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mwhipple_final

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  • pg 1
									          Mark W. Whipple

     Submitted in partial fulfillment
of the course requirements for INST 596
               April, 2009
        Ragen D. Tiliakos, Ed. D.
        Bridgewater State College
Can a social networking site be

used in a high school classroom

to increase student engagement

and collaboration?

              M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
A 2007 study found that 55 percent of teens
between the ages of 12 and 17 had created a
profile on MySpace or Facebook.
                                 (Lenhart, A., et. al. , December 19 2007 p. i)


     In 2008 the Attorneys General of the U.S. signed
     an agreement with MySpace which sought to
     address concerns about online safety.
                  (Angus, M. & Attorneys General of the United States 2008)



                                      M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
An Internet-based community, where members
post information and media pertaining to
themselves, and have the opportunity to find and
interact with other members, particularly those
with shared real-life interests or experiences.
                                          (Wikipeida, 2008)



                            M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Sixty-eight ninth grade students participated in
  a teacher-controlled online social network.

 Students assumed the persona of a historical
  figure and created a profile page for that
  character.

 The students interacted with each other in
  persona, using affinity groups and “wall” posts.


                            M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 This research project is challenging due to its

  scope and the requirement for critical thinking.


 Traditional research activities are solitary, not

  collaborative


 A social networking activity may increase student

  engagement and allow for more collaboration
                            M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Current Trends Among Teens

 Public Perceptions

 Reaction and Reality

 Summary




                         M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Nearly all teens have used some type of social
  networking technology (96%) (National School Board
  Association, 2007 )



 Many already have a profile on a social
  networking site (55%) (Lenhart & Madden, April 2007 )

 Nearly 60% talk about educational topics and
  more than 50% talk specifically about
  schoolwork (National School Board Association, 2007 )

                                M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 In 2008, the U.S. Attorneys General signed an agreement
  with MySpace to address child safety issues (Angus e.al.
  2008).


 “Social networking sites simply serve as the White Pages
  for pedophiles” (Baker & Favata, 2007).

        More than half of school districts surveyed have
           specifically prohibited the use of social networking
           sites in school (NSBA, 2007).


                                   M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Fewer than 3% of students say unwelcome
 strangers have tried repeatedly to
 communicate with them online

          • Only 2% say a stranger they met
          online tried to meet them in
          person

 Only .08% of all students say they’ve actually
 met someone in person from an online
 encounter without their parents’ permission
 (NSBA, 2007).



                       M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Most teens are regular users of social networks,

  often regarding schoolwork



 State officials and school administrators have

  many concerns regarding social networks.



 Those risks tend to be vastly over-estimated


                         M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Observation of student behavior during
 the social networking site activity using
 videotape recording

 Post-activity survey of student reactions
 to the activity

 Interview with the students’ teacher
 regarding her reactions to the activity


                      M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
Summary
 Students enjoyed the activity

 Many spent additional time on the activity
(outside of class)

 Behavior (engagement) results are difficult
to interpret

 Social studies teacher felt activity was
beneficial, particularly in the near future

                          M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Q1. Enjoyed using the social networking site
                97.3% agree

 Q3. I liked interacting with my classmates
 online during this project:
                81.1% agree


                           M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Q5. During this project I learned a lot from
 looking at my classmates’ profile pages:
                62.2% agree

 Q. 7 Nearly 30% spent at least some time on
 the project outside of class.


                            M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Only 8 students were observed


 The videotape did not allow the degree of
 detail expected

 Students who talked frequently did not
 seem to have their work negatively affected

 The behaviors that were expected to
 indicate engagement did not do so

                     M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 For students to take seriously the task of challenging
 each other, it needs to happen in a public forum, and it
 works best if there is some competition involved.

 By posting their arguments in the social network, they
 can receive feedback from their peers earlier in the
 process. It’s also iterative – they can make changes and
 get more feedback right away.



                                  M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 “. . . there’s no way I can provide the students with
 the same degree of choice [in a classroom activity]
 as a social network. “

 “Instead of having to try to remember facts about a
 random historical figure, each student chooses to
 post feedback or challenges on the pages of
 historical figures they are familiar with.”




                                 M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 Students enjoyed the activity, and they found some of
 the collaboration helpful

 The time they spent on the project suggests they were
 more engaged

 Students talking to each other during an activity does
 not necessarily result in reduced productivity.


                                 M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 The SS teacher was very positive about the benefits of
 this type of activity, even if those benefits came after
 the study was over

 The use of social networking as a classroom activity
 warrants additional research.




                                  M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
 How to accurately identify/measure behaviors that indicate
  student engagement, particularly in a project-based
  classroom.

 Longer study: more classes, pre-study control observations


 Does student enjoyment of an activity lead to increased
  performance?

 Can an SNS be used to foster/refine critical thinking skills
  through the prodding and challenging of peers?

                                    M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009
   Angus, M. & Attorneys General of the United States. Joint Statement On Key Principles of Social
    Networking Sites Safety. January 14, 2008. Retrieved September 18, 2008, from
    http://www.oag.state.va.us/KEY_ISSUES/FAMILY_INTERNET/Joint%20Statement%20on%20Key%2
    0Principles%20of%20Social%20Networking%20Sites%20Safety.pdf Web site of VA Attorney General.
   Baker, M. & Favata, C. (2007, December 1). Do Social Networking Applications Have a Place in the
    Classroom? Learning & Leading with Technology, 34, 4. Retrieved October 10, 2008, from
    www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Publications/LL/LLIssues/Volume_34_2006_2007_/Decemb
    er_January_4_/34408b.pdf.
   Lenhart, A., & Madden, M. (2007, April 18). Teens, privacy, & online social networks. Pew Internet and
    American Life Project Report. Retrieved 26 October from
    http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Teens
   Lenhart, A., & Madden, M. (2007, December 19). Teens, and Social Media. Pew Internet and American
    Life Project Report. Retrieved 29 September from
    http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_Teens_Social_Media_Final.pdf
   National School Boards Association. (2007, July). Creating and connecting: Research and guidelines on
    online social—and educational—networking. Alexandria, VA. Retrieved October 24, 2008 from
    http://www.nsba.org/SecondaryMenu/TLN/CreatingandConnecting.aspx_Privacy_SNS_Report_Final
    .pdf
   Wikipedia. Social Networking Service. Retrieved October 26, 2008, from
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_networking_service



                                                              M. Whipple – Social Networking - Spring 2009

								
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