limitations on ITAs
                  Invoicing and adjustments to expenses
                  Contact personnel
                  Limits of liability

           General Guidelines
           The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board has established operational guidelines
           pertaining to the application of ITAs in the local Michigan Works System:

           –     Value: The value of any individual ITA is $5,000 per year with a maximum of $10,000 for 2-years
                 (established by the NWLB program) except in extreme cases that will be evaluated on a case-by-case
                 basis for a waiver. These situations may include:

           –     Allowable Expenses: The ITA Voucher will provide for the cost of selected items relating to training:
                  Tuition
                  Fees required by the training institution and authorized by the Michigan Works Agency
                  Materials and supplies required for the class

           –     Duration: The duration of any ITA Voucher is for a period of one semester, quarter, or equivalent
                 division of training, from the date of issuance of the ITA Voucher. Renewal of the ITA Voucher for
                 each subsequent period of training is based on successful completion of each training period. The total
                 duration for any ITA is two-years. However, while not advisable, this training may be spread over a
                 four-year period starting at the date that training began.




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                              PY2007 - PY2009


                Application: WIA funding through ITA Vouchers may be applied only to skill enrichment or skill
                 training in a program area that leads directly to an occupation in demand or emerging industries in the
                 Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area. Occupational areas meeting this definition are identified
                 in the “Report on Occupational Employment Forecasts” prepared by the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph
                 Michigan Works Agency.

                Priority for training is for programs in high wage, high skill, and high demand areas. The allotment of
                 funds available for individual program ITAs is established annually by the MWA. The Individual
                 Training Account (ITA) System will be managed by the individual program service providers who are
                 determined through a competitive procurement process.

                Exceptions to the ITA System
                 While most skill training needs will be supported through the ITA System, there may be occasions
                 when an alternative training option is developed. These include,

                 a.   On-the-job training may be developed outside of the ITA System.

                 b.   Customized training for groups of eligible participants may also be conducted outside of the ITA
                      system. However, specific commitments to hire training completers are required from an employer
                      or group of employers.

                 c.   Training not supported with funds provided through the Michigan Department of Labor and
                      Economic Growth (e.g., Trade Act, personal payments, financial aid, etc).

           Debit/Commercial Card Options
           The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area is reviewing options for the implementation of a debit
           card system for the management of individual training accounts. This system will not impact the overall
           Individual Training Account System described above other than to provide an alternate process to partner
           with training institutions to expedite the process for the payment of training cost and reporting of the same
           to the state.

           The structure of the debit-card system, which will be initiated in the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA)
           program, has not yet been determined.

     F. Supportive Services
        Supportive services are provided to assist individuals facing specific barriers to securing employment when
        no other resources are available. Individuals eligible for support services are those that are:

           1.    Registered and actively participating in WIA core, intensive, or training service; the ten elements of
                 activity established under the WIA youth program; activities allowed under the Work First program; in
                 a locally administered WIA National Emergency Grant’ or the Trade Act program, and the individual is

           2.    Unable to obtain supportive services through other programs providing such services.

           Locally, supportive services include:
           – Medical and accident insurance
           – Transportation assistance
           – Child care assistance
           – Other reasonable forms of assistance required for successful participation in the program




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                              PY2007 - PY2009


           Information on Support Service Resources
           Within the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works System a significant network of support service
           resources has been established as a result of the significant investment of resources from the Job, Training
           and Employment (JET) program. This network of community resources serves as the basis of resources
           available for supportive services for all workforce development programs within the Michigan Works
           System, including those supported by the Workforce Investment Act.

           Information identifying resources is made available through the community resources directory available at
           each Michigan Works Service Center and through individual MWA staff working with the customers.

           Referral
           Customers are provided guidance in selecting appropriate support services. Referral to community
           resources is arranged by case managers and/or counselors or is provided directly through the support
           services system established within the dislocated worker services program.

           A limited amount of funding for supportive services is available to assist participants in removing barriers
           to acquiring a job when such services are not available from other sources. Based on historical experience
           with similar programs, a significant level of support services is not anticipated. However, the primary focus
           of these resources will be for individuals actively involved in the job seeking activities.

           Limits
           The following limitations are established for supportive services provided for WIA activities:

           –     No more than 15% of an individual WIA programs contract funding budgeted for supportive services,
           –     A maximum amount of $500 for any one supportive service or $1000 per 12-month period for multiple
                 services may be expended on one individual except for specific support services for childcare, where
                 the limit is higher.

           Waivers to the Limitations
           Maximum limitations may be waived by the MWA administrative office or revised for projects serving
           special groups of participants that may have unique needs. Additionally, the MWA supportive service
           system is guided by the Workforce Development Board Supportive Service policies may be revised, as
           necessary, to accommodate situations where multiple waiver request indicate a change may be necessary
           especially those resulting from the implementation of NWLB guidelines.


V. LABOR EXCHANGE SERVICES
   Labor exchange services are available, without cost, to all job seekers and employers. A range of services is
   available for both job seekers and employers. Services are also provided at different levels of intensity.

     A. Self-Service
        These services are provided primarily at designated Michigan Works Service Centers. One-Stop Customer
        Service Representatives are positioned at each Michigan Works Service Center in a highly conspicuous
        location to respond as the initial point of contact. Specifically assigned representatives serve as the initial
        reception of visitors to each service center as well as for telephone contacts, including calls initiated through
        the Michigan Works Toll-free number (1-800-285-WORKS).

           Customer Service Representatives provide assistance both verbally and in written form to facilitate assisting
           inquiries. Information on workforce development services is updated on an ongoing basis as new
           information is received and current information is revised. Staff is provided training in customer service
           through workshops and other available resources and can access community resource information through
           both written and electronic formats.


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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                         PY2007 - PY2009


           Job Seekers and employers visiting or calling the employment services for assistance are informed of the
           most direct means of accessing information and inserting themselves into the “system.” This is performed
           through the introduction to the Michigan Talent Bank (MTB). The MTB is an Internet-based program
           enabling individuals and employers to enter resumes or job orders, “surf” the Internet for available job
           openings and resumes, and access other job search resources.

           Additionally, Michigan Works Service Center site is equipped with a range of hard copy and electronic
           resources in their Resource Centers, all of which are available at the convenience of the job seeker and
           employer. Designated Employment Services Representatives monitor the use of the Resource Centers to
           ensure that adequate resources is available, equipment is in working order, that information is relevant,
           current, and accessible for individuals with disabilities.

     B. Facilitated Access and Mediated Services
        Facilitated labor exchange services are designed to assist job seekers in finding employment by providing
        access and direction on how to use Michigan's Internet-based Talent Bank labor exchange system. It is the
        responsibility of the job seeker to ensure that their registration in Michigan’s Talent Bank system is active.

           Employers are provided access and direction in how to use Michigan's Talent Bank system. This may be
           conducted at the Service Centers or at the employers work site. There are no preconditions for job seekers
           or employers seeking employment services.

           Employment Service staff are assigned the responsibility for providing orientation on the use of the MTB to
           both job seekers and employers. These services include: Providing assistance for initial registrations and for
           updating and/or revising resume and job order information as well as using the technology for search and
           match appropriate job orders and resumes. Most staff is cross-trained to accommodate increased volume of
           customer demand and periodic absence of staff assigned these functions as a primary task.

           1.    Job Seeker Services
                 A full range of basic services are available to job seekers. Additional mediated services are also
                 available for individuals having a need for more intensive assistance. To the extent that Michigan
                 Employment Service Agency policies permit, the MWA Employment Service staff will provide
                 mediated services not provided by qualified MDLEG/BWP staff of which only .80 FTE MDLEG/BWP
                 is assigned to the Kalamazoo/St. Joseph MWA. The range of “facilitated” labor exchange employment
                 services available to job seekers include:

                  –     Computer access to Internet Instruction on use   –   Referral of veterans, individuals with disabilities, and
                        of Michigan’s Talent Bank                            migrant/seasonal farm workers in need of mediated services to a
                  –     Assistance with use of computer, Assistance in       designated MDLEG/BWP worker,
                        development of resume` for the MTB,              –   Information on all workforce development services available
                  –     Assistance with data entry and update,               through the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development
                  –     Accommodations for persons with disabilities,        System.
                        including deaf and deafening persons,

                 Job Search Assistance (Facilitated and Mediated Services)
                 General guidance is provided on the utilization of the MTB system, including the preparation of
                 registration information that accurately describes the customer’s work history, skills and interests, and
                 how to most effectively use the MTB to locate the most appropriate opportunity for the customer.

                 Resource Centers have been upgraded to ensure that information and technology is current. While there
                 are variations between sites, the typical Resource Center will have a number of resources available:
                 Television/VCR with headsets; job search videos; access to copy machine and fax; resume writing
                 software; typing or keyboard software; Internet access; resume books; job search strategy books;
                 Dictionary of Occupational Titles; O*NET 98 CD ROM (Occupational Information Network);
                 Occupational Outlook Handbook; Michigan Manufacturers Directory, financial aid information, etc.
                 and the Michigan Career Portal found at www.michigan.gov/careers.




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                 Job Search Workshops (Mediated Services)
                 Job Search Workshops are available for customers desiring to “dig deeper” into the job search process.
                 While actual schedules for job search workshops may vary depending on customer interest (this service
                 is optional for customers), At least six hours of classroom training/workshops are offered weekly and
                 encompass at least six hours of classroom training addressing a number of critical areas, a few of which
                 include:

                      Job Search Strategies                       Resume` and Employment Letter Writing     Applications and Interviewing
                      Recognizing skills and abilities            Why use a resume`                         Being prepared
                      Determining what type of job you want       The structure of a resume`                This is your time to shine
                      How to find job leads                       Preparing a resume`                       Having the right attitude
                      Making the contact                          Cover, follow-up and /thank you letters   Dressing for success

                 Job seekers requiring assessment/testing, employment counseling, federal bonding assistance,
                 referral to training, etc., are assisted with general information on the availability of services and, as
                 necessary, referred to MDLEG/BWP Counselor for additional services which may be restricted to be
                 provided by qualified MDLEG/BWP staff. The MWA Employment Service sites provide job seekers
                 with pretest information made available by the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth.
                 One MDLEG/BWP Counselor is assigned part-time (.80 FTE) to Kalamazoo County and is available
                 for supplemental services for St. Joseph County.

                 Workers in Transition (Mediated Services)
                 Individuals dislocated from employment due to business closure or other layoff situations have access
                 to additional services through two primary sources: WIA Title I Core Services and WIA Intensive
                 Services. An essential component for assisting workers in transition is the participation of the MWA
                 Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Agency, Michigan Works Agency, and Dislocated
                 Worker Project staff in Rapid Response efforts.

                 The four agencies noted above, and depending on their availability, a representative of the Michigan
                 Department of Labor and Economic Growth Rapid Response Unit will respond immediately to
                 situations where notification is received of business closures or substantial layoffs. Following an initial
                 meeting between the employer and the MWA, UIA and, MDLEG, subsequent informational exchanges
                 are considered with participation of the four primary agencies and with business management, union
                 and employee representatives, and group meetings with employees. As appropriate, staff responsible
                 for Trade Act Assistance is available to assist.

           2.    Employer Services
                 There are no preconditions for employers requesting Wagner-Peyser Employment Services. Basic
                 labor exchange employment services are available to all employers:

                 –    Employers are provided access and direction in how to use Michigan's Talent Bank system. This
                      may be conducted at the Service Centers or at the employer’s work site
                 –    Assistance with use of computer, if necessary
                 –    Assistance in development, update and removal of job orders for the MTB, including direct entry
                      of employer data for employers, if necessary
                 –    Assistance with data entry and update including entering searches for employers and download,
                      print, and fax unqualified searches of qualified applicants
                 –    Distribution and collection of employer job applications
                 –    Posting of casual/day labor openings and state, county, local civil service job openings at the
                      MWSC
                 –    Employer eligibility to tax credit resources (Worker Opportunity Tax Credit Program, etc.)
                 –    Information on all workforce development services available through the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph
                      Workforce Development System

                 Services requiring a more intensive interaction of MWA Employment Services staff may, from time-to-
                 time, be limited do to funding limitations.


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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                              PY2007 - PY2009



                 Employment Service staff identified as representatives for the Rapid Response Team are assigned the
                 responsibility for participating with employers and other workforce development organizations in
                 events where employers are in need of a significant recruiting efforts.

                 Depending on the nature and scope of the worker needs, recruitment efforts will vary in intensity.
                 Based on current activity, worker recruitment assistance may take the form of: specialized searches on
                 the MTB, other resources; conduct of specialized Career Fairs; and, the solicitation and coordination of
                 assistance of local and regional Michigan Works Agencies, Workforce Development Boards, partners
                 of the local Michigan Works Systems, Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth, and
                 other workforce development agencies including secondary and post-secondary education and training
                 resources.

     C. Unemployment Insurance (UI) Work Test
        The Unemployment Agency refers UI Claimants to Employment Services for assistance in meeting their UI
        work-test requirements through registration of their résumés in the MTB and through periodic updates. The
        UA referral card is stamped and the initial MTB registration is printed, stamped and certified by designated
        BWP staff.

           UI Work-test Verification. The certified registration and referral card(s) are delivered to the designated UA
           office contact in accordance with a schedule established by the state UA, currently at the end of each
           workday. (This process has occasionally been modified by the state and is currently under review for
           additional refinement.) Also, UI claimants who visit Employment Service sites to update their résumés may
           have this activity confirmed with the Unemployment Agency (UA) to ensure continued eligibility for
           unemployment insurance.

           Work-test Compliance Monitoring. One component of the UI work-test activity is the monitoring of job
           seeker activity to ensure compliance with the available and seeking work requirement. While the MTB
           system is currently limited in how job search activity may be monitored, a number of ancillary procedures
           are available to conduct a minimum level of oversight, including letters from employers indicating a job
           seeker’s refusal of employment. With a non-compliance situation, ES staff completes the required
           MDLEG/BWP report form and transmits the same to the local UA contact.

     D. Interstate and Intrastate Clearance Orders
        Interstate and Intrastate Clearance Orders are processed by MWA ES staff in accordance with the
        procedures identified in the ES Manual. Designated MWA ES staff is assigned responsibility for this
        function to ensure prompt and accurate processing.

     E. Administration of the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA)
        To enhance the quality of services provided to customers eligible for TAA, designated Employment
        Services staff is trained to assist workers adversely affected by foreign competition. Michigan Works Area
        Dislocated Worker Program staff also receives training on the unique aspects of this program and any
        employer-specific projects supported through WIA National Emergency Grants.

           Employment Services staff providing core services to the dislocated worker population determine the
           eligibility of individuals for TAA training. As they are determined eligible, referral is made to the
           Dislocated Worker Services Program for registration and further assistance.




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                               PY2007 - PY2009


           A range of re-employment services is available for workers who have been determined as qualified for TAA
           services. Re-employment services available include:

           –   TAA employer certification                         –   On-the-Job Training
           –   Employment Registration                            –   Classroom Training
           –   Employment Counseling                              –   Self-Directed Job Search
           –   Vocational Testing                                 –   Job Search Allowances, and
           –   Job Development                                    –   Relocation Allowances.
           –   Supportive Services


     F. Local Employment Service Complaint System
        Job seekers and employers have access to a process to address disputes. The Michigan Bureau of
        Workforce Programs establishes the protocol through the Employment Service Manual. The Employment
        Service Complaint System has remedies at both the local and state level. To ensure proper application of the
        local ES Complaint Process designated MWA ES staff has been assigned this responsibility.

           The process incorporates multiple levels of review, by line and management level staff, prior to forwarding
           cases to the state. All attempts are made to resolve any dispute at its earliest point. However, whenever a
           complaint is put into a written format, the ES Complaint Process is set into motion.

           All issues which may fall under the purview of the local ES Complaint Process are directed to the
           designated ES staff. Situations in need of review are processed in accordance with the protocol and
           timeframe provided in the Employment Service Manual. These procedures are different from those provided
           by the Workforce Development Board and take precedent over the Workforce Development Board
           Grievance and Complaint procedures.

     G. Fidelity Bonding
        Fidelity bonding assistance is provided where employers have identified this as a requisite for employment.
        Designated MWA ES staff is assigned this process to ensure prompt service and full compliance with ES
        procedures.

     H. Veterans’ Priority
        In accordance with the priority established by the Jobs for Veterans Act, Public Law 107-288, all
        individuals registering for employment services are asked to indicate their veteran status. Registrants that
        have indicated a veteran status are immediately “flagged.” Veterans are assisted with initial registration
        service and advised orally and in written form of additional services available to them, including preference
        in referral to training and employment opportunities.

           One (1) MDLEG/BWP Veterans Representative is assigned part time (.80 FTE) in the MWA serving both
           Kalamazoo and St. Joseph Counties. Procedures for referral of veterans to the MDLEG/BWP qualified staff
           vary from site to site based on the preferences of the LVER/DVOP at the respective site. However, the
           general procedures include the following:

           –     Information is posted in conspicuous places within the Service Center of the additional services
                 available to veterans, including priority in vocational guidance, training, and job placement services in
                 accordance with the order of priority established by law and the availability of a Veterans Employment
                 Representative.

           –     Each individual entering the Service Center for employment services is asked of their veteran status in
                 the context that additional services and priorities are available for veterans.

           –     Each individual indicating a veteran status are provided with written information of the services
                 available to veterans (in addition to those available to the general public) and the name of the
                 Employment Services Veteran’s Representative at the Service Center site.



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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                              PY2007 - PY2009


           –     If desired by the veteran, a direct referral is made to the Employment Services Veterans Representative
                 in accordance with the procedures provided by the respective Employment Services Veterans
                 Representative.

           –     The Employment Services representatives, in consultation with the ESA veteran’s representative,
                 would coordinate the provision of additional facilitated and mediated services.

VI. Rapid Response Activities
    The MWA service provider for the dislocated worker program, Michigan State AFL-CIO Human Resource
    Development, Inc. (HRDI), is the designated agent to coordinate with state and local agencies to ensure that
    Rapid Response activity is provided as needed. The service provider serves as a primary local contact for the
    Rapid Response Team, which is a group of workforce development system agencies (Michigan Works partner
    agencies) that assist individual employers who have announced substantial layoffs or plant closures. The local
    Rapid Response Team consists of representatives from:

     –     MDLEG, Bureau of Workforce Programs (BWP) Workforce Consultant
     –     MWA Dislocated Worker Program designee
     –     The Michigan Works Agency, as appropriate
     –     Michigan Works System, Employment Services
     –     Michigan Unemployment Agency Rapid Response representative, as available during the process
     –     Community College, as appropriate
     –     Business Services Team Representative

     When notice of a plant closure or business/industry layoff or shutdown is received, a range of general
     procedures guide the Rapid Response Team activities. As individual layoff announcements do not follow a
     prescribed format, the following procedures are adequately flexible to be modified to fit the specific layoff
     situations:

     –     Within a 48-hour period following notification of a layoff/shutdown, a Workforce Consultant from the
           BWP and the local Rapid Response Coordinator will make personal contact with the business to obtain key
           data and information. The BWP Workforce Consultant will take the lead role in making this contact.

           If 50 or more workers will be impacted, the Workforce Consultant and the employer will also determine a
           mutually agreeable date for a rapid response meeting. If less than 50 workers are impacted, the local Rapid
           Response Coordinator and the employer will determine a mutually agreeable date for a rapid response
           meeting.

            If employees are covered by a collective bargaining agreement, the local union officials will also be
           contacted by the WC regarding organized labor’s participation in the RR meeting.

     –     The Rapid Response Team, including agencies most likely to be involved in providing services, prepares a
           presentation to any employer of a proposed program offering which would include: include information on
           employment services (including the Michigan Talent Bank), the Governor’s NWLB initiative (which
           includes dislocated worker services); and Trade Adjustment Assistance information; the option for
           development of a joint adjustment committee; a pre-layoff assistance package; and availability of financial
           resources from state and dislocated worker projects.

           UIA presentations at RR meetings will include information on filing for unemployment benefits, the
           MARVIN system, eligibility requirements, and training waivers. The UIA representatives will provide
           appropriate fact sheets and unemployment benefit booklets.




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                 PY2007 - PY2009


           A parallel service is established to deliver services to employers who are expanding and require additional
           training for current employees or who need additional trained workers.

VII. FUND ALLOCATION PROCESS
     A. Allocation of Workforce Investment Act Funds
        The Workforce Investment Act enables adults and dislocated workers to be served without regard to pre-
        defined eligibility requirements. However, local WDBs must address other considerations. These include:

           –     Economic and labor market conditions within the region, and
           –     The increased the number of individual’s participating in services at the One-Stop Centers as a result of
                 the No Worker Left Behind initiative.

           Because of these factors it has determined that when current obligations of training funds are at 95% of the
           total funding available for training, that the remaining training funds are not adequate to support program
           services to all adults without adversely impacting on the level of service to those who are low-income or
           public assistance recipients. This applies only to the WIA Adult program.

           Therefore, in situations where funding may be determined to be “limited”, the following priorities have
           been established for the WIA Adult program:

           –     Individuals that are recipients of public assistance
           –     Other low income individuals (i.e., at 70% of the Lower Living Standard Income Level (LLSIL))
           –     Individuals who are “underemployed”. Underemployed is defined as one that is employed full or part-
                 time, but whose family income is less than $40,000. This priority is established by the No Worker Left
                 Behind Initiative

           These priorities impact local formulas that allocates workforce development resources between individual
           programs and activities within those programs. The formulas incorporate flexibility into the distribution of
           adult and dislocated worker funds to its various service components.

           Based on these considerations, the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board has established
           the following guidelines for the allocation of Workforce Investment Act resources received for the MWA:

           1.    “Core Services”, including basic labor exchange employment services, will be supported substantially
                 by the amount allocated to the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area as program funds under
                 the Wagner-Peyser Act (section 7(a)). Additional resources are provided through the WIA Adult and
                 Dislocated allocations with between 10% and 15% of the program funds assigned to core services.

           2.    “Intensive Services” and “Training” fund allocations are derived from the amount of funds remaining
                 for program activities after an amount is allocated for “Core Services.” A determination of the
                 allocation between the two activities is established during each solicitation period and is dictated by
                 customer need and program design.

                 Depending on available funds, anticipated level of participant activity in training activities the share of
                 funds for Training Services will range between 20%-40%. The balance, 45%-70%, is assigned for
                 Intensive Services. This ratio may vary between adult and dislocated program designs. Priority for
                 customers accessing these services includes:




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Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                PY2007 - PY2009


                 Adults (including dislocated workers) eligible to receive “Intensive Services” shall meet specified
                 criteria, including:
                 a. Meet any federal or state criteria for access to this level of service,
                 b. Have an objective of obtaining employment,
                 c. Unable to achieve that objective through Core Services, and
                 d. Have multiple barriers to achieving employment (such as economically disadvantaged, less than a
                      high school education, limited English speaking, or a disability that serves as a barrier to
                      employment).
                 e. Priority is given to adults with low family incomes (i.e., 70% of the lower living standard income
                      level (LLSIL)).
                 f. Underemployed individuals (i.e., individuals that are employed full or part-time, but whose family
                      income is less than $40,000)

                 Adults eligible to receive “Training” shall meet the criteria specified for access to “Intensive Services”
                 as well as other criteria:
                 a. Meet any federal or state criteria for access to this level of service,
                 b. Unable to achieve the objective of obtaining employment through “Intensive Services”, and
                 c. Meet NWLB criteria.

     B. Procurement Process
        The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area Procurement System encompasses the procurement of
        goods and services required for the operation of the Michigan Works System. All procurements conducted
        with funds provided to the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works System are required to be conducted in
        such a manner as to ensure free and open competition.

           All service providers receiving grants or contracts from the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency
           must comply with the procurement policies, rules and regulations promulgated by the state and/or federal
           government for the state and/or federal funds assigned to the Michigan Works System. This includes, but is
           not limited to:

           –     The establishment of written procurement standards that comply with state and/or federal requirement
                 applicable for the programs covered under the respective grants and contracts

           –     Establishment of property control and record management procedures that comply with state and/or
                 federal requirements

           –     Establishment of procedures that address “Standards of Conduct,” “Conflict of Interest” and
                 discrimination and apply to all procurement decisions

           Administrative Responsibility
           Maintenance and implementation of these guidelines and the procurement system shall be the responsibility
           of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency. These responsibilities include, but are not
           necessarily limited to:

           –     Identification and maintenance of a local list of WIA Eligible Providers as defined in Section 122 of
                 the Workforce Investment Act of 1998

           –     The identification and maintenance of a list of pre-approved service providers not otherwise identified
                 as eligible providers for WIA training


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           –     Conduct procurements for services through the use of competitive procurement process such as
                 Request for Proposals (RFPs), Request for Quotes (RFQs), etc.

           These policies apply to training that may be procured under the “procedures for exceptions” as previously
           identified under “Individual Training Account (ITA) System.”

           Standards of Conduct
           A strict standard of conduct policy is incorporated in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works
           “Procurement and Property Management System.” The policy reflects State guidelines for “Standards of
           Conduct” and “Conflict of Interest.” The policy is applicable to members of the Workforce Development
           Board, Michigan Works Agency and Michigan Works providers receiving funds through the Michigan
           Works System. (See Attachment B, “Summary of Workforce Development Policies”, Policy 6,
           “Procurement Standards”)

     C. Allocation of Wagner-Peyser (Employment Service) Funds
        Employment services for job seekers are supported, in large measure, through federal Wagner-Peyser funds.
        These funds are allocated to each Michigan Works System for the purpose of providing employment
        services to employers and job seekers through the Michigan Works Service Centers. Employment Services
        funding is designated for two types of service:

           1.    Wagner-Peyser Employment Services
                 Wagner-Peyser funds support basic labor market exchange (employment Services) activities for
                 individuals and employers services for the general public – employers and job seekers.

                 Wagner-Peyser funds are appropriated to Kalamazoo-St. Joseph according to the specific formula
                 allocation:

                 –    50% based on the local area's share of the state's average civilian labor force during the previous
                      year and
                 –    50% of the local area's share of the state's average number of unemployed persons during the
                      previous year

                 All Wagner-Peyser employment services will be available at no cost to job seekers and employers.

                 Kalamazoo-St. Joseph restricts administrative cost for Wagner-Peyser funds to 15% of the total
                 allocation to the MWA.

           2.    Local Support of State Employment Services Employees
                 Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth/Bureau of Workforce Programs
                 (MDLEG/BWP) staff are assigned to Employment Service sites for the purpose of providing mediated
                 services to job seekers and employers. Mediated services are those that may be required beyond the
                 basic public labor exchange employment services provided by MWA Employment Services staff.

                 Each Employment Services site provides space, logistical support, and functional supervision for
                 MDLEG/BWP workers assigned to their locations. Assignment of MDLEG/BWP worker activity as
                 on-site or itinerant staff is established by the Employment Services provider(s), based on the volume of
                 job seeker and employer activity.

     D. Trade Adjustment Assistance Funds
        Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) funds support workforce development services for individuals
        qualifying for training services under the provisions of the Trade Adjustment Act.


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                                                                  SECTION II

                                           Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area
                                               Workforce Investment Act of 1998
                                                Two-Year Services Plan for Youth


I.   LOCAL VISION AND GOALS FOR YOUTH SERVICES UNDER THE WIA

     A. Vision and Strategic Workforce Development Goals
        The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board will continue to design service strategies for
        youth under the Workforce Investment Act as are currently provided. These strategies support the Board’s
        “vision” for youth programming which is:

           –     To expand educational choices available to young adults,
           –     To ensure that a “career preparation” philosophy is an integral part of our educational system,
           –     To increase involvement of the private sector and other community organizations,
           –     To establish a system of accountability to ensure consistent high quality of activities and services , and
           –     To provide technical and work behavior skills for success in a career of choice and lifelong learning

           Implementing a program design that embodies this vision is critical. Promoting education/job training
           partnerships designed to increase the number of youth entering the labor market who are able to
           demonstrate basic academic and personal skills required for workforce success is imperative. To attain these
           goals several strategies are in place:

           –     The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board and the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan
                 Works Agency (MWAs) will jointly work with employers, educational institutions, and other agencies
                 to ensure that skills attained by youth, as a result of participation in employment and training programs,
                 are consistent with the requirements of employers for workforce success.

           –     The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board will increase the role of private employers
                 in the planning, development, and evaluation of publicly-funded education and employment training
                 programs.

           –     The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency and local MWA Partners will review data and
                 information to deliver expanded services to target groups, while ensuring that basic services are
                 available to all eligible persons. Strategies will be jointly developed to improve program quality.

     B. Strategy for Streamlining and Enhancing Services and Accessibility
        1. Collaboration
            The current youth service system in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area is able to meet
            the customer and economic needs of youth, primarily because the system has a long history of
            collaboration with vocational rehabilitation, secondary and post-secondary education, adult education,
            and vocational education. This collaboration is made possible because of the long-standing, positive
            working partnerships that have been developed and maintained between the Michigan Works Agency
            and local agencies and organizations. These include the Kalamazoo Valley and Glen Oaks Community
            Colleges, Kalamazoo Regional Educational Services Agency, St. Joseph County Intermediate School
            District, the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Education Advisory Group, and a variety of other local community
            and educational agencies.



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     C. Eligible Customers
        The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Service Center System is designed to provide a range of core
        services to the population in general – job seekers and employers – regardless of age. However, customers
        meeting specific criteria can access a range of additional services under the Workforce Investment Act.
        Customers for whom the additional Workforce Investment Act services will be available include:

           –     Youth who are between 14-21 years of age;
           –     Youth who are low income, as defined in the WIA Section 101(25);
           –     Youth with significant barriers to employment; and
           –     Youth with one or more of the following:
                 1. Deficient in basic literacy skills;
                 2. School dropout;
                 3. Homeless, runaway, or foster child;
                 4. Pregnant or parenting;
                 5. Offender; or
                 6. Is an individual (including youth with a disability) who requires additional assistance to complete
                    an educational program, or to secure and hold employment (as determined necessary by the WDB.
                    See “Target Group for Youth Eligibility” below).

           At a minimum, the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area ensures that at least 40 percent of the
           expenditures on youth are for “out-of-school” youth. That is, individuals 14-21 years of age, who are low-
           income, have dropped out of school, or have graduated from a high school or hold a GED, but are basic-
           skills deficient, underemployed or unemployed.

           Target Group for Youth Eligibility
           The Workforce Investment Act provides opportunity for the State to define the sixth youth eligibility
           criterion, “when a youth requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or secure and
           hold employment.” The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board has not established
           additional criteria in response to this option.

           However, the WIA youth program is investing additional funds to assist youth that are currently involved in
           the judicial system. Strategies have been established to provide these participants with a range of services
           described herein, but at significantly higher levels of intensity. This includes a substantial investment in
           extensive one-on-one activity between Case Managers and individual youth.

     D. Awarding of Grants and Contracts
        The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area Procurement System encompasses the procurement of
        goods and services required for the operation of the Michigan Works System. All procurements conducted
        with funds provided to the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works System are required to be conducted in
        such a manner as to ensure free and open competition.

           All service providers receiving grants or contracts from the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency
           must comply with the procurement policies, rules and regulations promulgated by the state and/or federal
           government for the state and/or federal funds assigned to the Michigan Works System. This includes, but is
           not limited to:

           1.    The establishment of written procurement standards that comply with state and/or federal requirement
                 applicable for the programs covered under the respective grants and contracts.




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           2.    Establishment of property control and record management procedures that comply with state and/or
                 federal requirement applicable for the programs covered under the respective grants and contracts.

           3.    Establishment of procedures that address “Standards of Conduct”, “Conflict of Interest” and
                 discrimination that will apply to all procurement decisions.

           Administrative Responsibility
           Maintenance and implementation of these guidelines and the procurement system shall be the responsibility
           of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency. These responsibilities include, but are not
           necessarily limited to:

           1.    Identification and maintenance of a local list of WIA Eligible Providers as defined in Section 122 of
                 the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

           2.    The identification and maintenance of a list of pre-approved service providers not otherwise identified
                 as Eligible Providers for WIA training.

           3.    Procurement for services through the use of competitive process such as Request for Proposals (RFPs).

           Standards of Conduct
           A strict standard of conduct policy is incorporated in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works
           “Procurement and Property Management System”. The policy reflects State guidelines for “Standards of
           Conduct” and “Conflict of Interest”. The policy is applicable to members of the Workforce Development
           Board, Michigan Works Agency or Michigan Works providers receiving funds through the Michigan
           Works System.

     E. One-Stop Service Centers
        Another key strength is the number of partners within each Michigan Works Service Center (MWSC)
        System. Co-location and collaboration among partner agencies and the workforce development program has
        increased the effectiveness of the local workforce system, including youth program strategies. To the extent
        feasible, each one-Stop Service Center houses youth program workers and representatives. However, due to
        the volume of participants and variety of service options available for youth, direct services are provided at
        locations other than the One-Stop Service Centers.

           Notwithstanding the strengths described above, there remain several challenges that are addressed on an
           ongoing basis:

           –     Limited points of transition between K-12 and community colleges,
           –     A lack of guidance counselors to provide career counseling, and
           –     Identification of out-of-school youth.

           The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area employs several strategies to address these areas.

           –     Enhancing the involvement of community colleges through the Michigan Works Service Centers,
                 initiating direct involvement between secondary education and community colleges in the development
                 of protocol for the articulation of Career and Technical Education classes, and through the involvement
                 of the career preparation system in the development of M-TEC training.




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           –     Enhancing the connection and involvement of guidance counselors to provide career counseling is
                 important. With the expansion in the number of youth seeking assistance, Michigan’s Service Center
                 operators are finding it difficult to serve everyone, especially those customers requiring extensive
                 assistance.

           –     To identify and recruit out-of-school youth, the MWA uses a variety of means, such as:
                 a. Identify eligible youth through Michigan’s Department of Human Services listings and direct mail
                     notification of available funding for workforce training services,
                 b. Coordinate with community colleges to identify and contact recipients of Pell Grants
                 c. Place newspaper ads and special inserts describing available services,
                 d. Develop and expand work-based learning experience opportunities with employers,
                 e. Increase coordination with high schools to identify dropouts and with Employment Services to
                     identify young displaced workers; and
                 f. Develop continuum of services for additional training for youth receiving a high school diploma or
                     GED, but who lack essential basic workplace skills, or are underemployed or unemployed

           Strategies incorporated in this Plan enable participants acquire the “soft skills” needed to expand and
           enhance an individual’s employment experience and/or job readiness. These include, but are not limited to,
           those described later in this document. These program strategies are directed towards the improvement of
           participants’ family income level, ensuring long-term retention in unsubsidized jobs, and enabling
           participants to progress on their career ladders.


II. STRATEGIES FOR SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT
    Customer satisfaction and continuous improvement of the workforce development service system for youth are
    critical. The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board and the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan
    Works staff evaluate performance of youth programs. Information, including performance reports, provided by
    current providers of youth services and management information system reports from the MDLEG permit a
    continuous review of local youth program performance.

     The review of performance on an ongoing basis allows constant assessment and reinforcement of the strategic
     direction of the system. Members of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board are directly
     involved in regularly-scheduled evaluations of all workforce development service providers including those
     serving youth. (See Section I, Adult and Dislocated Worker Program, subsection IIA (page 10). “Quality
     Management of Service Providers”)

     Current Workforce Development Board policy calls for the full engagement of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph
     Education Advisory Group in a more active role for reviewing and evaluating youth services within the
     Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works System. The WDB (serving as the Youth Council) is also charged with
     assisting in this role.

     A. Workforce Development Board/Youth Council Strategies
        The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board continues to work with employers, educational
        institutions, and other agencies to ensure that the skills attained by youth and adults, as a result of
        participation in employment and training programs, are consistent with workforce success requirements of
        employers. Such skills have been identified locally by the Workforce Development Board as the
        “Workplace Know-How Skills Needed to be Productive”.




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           Further, the Michigan Works Service Center (MWSC) System will continue to promote education/job
           training partnerships designed to increase the number of youth entering the labor market who are able to
           demonstrate basic academic and personal skills required for success in the workforce.

           As a measure of ensuring that youth have access to the maximum services available, the Kalamazoo-St.
           Joseph Workforce Development Board established the WDB as the Youth Council.

           1.    Membership
                 – All Private Sector representatives
                 – One Economic Development representative
                 – One Labor representative
                 – One Community-Based Organization (CBO) representative
                 – One Rehabilitation representative
                 – Workforce Development Board
                 – Youth Service Agencies
                 – Juvenile Justice System
                 – Law Enforcement Agencies
                 – Organizations Representing youth
                 – Local Housing Authority
                 – Parents of Eligible Youth
                 – Youth (including former participants)
                 – Local Job Corp

           2.    Functions
                 – Identification of local youth services and any gaps in youth programs.
                 – Provide recommendations for the development of youth strategies for the youth portion of the WIA
                    Two-Year Strategic Plan.
                 – Recommend youth service providers to the Workforce Development Board
                 – Provide oversight of programs and activities funded through the Workforce Development Board
                    including on-site visits to programs
                 – Develop portions of youth plan
                 – Conduct oversight of youth activities
                 – Conduct oversight of eligible youth service providers
                 – Provide recommendations to WDB/EAG
                 – Coordinate youth service activities (WIA)
                 – Strategic Plan for Career Development (Youth)

     B. Coordination of Comprehensive Youth Services
        1. Assisting Youth with Special Needs with targeted strategies (See Subsection V.C., “Targeted Group for
           Youth Eligibility)
        2. Michigan Rehabilitation Services will assist any youth with disabilities
        3. Pregnant or parenting youth are assisted with referrals to various local agencies

     Job Corp, Youth Opportunity Grants, and Other Youth Resources
     The Kalamazoo St- Joseph Michigan Works Service Centers provide comprehensive services that are available
     to all eligible youth. Programs represented that are a direct benefit to eligible youth include WIA Title I Youth,
     Career and Technical Education, Vocational Rehabilitation services, Adult Education, and to a limited extent
     Wagner-Peyser.




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     While no Job Corps Center is in the Michigan Works Area, ongoing consultation with the Job Corps
     representatives is maintained to enable youth interested in Job Corp options to have access to the program
     representatives and are currently negotiating with the MWA for space at the Kalamazoo Michigan Works
     Service Center. The relationship between the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area and the statewide
     Job Corps program is “formalized” through a Memorandum of Understanding between the two parties.

     Critical to the successful implementation of youth service strategies is identification of a service provider with
     the capabilities of understanding the needs of the target population; to establish appropriate mechanisms to reach
     the population; and provide needed services. Equally important is the ability to work effectively within the
     educational community, with youth oriented community organizations, the judicial system, parents, and the
     Michigan Works System. Youth Opportunities Unlimited (YOU), a division of the Kalamazoo Regional
     Education Service Agency (KRESA), is the service provider for the Workforce Investment Act funded youth
     program for the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area.

     The youth population includes individuals attending school and those who are no longer attending. While the
     services and activities described in this plan are available to all youth, the diversity of the two population groups
     requires different approaches for services planning.

     A much different “package” of services may be assembled for younger and older youth, primarily due to their
     range of accessibility to the labor market and application of Youth Labor Standards. For in-school youth,
     attendance and academic performance is monitored and considered as part of their overall programming.
     Contact with school counselors is an on-going process. Incentives may be available to individual participants as
     a method of recognizing their efforts to maintain or advance in the academic and/or employability areas.

     A wide-range of workforce readiness activity and service resources is available to address the equally diverse
     range of barriers faced by this population in achieving their goals. The service and activity options, supported by
     numerous state and federal programs and local community resources, include:

     Outreach
     Outreach is conducted at area high schools, adult education programs, alternative education programs,
     community centers, the Department of Human Services, the Michigan Works Service Centers and other
     community based organization sites. Targeted outreach is necessary to ensure that a minimum of 40 percent of
     the participants meet the “out-of-school youth” definition.

     Representatives from the youth program are located at the service center to screen applicants, complete
     registration and enrollment for participants, and to provide additional, on-going service to participants.

     The majority of services funded through the Workforce Investment Act are housed at YOU’s primary locations.
     In Kalamazoo County, at 422 E. South Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan and in St. Joseph County, at 222 Enterprise
     Drive, Three Rivers, Michigan. As needed, additional sites maybe established at area schools, adult and
     alternative education sites, human service agencies, juvenile justice system, or other community sites. The YOU
     staff is available at the Michigan Works Service Centers in each county.

     Assessment
     Participants’ progress through a series of events prior to their assignment to any one or group of activities:
     screening, intake, registration, eligibility determination, etc. Once an applicant has been determined eligible, an
     objective assessment will occur. The assessment includes a review of basic skills, prevocational (pre-
     employment) skills, work maturity skills, occupational skills, previous work experience, interest, aptitudes,
     developmental needs, supportive service needs, and barriers to employment. A number of resources are
     available for application during the assessment process:


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     –     Basic skill needs are identified by use of the Michigan Appraisal Test (MAT), ACT WorkKeys or the Test
           of Adult Basic Education (TABE)

     –     Career interest, aptitudes, and values are measured using the Career Occupational Preferences System
           (COPS). This system consists of: the COPS interest inventory, the Career Ability Placement Survey
           (CAPS), which is an aptitude test, and the Career Orientation Placement and Evaluation Survey (COPES), a
           values measurement

     Individualized Service Strategy
     An individualized service strategy (ISS) is developed for each participant. The ISS incorporates assessment
     results, long- and short-term employment goals, further education and training needs, activities and services
     planned to address the needs, necessary referrals, supportive service needs, achievement of specific benchmarks,
     record of incentives or bonuses earned, etc. Assessment results are used to guide development of the
     individualized service strategy.

     In conjunction with ongoing counseling and case management services, the ISS is reviewed with the participant
     during each counseling visit. Achievements are recorded, plan of action reviewed and, as necessary, revisions to
     the ISS are made.

     Preparation for Unsubsidized Employment Opportunities
     Assisting young adults to prepare for employment is accomplished through several components. The primary
     option is through classes, workshops or group sessions. These are conducted on a regularly scheduled basis at
     designated sites several times each week.

     The purpose of the classes or workshops is to empower participants with skills necessary to identify and solve
     their own challenges, to develop life skills, to identify their strengths, to understand the value of stepping stone
     job opportunities, to create their own career and life goals, and to learn not only how to retain employment, but
     the tools to advance to higher levels in their career choice.

     Classes/workshops address a range of prevocational (pre-employment), work maturity, and life skill topics.

     –     Prevocational skills include: career decisions; applications; resumes; cover letters; thank-you letters;
           interviewing skills job sources and leads; and developing a job search plan

     –     Work maturity skills include: attendance and punctuality; employer expectations; communication skills;
           positive attitudes; task completion; teamwork; and diversity training

     –     Life skills include: leadership skills; problem solving skills; decision-making skills; conflict resolution; time
           management; money management; goal setting; self-esteem issues and stress management. A variety of
           resources and activities are available to enhance these experiences:

                Career Exploration using the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), CAPS, COPES and COP
                 System. This is supplemented with speakers from outside agencies and with job shadowing
                 opportunities.

                Financial aid options are identified and explained. Instructions on the manner in which financial aid
                 resources may be located on the Internet and how the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
                 (FAFSA) is completed are components of this class.




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                 --   College Enrollment options are made available using speakers from the community colleges,
                      Western Michigan University, and Davenport University. Tours of campuses and explanations of
                      the availability of varied resources are also used to assist youth participants in planning.

                 --   Michigan Works Service Centers are a source of tours for participants to gain the knowledge of
                      the resources available for job seekers and employers.

                 --   Teamwork Applications include organized events at specialized leadership training sites, such as:
                      YMCA Sherman Lake Camp and Pretty Lake Adventure Camp. These resources serve all levels
                      of business for leadership and teamwork training.

     Work Experience
     Through a number of funding sources, opportunities are provided for participation in work experience activities;
     summer employment; trade apprenticeships; co-ops; and internships. These opportunities are enhanced through
     the resources available within the Michigan Works Service Centers (Michigan Talent Bank) and the individual
     school districts and their resources (Career Pathways, PathFinder, etc.)

     For participants who are not yet ready for unsubsidized employment, paid and unpaid work experience is
     available. Work Opportunity Tax Credits, Youth Registered Apprenticeship Tax credits, and Empowerment
     Zone Tax Credits are incentives to employers to offer paid and unpaid work experience. For high demand
     occupations in Michigan, in-school youth are encouraged to pursue occupational skill training through
     enrollment in WIA Title I youth activities, career and technical education (CTE). For out-of-school youth,
     occupational skill training is an option through dual enrollment in the WIA adult program.

     Tutorial Assistance
     Participants who need additional basic skills or subject area tutoring are referred to their home schools or to
     numerous existing, experienced tutorial programs located throughout the county. These include: Boys and Girls
     Club of Kalamazoo, Douglass Community Association, Hispanic American Council, Salvation Army, Portage
     Community Outreach Center and Deacon’s Conference, School Works, Inc., and others.

     Summer Employment Opportunities
     Employers are recruited to provide summer employment opportunities that focus on academic enrichment and
     provide youth with career outlooks. Because work experience is an integral part of year-round programming for
     youth, only a limited amount of funding is provided during the summer months. Recently local funds have been
     contributed to enhance the availability of the WIA summer activities.

     Dropout Prevention Services
     Dropout prevention is intertwined through each service provided. The tool proven the most effective through
     the years is the award of school credit. Area schools may provide elective school credit for participation in the
     youth programs enabling at-risk students to gain necessary credit needed for graduation. Additionally, tutoring,
     mentoring, and work experience have been shown to be effective tools.

     Alternative secondary schools partner with the MWA service provider to provide options to participants who are
     not succeeding in regular K-12 programming and options to participants who have dropped out of school.

     Night school and GED programs are two viable options. The MWA staff has close working relationships with
     the adult and alternative education programs in the county. Each agency is interested in ensuring that youth
     complete, at a minimum, their high school education.




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     NovaNet is a computer-based, on-line learning system used for credit recovery, tutoring services and G.E.D.
     preparation. It is endorsed nationally and at the state level. Youth are assigned course material by their school
     counselors and work individually on lessons that are self-paced and will be available in the computer lab of the
     service contractor. Youth are scheduled for participation in NovaNet based on the participant’s school and work
     schedule. Youth can earn both elective and required course credits through successful completion of course
     materials.

     Mentoring
     An extensive mentoring network exists in the Michigan Works Area, particularly in Kalamazoo County.

     –     Big Brothers/Big Sisters
     –     YWCA Mentoring Program: Project Mentor
     –     Kalamazoo Area Academic Achievement Program
     –     Kalamazoo Public Education Foundation
     –     Three Rivers Area Mentoring (TRAM) Program
     –     School Works, Inc., and
     –     Kalamazoo Area Mentoring Network.

     When matches are not available within these organizations, appropriate adult family members will be contacted
     for consideration to serve in this capacity.

     Occupational Skill Training
     Limited occupational skill training opportunities are available to eligible youth through a variety of mechanisms:
     Career and technical education (CTE) supported through Perkins III, and dual enrollment options made possible
     through agreements between secondary and post-secondary institutions. Efforts are underway to establish CTE
     classes at the youth program location as a means to enhance access of WIA participants to CTE offerings.

     Further, older youth may access occupational skill training through the WIA Adult program. this requires dual
     enrollment in both the WIA Youth and Adult programs.

     Preparation for Post-Secondary Educational Opportunities
     Youth are offered basic skills enhancement, remediation, counseling, and assistance in applying for financial
     aid, tutoring, and training in study skills. The incorporation of vocational education, adult education, post-
     secondary, and all career and technical services within the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic
     Growth will elevate the coordination in the Michigan Works Systems to a higher level and ensure preparation
     for post-secondary educational opportunities and alternative secondary school services.

     The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Education Advisory Group and Workforce Development Board have taken steps for
     the regional alignment of Carl Perkins III Career and Technical Education (CTE), and Carl Perkins Tech Prep
     (TP).

     Linkages between Academic and Occupational Learning
     The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board, Youth Council and Education Advisory Group will
     work closely with public school career preparation systems to ensure the academic curricula reflects the labor
     market needs of local employers. The practical application of these efforts will be seen within the local
     Education for Employment and Career Preparation Programs within each of the respective counties.

     At least one school district has incorporated entrepreneurship models within the district’s career preparation
     curriculum. This offering will impact grades 7-12.




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                   Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                             PY2007 - PY2009




     Supportive Services
     Minimal funds are available to address supportive service needs related to employment. Creative solutions to
     meet other participant needs are utilized. Information regarding community agencies and resources, including
     the Family Help Book and the Kalamazoo Human services directory, is shared with participants.

     Referrals for supportive services are provided to youth to enable them to participate in activities. This may
     include, but is not limited to, assistance with housing costs, assistance with childcare and dependent care costs,
     and assistance with transportation costs.

     Comprehensive Guidance, Counseling
     Counseling and case management are an on-going process of interaction with the participant. The services are
     available during all phases of participation and include employment and career planning and short-term personal
     counseling for support and problem solving. Participants are contacted on a regular basis to review attendance,
     progress, and the individualized service plan. Counseling and case management are available as needed to
     facilitate individual success.

     Additionally, counseling and service referrals are available for alcohol and drug abuse, domestic violence,
     pregnancy prevention, health education, and any other issues that could potentially interfere with successful
     transitions to employment or post-secondary education or training. However, some restrictions apply for
     individuals requiring drug and/or substance abuse counseling. In situations such as these, only individuals
     having certification in Specialty Program for Drug and Alcohol Abuse (SPADA) may provide counseling
     service. While a limited number of MWA staff possesses this certification, it is anticipated that most individuals
     will be referred to Gateway or Gryphon Place treatment centers.

     Counseling services are offered on an individual and group basis. Participant needs may interfere with services,
     training, or placement. Personal counseling is offered on a short-term basis and will include referral to
     appropriate community resources for long-term treatment. At a minimum, counseling is offered once a month.
     Non-specific summaries of counseling sessions are included in the participant file and, when appropriate, in the
     MIS system.

     Case management is provided during training to ensure participant progress through different phases of training,
     to ensure that the goals and objectives of the individualized service strategy are obtained, to review future needs,
     to refer, coordinate, and track services provided by Michigan Works Partners, or other community agencies.
     Case management teams stress principles of self-sufficiency, including:

     –     Urgency: the time to learn positive life skills and tools to become self-sufficient is now
     –     Ownership: owning one’s own actions, behaviors and consequences
     –     Learn by doing: Self-esteem increases as participants become productive and, with increased self-esteem,
           participants accept risk-taking and target higher goals
     –     Life-long Learning: learning is not a product; it is a process
     –     Motivation: celebrating strengths (growth in self-esteem and confidence, leading to living an independent
           life)

     Case management may occur concurrently with counseling sessions, or as a stand-alone. It will occur, at a
     minimum, monthly. Case management is usually completed on an individual basis.




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                   Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                             PY2007 - PY2009




     Follow-Up Services
     In addition to follow-up which is conducted through case management and counseling contacts, follow-up
     services are provided for 12 months following completion of the program. Contact is made by a case aide a
     minimum of each 60 days following completion. If concerns, questions, and/or problems are identified during
     the follow-up contact, case management and/or counseling contact is scheduled with a case manager or case
     manager assistant. All contacts are documented in the participant file and, when appropriate, in the MIS system.

     Alternative Secondary School Services
     Alternative secondary school services offer core curriculum courses; some offer or provide access to vocational-
     type courses. Most programs conduct some type of an intake interview with each potential student; and, for
     students under the age of 18, some require parents to be present during the interview. As a measure for
     enhancing a focus on alternative secondary school services, two representatives from adult and alternative
     education are members of the Education Advisory Group (EAG) for guidance in this area.

     Leadership Development Opportunities
     Coordination at the MWSCs will create many avenues for youth-oriented leadership training opportunities such
     as mentoring programs, youth volunteer organizations, CBOs, and others. Leadership activities are a significant
     component of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Career Preparation System.

     Performance Payments
     While advancements in achieving specific goals may appear to the general audience as being small, the
     performance gains are actually significant advancements for individual participants. As a matter of encouraging
     continued progress, the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board established a system that
     provides recognition, in the form of monetary rewards, for positive performance. (See Attachment B, Policy 20,
     “Performance Payments”)

     The primary emphasis is payment for achieving academic/employability skills competencies at or above a
     minimum standard. Payment based on attendance is permitted provided attendance: (1) is directly associated
     with an activity that is designed to enhance positive academic/employability skills competencies and (2)
     payment for attendance does not exceed 45% of the total performance payment for the activity.


III. LOCAL PERFORMANCE AND GOALS
     In an effort to ensure that the integrity of the local program is maintained, a number of “internal” goals are
     established:

     –     One hundred percent of participants enrolled are eligible for the program
     –     Case managers and case manager assistants will ensure that accurate and timely documentation of services
           is included in the participant file
     –     Customer satisfaction surveys are given to applicants and participants after initial contacts, mid-way
           through training and after termination
     –     Participants evaluate workshops at the end of each session

     Results of customer satisfaction surveys and workshop evaluations are used to realign services and provide
     better quality services




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                                     Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                                               PY2007 - PY2009


                                                           Performance Indicators

                                                                        PY2007                           PY2008 Preliminary
                         Performance                       Older Youth       Younger Youth          Older Youth        Younger Youth
                                                          (19-21 Years)          (14-18 Years)      (19-21 Years)          (14-18 Years)
        Entered Employment Rate                               83.0%                                    84.0%
        Employment Retention at Six Months                    83.0%                                    85.0%
        Average Earnings Change in Six Months                 $ 3,000                                  $ 3,300
        Credential Rate                                       78.0%                                    79.0%
        Skill Attainment Rate                                                       90.0%                                     92.0%
        Diploma (or Equivalent) Rate                                                88.0%                                     89.0%
        Retention Rate                                                              78.0%                                     79.0%
        Participant Customer Satisfaction                                 91.0                                      91.0
        Employer Customer Satisfaction                                    86.0                                      86.0

     Source: MDLEG Policy Issuance 07-16, September 14, 2007



IV. REVIEW, COMMENT, AND PUBLICATION
    The Kalamazoo-St, Joseph Workforce Development Board presents this Workforce Investment Act Two-Year
    Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth for the Kalamazoo-St, Joseph Michigan Works Area for review
    and comment. In accordance with Section 118(c) of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, the plan will be
    available for review and comment for a period of thirty calendar days.

     A summary of the document will be published for one day in three (3) local newspapers of general circulation
     (Kalamazoo Gazette, Three Rivers Commercial, and Sturgis Journal). The summary will indicate the scope of
     the plan and indicate where copies of the plan may be obtained and/or otherwise reviewed (see below) ).

     An Executive Summary of the Workforce Investment Act Two-Year Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and
     Youth is distributed to:
     – Each member of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board,
     – Each member of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Educational Advisory Group,
     – Each of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works System Partners,
     – Superintendent of each secondary school district in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area,
     – President of each community college and four-year college and university in the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph
         Michigan Works Area, and
     – Other representatives of business and labor organizations not adequately represented on the Workforce
         Board or Education Advisory Council.

     A complete copy and summary of the plan is provided at:
     – Each County Board of Commissioner’s Office in the MWA,
     – Each Michigan Works Service Center, and the
     – Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works website: www.upjohninst.org/miworks




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Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area                                  Two-Year Comprehensive Services Plan
Workforce Investment Act of 1998                                                            PY2007 - PY2009




     Comments on the Two-Year Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth may be submitted in writing to:

                 Craig Schreuder, Deputy Director
                 Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area
                 222 S. Westnedge Avenue
                 Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007-4628

     Or comments may be sent by e-mail to: MIworks@upjohninstitute.org with the subject line reading: “Comments
     on WIA Two-Year Plan”

     In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, this Two-Year Plan for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and
     Youth will be made available in alternative format (large type, audiotape, etc.) upon special request received by
     the above-named individual.




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                                                                                                             ATTACHMENT A




                          A Private-Public Partnership Serving Kalamazoo and St. Joseph Counties
                              222 S. Westnedge Avenue, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007-4628


                         Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works One-Stop Service System

                                                  Memorandum of Understanding
                                                                  Between
                                      Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency
                                                                   and
                                           Michigan Works Service Center Partners
                                                       July 1, 2006 – June 30, 2009


  The following agreement represents a template of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) currently in effect between the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph
  Michigan Works Agency and the One-Stop Service Center Partners. As noted in the WIA Two-Year Plan, this MOU will be revised during 2008 to
  incorporate additional elements not currently in the agreement or elements requiring enhancement.


PURPOSE
This Michigan Works One-Stop System Memorandum of Understanding (hereinafter referred to as MOU),
a non-financial agreement, establishes the terms and conditions between the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph
Michigan Works Agency (hereinafter referred to as the MWA) an agent of the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph
Workforce Development Board (hereinafter referred to as the WDB) and (name of partner agency)
(hereinafter referred to as Partner).

By executing this MOU, the parties agree to abide by the terms, conditions, goals, policies, principles and
regulations of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, the Michigan Works “Certification Criteria for
Michigan Works Service Centers,” and of this MOU. This MOU establishes the partnership between the
WDB and the Partners for the implementation of the One-Stop Centers, known locally as Michigan Works
Service Centers, under the provisions of section 121(c)(2) of Title I of the Workforce Investment Act of
1998.

This agreement is to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of workforce services to prevent duplication
and coordinate resources in Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area. In addition, this MOU
establishes joint processes and procedures that will enable partners to integrate the current service delivery
system and resources, resulting in a seamless, comprehensive, and accessible array of education, human
service, job training and other workforce development services.

MISSION
The mission of the Partners is to establish and maintain a One-Stop Service Center system through co-
location and integration of Partner services and resources. The goal is to provide an inclusive, “seamless”
workforce delivery system to assist job seekers achieve economic security and successfully compete in
today’s economy and to meet employer’s current and future workforce needs.




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                                                                                      ATTACHMENT A

PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES

Principles
Through this MOU the Partners affirm that viable partnerships are developed and maintained only through
the mutual commitment and efforts of all individual Partners. Therefore, the undersigned pledges to
support this principle and agree to:

    Support a common vision.
    Establish and support common goals.
    Be accountable for upholding our individual Partner role(s).
    Engage in continued mutual dialogue to enhance the partnership.
    Maintain free and open communication among Partners.
    Achieve an understanding of and respect each other Partner’s perspective.
    Establish mutual trust among all partners.
    Interface each agency’s financial and professional assets to facilitate the strengthening of the whole
     Partnership.
    Accommodate itinerant staff from other agencies.
    Actively engage in continuous improvement and customer-centered services of the One-Stop Service
     Center system.

Objectives
The objective of the Partnership is to optimize the delivery of seamless workforce development services
that will provide,
 An employer with unencumbered access to a qualified workforce.
 A job seeker with unencumbered access to employment information, resources, and direct assistance.
 The delivery of job search assistance, employment enhancement skills, education, and training options
     for current and emerging jobs and careers.
 The functional support, coordination, and cooperation with state and local economic development
     activities.
 Focus on a process of continuous improvement and customer-centered service.


DURATION OF THE MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
The period covered by this agreement is July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2009.


SERVICE CENTER OPERATOR

Youth Opportunities Unlimited, Kalamazoo Regional Educational Services Agency (KRESA)
Through an open and competitive process the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Agency selected
Youth Opportunities Unlimited, a division of the Kalamazoo Regional Educational Services Agency as the
One-Stop Operator for the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works One-Stop Service Centers. In this
capacity, the One-Stop Operator is charged with the responsibility for overall coordination of services
within the One-Stop Service Center system.




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                                                                                                          ATTACHMENT A
Michigan Works Agency
In their capacity as lessee of the One-Stop Service Center facilities, the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan
Works Agency (Upjohn Institute) will assume specific responsibilities. However, Michigan Works Agency
personnel are not stationed at either One-Stop Service Center on a regular basis and are not responsible for
day-to-day operations. The Michigan Works Agency personnel will:

    Serve as the liaison between the Service Center partners and the landlord including troubleshooting
     facility issues.
    Serve as the liaison with non-MWA partners for space utilization (e.g., sub-lessees, AARP, UA
     Hearing Officers, etc.).
    Assist in the identification of alternative sites for One-Stop Service Centers, auxiliary, or satellite One-
     Stop sites as may be required.
    Obtain input from the One-Stop Operator and partners on resources at the facility including:
     technology, security and safety, space allocation and usage, resource room, computer lab, staff
     training, etc.


LOCATION OF THE ONE-STOP SERVICE CENTERS
This agreement covers activities located at the Kalamazoo County Michigan Works! Service Centers:

    Kalamazoo County: 1601 S. Burdick Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan
    St. Joseph County: 218 Enterprise Drive, Three Rivers,, Michigan.


ONE-STOP SYSTEM PARTNERS
       Partner Agency                                                                      Program Function
       Youth Opportunities Unlimited (YOU), a division of the     WIA Adult & Youth; Employment Services; Trade Adjustment
       Kalamazoo Regional Educational Service Agency (KRESA)      Assistance; One-Stop Operator
       Michigan HRDI, Inc.                                        WIA Dislocated Workers
       Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth
       Michigan Rehabilitation Services                           Rehabilitation Services
       Bureau of Workforce Programs                               Veteran Services/Migrant & Seasonal Farm Workers

       Kalamazoo Valley Community College *
       Glen Oaks Community College *                              Post-secondary Education and Training; Financial Aid

       Kalamazoo Adult Education *
                                                                  Basic Education/GED
       Three Rivers Adult Education*
       Michigan Works Agency                                      Facility Liaison and Partner Services
                                                                  Work First; Food Assistance E&T Program; Non-Custodial Parent
                                                                  Program; Michigan Prisoner Re-entry Program; Medical Review
       Goodwill Industries                                        Team Initiative

                                                                  Work First; Food Assistance E&T Program; Non-Custodial Parent
       Lake Michigan College
                                                                  Program
       Housing Resources Incorporated                             Housing Resources

       American Association of Retired Persons (AARP)             Senior Employment & Training Program

       Job Corps                                                  Education and Training


     * Itinerate partners




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                                                                                      ATTACHMENT A

Itinerate Partners
Partners that have fewer than two representatives assigned to the One-Stop Centers, whose representatives
are scheduled at the Centers only on a limited basis, or whose representatives are available for “on-call”
situations may be excluded from some provisions of this MOU.

However, all Partners, regardless of status or availability at the One-Stop Centers, agree to support the
vision and principles delineated in this Memorandum of Understanding, and when present in the Centers,
shall support all efforts of the One-Stop Centers to ensure that customers are provided the highest level of
service and accommodations as possible.

ONE-STOP SERVICE CENTER LOGISTICS

Conference/Training Room Scheduling
The One-Stop Operator will coordinate scheduling of common space, such as conference and training
rooms. A schedule of room availability will be posted in appropriate areas within each One-Stop Service
Center and for the Kalamazoo One-Stop available in the Internet at www.mwes.org.

Monthly Partner/MWA Meetings
The One-Stop Operator will schedule and moderate monthly Partner meetings for the purpose of
enhancing coordination and communication among Partners and the MWA and develop strategies for
attaining the goals and objectives identified in this agreement. Partner meetings will be scheduled on dates
and times determined by mutual consent of the Partners. Partners will, on a rotating basis, have
responsibility for leading each Partner meeting.

Common Reception Area, Communications, and Data Systems
The One-Stop Operator will provide staffing to perform the function of Greeter/Receptionist in an area
immediately inside the One-Stop Service Center’s primary entrance. A common communications and
information technology system will be available to all partners.

The Partner commits to provide staff assistance for Greeter/Reception function as may be requested by the
One-Stop Operator to ensure that these functions are maintained periodically during the absence of One-
Stop Operator staff during staff meetings, training sessions, lunch hours and periods of peak customer
traffic.

The Partner ensures that all Partner staff shall have a functional working knowledge of the One-Stop
Center facilities, programs, and services within the One-Stop Center, and a full and complete
understanding of the contingency plans for emergencies and building closures.

Common Calendar
The Partner understands the significance that an open and inclusive One-Stop system requires the attention
of all Partners to ensure that customers have access to all of One-Stop Service Center Partner resources and
services at all times that the One-Stop Centers is operational. This includes commitment among Partners to
agree to the following:

    Hours of operation of the One-Stop Services Centers are 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday through
     Friday, except on days designated as holidays by the State of Michigan.
    Ensuring that Partner representatives are available to assist customers during all hours that the One-
     Stop Centers are open.
    Ensuring that the One-Stop Operator is notified of specific times that Partner representatives will not
     be available at the One-Stop Service Center, including scheduled hours of Partners with itinerate staff
     or Partners with only one staff representative.



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                                                                                       ATTACHMENT A
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF PARTNERS
Partners will ensure that the One-Stop Service Centers provide, at all times, optimal services to customers
and Partners. This includes, but is not necessarily limited to:

    Ensuring Partner staff identifies themselves as Michigan Works staff and, if they must name their
     individual agency, shall specify that it is a part of the Michigan Works system.
    Possessing a working knowledge of each Partner’s program and service protocol.
    Possessing a thorough knowledge and understanding of all of the resources available at the One-Stop
     Center such as: Career and labor market information, unemployment insurance application process,
     Michigan Talent Bank services, assistive devices, and services for individuals with disabilities,
     resources in the Resource Center, etc.
    Having all staff trained to address situations of conflict by or with customers, assisting customers with
     disabilities, etc.
    Referring job seekers to One-Stop workshops as may be appropriate.
    Providing job seekers and employers with assistance in clarifying their needs and referring the
     customer to the most appropriate point of service within the One-Stop Center.
    Participate in other Partner’s staff meetings, when appropriate, to keep each other informed and
     updated of program changes.
    Participate in the planning and hosting of career fairs.
    Assisting as presenters in One-Stop workshops.
    Coordinating with other Partners in job development and job placement activities.
    Ensuring Partner representation at all Partner meetings.

Information Sharing/Customer-Focused Management Information System
Common information systems, open-access and connectivity among systems are required for an effective
and efficient workforce development system. These linkages support integrated service delivery as well as
conserve resources. Consistent with state and federal regulatory requirements, the Partner agrees to the use
of,

    A single, common customer release form (except where other formats are legally required.
    An interagency agreement for information sharing.
    Common intake data elements and processes.
    A common (state-developed) central database (case management and MIS performance data).
    A common automated labor exchange system (Michigan’s Talent Bank).
    A common system of measuring continuous improvement and customer satisfaction.
    A process for a periodic review of informational material and resources available within the One-Stop
     Center and Resource Center.
    Other systems and/or procedures that may be developed by the Partnership for enhancing the delivery
     of workforce development services to job seekers and employers.

Staffing and Professional Development
The Partner agrees to support and participate in professional development to ensure all Partner staff
understand and discharge their responsibilities within the context of a “system” rather than an “agency” or
“program.” Professional development may be provided in a variety of critical areas such as, but not limited
to:

    Consensus building, meeting management, conflict resolution, and problem solving.
    Design and implementation of shared workforce delivery systems.
    Use of new software and hardware.
    Principles of a customer-driven system.
    Principles of an integrated service delivery system.
    Cross-training (Partner-to-Partner, program-to-program, agency-to-agency, etc.).


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                                                                                               ATTACHMENT A
Resource Pooling and Cost Sharing
To the extent that discretionary resources are available, the Partner agrees to:

      Contribute staff resources (local and /or itinerant) to the general operation of the One-Stop Center.
      Contribute facilities, space, equipment, or other assets as may be required.
      Sharing of One-Stop facility and operational support costs on a prorated basis. (Facility and
       operational funds will be removed from the initial allocations of each funding source before the
       identification of program funds assigned to respective Partners through a methodology established by
       the Michigan Works Agency on an annual basis.)

MARKETING
The Partner shall be part of a unified Michigan Works marketing system. This includes adherence to
policies and procedures as described in the System Marketing section of the MDLEG policy “Certification
Criteria for Michigan Works Service Centers;” as well as policies and procedures relating to marketing,
communications and dissemination of public information adopted by the Michigan Works Association and
the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works Area. This includes, but is not limited to:

      Use of the official Michigan Works logo,
      Identifying Michigan Works in telephone greetings,
      Wearing Michigan Works name badge,
      Use of the official tagline that includes the EO statement, TTY number and funding source, and
      Identifying Michigan Works and the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth as the
       funding source.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, ACCESSIBILITY, AND INCLUSION
The Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Workforce Development Board and the Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan
Works Agency is committed to the principles of equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in the provision
of programs and services administered by this agency.

The discharge of this commitment requires the Partner to ensure equitable treatment of all persons in the
opportunity for employment, as well as access to and receipt of program services without discrimination on
the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, height, weight, marital status, arrest without
conviction, disability, political affiliation or belief and other bases prohibited by law. Further, the Partner
commits to work collaboratively to create an inclusive one-stop service system that is welcoming, inviting,
accommodating, and accessible to everyone.

MODIFICATION AND TERMINATION OF THIS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
Nothing in this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) shall violate existing grants, contracts or
regulations. Parties to this MOU reserve the right to modify this MOU based on legislative changes,
governing body directives, and funding availability. The agreement may be modified at any time by mutual
consent of all the parties to this agreement. The parties to this MOU retain the right to discontinue its
participation in this agreement upon 60 days written notice to all the other parties.

AUTHORITY AND SIGNATURES
The individuals signing below have the authority to commit the party they represent to the terms of this MOU
and do so commit by signing below.


Robert A Straits, Director                                        (Signatory Name and Title)
Kalamazoo-St. Joseph Michigan Works! Agency                       Name of Partner Agency

Date              9/28/06                                         Date




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                                                                                                   ATTACHMENT B
           KALAMAZOO - ST. JOSEPH




           Workforce Development Board
           222 S. Westnedge Avenue – Kalamazoo, MI 49007 – 269.349.1533 – FAX 269.349.5505




                                                                                      WDB Policy Summary
Federal regulations require and/or allow the Workforce Development Board to establish criteria on specific
program eligibility issues. The following provides a summary of the content and application of current
WDB Policies.


Policy 01        Program Design for WIA and ES
                 Local policy on allocation of funds. The policy provides priorities on how Workforce Investment Act
                 (WIA) and Wagner-Peyser (Employment Service) funds will be allocated to specific activities. The
                 policy incorporated certain elements required by the No Worker Left Behind Initiative.
                      10% of WIA adult and dislocated worker program funds to ES for Core Services provided to WIA
                       participants.
                      Wagner-Peyser funds for “core” services (Basic Services for ES) to the general public.
                      Minimum of 25% of WIA adult and dislocated worker program funds for Training Services.
                  NOTE: See WDB Policy 17, “Program Eligibility Definitions and Standards” for additional eligibility
                  elements.


Policy 02        Unassigned


Policy 03        Education Advisory Group (EAG)
                 The policy describes the role of the EAG and its relationship to the Workforce Development Board and
                 the WDBs established role for the EAG in the local Michigan Works Area.
                      EAG is a Workforce Development Board Standing Advisory Committee.
                      EAG is required by the Michigan State Aid Act to oversee the Carl Perkins Career and Technical
                       Education (CTE) and Tech Prep programs.
                      EAG provides input to the WDB on educational issues and development of the WDB Career
                       Education Strategic Plan.
                      WDB is required to provide staff support for the EAG.


Policy 05        Supportive Services
                 The policy identifies criteria for supportive services for all programs including local limitations
                 applicable to these programs.
                      Work First/JET support services as defined by state policy.
                      WIA Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs are defined locally.
                     WIA National Emergency Grant (NEG) (when administered by the MWA) includes needs-related
                     payments (available only to NEG participants.)
                      Trade Act (TAA) supportive services are defined by state policy and funding availability.




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Workforce Development Board                                                                WDB Policy Summary 11-2007



Policy 06        Procurement Standards
                 Federal and state policy requires the establishment of local procedures for procurement as part of their
                 “Financial Management System”. This policy describes the MWA procurement standards:
                      Requires the MWA to maintain written procedures for procurement and property management.
                      Incorporates Standards of Conduct and Conflict of Interest guidelines into the procedures.
                      Requires subcontractors to establish procedures for the accountability of all property purchased
                       with state or federal funds regardless of cost.


Policy 07        Investment Strategy for WIA Resources
                 Local policy establishes priorities on the use of WIA resources considering four options:
                      High investment strategy: Participants that require more than 104 weeks of services and activities
                       to become job-ready (hard-to-serve)
                      Intermediate investment strategy: Participants that require more than 26 weeks but less than 104
                       weeks of services
                      Moderate investment strategy: Participants that require less than 26 weeks of services
                      Low investment strategy: Participants that require less than 6 weeks of services


                 Priorities identified are:
                      10% of program funds for individuals requiring a low investment strategy (Core Services).
                      90% of program funds for participants in the intermediate and moderate investment strategies.
                      Individuals in the high investment strategy may be served as needed and in individualized
                       programs that target unique groups (e.g., school dropouts).


                 NOTE: This WDB Policy is undergoing review for revisions to expand the range of allocations of
                 funds for “core services”.


Policy 08        Selection Policy for “Job-Ready”
                 Local policy that establishes minimum acceptable standards for “certifying” that participants will be
                 job-ready when referred for employment. The policy incorporates several factors for this purpose:
                      Establishes a job readiness standard (i.e., intent to accept employment, compliance with
                       participation requirements, possesses minimum “employability skills”)
                      Establishes standard for enrollment into programs (i.e., intent of individual to actively participate
                       in chosen services and activities)


Policy 09        Performance Standards (WIA)
                 Federal and state policy requires the Workforce Development Board to establish local standards for
                 selected performance areas:
                      The WDB has decided not to establish local standards for the federal performance measures any
                       higher then established for the MWA by the MDLEG.
                      WDB uses the federal definition for the elements of the WIA performance and common measures.




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Policy 10        Conflict of Interest/Standards of Conduct
                 Federal and State policy requires the Workforce Development Board to establish standards for entities
                 and employees of any entity that receives state or federal funds from the MDLEG with respect to
                 situations of conflict of interest and standards of conduct in procurement.
                      Established standards that reflect state and federal policy.
                      Defines terminology used in the policy: Grant Recipient; Michigan Works Agency; Subcontractor,
                       Immediate Family, Administrative Capacity, Staff Position and Program.
                      Incorporates new disclosure requirements for the WDB members and WDB staff.
                 NOTE: This WDB Policy is under review for possible revision regarding providing services to NWLB
                 individuals that are related to WDB members or MWA staff.


Policy 11        Freedom of Information Act: Information Releases
                 The local policy generally reiterates Michigan’s FOIA policy, but adds local elements as allowed by
                 the State FOIA:
                      All FOIA requests will be directed to the MWA Director who will make the determination of
                       whether the requests falls within the guidelines of the FOIA.
                      All information requests will be recorded and maintained in a specific file location.
                      The MWA Administrative unit will review all requests.
                      Charges may be made for staff time and copy costs in preparing a response to the information
                       request.
                      Any fees charged must be paid in advance of transmittal of the copies to the requesting entity.


Policy 12        Standards for On-the-Job Training
                 The local policy describes the manner in which on-the-job training would be administered in the
                 Kalamazoo-St. Joseph MWA:
                      Service providers that operate OJT must establish written procedures for the administration of OJT
                       that incorporate provisions of this policy and those incorporated in WIA for OJT, regardless of the
                       funding source supporting OJT. A copy of the OJT procedures is to be provided to the MWA.
                      Participant Eligibility: Only unemployed individuals that meet program eligibility requirements are
                       eligible for OJT.
                      Employer Eligibility: Jobs must be classified as regular and full-time (at least 35 hours per week).
                      Employment Reimbursement: OJT participants are employees of the employer; must be paid at
                       same rate as other similar positions with reimbursement with program funds of no more than 50%
                       of the beginning hourly wage rate for actual hours worked.
                      Complaints: OJT referrals to employer are frozen until resolution of any EO, labor or program
                       complaints against the employer.


Policy 13        Individual Training Account (ITA) System
                 Local policy describes the purpose of the ITA System and general operating policies.
                      Provides the scope and limitations (maximum cost and duration for training supported through the
                       local ITA Voucher system) as $5,000 per year, but not more that $10,000 for two-years with
                       training not to exceed two-years.
                      Established training programs eligible to receive financial support.




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                      Provides a description for the use of ITAs for Internet-based training.
                      Provides guidance for the impact of scholarships and other financial aid on ITAs.
                      Requires development of ITA System Procedures.


Policy 14        Audit Plan
                 Federal and state policy requires local areas to establish procedures to address compliance with state
                 and federal audit requirements:
                      MWA will develop an Audit Plan.
                      Provides general information of the organizational structure: Grant Recipient; Administrative
                       Agent; Cognizant Agency; Program Period.
                      Audit plan policies: reflect state and federal requirements for Single Audit Act coverage and
                       MWA monitoring responsibilities.


Policy 15        Work Experience
                 Local policy that establishes guidelines for work experience provided through any MWA program
                 where work experience is an allowable activity:
                      Participant Eligibility
                      Work Experience Duration: Short term (100 hours) but not longer than 500 hours, paid or unpaid.
                      Worksite Development
                      Worksite Standards established through a written agreement with worksite sponsor.


Policy 16        Termination for Disruptive Behavior
                 Local policy that describes the procedures to manage situations of disruptive behavior:
                      Establishes criteria under which disciplinary action, up to and including termination, may be taken
                       for individuals that exhibit disruptive behavior while participating in the program.
                      Establishes procedures to be taken if a disruptive situation occurs.
                      Establishes worksite standards for administering this policy.


Policy 17        Program Eligibility Definitions and Standards
                  Federal regulations require and/or allow the Workforce Development Board to establish criteria on
                 specific program eligibility issues.
                      Declares that the MWA has limited funds for training and, as a result,
                      Establishes priority for WIA Intensive and Training Services to Adults to individuals that are
                       public assistance recipients, low income individuals, or are underemployed , (i.e., individual
                       whose family earnings are $40,000 or less)
                      Basic Literacy Skills Deficient, as defined by state policy (8.9 grade level or below).
                      “Sixth Eligibility Criteria” for youth. (Individuals who required additional assistance to complete
                       an educational program, or to secure or hold employment). The WDB is choosing not to establish
                       additional criteria at this time.
                      Self-sufficiency: The locally established criteria for self-sufficiency is:
                           For employed adults as those with a family income of $40,000 or less (No Worker Left
                            Behind [NWLB] criteria),
                           For dislocated workers as 80% of wage at dislocation for dislocated workers.




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Policy 18        Monitoring
                 Federal policy requires the Workforce Development Board to provide oversight for their programs.
                 The current policy reflects the WDB Monitoring & Evaluation Committee’s current desire to refine the
                 monitoring process, but maintain the overall strength of the local monitoring effort. This policy
                 describes procedures that will be used to monitor program.
                      Oversight Responsibility: WDB Monitoring & Evaluation Committee.
                      On-Site Review Responsibilities: MWA staff and WDB Monitoring and Evaluation Committee.
                      Internal Management Monitoring: MWA staff for program eligibility, financial reporting, etc.
                      Program Monitoring: Compliance monitoring by MWA staff.
                      Subcontractor Internal Monitoring: Subcontractor responsibilities for internal controls, OJT, and
                       work experience placements.


Policy 19        Participant Attendance in Training Activities
                 Local policy establishing attendance requirements for participants in training.
                      Local policy does not require full-time attendance in occupational skill training.
                      95% attendance in scheduled classes for participants in occupational skills training.
                      90% attendance in scheduled hours for participants in job search, employability skills training.
                      Waivers available on a case-by-case basis.
                      Defines reasons for “Absence for Good Cause”
                 NOTE: The policy is used in conjunction with WDB Policy 07, “Investment Strategies” and 08, “Job
                 Readiness”.


Policy 20        Performance Payments
                 Local policy describing the process for implementing a performance payment option:
                      Local policy is restricted to individuals participating in the WIA Youth program.
                      Primary emphasis is payment for achieving academic/employability skills competencies at or
                       above a minimum standard, with exceptions as approved by the MWA (e.g., follow-up responses).
                      Payment based on attendance is permitted provided attendance: (1) is directly associated with an
                       activity that is designed to enhance positive academic/employability skills competencies and (2)
                       payment for attendance does not exceed 45% of the total performance payment for the activity.
                      Subcontractors must prepare written procedures for their performance payment system.
                       Procedures will be approved by MWA.


Policy 21        Confidentiality Standards – Use of Social Security Number
                 State statute requires the protection of individual social security account numbers (SSAN).
                      Non-disclosure of more than 4-digits of an individual’s SSAN on hard-copy and electronically
                       visible or transmitted material that may be accessed by individuals not having a need-to-know
                       (i.e., mailings, statements, applications, participant records, correspondence, etc.)
                      Secured handling of program reports and information containing individual SSANs.
                      Organizations are required to establish procedures ensuring that the elements of the law are
                       implemented.




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Policy 22        Nepotism
                 Federal and State policy require the Workforce Development Board to establish standards for entities
                 and employees of any entity that received state or federal funds from the MDLEG with respect to
                 situations of Nepotism.
                      Established standards that reflect state and federal policy.
                      Defines terminology used in the policy: Immediate Family, Administrative Capacity, Staff
                       Position, and Program.
                 NOTE: This WDB Policy is under review for possible revision regarding providing services to NWLB
                 individuals that are related to WDB members or MWA staff.


Policy 23        Sexual and other Forms of Workplace Harassment
                 Federal and state policy requires local areas to establish local policy and procedures, consistent with
                 state and federal requirements, that address sexual and workplace harassment.
                      Establishes a definition of sexual harassment that is consistent with federal and state definitions
                      Establishes protocol for handling forms of sexual and workplace harassment
                     Established prohibition against reprisal or retaliation on individuals that file harassment
                      complaints.
                 Service providers and administration are required to establish procedures for addressing complaints of
                 sexual or workplace harassment within their area of control.


Policy 24        Grievance and Complaint Policy
                 Removes components of the “Grievance and Complaint” procedure from the former WDB Policy 25
                 and creates separate WDB policy.
                      Requires policies and procedures to address a range of grievance and complaints:
                           Participants
                           Vendors and Subcontractors
                           Respondents involved in the solicitation process (RFP, RFQ, etc.)
                      Required development of Grievance and Complaint Brochure to be distributed to all participants
                       and includes specific process for filing a grievance or complaint beginning with the service
                       provider.


Policy 25        Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination (Proposed)
                 Federal and state policy requires local areas to establish local policy and procedures consistent with
                 state and federal requirements that address equal opportunity (EO) and non-discrimination.
                      Equal Opportunity includes the traditional statement for non-discrimination and the establishment
                       of EO benchmarks for “Protected Classes” based on the Annual Planning Information Report.
                      Requires compliance with the posting of EO and Non-discrimination notices for both public and
                       staff access.
                      Specifies data collection and reporting requirements.
                      Provides for a process of notification, complaint processing and file documentation.




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Policy 26        Reasonable Accommodations
                 Federal and state policy requires local areas to establish local policy and procedures consistent with
                 state and federal requirements that address reasonable accommodations.
                      Policies concerning the reasonable accommodations process for participants, employees and the
                       general public.
                      Processing accommodations requests at service provider and administrative levels.




                                                         End of WDB Policies




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