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ARES Training Course

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					ARES Training Course




   Amateur Radio
 Emergency Services
  Typical ARES Objective

  This session is designed to
establish and provide training
for a core group of emergency
        communicators.
Typical ARES Objective
This group will provide emergency
communications in time of need for
Police, Red Cross, Municipal or
other agencies as requested.
  Introduction to ARES
At the end of this session, you will
have a clearer understanding of
what ARES is, how it functions at
the different levels and how it
provides community service in
times of need.
Typical ARES Objectives
This group will consist of licensed
Amateur Radio operators and other
volunteers who will respond to
training, exercises and public
service activities which require
radio communications, including
declared emergencies.
  Typical ARES Objectives
This group will become the nucleus of
skilled and trained radio operators
who will establish the first line of
communications at the emergency
site and will assume supervision of the
amateur communications network.
           Overview
The Amateur Radio Emergency
Service (ARES) was created by ARRL
(Amateur Radio Relay League) in
1935.

There are more than 70,000 ARES
members throughout North America.
            Overview
Canadian radio amateurs agreed to
provide communications for the
Canadian Red Cross in a 1980
agreement, following successful
cooperation during the Mississauga
train derailment and evacuation.
           Overview
Radio Amateurs of Canada was
formed in 1993 with the merger of
Canadian Radio Relay League and
Canadian Amateur Radio Federation.
            Overview
The Amateur Radio Emergency
Service and National Traffic System,
which were part of CRRL, are now
both part of the Radio Amateurs of
Canada Field Services Organization.
    Organizational Structure
• FSM Field Service Manager
• SM Section Manager
• SEC Section Emergency Coordinator
• DEC District emergency Coordinator
• EC Emergency Coordinator
• AEC Assistant Emergency
  Coordinator
• The Members
    Field Services Manager
• The Field Services Manager is an
  Elected Position, entitled Vice
  President, Field Services.
• The FSM carries out the policies as set
  out by the RAC Board of Directors.
• The FSM maintains liaison with other
  organizations at the national level.
• The FSM is Bob Cooke, VE3BDB.
         Section Manager
• The Section Manager (SM) is elected by the
  RAC board of directors.
• The Ontario SM is Alan Boyd, VE3AJB.
• The Assistant SM is Phil McBride, VA3QR.
• The SM manages the field organization
  activities in a given RAC section, of which
  there are eight in Canada.
• The SM is responsible for traffic handling,
  emergency communications and on-air
  bulletins.
        District Emergency
           Coordinator
• The DEC is appointed by the SEC to
  supervise a group of EC‟s (Emergency
  Coordinators) in a concentrated population
  area.
• The DEC coordinates EC activities,
  interfacing between ARES and local
  emergency plans.
• The DEC recommends EC appointments.
• The DEC for the Ottawa region is Michael
  Hickey, VE3IPC.
  Emergency Coordinator
• Is appointed to handle the direction
  of all ARES activities in a given area.
• Promotes ARES co-ordinates
  training and organization and
  conducts exercises.
• Establishes links to other
  organizations requiring assistance.
  Emergency Coordinator
• Sets up ARES Radio Nets. These are
  radio nets prepared to handle messages
  during an emergency.
 (A Net is a meeting of amateurs using their radio equipment.)

• Conducts pre-planning sessions and
  develops a local ARES manual.
• The EC for Cornwall is Tim Smith,
  VE3HCB.
• The EC for SD&G is John Baynham,
  VA3OW
      Assistant Emergency
          Coordinator
• Is appointed by the EC to assist with all
  the duties of the EC.
• There can be as many AECs as
  required to do the job.
• The AEC does not have to be a RAC
  member.
       ARES Members
• The members are by far the most
  important persons in ARES.
• They are the active and dedicated
  members required to make it all
  happen.
• They do the hard work during an
  emergency.
• The ARES operator does not have to
  be a RAC member.
           Preplanning
• It is essential that the ARES group
  does as much preplanning as
  possible to help reduce the last
  minute actions down to a
  manageable amount.
• Establish a steering committee
  within the ARES group to make
  decisions and formulate plans that
  will be put into place in the event of
  an emergency.
               Preplanning
              Issues to be resolved are:
•   A call up tree for phoning all members.
    (home and business)
•   A list of names and phone numbers of ARES
    members in adjacent regions to assist in the
    event of a large or lengthy emergency.
•   Repeater and simplex frequencies be used.
    (including alternates)
•   Installation of equipment at predesignated
    emergency operation Centres.
           Preplanning
       Issues to be resolved are:
• Preparation of ready kits to assist in
  setting up stations.
• Checklists of equipment and
  personal articles required.
• Instructions on establishing
  stations.
           Preplanning
       Issues to be resolved are:
• Interfacing with agencies being
  served to clarify our role.
• Establishing shifts for extended
  operations.
• Training of members.
          Call-Up Tree
• Required for a „First Response‟
• Should be organized
  Geographically.
• Consists of active ARES members
  who will be available for the initial
  callout.
• This list should be reviewed often to
  assure that those listed meet the
  criteria for first Response.
          Call-Up Tree
• It is not always necessary to activate
  all members on a call-up tree. The
  situation has to be evaluated and the
  manpower required called in.
• The other members would be placed
  on standby.
• When non-ARES members respond
  to a real emergency, the trained
  ARES members function as
  supervisors.
          Call-Up Tree

The Call Up Tree should also include a
list of names and phone numbers of
members in adjacent regions to assist
in the event of a large or lengthy
emergency.
     Assigned Frequencies
Assigned Frequencies to be used in a declared
emergency in the Cornwall area:

– 147.180 MHz VE3SVC Repeater
– 147.520 MHz VHF Simplex Calling
  Frequency
– 443.000 MHz VE3PGC Repeater if UHF
  radios available
– 444.450 MHz VA3EDG Repeater if UHF
  radios available
– 446.000 MHz UHF Simplex Calling
  Frequency
  Pre-Installed Equipment
• The EOC(s) should have, at the very
  least, an outdoor VHF/UHF antenna
  with coax into the Radio Operator‟s
  workstation. The coax should have
  both BNC and PL259 terminations.
  ARES operators will bring their own
  radios.
• Equipment may be pre-installed at
  the EOC.
  Pre-Installed Equipment
• Shelters should have an outdoor
  VHF/UHF antenna with coax into the
  location where the assigned ARES
  operator will be located. The coax
  should have both BNC and PL259
  terminations.
• ARES operators will bring their own
  radios.
     Training
• Initial and ongoing
  training
• Exercises
• Public Service Events
• Nets
• Regular Meetings
• Agencies Serviced
• Published Articles
              RECAP
• ARES is a national Structure
• Planning is done at the local level
• ACTIVE members are required
• Maintain a “First Response”
  Procedure
• Ongoing training is essential
The Big Picture
        The Big Picture
At the end of this session, you will
understand the hierarchy of the
emergency structure for the local area
and the sequence of actions that will
serve the mobilization of the ARES in
times of an emergency.
            Overview
In any emergency situation, ARES will
provide communications only for
those agencies requesting
assistance. Rarely would ARES
provide any other service, although it
could happen that ARES members
may be asked to do some other chore
if required and if it did not prevent
them from performing their assigned
communications task.
            Overview
The specific agencies dealt with and
the extent of the interaction with
ARES should be spelled out in formal
predetermined understandings so
that both parties are aware of each
others needs and obligations
             Overview
As one of the support groups in any
emergency operation, ARES does not
normally initiate any action until they
are notified by one of the agencies
they are serving.

At that time the local ARES will put
their own emergency plan into effect,
responding to the specific situation at
hand.
      Sample Procedure

Presented here is a sequence of
events that would likely occur in the
event of a declared emergency.

Please note that this is a “text book”
scenario and may change based on
the actual emergency.
                Details

• A disaster occurs within the
  community

• Police are notified and respond to the
  scene
                 Details
Police assess the situation and call for
specific aid:
•   More police
•   Fire trucks
•   Public Utilities
•   Ambulances and medical personnel
•   Hazardous material containment team
              Details
• Specific agencies would be notified
  and put on standby under the
  Emergency Plan
• Social Services become involved
  when people require food, clothing
  or shelter.
• Red Cross is called if shelters are to
  be established
• ARES will be notified if
  communications are required
     ARES gets called out

• The DEC, EC or AEC will be called
  with a request for aid and an initial
  assessment of the situation.
• The DEC, EC and/or AEC quickly
  confer to assess the situation and
  determine what actions are required.
           Initiate Call-up
• The call-up tree is activated to alert
  members, assign a temporary net
  controller and to make announcements
  on the local emergency frequency
• The members are advised whether they
  are to:
  •   Standby for further instructions
  •   Report to a shelter or office
  •   Report to a central rally point for instructions
  •   And to establish a permanent net control
      station (NCS)
     DEC/EC/AEC Actions
• Meet at EOC or where requested for
  further instructions and to liaison to
  other agencies
• Provide additional communications
  if requested by the:
 • Police Department,
 • Fire Department or
 • Municipal Offices
    • (Emergency Management Committee)
     DEC/EC/AEC Actions
• Provide long term plans
• Establish a logistics Net if required
• Determine manpower for additional
  shifts.
• Designate a team to coordinate
  manpower
• Call ARES members that are on
  standby
    DEC/EC/AEC Actions

• Call local non-ARES members for
  assistance
• Call EC or AEC of adjacent ARES for
  assistance
• Put out a general on-air call for
  anyone to assist
• Establish an alternate frequency to
  accommodate call-ins.
    DEC/EC/AEC Actions
• Continue until requested to stand
  down
• Conduct a debriefing after the event
  to learn valuable lessons:
 • What went right
 • What didn‟t
             Recap
• Provide communications as required
• Red Cross involved for sheltering
  only
• ARES is called by Red Cross
• Alert members via call-up methods
• Set up at EOC
• Establish scheduling and logistics
  support
• Learn from the event
   NET
 CONTROL
PROTOCOL
NET CONTROL PROTOCOL
• OBJECTIVE:
  – At the end of this session, you will
    understand how to act as a net
    controller, directing call-in stations
    authoritatively and calmly.
  – You will also know how to properly
    call into a controlled net and how to
    convey pertinent information in a
    concise manner.
Sample Exchange with
    Net Control
  Net Control
    This is             Crash Site
  Crash Site              This is
                       Net Control,
                           Over
  Net Control,
  I need relief
operators at this      Crash Site,
    site, Over       We will get back
                     To you on that,
                          Over
 Net Control,
  Message
 Understood,            Crash Site
     Out            This is Net Control,
                            Out
  NET CONTROL PROTOCOL

• Radio operators must hold a certificate
  with qualifications appropriate to the
  frequency bands being used.
  – A certificate with Basic qualifications is
    adequate for a VHF/UHF net, but additional
    qualifications are needed for HF nets.
  NET CONTROL PROTOCOL
• All Nets will be controlled nets
  – This means that there will be ONE station,
    known as the NET CONTROL STATION
    (NCS) into which other stations will call.
• The NCS will then direct the
  actions of the calling station.
  – This will provide Organization, Efficiency
    of Operation, and a stable or familiar
    environment for the radio operator during
    a time of stress
NET CONTROL PROTOCOL
• Stations involved in the net should
  use tactical call signs (i.e.: Crash
  Site).
  – These should be chosen to be clear and
    sensible for all and to avoid similarity in
    the calls.
  – They should be rigorously used for the
    duration of the exercise/emergency.
  – The use of tactical calls requires that
    stations identify periodically using a
    proper amateur radio call-sign in order
    to conform to radio regulations.
NET CONTROL PROTOCOL
          Tactical Call Signs:


VA3EDG                             VA3TL
SHELTER                             RED
  ONE                              CROSS



                VA3WMS
                  NET
                CONTROL



VA3PUR                             VE3HCB
SHELTER                          EMERGENCY
  TWO                            OPERATIONS
NET CONTROL PROTOCOL
• Speak in a calm and steady manner.
  – A hastily given message saves no
   time if it is not understood and has
   to be repeated.
• Leave a short pause after the
  previous station finishes transmitting.
  – This allows other stations to call if
    they have emergency traffic.
  – It also allows the message recipient
    to finish handling the message.
       ANNOUNCE THE NET
• When commencing a NET, the
  controller should announce the purpose
  of the net and that the repeater will be
  taken out of regular use for the
  operations.
• The NCS should re-announce the net
  and request a clear frequency from
  stations not in the exercise/emergency.
  – This is recommended to alert stations that have
    just turned on their radios during a quiet time, and
    may not be aware of the operation being
    conducted.
      PASSING MESSAGES
• The NCS frequency should only be used for
  coordinating purposes or the handling of
  short messages, when time permits
• For the passing of lengthy messages, the
  NCS should contact both stations and
  request that they move to another frequency
  which the NCS assigns and they both agree
  to.
• Both stations should acknowledge the move
  and let the NCS know when they return to the
  net.
• By assigning alternate frequencies, many
  messages can be passed at the same time.
        PASSING MESSAGES
Net Control, This is
Shelter One, Over
                       Shelter One, This is
                        Net Control, Go
Net Control, I have          Ahead
a message for Red
   Cross, Over          Red Cross, This is
                          Net Control,
                             Over
Net Control, This is
 Red Cross, Over       Red Cross, Shelter
                       One has a message
                        for you. Call them
                       on this frequency,
                               Over
Shelter One, this is
 Red Cross, Over
                        Red Cross, This is
                       Shelter One. Is John
                          Smith at your
Shelter One, Red         location, Over
Cross, will check
and call you back,
                       Roger, Shelter One,
       Out
                       Back to Net Control,
                               Out
     UNATTENDED RADIOS

• The Net Controller must NEVER leave
  the radio unattended. Always make
  sure someone is acting as the NCS,
  even if it requires turning control over
  to a totally separate station.
 TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

• Most clubs have their own weekly or
  monthly net. ARES members should
  take turns acting as Net Controller for
  these nets to gain experience and
  familiarity with being a net controller.
 TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

• They should run the net using the same
  format as would be used in an actual
  emergency.
  – Simply monitoring other nets is also a
    good way to obtain the feel of how a net is
    run. Listen to the Ontario Phone Net on
    3742Khz at 7:00 pm every night.
    ACKNOWLEDGE CALLS

• Always acknowledge all calls so the
  calling station knows it was heard. If it
  is not possible to process the call
  immediately, at least tell the caller to
  stand by.
                            LOG SHEET
  With many stations passing messages
  on alternate frequencies, the NCS needs
  a way to track them. The log sheet
  below shows the information that should
  be recorded.
NET CONTROL                                  FREQUENCY
CALL SIGN
Msg   TIME    STN CALLING   PRIORITY   RTN   STN CALLED   RTN   FREQUENCY   REMARKS
Nmr
          CALL-IN STATION
• Use ITU phonetics for clarity only if
  required. The Phonetics are covered later.
• When calling in an urgent request,
  announce your intentions briefly, e.g.:
  “Net Control, this is Crash Site. I have a
  priority message for Red Cross
  Headquarters.”
• If you don‟t receive a reply, call again in a
  few minutes – don‟t give up. If you still
  cannot contact the NCS, check your
  equipment or location.
        CALL-IN STATION
    RECEIVING A CALL FROM THE NCS
• Give the NCS call, then your own,
  followed by “over”
• When given instructions by the NCS,
  acknowledge them as understood and
  announce your intentions.
• Ask for clarification if you don‟t
  understand the net controllers
  instructions. Do not assume anything.
           CALL-IN STATION
      RECEIVING A CALL FROM THE NCS
•   If you require further instructions from
    the NCS, terminate your call with “over”
•   If this is the end of your exchange with
    the NCS, terminate your call with “out”
•   When leaving the net, always inform the
    NCS so that he does not waste valuable
    time attempting to contact you
•   When returning to the net, contact the
    NCS.
         CALL-IN STATION
• PASS FORMAL MESSAGES EXACTLY AS
             WRITTEN!
  – Unless it makes no sense, in which case you
    should ask for clarification.
• Do not try to interpret what you think the
  writer meant. Code-words may be in use
  in the message.
• DO NOT PASS AN UNSIGNED MESSAGE
          CALL-IN STATION
• Do NOT engage in any extraneous talk with
  the NCS or other stations – this only clutters
  the NCS frequency needlessly.
• Use Crisp, Clear Factual transmissions.
• Think about what you are going to say before
  calling in. This will avoid lengthy
  transmissions.
• Remember that anyone may be monitoring
  your frequency. The manner in which you
  behave can leave lasting impressions.
        CALL-IN STATION
• Do NOT say BREAK to gain access
  between transmissions; give your call
  letters. This way the NCS knows
  someone needs immediate attention and
  who it is.
• Don‟t break in during transmissions.
• Once a message is fully received,
  confirm it by saying “message received”
  or “message acknowledged” or “I
  acknowledge your message number 17”
                RECAP…
• All nets will be controlled. All calls will
  be directed by the NET CONTROL
  STATION.
• Stations using the net should use
  tactical call signs (e.g.: Crash Site).
  Amateur call signs should be used only
  periodically in order to conform to radio
  regulations.
               RECAP…
• Speak in a calm and steady manner
• Leave a short pause after the previous
  station finishes transmitting
• Net Controller should announce the
  purpose of the net and that the repeater
  will be taken out of regular use for the
  duration of the operation
              RECAP…
• The Net Controller must never leave the
  radio unattended
• ARES members should be encouraged
  to act as Net Controllers during weekly
  or monthly training nets
• Net Controller should acknowledge all
  calls made to the station
• Use ITU phonetics for clarity only
              RECAP…
• Acknowledge any instructions given by
  Net Control. Ask for clarification if
  necessary
• Inform Net Control if you are leaving or
  returning to the net
• Pass formal messages exactly as written
• Do not engage in extraneous talk
• Acknowledge receipt of messages
PERSONAL
READINESS
 PERSONAL READINESS
Objective:

At the end if this session, you will
have a clear understanding of what
can be done, as an individual, to
assure efficient operation during
an emergency.
   PERSONAL READINESS
               General
• Once an emergency is declared, it is
  the responsibility of the individual
  amateurs involved to perform in their
  most efficient manner.
• Their effectiveness will, in part, be
  determined by how well they have
  taken care of personal preparations,
  some of which are listed on the next
  pages:
   PERSONAL READINESS
               General
Make sure all your equipment is in good
working order. Faulty or intermittent
equipment that is an annoyance in day-
to-day operating can become a major
impediment during an emergency.
(Remember, Murphy says things will
only get worse.)
   PERSONAL READINESS
               General
Know what the emergency plan is for
your area. This will be covered in your
ARES communications manual (we
have to create one yet for the Cornwall
area) covering such points as:
    PERSONAL READINESS
                    General
• Repeaters or frequencies to be used:
  – Do you know what your primary repeater will be
    in an emergency?
  – Will you use a simplex frequency for your
    operations?
  – What is the contingency if the repeater fails?
  – What backup repeaters will be used?
  – Does the repeater have emergency power?
  – Are you aware of any control codes required for
    the repeater?
  – Who has access to the repeater for
    maintenance?
   PERSONAL READINESS
                General
• Emergency Coordinators
  – Who are the ECs and AECs for the area?
• Existing Facilities
  – What buildings have antennas already
    erected?
  – What locations have radios permanently
    installed?
  – How do you get access to these
    locations?
     PERSONAL READINESS
                    General
• Supplies
 –   Is there a cache of supplies available?
 –   Where is it and how is it accessed?
 –   What is available?
 –   Does someone periodically check it?
 –   Do you have a personal „ready kit‟?
 –   Would it enable you to establish an emergency
     station?
   PERSONAL READINESS
                  General
• The Call – Up Tree:
  – Do you have the latest copy?
  – Is there a copy at work, at home, in your
    vehicle?
  – Are your phone numbers and address correct?
  – Do you know what to do if no-one answers?
  – What if you get an answering machine?
   PERSONAL READINESS

                    General
• The First Alert
  – What do you do when you get alerted?
  – Where do you go when you get alerted?
   PERSONAL READINESS
Have some form of emergency power.
• For hand-held radios you should have a
  spare battery pack and keep in the habit of
  changing these regularly.
• One of the “shell” battery packs is a handy
  item. These allow you to insert alkaline
  batteries, which are recommended, since
  they don‟t tend to lose their charge when
  not in use the way that a Ni Cad battery will.
   PERSONAL READINESS
Have some form of emergency power.

• Does everyone have a spare battery
  pack?
• Do you have a routine for recharging
  batteries?
   PERSONAL READINESS
Have some form of emergency power.

• A car battery provides an excellent
  means of powering a base station for
  extended operation. It will be good for
  several hours of intermittent
  operation.
   PERSONAL READINESS
Have some form of emergency power.

• Make sure that you have a spare fuse
  for the radio in case the original one
  blows.
 – Tape it to the power cord
• Does everyone have spare fuses?
   PERSONAL READINESS
      Keep spare antennas ready.
• A magnetic mount antenna is a good choice
  since it can be attached to any metallic
  surface to form a ground plane.
• If you must operate inside a building where
  reception is poor, a coax extension (with
  appropriate connectors) should be
  available to assist you in mounting the
  antenna in a more ideal location
PERSONAL READINESS

     Does everyone have a
    spare portable antenna
       that can be easily
   transported and erected?
 PERSONAL READINESS
Practice your skills wherever
possible.
 – Participate in public service
   activities,
 – Handle messages and
 – Check into nets
So that you can constantly practice
activities that will be required in an
emergency.
   PERSONAL READINESS
Prepare a ready kit. Common items
such as pens paper, message forms,
repeater directory, flashlight, log
sheets, candles, matches, batteries,
etc; stored in a handy container will
assist you in quickly setting up a
station if required.
PERSONAL READINESS

 Don‟t assume that anyone
else will be providing these
items; you may be the only
one there!
   PERSONAL READINESS

Register your availability. If you intend
to be an active participant, make sure
your name is included in the call-up list
which is vital for a speedy first
response
   PERSONAL READINESS

Monitor the local emergency frequency
often. (147.180) Whether at home or in
your car, this will be the best way for
you to have the soonest possible
notification of an emergency condition.
   PERSONAL READINESS
                 RECAP
• Always keep radio equipment in top
  operating condition
• Stay familiar with the emergency plan
  for your area
• Don‟t depend on regular power
  sources – have alternates
   PERSONAL READINESS
                 RECAP
• Practice operating skills regularly
• Prepare a kit with items used to run
  an emergency station
• Make your availability known
  STATION
SUPERVISOR
   DUTIES
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
               OBJECTIVES
At the end of this session, you will be aware
of the role that the Station Supervisor plays
in setting up and running an emergency
radio station.

You will also know how to interface with
other workers at the radio site so as to
facilitate an efficient flow of information
between the agency being served and other
radio sites in the operation.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
     THE STATION SUPERVISOR

 The Station Supervisor is the ARES
 member in charge of all of the ARES
 communications at an outsite, i.e.:
  – a shelter,
  – the incident site,
  – a hospital,
  – the Red Cross depot, etc
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
     THE STATION SUPERVISOR

The person acting as the supervisor
must be a trained and active ARES
member. He/She must be familiar with
the emergency plan and how to put it
into effect.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
            INITIAL SETUP

As soon as possible after the initial
shift supervisor arrives at the site, he
should establish where the station
will be physically located, taking into
account accessibility, antenna
erection, privacy and facilities.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
              INITIAL SETUP
• The Station Supervisor must contact the
  Manager of the location.
• The radio room must be mutually agreeable
  and convenient for both.
• It must be established early what the
  routing of the messages is within the site.
• He should keep the Location Manager
  informed of any changes to the station
  which would affect the running of the
  location; such as shutting down the station,
  or moving it.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
      BEGINNING OPERATION

Once the station is operational, call
the NCS and announce your location,
your tactical call sign and your state
of readiness.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
             STATION LOG
The station manager should begin a
log of the activities at the station. This
should include Time Started, Location
and Operators on Duty.

As the operation progresses, record
pertinent information of items that
affect communications and action
taken to resolve them if necessary
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
            STATION LOG

Formal message logging is not required
as all details about the message
transactions are recorded on the
message forms.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
                 STATION LOG
COMPLETENESS OF THE LOG IS IMPORTANT
All of the messages and logs become part of a
legal document that has to be available for use
during an investigation and all of it has to be
admissible to a court of law. Even the notes
you make on bits of paper that pertain to the
communications activities must be kept.

Keep your logs accurate, simple, clear and
readable.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
              STATION LOG
 COMPLETENESS OF THE LOG IS IMPORTANT
      for post-emergency purposes!

The ARES group itself may require it for
self-evaluation and improvement or the
authorities may request it for an inquest or
for legal matters.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
             STATION LOG

Times on the log should be stated using
the 24 hour clock.
i.e. Write 1500 hours, not 3:00 pm.

Dates should be written as Month (in full
or 3 letter abbreviation) date and year.
For Example, January 29, 2005.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
        RADIO ROOM SECURITY

Make sure the radio room is kept secure
and occupied only by those on duty for
that shift. All other amateurs and shelter
personnel should be kept from the room
so as to not distract operators with their
talking. A separate room with a door
should be used if possible.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
        THIRD PARTY CONTACT
Any interfacing between the communica-
tions people and the location people, or
anyone else, is done by the supervisor.

This should be done outside the radio
room to avoid disturbing the radio
operators.
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
     THIRD PARTY CONTACT

DO NOT RELEASE ANY INFORMATION
    ABOUT THE DETAILS OF THE
 OPERATION TO ANY THIRD PARTY!
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
          THIRD PARTY CONTACT
Do not release any information about the
details of the operation to any third party!
This is often how the press gets material
for their articles.
Much confusion can be caused if facts are
taken out of context or misunderstood.
   (With the Standard Freeholder, this is the norm.)
STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
       THIRD PARTY CONTACT
Do not release any information about
the details of the operation to any third
party!
The release of restricted information
could reflect badly on the ARES group.
Anyone requesting information should
be referred to the person on location
responsible for public information.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
           CHANGING NEEDS
It is the duty of the Station Supervisor
to recognize changing telecommuni-
cations needs within the location and
act accordingly.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
          CHANGING NEEDS
If additional operators or equipment
are required, the supervisor should
initiate whatever action is needed;
keeping in mind total resources
available and the possible duration
of the emergency situation.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
            CHANGING SHIFTS
• Make sure that operators reporting for
  the next shift identify themselves by
  signing in on the log.
• Do not let the previous shift leave until
  the new one arrives.
• Attempt a ten minute overlap so the
  new shift has a feel for the situation and
  what actions are pending.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
           CHANGING SHIFTS
• A formal briefing should take place for
  the handover from one shift to another.
  The debriefing would include:
 –   Basic procedure and policy
 –   How messages are routed within the site
 –   Who the location manager is
 –   Any equipment concerns or issues
 –   General activities within the location
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
                 RECAP
• The station manager must be a trained
  ARES member familiar with the
  emergency plan.

• Upon arrival at the location, the station
  manager should identify himself to the
  location manager. The location of the
  station should then be identified.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
                   RECAP
• Once the station is operational, the
  station manager should contact the net
  control station announce location,
  tactical call sign and state of
  readiness.

• The station manager should begin a log
  of events
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
                 RECAP
• The radio room should only be
  occupied by those operators on duty.
  The room must be kept secure at all
  times.

• Interfacing with other location
  personnel will be done through the
  station manager only.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
                 RECAP
• No information should be released to
  third parties.

• Any request for information should be
  directed to the public information
  representative on location.
 STATION SUPERVISOR DUTIES
                 RECAP
• The station manager must
  acknowledge and act upon changing
  telecommunications needs

• There should be a 10 minute overlap of
  incoming and outgoing shift personnel.
  During this time, a briefing will take
  place.
MESSAGE
HANDLING
    MESSAGE HANDLING

            OBJECTIVE

At the end of this session, you will
be familiar with the standard RAC
message form; including what
information is to be inserted in each
field and the proper procedure for
passing the message to another
station.
                 MESSAGE HANDLING
            Standard RAC message form
                                       RADIOGRAM
Number   Precedence     HX   Station of Origin   Check    Place of Origin        Time Filed           Date


                                                                         This Radio Message Was Received At
To:                                                             Amateur Station __________________ Phone ___________
                                                                Name ______________________________________________
                                                                Street Address _____________________________________
                                                                City ________________________________________________
Phone:
________________   ________________    ________________   ________________            ________________
________________   ________________    ________________   ________________            ________________
________________   ________________    ________________   ________________            ________________
________________   ________________    ________________   ________________            ________________
________________   ________________    ________________   ________________            ________________
________________   ________________    ________________   ________________            ________________



          From        Date      Time                         From            Date              Time
REC‟D                                            SENT
                  MESSAGE HANDLING
               Standard RAC message form
                                           RADIOGRAM
Number     Precedence      HX     Station of Origin     Check   Place of Origin        Time Filed           Date


                                                                               This Radio Message Was Received At
The Preamble part of the form contains the following:
To:                                                                   Amateur Station __________________ Phone ___________
                                                                      Name ______________________________________________
1.    The Message Number.                                             Street Address _____________________________________
                                                                      City ________________________________________________
Phone:
     1.    A sequential number is assigned to each message to be transmitted. This number will be used for
           filing all ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
________________ messages sent from the station. If you need to reply to a message or inquire about one
           of yours, refer to the message number in question.
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
2.   Precedence.
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
     1.    The originator will indicate the PRECEDENCE of the message. THIS MAY NOT BE ALTERED BY
           THE RADIO OPERATOR. There are four precedence's used; EMERGENCY, ________________
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ PRIORITY, WELFARE
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
           AND ROUTINE.
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
3.   Station of Origin.
      1.    Messages will indicate the call sign of the station of origin. Tactical call signs may be used
            provided the message is not sent through normal Amateur Channels (i.e. National Traffic System)
            Otherwise, a regular Amateur Radio call sign is used.
            From        Date         Time                              From          Date         Time
REC‟D                                                     SENT
                   MESSAGE HANDLING
               Standard RAC message form
                                             RADIOGRAM
Number     Precedence       HX    Station of Origin      Check    Place of Origin         Time Filed           Date


                                                                                  This Radio Message Was Received At
The Preamble part of the form also contains the following:
To:                                                                      Amateur Station __________________ Phone ___________
                                                                         Name ______________________________________________
•     Word Check                                                         Street Address _____________________________________
                                                                         City ________________________________________________
Phone: indicates how many words, Letter/number groups and punctuation signs thee are in the text of the
     This
     message. Closing remarks such as ________________ 73, 88 are included the text and word
________________ ________________ best wishes, yours truly,________________ in________________
     count. This is so the message integrity can be checked at each stage of it‟s journey.
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
•    Place of Origin
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
     The LOCATION of the originator is the place of origination. This is not necessarily the same as the
     location of the ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
________________ originating radio station.
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
•    Time Filed
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
      Optional for use of the radio operator When used, the filing time should be local time, in 24 hour format.
      If the message will be travelling outside the originating time zone then UTC/GMT times should be used,
      and should be indicated.
•     Date Filed
            From         Date         Time                            From            Date              Time
REC‟D                                                   SENT
    This will be written as the Month, followed by the Day and the Year. I.E. Jan 29, 2005
                  MESSAGE HANDLING
               Standard RAC message form
                                          RADIOGRAM
Number     Precedence      HX    Station of Origin     Check    Place of Origin        Time Filed           Date


                                                                               This Radio Message Was Received At
To:                                                                   Amateur Station __________________ Phone ___________
                                                                      Name ______________________________________________
                                                                      Street Address _____________________________________
                                                                      City ________________________________________________
Phone:
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________

The Addressee of the message goes in the area labelled „To:‟, and a telephone number (or other routing
instruction) is generally necessary if the message has to be forwarded away from the destination radio
             From          Date        Time                          From       Date        Time
station.
 REC‟D                                                   SENT
                  MESSAGE HANDLING
               Standard RAC message form
                                           RADIOGRAM
Number     Precedence      HX    Station of Origin     Check    Place of Origin         Time Filed           Date


                                                                                This Radio Message Was Received At
To:                                                                    Amateur Station __________________ Phone ___________
                                                                       Name ______________________________________________
                                                                       Street Address _____________________________________
                                                                       City ________________________________________________
Phone:
________________     ________________      ________________      ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________      ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________      ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________      ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________      ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________      ________________            ________________


The actual message goes on the lines, one word on each underline section. This makes checking the word
            From          Date        Time                           From        Date         Time
count much easier. It is to be completed by the person originating the message. Try to keep the messages to
25 words or less, although longer messages can be handled.
REC‟D                                                    SENT
                  MESSAGE HANDLING
               Standard RAC message form
                                           RADIOGRAM
Number     Precedence      HX    Station of Origin     Check    Place of Origin        Time Filed           Date


                                                                               This Radio Message Was Received At
To:                                                                   Amateur Station __________________ Phone ___________
                                                                      Name ______________________________________________
                                                                      Street Address _____________________________________
                                                                      City ________________________________________________
Phone:
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________
________________     ________________      ________________     ________________            ________________


The originator of the message puts his/her name and title in this area of the message form. An address and
            From         Date        Time                             From        Date
telephone number may be included. IT IS TO BE COMPLETED BY THE PERSON ORIGINATINGTime         THE
MESSAGE.
 REC‟D                                                  SENT
                   MESSAGE HANDLING
               Standard RAC message form
                                            RADIOGRAM
Number     Precedence       HX    Station of Origin     Check     Place of Origin          Time Filed           Date


                                                                                   This Radio Message Was Received At
To:                                                                       Amateur Station __________________ Phone ___________
                                                                          Name ______________________________________________
                                                                          Street Address _____________________________________
                                                                          City ________________________________________________
Phone:
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
Each radio station that receives and forwards the message indicates in the bottom section of the form the
following information ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
________________ about the relaying of the message:
________________ was Received From or Sent To:
1. Who the message ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
________________ ________________ Sent
2. The Date the message was Received or ________________ ________________ ________________
________________ ________________ Sent
3. The Time the message was Received or
                                           ________________ ________________ ________________
________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
This is used for tracking the progress of the message should anything undesirable happen to it, or for
calculating how long messages are taking to get to their destinations


            From         Date        Time                            To                Date              Time
REC‟D                                                    SENT
        MESSAGE HANDLING
          Reception of Messages
Record an incoming message using the RAC
Radiogram form.
PRINT ALL INFORMATION LEGIBLY. Complete
the bottom left field marked RCV‟D noting the
station it was received from, the date and time
of reception. Local date and time may be used.
Deliver the message to the person designated
for the reception of radio messages at your
location.
        MESSAGE HANDLING
              Informal Traffic

Informal traffic should be restricted to the
provision of direct personal contact between
officials of the agency being served.
It should be carried out on an alternative
frequency from the formal traffic whenever
possible.
          MESSAGE HANDLING
                  Informal Traffic
• Contact should be established between the amateur
  operators before handing over the microphone to the
  officials.
• Be sure the official is familiar with the operation of the
  equipment before the conversation begins.
• Once the traffic is completed, the amateurs should
  sign off in the usual manner.
• The radio amateur is in charge of the station and
  responsible for all transmissions from that station.
       MESSAGE HANDLING
            Informal Traffic
• Informal traffic concerning Radio
  Operations should be carried out by the
  Radio Shift Supervisor, or designate,
  according to the procedures outlined on
  the previous screen.
          MESSAGE HANDLING
                        RECAP
A formal message contains four parts:
• Preamble: The record keeping part
• Address:   The party to whom the message is being sent

• Text:      What the sender wants to tell the recipient

• Signature Identifies the sender of the message
• The message forms must be legible and
  completed in full.
LOGGER &
OPERATOR
 DUTIES
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
            OBJECTIVE

 At the end of this session, you will
 understand the role of the operator
 and the logger in the operation of
 an emergency station.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
              GENERAL DUTIES
All nets will be controlled nets. This means that
there will be one station, known as the NET
CONTROL STATION (NCS) into which all other
stations will call.

The NCS will then direct the actions of the
calling stations. This will provide organization,
efficiency of operation and a stable or familiar
environment for the radio operators during a
time of stress.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
            GENERAL DUTIES


All stations should ideally be staffed by THREE
amateurs having distinct roles, although more
personnel may be enlisted for a particularly
busy station.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
             GENERAL DUTIES
                The positions are:
• Station Supervisor
   • A trained and active ARES member who will
    take charge of the station.
• Operator
   • The person who will do the actual radio
    operating, and
• Logger
   • The person who will handle the log and
    messages being passed.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
             GENERAL DUTIES
• Stations involved in the net should use
  TACTICAL CALL SIGNS (e.g. CRASH SITE).
  These must be chosen to be clear and sensible
  to all and avoid similarity in the calls.
• They should be rigorously used for the duration
  of the exercise/emergency.
• However, the use of tactical calls requires that
  stations identify periodically using a proper
  Amateur Radio Call sign in order to conform to
  radio regulations.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
            GENERAL DUTIES

When passing a message, leave a short
pause after the previous station finishes
transmitting. This allows other stations to
call in if they have emergency messages.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
            GENERAL DUTIES

Report to the station about 10 minutes
prior to your assigned time to allow an
overlap with the previous shift. This will
enable you to get the “feel” of the
operation and be made aware of any
pending actions or situations that will
carry over into your shift.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
           GENERAL DUTIES

Remember that you may have trouble
getting to the site and trouble accessing
the site if conditions are bad. Leave
yourself adequate time for these delays
when you plan your departure time from
home.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
            GENERAL DUTIES

If you take a break during your shift,
remove yourself completely from the
station for a complete recess from the
situation. A break should be just that, a
break.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
         GENERAL DUTIES

The operator and logger should not
converse with anyone other than
themselves or the station supervisor.

It is the Supervisor‟s job to interact
with other personnel at the location.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
        GENERAL DUTIES

Sign in on the log when assuming
shift duties.

Operator and logger positions may
be rotated during the shift. However,
they may only act as the station
supervisor if they are trained and
active ARES members.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
         GENERAL DUTIES

Amateurs are expected to make
available their equipment for use at
the station they are participating at,
although some stations may have
permanent installations.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
           GENERAL DUTIES

Hand Held radios, due to their low
power and sensitivity should not be
used if a base station radio is available.

ARES members should have a “ready
box” consisting of those items required
to properly support station activities.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
   ANNOUNCE THE NET (NCS only)

When commencing the net, the NCS
operator should announce the purpose
of the net and that the repeater will be
taken out of normal use for the duration
of the exercise or emergency.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
   ANNOUNCE THE NET (NCS only)
At periodic intervals, when there is a lull
in the traffic, the NCS operator should
re-announce the purpose of the net and
request a clear frequency from stations
not participating in the exercise or
emergency. This is to alert stations that
have just turned on their radios and may
not be aware of the operation.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
        PASSING MESSAGES
The NCS frequency should only be used
for coordinating purposes or for the
handling of short messages if time
permits.
For the passage of lengthy messages or
several messages at the same time, the
NCS should contact both stations and
move them to another frequency.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
        PASSING MESSAGES
Both stations should acknowledge the
move and let the NCS know when they
return to the net.

By assigning alternate frequencies,
many messages can be passed at the
same time.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
        UNATTENDED RADIOS
NEVER leave the radio unattended.
Always make sure that someone is
acting as the operator, even if it means
temporarily turning control over to a
completely separate station.

Obtain permission from the NCS before
doing this.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
        ACKNOWLEDGE CALLS
Always acknowledge all calls so the
calling station knows it was heard.

If it is not possible to process the call
immediately, at least tell the caller to
stand by.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
       ACKNOWLEDGE CALLS
Use ITU phonetics for clarity only if
required. They slow you down too much
if they are not required.

ITU phonetics will be covered in the
next module.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
       ACKNOWLEDGE CALLS
• Do not engage in any extraneous talk
  with stations on the net; this only
  causes clutter on the NCS frequency.
• Use crisp, clear factual transmissions.
• Speak in a calm and steady manner. A
  hastily given message saves no time if
  it is not understood and has to be
  repeated.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
        ACKNOWLEDGE CALLS
• Think about what you want to say
  before calling another station. This will
  avoid lengthy transmissions.
• Remember that anyone could be
  listening to your transmissions!
• When first establishing a station at a
  location, inform the NCS just as soon
  as you are operable. Don‟t assume he
  knows that you are operable.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
                LOGGER

It is the responsibility of the logger to
keep track of all paperwork at the
station, including the station log started
by the station supervisor, messages
sent by the station and messages
received by the station.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
              LOGGER

Make sure you are aware of the routing
 of messages within your location.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
              LOGGER

 Messages to be sent by the station
 should be quickly scrutinized by the
 logger for proper form and referred
 back to the originator, via the station
 supervisor, for any corrections or
 clarifications, if required.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
               LOGGER
• The message preamble, text and
  signature must all conform to standard
  RAC message form requirements.
• The message content MUST NOT be
  changed in any way without the
  agreement of the Originator.
• ALL messages MUST have the signature
  and position of the Originator.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
               LOGGER
• Messages received by the station should
  be neatly printed and promptly passed
  to the recipient.

• Transmitted messages should be filed
  by message number.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
             LOGGER
 The station log should include time
 started, location and operators on
 duty.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
               LOGGER
As the operation progresses, any
pertinent information should be
recorded, such as bands and equipment
used, shift changes, informal traffic
handled (parties involved and general
topic), operators on duty for a shift and
other events affecting communications.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
                LOGGER
Formal message logging is not required
as all details about the transaction are
recorded on the message form.
 LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
                LOGGER
    COMPLETENESS OF THE LOG IS
              IMPORTANT
     for post-emergency purposes!

The ARES group itself may require it for
self-evaluation and improvement or the
authorities may request it for an inquest
or for legal matters.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
                 RECAP
The logger and the operator at an
emergency radio station are the two
most “hands on” people in an
emergency operation. They form the
direct link to other stations and
agencies involved in the operation.
The operator will talk directly with all
the other operators, passing formal
and informal messages in an efficient
manner.
LOGGER & OPERATOR DUTIES
                 RECAP
The logger must keep track of all
incoming and outgoing messages,
making sure they follow the proper
format and that they are relayed to the
appropriate recipient.

Remember, your work must be able to
survive a possibly hostile investigation.
   ITU
PHONETIC
ALPHABET
  ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET
             OBJECTIVE
At the conclusion of this section, you
will be able to recite the ITU
(International Telecommunications
Union) phonetic alphabet, and verbally
communicate a variety of emergency
messages utilizing the phonetic
alphabet.
  ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET
     THE PHONETIC ALPHABET
    – what it is and why it is used.
• It is a set of standardized words that
  represent each letter of the
  alphabet and individual numerals.
• Standardization makes it easier for
  radio operators from around the
  world to communicate
    ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET
             A - Alpha          T - Tango
             B - Bravo          U – Uniform
             C - Charlie        V – Victor
             D - Delta          W – Whiskey
             E – Echo           X – X-ray
             F – Foxtrot        Y – Yankee
             G – Golf           Z – Zulu
             H – Hotel          1 – wun
             I – India          2 – too
             J – Juliet         3 – tree
             K – Kilo           4 – four
             L – Lima           5 – fife
             M – Mike           6 – six
             N – November       7 – sev-en
             O – Oscar          8 – ate
             P – Papa           9 – niner
             Q – Quebec         10 – ten or wun-zero
             R – Romeo
             S - Sierra




(note that 5 and 9 have distinct pronunciations because
    they are very easy to confuse in bad conditions)
   ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET
When the phonetic alphabet is used:
• The phonetic alphabet is used
  whenever a mistake in spelling may
  occur, particularly when sending
  messages.
• ARES members are encouraged to
  identify their stations by spelling our
  their call-signs using phonetics. Other
  non-ARES stations will soon catch on
  to the practice.
  ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET
When the phonetic alphabet is used:
• Numerical figures should be sent as if
  they were written out. e.g. 1093
  should be sent as: „figures wun zero
  niner three‟ and not as „one thousand
  ninety three‟.
• When sending messages using
  phonetics, only use the standard ITU
  phonetic alphabet.
 ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET


DO NOT MAKE UP CATCHY PHRASES
 OR USE NON-STANDARD WORDS.

         It can cost lives.
  ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET
               RECAP

• The phonetic alphabet is used to
  ensure the clear, concise
  transmission of messages.
• The phonetic alphabet should only be
  used when there may be a mistake in
  spelling.
  ITU PHONETIC ALPHABET
               RECAP
• It is good practice to identify your
  station using phonetics.
• Figures should be sent as if they
  were written out.
• When using phonetics, use only the
  standard ITU alphabet – do not
  make up catchy phrases or use non-
  standard words.
SIMULATED
EMERGENCY
  TESTS
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST

             OBJECTIVE

At the end of this session, you will be
able to identify and explain what a
Simulated Emergency Test is and why
it is conducted.
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST
                  (SET)
What a SET is:

• A SET is a training exercise designed
  to test plans, procedures, policies and
  equipment under conditions which
  most resemble those which may be
  present in a real life emergency.
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST
                  (SET)



SET‟s are NOT MEANT TO TEST PEOPLE
in their emergency roles.
  – Testing people may cause undue stress.
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST
                 (SET)


• SET‟s are meant to be a learning
  experience.
• If things go wrong, that is part of
  the experience.
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST
                 (SET)


Lessons learned from conducting
SET‟s will contribute to the overall
state of readiness.
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST
                 (SET)

 SET‟s may be conducted at varying
 intervals and at varying degrees,
 from simple table-top exercises
 involving only ARES members, to
 full-scale exercises involving other
 emergency service organizations.
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST
              (SET)



 SET‟s should be well planned
 and depict scenarios that are
   relevant to the location.
SIMULATED EMERGENCY TEST
              RECAP

• Simulated Emergency Tests are
  meant to test Plans, Procedures,
  Policies and Equipment
• SETs are not meant to test people
• SETs are a learning experience –
  when things go wrong, lessons are
  learned.
ESTABLISHING
     A
  STATION
 ESTABLISHING A STATION
           OBJECTIVE



At the conclusion of the session,
     you will understand the
   procedure for setting up an
       emergency station.
 ESTABLISHING A STATION
 Authorization to establish a station

Establishing a station or stations for
telecommunications during an
emergency or exercise should only
be commenced upon authorization
by the Amateur Radio Emergency
Coordinator.
   ESTABLISHING A STATION
  Each one of these circles represents a „Station‟



VA3EDG                                       VA3TL
SHELTER                                       RED
  ONE                                        CROSS



                    VA3WMS
                      NET
                    CONTROL



VA3PUR                                      VE3HCB
SHELTER                                   EMERGENCY
  TWO                                     OPERATIONS
 ESTABLISHING A STATION
The Emergency Coordinator will have
a prearranged agreement with the
emergency service personnel in the
area regarding when, where and how
emergency telecommunications will
be provided by ARES members. This
agreement should be included in the
emergency plan.
ESTABLISHING A STATION

The Emergency Coordinator will
determine the ARES resources
required and the initial plan of
action.
ESTABLISHING A STATION

The coordinator will relay this
plan to the respective ARES
members through the use of
emergency notification.
ESTABLISHING A STATION

This notification should include
what action is required, by who
and within what time frame.
ESTABLISHING A STATION

Consideration should be given
as to the estimated duration of
the emergency situation in
order to adequately deploy
ARES resources.
ESTABLISHING A STATION

Do not deploy all resources at
the outset of the emergency.
You may need people as a
resource pool for the rotating
personnel.
ESTABLISHING A STATION


During emergency situations
involving ARES members,
one or more stations may be
established.
 ESTABLISHING A STATION

• Upon arrival at the station,
  identify yourself as an
  Amateur Radio Operator.
• Proceed to the predetermined
  station location or determine
  suitable locations.
 ESTABLISHING A STATION

• The area should be accessible
  to the normal recipient of the
  messages.

• However, access to the area
  should be limited.
 ESTABLISHING A STATION

• Select an area with minimal
  noise.
• Identify the station with a large
  clear sign identifying the area as
  a telecommunications room.
ESTABLISHING A STATION

 The station will consist of a
 minimum of three amateur
 radio personnel:
• the station supervisor,
• the operator and
• the logger
   ESTABLISHING A STATION
• The station supervisor will oversee
  operations and interface with the
  location manager.
• The logger will prepare and check
  messages and handle filing and
  distribution.
• The operator will be responsible
  for transmitting and receiving the
  messages.
ESTABLISHING A STATION



All three positions can be
rotated to alleviate undue
stress on any one individual.
  ESTABLISHING A STATION

The routing of messages within the
location should be established as
soon as possible.

Message handling should conform
to standard procedure.
 ESTABLISHING A STATION

Shift changes should overlap by
at least ten minutes in order for
personnel to brief the incoming
members.

When shift personnel change,
Net Control should be informed
ESTABLISHING A STATION


All traffic must be done via
the controlled traffic nets.
  (Refer back to slide 57 for a picture of the process)
  ESTABLISHING A STATION


The Telecommunications room
should be kept clear of all non-
operating personnel.
  ESTABLISHING A STATION
The Telecommunications room should
be kept in a neat orderly fashion. Only
equipment being used, or backup
equipment should be in the room.

Personal radios or other equipment
not used in the operation should be off
and out of the way.
   ESTABLISHING A STATION
                RECAP

• The ARES Emergency Coordinator
  will authorize the establishment of
  stations

• The station location should be pre-
  determined in the emergency plan.
  Alternate locations should be
  considered.
  ESTABLISHING A STATION
                RECAP

• The station will consist of a station
  supervisor, a logger and an operator.
  Additional personnel may be added
  as required.

• Messages should be handled
  according to standard procedures.
WHAT DOES AN
   ARES
 VOLUNTEER
 LOOK LIKE?
WHAT DOES AN ARES VOLUNTEER
        LOOK LIKE?
        OBJECTIVE

 At the end of the session, the
 student will understand what
 an ARES volunteer is and
 what is expected of them.
WHAT DOES AN ARES VOLUNTEER
        LOOK LIKE?
Being an ARES volunteer does not
require a great amount of time
commitment.
Nor does it require you to be an
experienced radio operator with a
lot of equipment and experience in
emergency preparedness.
     ARES VOLUNTEERS:
• Come in a variety of sizes, shapes
  colours and backgrounds, and
  have various skills & experiences.
• Are, or are about to become,
  licensed Amateur Radio
  Operators.
• You do not need to belong to any
  particular club to be an ARES
  volunteer.
     ARES VOLUNTEERS:
• Are team players.
• Have needs, goals, attitudes,
  strengths and weaknesses – just
  like anyone else.
• Are interested in utilizing their
  expertise in radio communications
  in performing a public service.
     ARES VOLUNTEERS:
What is expected of an ARES volunteer?
  ARES Volunteers:
  • Are a group of dedicated,
    enthusiastic radio operators
    willing to assist the public
    during emergency and non-
    emergency times.
      ARES VOLUNTEERS:
What is expected of an ARES volunteer?
  ARES Volunteers:
  • Work as cohesive team players

  • Are interested in participating in a
    variety of training exercises
    including events such as nets,
    notification drills and simulated
    emergency tests
      ARES VOLUNTEERS:
What is expected of an ARES volunteer?
  ARES Volunteers:
  • Are interested in expanding their
    knowledge and are willing to share their
    knowledge and experience.
  • Are not required to commit a great deal
    of time.
  • Are interested in meeting new friends
    and having fun while learning new skills.
      ARES VOLUNTEERS:
While in the event of an actual emergency,
ARES volunteers may be asked to
participate in telecommunications
operations, it is recognized that first and
foremost, volunteers must address their own
personal safety needs and those of their
loved ones.
Once the volunteer‟s immediate needs are
addressed, they are better able to serve the
public as part of the ARES team.

				
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