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					Thammasat
   IMBA
  Bringing the
   3Is to Life

  PIM 2010,
 New Zealand
 Creating Change Makers in Thailand:
           Three Questions

• Q 1: Why should we care (in Thailand, in Asia,
  or anywhere else, for that matter)?
• Q 2: What do we mean by ‘Change Maker’?
• Q 3: What is IMBA doing to Create Change
  Makers?
         Why Should We Care?
• In the Knowledge Economy Rewards Come
  From Creating Value in Innovative or Creative
  Ways…
• What does that mean?
Why Wasn’t the IPOD Developed in
           Thailand?




                    Why do we care?

                    We can always buy
                    one from Apple!
     H1: Thailand Doesn’t Have the
               Technology
• Thailand makes (or is capable of making) all of
  the components now…
  H2: Thailand Doesn’t Have Style or
         Design Capabilities?
• Thailand has many creative designers in
  fashion, jewelry, furniture, software…many
  reaching international audiences.
  What is Important in KE: Reward for
                Value
What Value Does the IPOD Provide?
• Store lots of songs:
  – Hard Drive Supplier gets $75 of the IPOD selling price.
• Read songs/watch video:
  – Display supplier gets $23.
• Able to read compressed music files:
  – Controller/processor supplier gets $13.
• Long-lasting playing time:
  – Battery supplier gets $3.
         Why Should We Care?
• Apple’s suppliers receive ONLY a total of $145
  of the IPOD’s selling price.
  – This has been Thailand’s (and Asia’s) recent role:
    manufacturer and supplier.
• Apple receives $154 of the IPOD’s $299 selling
  price.
  – For Designing and Creating—that’s how the
    Knowledge Economy is different.
   Question 2: What do we mean by
          ‘Change Maker’?
• Thailand is already at, or near, the top in the
  World in Entrepreneurship.
      (If you believe studies like Babson College’s Global
          Entrepreneurship Monitor, or other similar…)
• But…little differentiation, and not high value.
• Change Makers = creating something different
  and valuable.
• Change Makers: Taking Entrepreneurship in
  Thailand to the Next Level.
    Not necessarily about skills and
             capabilities:
IMBA Focus: Mindset and Motivation
•View Problems As Opportunities.
•Solve Big Problems.
•Write own job descriptions.
•Challenge fears.
•Leverage for maximum impact.
•Move Into Action.
Question 3: What is Thammasat IMBA
  doing to Create Change Makers?
• Our Basic Raw Materials:
  Entrepreneurs who…
   – Want to start new companies.
   – Change Makers who want to
     innovate in existing companies.
   – Change Makers who want to
     innovate in other organizations.
• Motivate people to build their



                                        International
  entrepreneurial ambition in one




                                                        Impact
  or more of the 3 I’s:
   – International
   – Innovation
   – Impact
              How? Curriculum
First Year:
• Develop Broad
     Skills
• Gather Ideas




    Second Year:
    • Specialize (China Track, Japan
        Track)
    • Identify and Develop
        Opportunities
                 How? Action
Selling Project: Raised THB
700K (about $25K) for local
NGOs in two months.
Market Research Project:
Real Research, Real
Companies.
Real Technology
Development:
Winning Business Plans:
Real Companies
                         Links
• Stanford Technology Ventures
  Program
• UC Berkeley--Global Social
  Venture Competition
• Hitotsubashi University, Japan
• Shanghai University of Finance
  and Economics, China
• Green MBA Program, USA
• Rice University Business Plan
  Competition
• National Science and
  Development Agency
                Expertise
Attempting to find an optimum mix between:
• Practical and business theory, and
• Local and international viewpoints.
IMBA utilizes:
• Local entrepreneurs and business people.
• Local business experts.
• International experts.
GLOBAL SOCIAL VENTURE COMPETITION
                        Southeast Asia
                        2010 Performance Report
  Global Social Venture
      Competition

“Promote entrepreneurial start-ups with
   measurable triple bottom lines. “
    Global Social Venture Competition


• Launched in 1999 by UC                  Financial Profit
  Berkeley
• In 2010, GSVC welcomed
  500 teams worldwide.
• The largest and oldest
  global graduate-student                               Environmental
                              Social Benefit
  competition to promote                                   Benefits
  entrepreneurial start-ups
  with triple measurable
  bottom line
            GSVC Partners
                Thammasat
                 Business
     London       School        Indian
     Business                  School of
      School                   Business


Columbia        Haas School            Essec
Business        of Business,         Business
 School         UC Berkeley           School
                     GSVC Ventures
• Around 25% of the plans in the Global Finals
  became real businesses in various categories:
  •   Education
  •   Non-Profit
  •   Community Development
  •   Finance
  •   Environment/Technology
  •   Healthcare
  •   Others
  • For more information, visit www.gsvc.org
      Sample Ventures from GSVC
• Ethos Water  World of Good    Micro Energy
                                  Credits
    Sample Ventures from GSVC
• D-Light    Revolution Foods
                 WHAT’S DIFFERENT?
                                          • Business solves
            Financial Profit                social or
                                            environmental
                                            problem.
                                          • Profitable
                          Environmental
Social Benefit
                             Benefit
                                          • Sustainable

         Triple Bottom Line
        NOT JUST COMPETITION

Community              Knowledge             Opportunity
Building               Sharing               Creating
- volunteer judges,    - Workshop            - New social
staff, students,
schools                                      venture start up
                       - Competition
- NGO, firms, social   - Symposium
org
                       - Student-run event
- Everyone who has
like-mind thoughts
            ACTIVITY FLOW




Sep-Dec   Jan     Mar       Apr
      GSVC IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

• Founded in 2008.
• Recruit 3 winning teams to the Global Finals
   – 2 Overall Winners
   – 1 Best Social Impact Assessment
• In only 3 years, 5 real social ventures are up-
  running.
• Covering Southeast Asian countries and Oceania
• More than 24 universities from 10 countries
  participated.
GSVC-SEA Success Stories
            • GSVC-SEA Finalist in 2008
            • empowering off-grid communities
              in the Philippines by pursuing
              sustainable solutions in renewable
              energy.
            • supporting local produce such as
              lemongrass oil by expanding their
              markets and engaging in
              community-centered product
GSVC-SEA Success Stories
            • New Zealand Team
            • GSVC-SEA Social Impact
              Assessment (SIA) Winner and GSVC
              Global SIA Winner in 2009
            • Applications that fuse immersive
              gaming principles with Cognitive
              Behavioural Therapy / CBT. In the
              ideal world, there would be access
              to quality face to face therapy for
              every child who needed it e.g. Kids
              with Asperger, Autism.
            • Selling their product online.
GSVC-SEA Success Stories
            • Thailand Team
            • An online platform to research
              how happiness can be improved
              for different types of people. data
              will be both useful for the
              government and private sector for
              improving happiness by providing
              the right kind activities for their
              targets.
            • Piloting their e-survey.
            • Winner of GSVC-SEA 2010
GSVC-SEA Success Stories
            • Thailand Team
            • A cost-effective and patented
              technology and realize increased
              productivity while reducing the risk
              of disease and contamination.
              Their solution consists of indoor,
              re‐circulating water systems that
              enable farmers to raise aquatic
              animals in high‐density conditions
              without needing to perform water
              changes.
            • In the incubation program of
              Thailand Science Park
            • Finalist of GSVC-SEA 2010
GSVC-SEA Success Stories
            •   The PhilippinesTeam
            •   Reducing post-consumer waste
                through more sustainable retail
                systems. It leverages its social impact
                through varied distribution methods
                that deliver quality, affordable and
                locally produced eco-friendly
                household and personal care products
                that utilize less packaging and
                encourage more environmental
                awareness in consumer practice
            •   Piloting their products with Hapinoy,
                the biggest social retail chain in the
                country.
            •   Social Impact Assessment of GSVC-SEA
                2010
GSVC 2010-2011
• Open for executive
  summaries till 15
  Jan 2011.
• GSVC-SEA Finals and
  Social
  Entrepreneurship
  Symposium 2-4 Mar
  2011
• www.gsvc-sea.org
  PRELIMINARY ROUND JUDGING
95 judges joined us.
PRELIMINARY ROUND JUDGING
       GSVC-SEA FINAL ROUND
• 11 Plans from 5 Countries (Thailand,
  Indonesia, Vietnam, The Philippines, and
  Singapore) competed against each other.
• 30 students from TU supported
• 10 professional judges attended in final round
       GSVC-SEA FINAL ROUND
 1st Day
    Students Walk Rally
    60 Second Pitch/ Opening Ceremony
 2nd Day
    Competition
    Net Impact Meeting Program
    Award ceremony
 3rd Day
    Social Entrepreneurship Symposium
GSVC-SEA FINAL COMPETITION
GSVC-SEA FINAL COMPETITION
GSVC-SEA FINAL COMPETITION
NET IMPACT PROFESSIONAL CHAPTER
           LUNCHOEN
• “HIP Investor (Human, Impact + Profit)” by R.
  Paul Herman, CEO, HIP Investor Inc.
• Coordinated with Net Impact Professional
  Chapter.
NET IMPACT PROFESSIONAL CHAPTER
           LUNCHOEN
AWARD CEREMONY
AWARD CEREMONY
             COMPETITION RESULT
       WINNER

Freehap, Thailand
Chulalongkorn University
Thammasat University

Social networking web to find
Realistic and measurable way
To help people increase their
Happiness.
              COMPETITION RESULT
          WINNER

Amandes, Indonesia
Prestiya Mulya Business School

Providing drinking water to people
in remote coastal area by using
solar energy to purify seawater.
             COMPETITION RESULT
    Best Social Impact
       Assessment

Puno, Philippines
Ateneo de Manila Graduate
School of Business

A sustainable retail system
delivering personal care product
with less packaging to reduce
post-consumer waste.
SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP
       SYMPOSIUM

           Over 200 participants
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS AND
     PANELISTS
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS AND PANELISTS
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS AND PANELISTS
                 Conclusions
1)   Inspire change
2)   Create action
3)   Network with experts
4)   Create Value
5)   Focus on Sustainability
    Sound Interesting?

   Contact IMBA:
www.bus.tu.ac.th/imba
 Contact GSVC-SEA:
  www.gsvc-sea.org

				
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