My Employee Basic Information Sheets by jzp18763

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									  Veteran’s
     Directed
        Home &
          Community
            Based
              Services
Veteran’s Participation Guidebook
                                           Important Phone Numbers
How can this                               Area Agency on Aging of Central Texas
guidebook help                             254-770- 2357
                                           1-800-447-7169 ext. 2357
you?                                       Financial Management Service

                                           ______________________________________________
This guidebook will help you to use
The Veteran’s Directed Home and            Phone:_______________________________________
Community Based Services (VD-              My Service Coordinator/Consultant
HCBS) available to your through a
partnership program with the Area          ______________________________________________
                                           VD-HCBS Service Coordinator/Consultant
Agency on Aging of Central Texas and
the United States Department of            Phone:______________________________________
Veterans Affairs. You will get some
new information, and it may be hard to     1-800-447-7169 ext _________
remember everything. You will be able      Other Numbers
to refer to your guidebook for help. It
explains who is available to assist you.
Self-direction doesn’t mean doing
things all by yourself — people are
available to support you along the way.

There is a section that talks about who
does what. There are ideas and tips for
when you develop your own service
and support plan and budget. It also
explains your rights and
responsibilities in the Veterans
Directed Home and Community Based
Services (VD-HCBS). Please think
carefully about the information in this
guidebook. With the Veteran’s
Directed Home and Community
Services program, choice, and
flexibility come with responsibilities.
                           TABLE OF CONTENTS
What Is the VD-HCBS Program........................................................................................................................ 2
What Does Self-Direction Mean?..................................................................................................................... 2
My Responsibilities in VD-HCBS..................................................................................................................... 3
Do I Have to Do This by Myself?.................................................................................................................. 4-5
  • Consultant/Service Coordinator ............................................................................................................................... 4
  • Financial Management Service.................................................................................................................................. 5
What Does It Mean to Be an “Employer of Record”?.................................................................................... 6
Creating My Service and Support Plan and Budget.................................................................................. 7-15
 • Why do I need a service and support plan and budget?.......................................................................... 7
 • How much money will be available for services, supports and goods?................................................ 7
 • Getting started.......................................................................................................................................... 7- 8
                           -    Deciding what is important
                           -    How to get my needs met
    • Making my plan and budget................................................................................................................... 9-10
                           -    In making my plan and budget, how should I start?
                           -    What should my proposed plan and budget include and how will I get what I need?
                           -    Are there specific plan and budget approval guidelines?
    • Services, supports and goods I MAY choose to buy..........................................................................11-15
                           -    VD-HCBS services, supports, and goods
                           -    Examples of Other services, supports, and goods
                           -    Special purchases
 • Services, supports and goods NOT COVERED in VD-HCBS................................................................. 15
 • Submitting my plan and budget for approval .................................................................................... 15-16
 • What If My Plan and Budget Aren’t Approved?....................................................................................... 16
Making It Happen - Arranging for Services, Supports and Goods........................................................... 7-24
                           -    How to hire help
                           -    How to place an ad
                           -    How to do an interview
                           -    How to do a background check and check references
                           -    How to purchase participant-delegated goods and services
                           -    How to make sure VD-HCBS is working the way I want
                           -    How to change my approved plan and budget
                           -    Annual plan and budget review
                           -    Health and safety
What If VD-HCBS Isn’t Working for Me? ..................................................................................................... 25
Additional Contacts........................................................................................................................................ 25
Appendices................................................................................................................................................. 26-48
   A. Glossary of Terms………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..… 26-29
   B. Frequently Asked Questions…… ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 30-31
   C. Reference Range of Agency Fees by County………………………………………………………….………………………….… 32
   D. Sample Service and Support Plan, Budget and Worksheets………………………………………………………………….… 34-44
   E. Orientation Forms Employer…………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 45
   F. Orientation Forms Employee…………………………………………………………………………………………………………... 46
   G. Information Sheets to help You with your Employees………………………………………………………………………………… 47




1
    What Is the Veteran’s Directed
    Home and Community Based
    Services?
    The VD-HCBS is a pilot program for a new
    Veteran’s directed approach to home and
    community services. VD-HCBS is designed to
    assist you in directing your own services and
    supports.

    What Does Self-Direction
    Mean?
    In the VD-HCBS program, self-direction
    means you decide:
    • What services, supports and goods you need
    • When the services and supports are provided
    • Who provides those services and supports
    • Where the services and supports are provided
    • How the services and supports are provided
    Self-direction means you have more:
    • Choice
    • Control
    • Flexibility
    • Freedom
    With self-direction, you:
    • Are in control of your life and how you live it
    • Can get support with what you need in the way
    you need it
    • Make choices about your services and supports
    • Hire the people to provide your services and
    supports
    Self-direction also means:
    • Money gets approved for you to use to hire
    workers and buy supports and goods, called a
    budget, according to a plan you create
    • You are responsible for following the Veterans
    Directed Home and Community Services rules.

2
My Responsibilities in
VD-HCBS
As a VD-HCBS participant, some of your
responsibilities will be to:
• Assist with establishing your VD-HCBS eligibility
through your local VA Medical Center.
• Develop a plan and budget
• Follow your plan and budget
• Let someone know if you need help
• Work with your service coordinator/consultant
• Work with the financial management service
• Arrange to get the services, supports and goods
you need and pay for them
• Hire and manage the people who will provide
services and supports, which may include replacing
them if they are not working out for you
• Keep records
• Follow the VD-HCBS guidelines
• Be accountable for the use of VD-HCBS funds


Notes:




3
                                             Do I Have to Do This by
                                             Myself?
                                             You do not have to do this by yourself. The
                                             service coordinator/consultant and
                                             financial management service can help
                                             you. People in your life can also help you
                                             with the VD-HCBS; they can participate
                                             with you. You may choose people you
                                             trust, such as your family, your friends or
                                             people who have helped you before.

                                             • Service Coordinator/Consultant
                                             Everyone who participates in VD-HCBS
                                             will have a service coordinator/consultant
                                             from the Area Agency on Aging of Central
                                             Texas. The consultant is available to you
                                             to:
In working with your                         • Help you understand VD-HCBS
consultant, here are some                    • Help you develop your service and
questions to think about                     support plan and budget
asking:                                      • Help you evaluate your service and
                                             support plan and budget, and how VD-
• What days and times are you available to
                                             HCBS is working for you
meet with me?                                • Help you understand and complete the
                                             paperwork
                                             • Help you with problems
• Can you come to me when and where I
need you?
                                             In working with your consultant, you are
• Are you located on a bus route and can I   responsible for sharing what is important to
get to you easily?                           you and deciding what direction you want
                                             your life to go.
• Is your location accessible?               t
• How soon could we meet to get started?

• Can you help me do the paperwork?

• How familiar are you with community
resources?
4
• Financial Management
Service
Everyone who self-directs in VD-HCBS
must have a Financial Management
Service (FMS) who is available to you.

The FMS will:
• Act as your payroll agent and take care
of all money issues like timesheets,
payroll, taxes and other employer-related
Requirements.
• Send checks to the people you hire and
to the places where you purchase your
goods and other services.
• Send you a quarterly budget report
• Contact you and your consultant if you
request something that is not approved in
your plan and budget.
• Answer questions you and the people
you hire may have about payroll matters.


NOTES




5
    What Does It Mean to Be an
    “Employer of Record”?

    In VD-HCBS, you will have some
    employer-related responsibilities.

    When you self-direct through VD-HCBS, you
    become the ―employer of record.‖ You will need
    to complete certain forms that officially make you
    an employer. In addition, you will receive training
    on being an ―employer of record,‖ including how
    to be in charge of finding, hiring, scheduling and
    training your own employees; civil rights
    compliance; workers’ compensation; and other
    employer-related issues.

    As an “employer of record,” you will
    have the following responsibilities:
    • Complete the employer paperwork.
    • Help the people you hire complete their
    employee paperwork (supplied by the FMS). The
    FMS will process all the paperwork for you.
    • Review, approve and submit time sheets to the
    FMA on time, through the mail or by fax, so that
    your employees get paid for their work on a
    timely basis..

    Note: You will be provided with all the training
    and tools you need to be a successful employer.

    What is Next?
    The next step is to create your Service and
    Support Plan and Budget, which will put VD-
    HCBS into action.



6
Creating My Service and Support Plan and Budget
• Why do I need a service and support
plan and budget?
The service and support plan and budget describe the
services, supports and goods you need to live in the
community the way you want. The plan lists who will
provide the services, supports and goods; the budget
shows the amount of money you plan to spend. The
plan and budget will also help the VA understand why
you need the services, supports and goods you chose,
and what the plan will cost.

• How much money will be available for
services, supports and goods?
The amount of funding available for you will be
determined by the VA contract based upon your level of
service required. Your consultant will have this
information and will be able to tell you how much
money you have to spend. You may use this money to
buy what you need to live in the community.
Remember, you do not have to spend all the money
available to you. It may accumulate in budgeted
amounts over several months to acquire something that
you need to stay in your home and community in the
future.

• Getting started
Deciding what is important
VD-HCBS allows YOU to decide what services,
supports and goods will best meet your community
living needs. Spend some time thinking about what is
most important to you. This information will help you
when you write your plan and budget.
How to get my needs met
In considering what is most important to you, answer
the following questions:
7
Q: What services and supports will I pay for?                       A:
Finding things you will pay for takes time and patience. After
all, you want to ―shop‖ for the best price but still make sure
you get a good value. You want to be sure that what you
buy is what you need for community living, whether it is
services, supports, equipment or supplies. The more people
who know you’re looking for something, the better chance
you have of finding it. Be sure to let others know what you
need and be specific.

Finally, there is a good chance that someone else in VD-
HCBS is looking for some of the same help you are. If you
are interested in sharing, with permission, what you have
found out, let your consultant know. Your consultant can
help you exchange phone numbers.


Q: Can I get any of the things I need for free?                     A:
Are your friends and relatives aware of your specific needs?
Sometimes what is obvious to you is not clear to others. If
you have not discussed your needs with your friends and
family in a while, it may be worth doing again. Be as specific
as you can so people can understand what you need.
People close to you may want to help, but they may not
know how. If your friends and family cannot help, they may
know someone who can. You may be surprised to learn
how much you can get for free.


Q: Could a local club, civic organization or faith                  A:
organization provide any of the things I need for
free?
Often the answer to this question is ―I don’t know.‖ What you
need is a place to start. Sometimes the best place to start is
to call the Texas state information and referral line (dial 211).
Sometimes the first call does not get you exactly what you
want, but it gets you started asking for help. Have a pencil
and paper ready to take notes.

8
    • Making my plan and budget
    Your consultant will have some worksheets to help you list
    and figure out what is important to you, what services and
    supports you need, how much these services and supports
    will cost and what you want to spend.
    In making my plan and budget, how should I start?
        1. Think about what you would like your life to be like
           and what services, supports and goods would
           improve your life. What skills would you like to
           improve? How would you like to spend your time?
           With whom would you like to spend time? Think
           about why these changes would make your life
           better.
        2. Think about who might help you make these things
           happen.
        3. Contact your consultant to set up a planning
           meeting.
        4. Write your plan with the help of your consultant and
           anyone else you might want to help you, including
           family and friends.
    What should my proposed plan and budget include and
    how will I get what I need?
    You will receive an amount of available funding that you will
    use to develop your plan and budget for the entire year. It is
    required that you break the budget down into monthly
    amounts to help you plan how you will meet your needs
    throughout the year. In making your plan and budget, think
    about:
        1. What services, supports and goods you will need
           each month, and those services, supports and goods
           you may need once during the year or just a few
           times.
        2. The types of workers you need to hire to provide the
           services and supports.
        3. The types of goods you may need.
        4. How often you will get the services, supports and
           goods.
        5. The amount of money you have and how much
           money will be needed to pay for the services,
           supports and goods.
        6. Your backup, or emergency, plan.
        7. How you will decide if your plan is working for you.

9
Are there specific plan and budget approval guidelines?

Yes. When developing your service and support plan and budget, you must follow the
approval guidelines. Your consultant will give you information about the guidelines and
explain how they affect your plan and budget.

The services, supports and goods that you choose must:
     • Help you meet your functional, medical and/or social needs;
     • Help you to reach the goals you may have set for yourself;
     • Not be prohibited by federal and state laws and regulations;
     • Not be available through another VA source AND
     • Do one or more of the following:
           - Make it easier for you to do things that are hard because
           of your disability or health issues;
           - Increase your safety in your home environment;
                                       and/or
           - Lessen your need for other publicly funded services.

If you have a change in health or social needs, a short hospitalization with change in
health baseline, another assessment may be done. If you are hospitalized for more
than 15 days, the VA will disenroll you from VD-HCBS and you will need a new referral
and assessment in order to be re-enrolled in the VD-HCBS program. With appropriate
justification, approval, and availability of funds, you may be able to receive more
funding, should your needs require it. But, for the most part, the amount of funding
available to you for the month will not change, so you have to be careful to plan for
how you will meet your needs for the whole year.

NOTES:




10
• Services, supports and goods I MAY choose to buy

You may choose from the following VD-HCBS services, supports
and goods:

Adult Day Care
Caregiver Education and Training
Caregiver Support Coordination
Chore Maintenance
Electronic Monitoring
Environmental Services
Escort Services
Financial Management Services
Health Maintenance
Homemaking and Personal Care
Independent Living Consultant Services
Individually identified services Necessary for Independent Living
Individually identified Goods Necessary for Independent Living
Information and Referral Services
In-Home Respite Care
Medication Management
Nutritional Services
Safety Services
Shopping or Running Errands
Socialization Support Services
Transportation

Examples of Other services, supports and goods
You may also choose to purchase other services, supports or goods.‖When selecting
these services, supports and goods, use the following chart showing different
categories and some, but not all, examples in each category.

11
Category                           Example
Adult Day Care                         Adult Day Care Center Program
                                       Adult Day Care in another home other
                                        than the Veteran’s
Caregiver Education and Training       AAACT Caregiver support programs
                                       The Savvy Caregiver
                                       A Matter of Balance
                                       Chronic Disease Management Class
                                       Monthly AAACT Programs
Caregiver Support Coordination         comprehensive caregiver assessments
                                       Home and phone visit support
                                       Referral to caregivers support services
Chore Maintenance                      initial heavy-duty cleaning of home.
                                       Removal of trash and debris from the
                                        home
                                       Yard cleanup
Electronic Monitoring                  Purchase of room monitors
                                       Bed alarm
                                       Programmable or voice-activated phones
                                        Personal alarms
                                       Life lines (available through VAMC)
                                       Cell phones
Environmental Services:                installation of grab bars, railings,
                                        specialized lighting, etc.
                                       Minor home repair
                                       Painting (interior or exterior)
                                       Plumbing
                                       Ramps (If denied by VA)
Escort Services                         Accompanying and personally assisting
                                        the Veteran to obtain a needed service.
                                        Filling out applications and explaining
                                        directions to the veteran
Health Maintenance                     Cooking classes for caregiver
                                       Gym or Health Club membership
                                       Health Counseling
                                       Health Education
                                       Massage therapy beyond services
                                        traditionally covered by insurance
                                       Service/Support Animal Health
                                       Public health maintenance programs
                                        Structured weight reduction programs


12
Category                                    Example
Homemaking Services                             Light Housekeeping
                                                Laundry
                                                sweeping and mopping floors
                                                 dusting
                                                changing linens
                                                cleaning the bathroom (Toilet
                                                 tubs/showers, sinks & floors)
                                                cleaning the kitchen (loading/unloading
                                                 dishwasher, hand washing dishes,
                                                 washing off countertops, sinks, floors, and
                                                 stovetops as needed).
Personal Care Services                          to assistance in and out of the shower or
                                                 bath tub, any assistance during the
                                                 bathing process
                                                 assistance in getting on/off the toilet
                                                brushing teeth/dentures
                                                personal grooming tasks and dressing
                                                providing verbal prompts to taking
                                                 medication or placing pills from the
                                                 medication minder into the hands of the
                                                 veteran and verbally reminding or
                                                 physically guiding the veteran to take
                                                 them.
Individually identified services or Goods       Upkeep of Service animals required for
Necessary for Independent Living                 veteran to stay independent.
                                                What would you feel is needed in your
                                                 home to keep you independently living not
                                                 covered by traditional VA programs and
                                                 services
Information and Referral Services             Referral to community agencies and
                                               programs to improve quality of life
Respite Care                                    In-home services can be provided by
                                                 volunteer or paid help, occasionally or on a
                                                 regular basis. Respite services may
                                                 include meal preparation, housekeeping,
                                                 assistance with personal care and/or
                                                 social and recreational activities,
                                                Out-of-home respite care programs may
                                                 include contracted short stay at an area
                                                 nursing home or other specialized
                                                 facilities, for up to 30 days, that provide
                                                 emergency and planned overnight
                                                 services, allowing caretakers 24-hour relief

13
Category                         Example
Nutritional Services                 Home delivered Standard Meal – the
                                      regular menu from the standard menu that
                                      is served to the majority of participants.
                                     Therapeutic meal or liquid supplement – a
                                      special meal or liquid supplement that has
                                      been prescribed by a physician and is
                                      specifically for the participant by the
                                      dietitian (i.e. diabetic diet, renal diet,
                                      pureed diet, tube feeding)
Safety Services                      Personal Emergency Response System
                                      includes the installation of the individual
                                      monitoring unit, training associated with
                                      the use of the system, periodic checking to
                                      insure that the unit is functioning properly,
                                      equipment maintenance calls, response to
                                      an emergency call by a medical
                                      professional, paramedic, or volunteer, and
                                      follow-up with the veteran.
                                     Combination key box for the door, this
                                      keeps a key available for easy access to
                                      the home by emergency personnel
                                     Home Safety Evaluation by a professional
                                      person to assure safety of travel paths and
                                      needed
Shopping or Running Errands          Shopping with or without the veteran for
                                      the veteran
Socialization Support Services       Caregiver to accompany the veteran to
                                      activities such as education or exercise
                                      classes,
                                     Caregiver taking the veteran to the
                                      movies, a Bible Study, or other social
                                      engagements
Transportation                       Public transportation like the HOP or VA
                                      Van, or other transport required to go for
                                      socialization support or medical support
                                      activities with the designated caregiver
                                      providing escort.
                                     A Month Public Transport Pass like the
                                      HOP to get around town or the area to go
                                      to social activities.
                                      An escort to a veteran who has special
                                      needs (physical or cognitive) when using
                                      regular vehicular transportation.

14
     Special Purchases
     In making your plan and budget, keep in mind that your annual
     available funding must cover your needs for a whole year. This
     includes planning and budgeting for a special, higher-cost item,
     as well as, services you will need on a regular basis.

     • Services, supports and goods NOT COVERED
     in VD-HCBS
          • Services already being provided to a veteran or their
            family caregiver(s) by or through the Department of
            Veterans Affairs.
          • Services, supports or goods provided to or benefiting
             persons other than you
          • Room and board, including rent and mortgage payments
          • Personal items and services not related to your disability
          • Experimental treatments
          • Vacation expenses (except for the cost of the services you
              may need while you are on vacation)

     A sample plan, budget and worksheets are included in the
     Appendices at the end of this guidebook.

     In developing your budget and considering what you want to pay
     for services, your consultant will have information about current
     rates paid to agencies in the area for traditional homecare and
     provider services. These will give you an idea of how much
     agencies currently charge for their services to help you determine
     a good ―market rate‖ when determining how much you will pay for
     your employee. In Appendix C you have a reference to total
     budget cost with taxes included for specific in wages offered for
     services.

     • Submitting my plan and budget for approval
     Your plan and budget must be approved before services under
     VD-HCBS begin. Once you have prepared your plan and
     budget, your consultant will work with you to help get the plan
     and budget submitted to the Financial Management Service.


15
Make sure your plan and budget focus on your long-
term service needs and help you:

     • Live at home and in the community the way you
        want;

     • Reach your personal, social, physical or work-
        related goals;

     • Be involved with your family, friends and
        community in the way you want;

     • Increase your independence to the extent
         possible;

     • Decrease your need for other publicly funded
        services
                        AND
        be sure your budget follows the budget approval
        guidelines.

Your consultant can help you understand these
guidelines.



                               What If My Plan and Budget
                               Aren’t Approved?
                               If your plan and budget, or a part of your plan and
                               budget, are not approved, work with your consultant to
                               figure out your options, including help to request
                               reconsideration of the decision. Final disapproval
                               decisions will be sent to you in writing, including steps to
                               follow if you disagree with the decision. Also, you
                               always have the right to appeal the decision and ask for
                               a Fair Hearing.


16
Making It Happen: Arranging for Services, Supports and Goods
While you are waiting for the approval of your plan and
budget, you can begin to work on getting the services,
supports and goods in your plan and budget. However, you
cannot actually hire someone and begin services until your
plan and budget are approved.

• How to hire help

You may hire your own service workers, a family member, or
a friend. Here are some things to think about when hiring:

     • What do I need the service provider to do?
     • How do I want it done?
     • How often do I want help? Part-time or full-time?
     • What time of day do I want help?
     • Do I want help on the weekends and/or during the week?
     • Do I prefer someone who is male or female?
     • Do I prefer someone of a particular age?
     • Does the person who helps me need to be strong?
     • Does the person who helps me need to be able to drive?
     • Does the person who helps me need to have his or her
          own car?
     • Do I need more than one person to help me?
     • Do I need different people to help me with different
          things?
     • What do I want the people who help me to know about
          me?
     • Do I want the people who help me to be friends,
          neighbors, family members or a formal provider?
     • Would the person I want most to help me be the best
          person for the job?
     • How much am I willing to pay for the help I need?




17
     Once you know what type of service provider you want
     to help you, you will need to find that someone to do the
     job.

     Good places to look are:
       • People you already know
       • Local organizations for people with disabilities
       • At your church
       • With your doctor
       • Employment agencies
       • Local newspapers
       • Bulletin boards at local organizations
       • Local colleges or universities

     If you can’t find the help you need through those places,
     you may want to place an advertisement.

     • How to place an ad

     You may have to place an ad in a newspaper, on a bulletin
     board or on a radio station to find help. Check ads in each of
     those places to see what they are like and how much they
     cost. The cost of an Ad may be included in your plan and
     budget if you so wish.

     Make sure you include important information in your ad like:
       • What hours you want someone to work
       • A general description of what you want them to do
       • How to contact you or your contact person

     You need to be careful about the type of information you put
     in the ad. Do not include your address or that you live alone.

     You need to be careful that when you hire someone, they
     will treat you the way you want to be treated. One way to do
     this is to talk with them over the phone before you meet
     them.

18
• The Telephone Screening Interview
   1. Ask questions: name, address, phone number and
      how they would get to work.
   2. Talk about the job duties, and then ask about things
      that might be hard for them, like lifting or personal
      care.
   3. Ask about their experience in working with people
      who have disabilities.
   4. Make sure they provide references.
   5. Thank them for calling, and tell them you will call
      them back if you want to interview them in person.
***As with other parts of VD-HCBS, your consultant can
help you if you have questions.

• How to do an face to face interview
Think about where you want to do the interview — at home
or some other place nearby. If you interview someone, you
might want to do some of the following:
    Take notes during the interview, or have someone
     there to help you remember what is said
    Introduce yourself
    Tell them about the job and what you want them to
     do
    Give them an application and ask them to fill it out
    Ask about how they will get to work
    Talk about when you need help
    Talk about VD-HCBS and how the Financial
     Management Service will be writing their checks and
     ensuring that their payroll taxes and workers’
     compensation are handled
    Talk about what the job pays
    Ask them why they want to work with you
    Ask them why they think they would be good at
     working with you
    Tell them you are required to do a criminal
     background check and ask for proof of
     citizenship/legal resident status
    Ask them for references
    Thank them and tell them you will call when you
     make your decision
19
     • How to do a background check and check
     References
      - Once the interview is over, you will need to check their
        references and do a background check.
      - To do a background check, the AAACT will conduct a
        background check on the public access program of the
        Texas Department of Public Safety for you.
      - To check references, call the people listed as references
        and ask about the applicant. Some good questions are:
             1. What are the applicant’s strengths?
             2. What are the applicant’s weaknesses?
             3. Would they recommend the applicant to work with
             you?
             4. Do they show up on time?
             5. Do they do the job required?
             6. Do they show up regularly?
             7. Do they call when they will be late, or may not be
             able to work?
             8. Do they bring personal problems on the job?
             9. Do they drink or do drugs on the job, or come to
             work impaired?

     Ask questions about the qualities you want in someone. For
     example, is the applicant honest? Does the person respect
     other people?

     Now that you have learned about the applicant, make the
     best decision you can about whether the applicant is right for
     you.

     Call and let the individual know you want to hire him/her for
     the job and restate what the job pays. If accepted, contact
     your Consultant who will meet with you as the employer and
     the employee to provide an orientation for the employee, fill
     out the necessary forms for the employee, and decide on a
     starting date. The consultant will forward required documents
     to the Financial Management Service to start payroll and tax
     requirements.


20
• How to purchase participant-delegated
goods and services

Some of what you may want to spend your budget on might be
things that would make it easier for you and mean that you
would need less help from others. For example, a fax machine
will be offered for purchase to you to help facilitate a timely
submission of time sheets for your employees. Or perhaps a
microwave oven might make it easier for you to prepare your
own meals. You might also want to buy a service, like someone
to repair your car so you can get to the doctor when you need
to.

Review the list of categories in this guidebook for examples.

When you buy something other than hiring someone to help
you, you need to:

     • Find what it is you are looking to buy

     • Find out if it is the best price for you

     • Get a quote, which is a written document showing how
       much the service or item will cost, including tax and
       delivery or setup fees, if they apply

     • Find out if the business will accept a check from the FMS

     • Send the quote with a request for a check to the FMS

     • Find out if the item is covered – the FMS will pay the
       people selling what you want so you get the item or
       service

Notes...
21
         • How to make sure VD-HCBS is working
         the way I want
         Once you use the services and supports in your plan, how
         do you make sure they are really helping you? Only you
         will really know if something needs to change. You might
         want to ask yourself questions like:

             • Does the person I hired do what we agreed he/she
             would do?

             • Am I happier now?

             • Do I spend more time doing the things I am good at
               and enjoy?

             • Do I spend time with the people I care about and
             like?

             • How could my life be better?

         If you want to talk with someone about these questions,
         think about asking your family, friends or others you trust.
         You can also contact your consultant to talk these things
         over.

NOTES:




22
• How to change my approved plan and budget
When you want to make any changes in your plan or budget, you
must contact your consultant first to discuss the change and, if
necessary, get approval. Depending on the change(s) you want to
make, you may have to amend your plan and budget and get them
approved. Here are the rules for making changes:

You DO have to amend your plan and budget and
ask for another approval if:

     • You want to make a big change, such as changing your
     worker’s pay rate or spending more on a service or item. You
     will have to revise your plan and budget and have them
     approved, because the change(s) mean(s) that you will have to
     spend less on something else.

     • You want to add a new need to the plan and buy a new
     service or good. Again, remember, when you add a new
     service or good, you will have less to spend somewhere else,
     and you will have to adjust your spending.

You DO NOT have to amend your plan and budget
and ask for another approval if:

     • You want to increase or decrease slightly the amounts you
     spend on the approved purchases.

     • You have unexpected assistance and will be spending less
     than you planned that month for a service or support.

     • You want to redistribute your workers’ hours among your
     workers (when you have more than one worker) while keeping
     the total number of hours the same.

     • You want to change a purchase from an approved service or
     good to an alternate service or good that could address your
     needs in a similar or better way with little change in your
     approved budget.



Remember, when you want to make any change in your plan and
budget, you must contact your consultant first to discuss the change
and, if necessary, get approval.

23
• Annual plan and budget review

In month 12 of your VD-HCBS program, you will be reassessed to renew your VD-
HCBS eligibility each year. During this reassessment, you will also review your plan
and budget and decide if they are working for you. You can also review the plan and
budget more often, if needed. When you review your plan and budget, you may want to
make changes, especially if your needs have changed. Contact your consultant and
follow the guidelines described in the previous section for making changes in your
approved plan and budget.

• Health and safety

        The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Area Agency on Aging of Central
         Texas wants to make sure that you are receiving the services and supports you
         need in VD-HCBS to live successfully at home and in the community. Officials
         from the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) and the
         Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will look at the program to make sure VD-
         HCBS policies and directives are being followed and that VD-HCBS participants
         are receiving the services and supports they need.

        If you suspect abuse, neglect or exploitation, please call Adult Protective
         Services at 1-800-252-5400 or via the internet at www.txabusehotline.org


NOTES




24
What If VD-HCBS Isn’t
Working For Me?
If you decide that VD-HCBS is not working for
you, you can disenroll from VD-HCBS and
instead return to services through other VA
programs. Contact your consultant, and you and
your consultant can arrange a plan for this if you
want.

Additional Contacts
If you have questions that have not been
answered in this guidebook, there are other
places to find the answers. These include the
consultant or the financial management service.      My Consultant:

• My VD- HCBS Agency is :




                                                     My Financial Management Service:



2180 North Main, Belton TX 76513
       254-770-2357
       1-800-447-7169 ext. 2357




25
Appendix A. Glossary of Terms
Adult Day Care: Daytime care of any part of the day, less than 24-hour care. The program provides a
structured, comprehensive program that is designed to meet the needs of adults with functional impairments
through an individual plan of care by providing heath, social, and related support services in a protective
setting other that the veteran’s home.

Area Agency on Aging of Central Texas (AAACT): The AAACT holds a contract with the Department of
Veterans Affairs, hires individual consultants and trains these consultants to work at the local level and provide
supports to individual VD-HCBS participants.

Budget: The amount of available funding for each individual participant. The participant’s consultant receives
the individual budget from the VAMC and informs the participant when he/she is deciding whether to select
self-direction over traditional VA services and during the planning process. Any requests for adjustments to the
budget, based on a change in the veteran participant’s needs, are initiated by the participant through his/her
consultant.

Caregiver Education and Training: Access to a resource library, informational resources, support groups,
seminars and focus groups, individual or group counseling. And education services to caregivers of Veteran.

Caregiver Support Coordination: Care givers of Veterans often give more hours than they are paid for in
additional service to the Veteran. Caregiver support coordination begins with comprehensive caregiver
assessments through home or office visits and phone follow up. A plan of care is created based on the
assessment and staff assist in coordinating necessary care and services to include caregiver trainings and
support groups to help support caregivers in their roles. This may also include individual or group
counseling services to assist caregivers with problem solving and emotional support.

Chore Maintenance: Initial and/or periodic heavy cleaning chores. Some initial assessments may reveal that a
home is unhealthy due to prior neglect of Household chores by the veteran. Chore Maintenance allows a
heavy-duty level of cleaning to get the home into a healthy environment for the Veteran. This may include
removal of trash and debris from the home, heavy cleaning (scrubbing floors, washings walls, washing outside
windows) moving heavy furniture, yard clean-up, and walk maintenance and repair.

Consultant – A trained individual who assists individual VD-HCBS participants with understanding the VD-
HCBS requirements, developing a service and support plan and budget, and identifying where or how the
developed service and support plan and budget can be implemented.

Consumer Direction: A belief that emphasizes the ability of older persons, persons with disabilities and,
where appropriate, with the Veteran’s approval, their families, to decide about their own needs and make
choices about what services would best meet those needs. Consumer direction and self-direction are
sometimes used interchangeably.

Electronic Monitoring: This may include the purchase of room monitors similar to baby monitors to place in
the room of the vet and a family member to enable movement monitoring, motion monitors, and other monitor
services not otherwise covered by VA or other insurance programs.

Environmental Services:
 Gutter cleaning
 Home injury Control (installation of grab bars, railings, specialized lighting, etc)

26
 Minor home repair (windows, screens, shower pans, etc as indicated by veteran)
 Painting (interior or exterior)
 Plumbing
 Ramps
 Leaf removal & lawn care (mowing, flower planting, shrub trimming)
 Specialized lighting (motion sensors, outside lighting, etc)

Escort Services: Accompanying and personally assisting the Veteran to obtain a needed service. This may be
provided by a paid caregiver, a paid escort, or service provider. It may include assisting the Veteran in
understanding and filling out applications for services (i.e. social security benefits, Veterans Benefits, Food
stamps, etc)

Financial Management Services (FMS): The FMS is under contract with the AAACT to act on behalf of each
VD-HCBS participant to handle employer-related functions, pay participants’ workers and help the participant
keep track of his/her funds.

Health Maintenance: The provision of services, prescription and medications, and/or other assistive devices
which will prevent, alleviate, and/or cure the onset of acute or chronic illness, increase awareness of special
health needs, and/or improve the emotional well-being of the Veteran. This may include the cost of a caregiver
to escort the veteran to facilitate participation as needed. Some health maintenance services include the
following.
  Continued health maintenance and monitoring not available through insurance or veteran’s benefits
  Cooking classes for caregiver
  Gym or Health Club membership
  Health Counseling
  Health Education
  Massage therapy beyond services traditionally covered by insurance
  Pet Therapy
  Public health maintenance programs (like water exercise classes or cardio-aerobic exercise classes)
  Structured weight reduction programs

Homemaking Services: These include but are not limited to laundry, sweeping and mopping floors, dusting,
changing linens, cleaning the bathroom (Toilet tubs/showers, sinks & floors), cleaning the kitchen
(loading/unloading dishwasher, hand washing dishes, washing off countertops, sinks, floors, and stovetops as
needed). This may also include the preparation of meals, home management, and/or escort services.


Individually identified services or Goods Necessary for Independent Living: These services and goods
are not covered by traditional VA or other resources but are deemed to be necessary for the veteran to remain
independent with the best quality of life as defined by the veteran.

Information and Referral Services: Consists of activities such as assessing the needs of the Veteran,
evaluating appropriate resources, assessing appropriate response modes, indicating organizations capable of
meeting those needs, providing information about each organization to help the Veteran make an informed
choice, helping the Veteran for whom services are not available by locating alternative resources when
necessary, actively participating in linking the Veteran to needed services and following up on referrals to
ensure the service was received or provided.

Nutritional Services: Hot, cold, frozen, dried, or supplemental food which provides a minimum of 1/3 of the
daily recommended dietary allowances (RDA) as established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National
Academy of Sciences – National Research Council.

27
     1) Home delivered Standard Meal – the regular menu from the standard menu that is served to the
       majority of participants.
     2) Therapeutic meal or liquid supplement – a special meal or liquid supplement that has been
       prescribed by a physician and is specifically for the participant by the dietitian (i.e. diabetic diet,
       renal diet, pureed diet, tube feeding)

Participants in VD-HCBS: All veterans enrolled in the VA Health System are Eligible to participate in VD-
HCBS program who meet requirements for the program and state an interest in Consumer Directed services.
Where participants have cognitive impairments, the participant may designate a person (family member or
trusted friend) to be their ―Designated Representative‖ to make decisions or take action for them..

Personal Care Services: These are service tasks provided directly for the veteran’s person and include but
are not limited to assistance in and out of the shower or bath tub, any assistance during the bathing process,
assistance in getting on/off the toilet, brushing teeth/dentures, personal grooming tasks and dressing as well as
providing verbal prompts to taking medication or placing pills from the medication minder into the hands of the
veteran and verbally reminding or physically guiding the veteran to take them.

Respite Care: Respite care provides short term breaks that relieve stress, restore energy, and promote
balance in caregivers of the veteran.
  In-home services can be provided by volunteer or paid help, occasionally or on a regular basis.
     Services may last from a few hours to overnight, and may be arranged directly with an individual,
     family member, or through an agency. Respite services may include meal preparation,
     housekeeping, assistance with personal care and/or social and recreational activities,
  Out-of-home respite care programs include an array of services provided in a congregate or residential
     setting (nursing home, assisted living center, adult day care center) to the veteran in need of supervision.
     Services may include contracted short stay at an area nursing home or other specialized facilities that
     provide emergency and planned overnight services, allowing caretakers 24-hour relief. In addition to
     supervised services, the facility will be expected to provide meals, social and recreational activities,
     personal care, monitoring of health status, medical procedures and/or transportation. (limited to 30 days
     per episode)

Safety Services: These may include a Personal Emergency Response System) or a combination key box for
the door (keeps a key available for easy access to the home by emergency personnel). Safety Services may
include a home safety evaluation by a professional person to assure safety of travel paths and needed durable
medical equipment that may create a safer environment for the veteran.
    1) Personal Emergency Response System includes the installation of the individual monitoring unit, training
        associated with the use of the system, periodic checking to insure that the unit is functioning properly,
        equipment maintenance calls, response to an emergency call by a medical professional, paramedic, or
        volunteer, and follow-up with the veteran.
    2) Combination key box for the door, this keeps a key available for easy access to the home by emergency
        personnel
     3) Home Safety Evaluation by a professional person to assure safety of travel paths and needed
         Durable medical equipment that may create a safer environment for the veteran

Self-Determination: A broad concept that means veteran participants have overall control of their lives and
ability to take part in society. The Veteran has the ability to succeed or fail on his/her own decisions. Self-
determination rests on five basic principles: 1) freedom to lead a meaningful life in the community; 2) authority
over dollars needed for support; 3)support to organize resources in ways that are life-enhancing and
meaningful; 4) responsibility for the wise use of public dollars; and 5) confirmation of the important leadership
that self-advocates must hold in a newly designed system.

28
Self-Direction: A process whereby older persons individuals with disabilities and, where appropriate, families
have high levels of direct involvement, control and choice in identifying, accessing and managing the services
they obtain to meet their personal assistance and other health-related needs. Self-direction and consumer
direction are sometimes used interchangeably.

Services and Supports Plan: A participant plan that contains the services that the participant chooses; the
service(s)’s projected cost, frequency and duration; and the type of provider who furnishes each service. The
plan also includes other services and informal supports that complement services in meeting the participant’s
needs.

Shopping or Running Errands: Shopping with or without the veteran. If the caregiver uses the veteran’s
private vehicle, no mileage is paid. If the care provider uses their own private vehicle for travel, mileage and
travel may be reimbursed as agreed upon with the veteran.

Socialization Support Services: Caregiver to accompany the veteran to activities such as education or
exercise classes, support groups, movies, or other social engagements as indicated by the veteran.
Counseling and support advisory counseling is provided that is beyond services traditionally reimbursed by VA
or other insurances.

Transportation: The HOP, Medicaid Van, or other transport required to go for socialization support or medical
support activities with the designated caregiver may be reimbursed as agreed upon with the veteran. Provision
of transportation assistance may include an escort to a veteran who has special needs (physical or cognitive)
when using regular vehicular transportation.

Veteran Directed Home and Community Based Services (VD-HCBS): The VD-HCBS is a pilot partnership
program with the Area Agency on Aging of Central Texas and the United States Department of Veterans
Affairs through which eligible participants will have the option to control and direct services, supports
and Medicaid funds, using the essential elements of person-centered planning, individual budgeting,
participant protections, and quality assurance and quality improvement.




29
Appendix B. Frequently Asked Questions
            254-770- 2359   1-800-447-7169 ext 2359 (Toll Free)

Q. How can Veterans         A. All veterans enrolled in the VA Health System are Eligible to
qualify for VD-HCBS?        participate in VD-HCBS program. The Veteran must state an
                            interest in consumer directed care, be determined to be ―in need of
                            Nursing home care‖ defined by the VAMC.

Q. Who is the leader        A. The veteran participant is the leader. He/she decides if family
in VD-HCBS?                 members or any other persons should be involved.

Q. What services are        A. The participant decides what services he/she needs. This
included?                   means the participant may choose to buy any services, supports
                            or goods if those services, supports or goods:
                                 • Help the individual to meet his/her functional,
                                 medical and/or social needs and live life successfully;
                                 • Help the individual to reach the goals he/she has set for
                                 himself/herself;
                                 • Are not prohibited by Federal and State laws and
                                 regulations;
                                 • Are not available through another source; and
                                 • Do one or more of the following:
                                       - The service or item would make it easier for the
                                       individual to do things that are hard because of his/her
                                       disability;
                                       - The service or item would increase the individual’s
                                       safety in his/her home environment; and/or
                                       - The service or item would lessen the individual’s need
                                       for VA or other publicly funded services.

Q. How much funding is      A. The amount of funding available for you will be determined by
available for services      the VA contract. Based on your assessment you will be rated as
and who decides how         Basic, Intermediate, or Extensive Service levels. Your consultant
it will be spent?           will have this information and will be able to tell you how much
                            money you have to spend. You may use this money to buy what
                            you need to live in the community. Remember, you do not have to
                            spend all the money available to you. It may accumulate in
                            budgeted amounts over several months to acquire a something
                            that you need to stay in your home and community.


30
Q. Who can help the Veteran A. The Veteran participant decides what services he/she needs
participant develop a plan and   and develops a Service and Support Plan and Budget with the
budget?                          assistance of the consultant and anyone else the Veteran
                                 participant wants to be involved, such as a family member or
                                 trusted friend.

Q. Who hires the service         A.  The Veteran participant decides what workers to hire and how
workers and decides what to      much to pay them. The VD-HCBS Financial Management Service
pay them? Who pays the           (FMS) will pay the workers based on the approved budget,
workers?                         and will handle other employer responsibilities for the participant.


Q. Who can help the Veteran A. The Veteran participant’s consultant can help to implement the
participant with implementing    approved Service and Support Plan. The VD-HCBS FMS will help
the approved plan and            implement the approved budget by paying the Veteran’s workers
budget?                          and keeping track of expenses.


Q. How much flexibility          A. The Veteran participant directs his/her services. The Veteran s
and control will the Veteran     will have flexibility and control over the types of services and
participant have about           supports they purchase, who will provide the services, where and
services?                        when those services and supports will be received, and how much
                                 the workers are paid.


Q. What learning and             A. The Veteran participant will receive information about
training activities              VD-HCBS and how it works from multiple sources:
are included?                    his/her consultant, one-on-one learning and peer
                                 support. Individuals may also study on their own, using
                                 the VD-HCBS Participant Guidebook, worksheets and
                                 other materials.




31
Appendix C. Reference Range of Agency Fees by County
As an employer, one of the most frequent questions posed often is ―How much should I
pay my employee?‖

You will want to provide a fair and just payment for the services that you receive so the
worker that you like and is doing the job you want them to do, in the way you want
them to do it, to stay in your employ. To assist you we have provided a county by
county range of cost survey to show what agencies are currently charging for services
in that county. This may be a good place to start in determining a fair market value on
the services you wish to procure. It is important to note that the worker is actually being
paid less than this amount as the agency has administrative and tax requirements
added to the basic salary of the work that factor into this charge for the services.

You must remember that as an Employer, when you offer a salary you will also be
paying the Social Security and Medicare Taxes for your employees from your own
budget. This means for example if you budget $10 an hour for a service, your
employee may only receive $9.10 per hour the rest being paid for taxes. Your Financial
Management Service will do all of these payments for you but the full charge of these
come from your budget.

County                 Respite Services       Homemaker              Personal Care
Bell County            $9.94 hr - $16.00 hr   $10.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $10.61 hr- $16.00 hr
Milam County           $9.94 hr - $16.00 hr   $10.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $10.61 hr- $16.00 hr
Coryell County         $9.94 hr - $16.00 hr   $10.36 hr -$16.00hr    $10.61 hr- $16.00 hr
Lampasas County        $9.94 hr - $14.02 hr   $10.36 hr -$16.00hr    $10.61 hr- $16.00 hr
San Saba County        $10.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $10.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $11.82 hr-$16.00 hr
Mills County           $10.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $11.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $11.17 hr-$16.00 hr
Hamilton County        $10.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $10.36 hr-$16.00 hr    $11.17 hr-$16.00 hr




32
Place holder for Appendix D pp33-44




33-44
Appendix E. Orientation Forms Employer
In this appendix are located the forms that are specific to the Veteran Employer entering the
VD-HCBS Program. These Forms will be filled out in a meeting with your Consultant. The
forms are:

AAA 2060 Assessment Form and Criteria (VD-HCBS )

Form 1581 VD-HCBS Veteran’s Directed Home and Community Based Services Overview

Form 1581 SRO Veteran’s Directed Home and Community Based Service / Service Responsibility
Option (SRO) Overview

Form 1582 VD-HCBS Consumer Directed Responsibilities

Form 1584 VD-HCBS Consumer Choice Form

Form 1720 VD- HCBS Designated Representative

Form 1721 VD-HCBS Revocation of Designated Representative

Form 1735 VD-HCBS Employer and Financial Management Service Agreement

Form 1736 VS-HCBS Documentation of Employer Orientation On Financial Management Services

Form 1738 VD-HCBS Rules Acknowledgement

Form 1740 VD-HCBS Service Backup Plan

Form 1741 VD-HCBS Corrective Action Plan

Form 1745 VD-HCBS Service Delivery Log

Form 1826-D VD-HCBS Case Information Release

IRS Paperwork: Permissions, Form SS-4 EIN, Form 2678, Form 8821

TWC Form C-42 (Appointment of FMS to serve as Veterans Agent with TWC)

NOTE: the Veteran’s Directed Home and Community Based Services is adapted from the Texas
Administrative Code Title 40 Part 1 Chapter 41 Consumer Directed Service Option which is
available upon request.


45
Appendix F. Orientation Forms Employee

Form 1583 VD-HCBS Employee Responsibilities

Form 1724 New Employee Packet Cover Sheet

Form 1725 Criminal Conviction History and Registry Checks

Form 1727    Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens

Form 1728 Liability Acknowledgement

Form 1729 Applicant Verification for Employees

Form 1730    Wage and Benefits Plan Employee Compensation

Form 1731    Employee Work Schedule and Assigned tasks

Form 1732    Management of Service Provider

Form 1733 Employer and Employee Acknowledgement of Exemption from Nursing Licensure for
Certain Services Delivered through Consumer Directed Services

Form 1734    Service Provider and Employer Certification of Relationship for Employment

Form 1737 VD-HCBS Employer and Employee Service Agreement

Form 1739 VD-HCBS Service Provider Agreement

Form 1745 VD-HCBS Service Delivery Log

Form 1826-D VD-HCBS Case Information Release

OMB Form 1615 I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification

Form W-4 2009 Employees With Holding Allowance Certificate

Form W-5    Earned Income Advanced Payment Certificate




46
APPENDIX G: Information Sheets to help You with your Employees
The following information sheets will help you in working with your employees. The
Information sheets are:
   a) Sample Employer Forms
      1) Attendant Job Description sample
      2) Performance evaluation
      3) Tasks, Training, and schedule for Attendant
      4) Wages and Benefits Plan
      5) Emergency and Other Contact Information
      6) Employment Agreement
   b) Writing Job Ads
   c) Employment Application
   d) Training Workers
   e) Dismissing (Firing) Workers
   f) Emergencies
   g) Governmental Websites




47
Information Sheet : Dismissing (Firing) Workers

Most people do not like having to dismiss or fire someone. However, sometimes that "perfect" person
you hired does not work out. People and situations change. If you find at some point that your worker
is not meeting your needs, you may have to fire that person. Keeping a hiring agreement up-to-date
and keeping a regular schedule for reviewing your employee’s job performance can help you decide if
you have grounds for firing.

Some Grounds for Firing
The reasons to fire someone will vary. Here are some of the most common reasons:
    The employee’s work does not meet agreed upon expectations.
    The employee does not learn fast enough to meet your changing needs.
    The employee is late or fails to show up too many times.
    The employee’s personal habits bother you.
    The employee does not pay attention to your instructions.
    You find you are having too many arguments.
    You do not feel safe and comfortable with the employee.
    The employee has a schedule that is not flexible enough for you.
    The employee violates your employment conditions, seriously or often.

Grounds for Immediate Firing
Some actions by a worker may be grounds for firing him right away. You should have
put these in your hiring agreement, as we talked about earlier. Hopefully you covered
these with your worker when s/he started working for you.

These grounds include actions such as:
    Drinking on the job
    Using illegal drugs on the job
    Coming to work impaired by alcohol or drugs
    Being caught stealing from you
    Abusing you in any way
    Violating your confidentiality

How to Dismiss or Fire Workers
Weigh all your options before you fire a worker. Maybe trying to work things out with the employee
might be better. Trying to hire a new one will take time and effort and there is no guarantee your new
employee will be a better worker.

How you decide to handle firing a worker will depend upon your personality, your employee’s
personality, and the situation. You might want to get advice from your Consultant, and make sure
your back-up plan is available before you fire your worker. However, if firing is your decision, consider
the following questions.
   -   How should you tell the employee you are firing him/her? Doing it by phone or letter may feel
       safer and/or easier, but doing it "in person" is more respectful. Having a third person, such as
       your designated representative, tell the employee s/he is fired is also an option.

   -   What reasons should you give the employee for firing him/her? If you have been giving plenty
       of feedback and doing regular evaluations, the worker should not be surprised. S/He should
       also know what you have said are grounds for firing. In some cases, something may happen or
       some very serious problem may arise that you have not addressed in your guidelines or
       evaluations. In most cases, give the employee some idea of why you are firing him/her, but
       you do not have to go into great detail.

   -   How will the worker react? Have a neighbor, friend, relative, or consultant in the room with you
       and your worker if you feel there may be a problem when you bring up the subject of firing.

   -   How much notice should you give your worker? Be fair, but remember that if you give the
       worker advance notice, you may risk even more problems with his or her work and behavior.

   -   Who will provide your support once you fire the worker? Before you fire your present
       employee, have at least one backup worker ready to step in right away.

   -   Are you safe and secure? If the worker you fired had access to the keys to your residence or
       car, get them back on the same day that you fire the individual.

   -   Learn from the experience. After you have had some time to consider the situation, think about
       what you have learned from it. Would you deal with the situation in a different way? Was there
       a question you would have asked in the interview process that would have helped you realize
       that this was not the person for you?


Once you fire an employee, contact your Consultant and your Financial Management Service
right away. The Financial Management Service will need to make changes to the employee’s work
file and to your records.

								
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