All of this relates to Scimitar SE

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All of this relates to a Scimitar SE5a. I would expect there to be stuff that will be useful to
other Scimitars (SE6‟s). The information in this doc ument is stuff that I have found on various
message Boards. The questions asked and answered seem to be repe ated so it would
appear that the information is as comprehensive as it‟s going to be. I hope it is of help to
someone as I had copied and pasted for my own use. To Format etc so others can make
sense of it has taken a “Few” minutes so I hope it is of use t o someone. I‟m sure t here are
some errors but it should make sense. Your spell check could go into warp drive.

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Alphabetical Index.
I suspect that I have made some mistakes with page numbers but it should mak e sense.
                                                                                        Page Number.

38 DGAS Settings.                                                                           4
5a Door Handles.                                                                            5
Alternate Alternators.                                                                      6
Auto to Manual Rear Axel Ratio.                                                             7
Body Lifting for Welding.                                                                   8
Brake Bleeding.                                                                             9
Bleeding Clutch                                                                             109
Bumpers.                                                                                    11
Cam Gear Change.                                                                            12
Camwheel Change, 2.                                                                         14
Camshaft Removal with Heads on.                                                             16
Carb Overhaul.                                                                              17
Clutch Fluid Type.                                                                          18
Clutch/Overdrive Slip.                                                                      19
Clutch Overdrive Slip, 2.                                                                   22
Clutch wont Disengage.                                                                      25
Decoke.                                                                                     26
Disc Groove. Trunnion Bolt.                                                                 28
Door Adjustment.                                                                            29
Fit Rear Window Seal.                                                                       30
Fitting Piston Rings and Gap Position.                                                      31
Fitting Polly Bushes.                                                                       32
Fitting Rear Brak e Cylinders.                                                              34
Fitting Shocker Bushes.                                                                     35
Fitting Windscreen/ Rubber.                                                                 36
Five Speed Gearboxes.                                                                       38
Flickering Ignition Warning Light.                                                          39
Free Play in Steering.                                                                      40
Front – Rear Springs.                                                                       41
Gear Select Problems.                                                                       42
Gearbox Check Adjust.                                                                       43
Gearbox Oil.                                                                                44
Gearbox Removal.                                                                            46
Gearbox removal. My Version.                                                                47
Gearbox Selector Oil Seals.                                                                 49
Getting at Wiper Wheel box es.                                                              50
Grinding Inlet Valves.                                                                      51
Grease Squirting out of Trunnions.                                                          112
Head Gaskets.                                                                               52
Heat er Repairs.                                                                            53
Heat er Shut off Valve.                                                                     54
Ignition Switch Operation and Repair.                                                       115
Ignition Warning Light.                                                                     55
Inlet Valve Coating.                                                                        56
Lifting off Body.                                                                           57
Master Cylinder Repair and Bleed Nipples Seized.                                            58
Oil Pump Info                                                                               121



                                                                                                       1
2

Overcharging & Alternate Alternator.                59
Overdrive Faulty after 20 Miles.                    61
Overdrive Faulty.                                   62
Overdrive in Other Gears.                           63
Overdrive Problems.                                 64
Overdrive ( Replacing )                             123
Paint Stripping.                                    65
Rear Axel Wheel Bearings (Greasing).                120
Rear Axel Breat hers.                               66
Rear Axel Filler Plug.                              67
Rear Axel Oil Seal.                                 68
Rear Axel Oil Seal 2.                               118
Rear Axel Ratio.                                    69
Rear Wheel Cylinder Repair and Size.                70
Rear Chassis Cross Member.                          71
Rear Hatch Hinge Pins.                              72
Rear Hatch Lock Repair.                             73
Rear Wheel Bearing Removal.                         74
Rear Wheel Bearing removal 2                        110
Rear Hub Half shaft Extractors                      122
Rear Wheel Stud Removal.                            75
Rear Window to Body Seal.                           117
Removing Gearbox.                                   76
Removing Paint.                                     78
Removing Trunnion Bolts and Fitting Trunnions.      79
Removing Wiper Boxes and Tubing.                    81
Replace Axel Oil Seal.                              82
Replace Gearbox Selector Oil Seals.                 83
Replace Rear Axel Pinion Seal.                      84
Replacing Heater Matrix.                            85
Replacing Heater Matrix, 2.                         87
Replacing Rear Shoes and More.                      88
Ride Height.                                        114
Steering Rack Oil..                                 89
Steering Rack Play                                  90
Sticking Brakes.                                    91
Sticking Overdrive.                                 92
Sticking Overdrive. Clean Filters.                  93
Sticky Steering Rack and More.                      94
Stiff Steering.                                     95
Strange Brake Pedal.                                97
Stub Axels.                                         98
Switch Part Numbers.                                99
Tracking and Camber.                                100
Trunnion Steering Lock Stops.                       101
Trunnion Bolts Fitting.                             102
Unleaded & Head Gaskets.                            104
Voltmeter Reading High (Intermittent).              106
Wind Noise at Speed.                                107
Wiper Wheel Box Removal.                            108

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                                                          2
3




38 DGAS Settings.




                    3
4

I was talking t o a colleague recently about Weber Carbs. And he told me the following for t he
38DGAS: If the mixture screw is more than one and a half turns out then the idle jet is too
lean. If the mixture screw is half a t urn out or less, then the idle jet is too rich. Also the speed
screw setting is should not be opened more than half a turn in. If the speed screw has to be
opened a half a turn or more then this is also an indication of a lean condition. My question is
does any one know if the above settings are correct as I checked the mine and the speed
screw is OK but mixture screw(s) are both 3 turns out. If I turn mine in t o one and a half turns
it runs a bit rough.
Well, I can say t hat I agree about what the settings roughly are, mine are very similar on t he
5a (and the 6a actually). -I also understood the same thing about Weber "normal" settings.
However differences can be due to a 'fiddle' e.g. somewhat oversize/undersize idle jets to fix
some other problem.
Sounds OK to me. The 'idle jets' aren't idle jets really. They determine progression mixture
(the critical bit just off idle for pickup & low speed c ruising). Fuel for the idle circuit flows
through these jets but they don't determine idle mixture - that's the job of the idle mixture
adjustment screws. Over large or over small jets can make the idle screws run out of
adjustment but progression would be atrocious long before that. Neither idle jets nor screws
have any effect past 1/3 throttle or thereabouts. All this means that if progression is OK - and
you'd certainly notice if it wasn't - and you can ac hieve a smooth idle and correct emissions
within the range of adjustment of the idle mixture screws then all is well. It would require
substantial alterations to the engine (perhaps a radical camshaft) to warrant changing the idle
jets.




5a Door Handles.




                                                                                                   4
5

The driver‟s door handle mechanism (whic h has been dodgy for some time) has finally given
up. I have sorted the push button to at least get the door opening but the loc k now no longer
works. Am I correct in thinking that these handles are no longer available? If so is there any
method of easily refurbishing the lock? Or, does anyone out there have a spare drivers door
lock for a SE5a with key and in working order?
If you need door handles they are the same as a mini and you can get them a lot easier and
cheaper from a mini spares place or breakers than going to a scimitar parts supplier.
If you can't get the originals try some Mini ones from a breakers. They are exactly t he same
handle but need a minor modification to the internals.
Mini door handles do fit but on some of them y ou have to c hange part of the plunger
mechanism.
I always thought the door handles were Mk I Ford Consul. I can't remember where I learnt this
and have never had to replace a handle. Ford owners clubs are good at re-manufacture and
may be a source which might eliminate the modifications needed on the Mini item.




Alternate Alternators.




                                                                                            5
6

I've just been searching through the archive but didn't come up with anything. My alternat or
isn't coping with the demands that my lights, radiator fan, heater fan, rear demister, stereo,
wipers all at once. Bit of an unusual occurrenc e for a Scimitar I know but I have managed to
get all components working and in traffic the alternator charge drops down to less that 12V
The alternator is new and is working correctly but I think I may have been a bit stupid when I
exchanged it because I'm now pretty sure that the old one must have been an up rat ed one to
supply the halogen headlights which are wired up with relays in a quad -beam set up. S o..
Simple question, what are my options for getting an up rat ed alternator?? Can I get one off
the shelf for the Essex engine and what amperage should I go for.
Essex-powered Scimitars had one of the horrible Lucas 15/16/17ACR type as standard.
These only give about 45 amps maximum, and need t o be spinning quite hard to generate
anywhere near this. I always replace them with a Bosch K1-55A whic h gives 55 amps, and
gets up to full output at much lower RPM than the old Lucas ones. Look at somet hing like a 2-
litre Granada/Sierra for getting hold of a K 1-55A. Y ou should also check the diameter of t he
alternator pulley; an Escort I used to own kept r unning its battery flat even t hough t he
alternator was the right one - turned out it had the wrong [too large] pulley on it, so t he
alternator wasn't t urning fast enough. Scimitars are generally low -revving engines so need to
have the alternator "geared up" a bit compared t o something like a Mini where the engine's
doing 5000RPM all the time!.
An alternator from a 2.9 engine Granada / Scorpio should fit (you may have t o slightly modify
the adjusting strap). The one I'm thinking of is 90amp output. Do not, however, believe t he
dashboard voltmet er. It reads the volt age c orrectly at its point of measurement which is some
way after the battery (longish wire & via the ignition switch). Check with an accurate voltmet er
directly wired to t he battery. It is though important to note t hat the maximum voltage available
to all the car services (with the exception of those fed directly from the battery itself) is the
voltage displayed by the dashboard meter. So improvements to the feed mentioned above will
improve everything.
Most Lucas alternators that look the same will fit. The series is nnACR where nn identifies the
output amongst other things. If the alt ernator you have, or acquire, is OK other than being a
LH rather than RH fitting you can change it by undoing the t hree long bolts & rotating one end
relative to the other. Then replace the bolts. This makes what was the adjustment hole into
one of the mounting holes so the adjuster bolt thread will need drilling out & the adjuster (now
using what was a mounting hole) will need a nut & bolt. By now a lot of ACR alternator has
already been modified any way so drilling may not be required. Alternatively if you're up for a
little more fettling the 2.9 (& maybe others) Scorpio us es a rat her nice 90A output device
which is electrically compatible but will need a different slotted adjuster strap at least.




Auto to Manual Rear Axel Ratio.




                                                                                                6
7

Currently restoring 1973 SE5a Auto. Am putting Manual with Overdrive from 1975 Se5a into
this car. Is it necessary to also change the rear axle and prop shaft or is there no difference
between the two. (Visually both look the same).
From chassis no 453501 onwards the axle ration was 3.31 on all Scimitars. Prior to that it was
3.07 on autos. I personally think 3.31 is too low and 3. 07 is nice cruising.
Couldn‟t agree more. My 72 Scimitar with aut o diff on manual with overdrive gives nearly
90mph @ 3000rpm so relaxed.
I agree - my 72 5a performs well and cruises in a very refined way with o/drive box and 3. 07
axle.
Makes Granadas (fitted with the same engine) seem positively buzzy.




Body Lifting for Welding.




                                                                                             7
8

OK, the man with the welder says he t hinks he can do the work by lifting the body but not
removing it. He suggests an 18" wide lifting strap to suspend t he body through the door
apertures (doors on windows down!).
The method I have heard of that I know works is to place two lengths of 4x2with cross braces
to keep them apart, through the windscreen aperture and the rear hatch with the 4x2 close to
the outside verticals of the frame. This puts the lifting forces very close to strong GRP
members that have steel tube running through them. This did not distort the body shell.
However the seats were out and the doors were off to reduc e the weight.
Theory would suggest that Alan's method has to be safer. I would have thought that going
through the open windows the bending momentum the roof will be significantly higher.
Don‟t mean to sound negative, but lifting the body is a hell of an u ndertaking. Locate every
bolt, disconnect the roll over bar and then disconnect all ancillaries, my question is where is
the welding needed and can a specialist do it, body on? Ideally, the body should be lifted from
the front, supported in the area where it sits on the front suspension pillars, as you wont get
the height at the rear because of the rear cross member.
I must admit that when I had my scimitar welded the guy did it 'body on' and was obviously
competent about it (I'm an engineer and I watched him do it). If the guy who's doing this is not
happy then should he be doing it (or is it so inaccessible??)
I have changed quite a few chassis pieces with the body on - I have also lifted a body to
replace the chassis completely - it was too bad to do anything with as the centre box sections
were full of holes. You c an c ut sections of the fibre glass out to do some welding if you think
you are likely to start a fire - then just glass them back into position. The other tip I have is not
to weld for long periods - do a few inches then allow to cool before doing more and keep an
old Mr Muscle ( or similar ) spray bottle close to hand full of water t o squirt on any small fires
that do start. Fibre glass may burn well but it is not so easy to set fire to in the first place - not
with ( Mig preferred )welding gear any way.
Possibly, but as I am several hundred miles from a scimitar specialist and the guy who is
welding it did t he front outriggers several years ago body on. Ideally, the body should be lift ed
from the front, supported in the area where it sits on the front suspension pillars, as you wont
get the height at the rear because of the rear cross member.
When mine came off, I removed doors & bonnet and lifted the front using a ratchet hoist
attached to the two front bumper brackets (still attached to the front tray of course). Then a
length of 3in x3in timber was slotted under the body where it sits on the front suspension
towers. This was then used to hang the body with two rope loops around the timber (one at
each end) from a suitably strong beam (scaffold pole) in the garage roof. The rear was
supported using the rear bumper brackets as it was possible to undo the bolts and separate
the rear cross member from the chassis. While the front was left hanging from the garage roof
(for rather more than one year), the floor / rear foot wells were supported on wooden trestles.
This was all done single handed. No distortion of the body was apparent on reassembly.




Brake Bleeding.




                                                                                                    8
9

SE5 / SE5a - Girling brakes - single line master cylinder via a remot e Powerstop servo to a 3
way split. This then s plits the fluid to both front callipers and a single line to t he rear wit h a
single bleed nipple on the N/S/R wheel cylinder. The master cylinder and servo cam e from my
sprint GTE which had a very firm pedal - and their condition was known to be good and are a
recent purchase. The wheel cylinders are new as are all 3 flexi hoses which are the
Goodridge stainless steel type. The drums have been checked for true-ness and the shoes
new. During the bleeding process - the handbrake has been applied. I have been trying to
bleed the brakes - and I cannot get a decent firm brake pedal - bearing in mind the car is not
moving - so pad knock back is eliminated so far. Pedal travel is approx 2 inches. I filled the
system - carried out a brief bleed to get fluid round the system - then with the engine running -
cracked off the pipe work on both sides of the servo to eliminate air in the servo cylinder -then
work ed in the following sequence. N/S/RN/S/FO/S/Fwith the aid of an operator in the car - and
a bleed valve in the bleed pipe - no air was seen to be evident with the bleed pipe immers ed
in brake fluid. The clevis pin and pedal pivot are in good condition - and the master cylinder
push rod adjusted to take out the slack before the brak es bind. Am I missing a trick here - or
is the wheel order wrong???
Not sure if t his will help as my 5a is running the standard servo, but I had trouble getting a
non-mushy pedal too. I ended up going round in this order (I think): servo, NSF, OSF, nsr. I
had to go round a few times. This was using an Eezibleed with handbrake and engine off.
E ven aft er several circuits I still wasn‟t happy, but the brakes did improve by driving the car
around a bit then leaving it for a day then going round again.
The order you did is ok for initial bleeding but where you have problems then Richards
suggestion is the follow up, 2nd attempt etc. However if y ou have got rid of all the air....
(Assuming it‟s a Girling setup) the significant thing which affects pedal travel, is adjustment.
You must get the rear shoes properly adjusted, and ensure the wheels cylinders are free to
slide on the back plate. If these are not sliding freely then it makes adjustment very diffi cult.
With your bleeding problem you may have an air pocket in the pipe especially if you have an
upward loop. Have you tried pressing the pedal quickly as oppos ed to gently pressing it. The
quick pressure may push the air out before the fluid can seep pas t it. Otherwise new fluid can
be spongy anyway and may take time to settle in. as others have suggested run it for a few
days to see how it goes - as long as they are not bad enough as to be dangerous.
On some cars applying the handbrake can let the wheel cylinder pistons move out and y ou
can get air trapped in there. Also worth letting some fluid out from the rear side that doesn't
have a bleed nipple.
I thought the order was NSF, OSF and then rear. Could be wrong but I have had not trouble –
but then I seldom us e the brakes.
The way I've always done it is nearest the MC first on the basis that there‟s no point in
pushing the air from the MC / servo through the longest pipe. I would also ensure that t he
engine is stopped & the s ervo cleared of residual vacu um. Having said that I've never had
any difficulty bleeding anything unless the MC seals are failing - often shown up for the first
time by the longer pedal stroke used when bleeding manually as opposed t o the(hopefully !)
much shorter one used when braking. Neit her have I had to disconnect any part of any
system to bleed: I‟ve simply used the bleed nipples. For around half my mot oring life I bled
clutch & brake hydraulics manually, then for a few years I used a home-made pressure
bleeder which worked fine but was hard to keep clean, and most rec ently (for the last 10
years or so) I've used an Eezibleed. And even that has never leaked. If the E ezibleed is to
replicate the fairly violent movement of fluid in the system caused by manual bleeding it
needs to run at spare wheel pressure. I suspect that if all the air in the system isn't being
cleared it's because the fluid isn't moving fast enough. E ach part of the hydraulic circuit can‟t
rap air - the bleed connections aren't necessarily exactly at the highest point of the callipers or
cylinders & the only way that trapped air is shifted is by the movement of the hy draulic fluid.
Thanks to everyone who responded to my request for brake bleeding advice. This time I took
all the wheels off - and with the car on stands -proceeded to re-bleed per the postings. Upon
looking at the front callipers - I noted that the inner pads on both callipers were very sticky -
so the outer pistons moved - then the free play in the bearings pushed the disc towards the
inner pad/piston. Removed the pads - cleaned and freed every thing off - re bleed and hey
presto - a solid feeling pedal - very little movement - and a successful road test once the
wheels were back on the car. I guess this would be the equivalent of pad knock off -but the car
had not moved - but the disc/bearing did.




                                                                                                   9
10




Bumpers.




           10
11

Can anyone confirm definitively which mass produced tin box/car they come from?
I do know that the over-riders come off a Mk1 Ford Escort, I guess the bumpers could be t he
same.
I've this vague 50% feeling that they don't; they're exclusive. Either that or it was something
like you make them by taking the back bumper of a Mk I Zodiac and cutting the centre 12" out
of it.
Bumpers are Ford Classic that funny hardly heard of car but Reliant cut & welded in t he
centre to make them narrower. You can see the join.
Classic Capri. The rear bumper was the entire - no mods. The front was cut to fit.




Cam Gear Change.




                                                                                            11
12

I‟m about to replace the Timing Wheel with a Steel One. Any thoughts/ideas appreciated.
 The front pulley will come off OK - might take a tap with a wooden drift but they normally just
pull off by hand. The cover seals at the bottom against the s ump gasket & is held by a
number of s ump bolts so you need to either take great care not to tear the sump gasket or
better still have a replacement to hand. At worst you'll only need to replace the section under
the front cover. If yours is the early engi ne (front dipstick) you need to centre t he cover when
fitting it. The later one self-centres. As far as backlash is concerned t ake the advic e of t he
person from whom you bought the timing wheel.
I'd remove the cross member. To do so loosen all fasteners slightly then use a jack on one
chassis rail below the cross member location to take some of the weight of the car. Remove
fasteners & release X-member. You can remove the jack until you come to refit the cross
member - it just helps free it & helps it to drop into the correct position upon replacement. A
light coat of grease on the cross member end plates helps as well & prevents corrosion.
There is no backlash adjustment as such. Originally it was set using a selection of c rankshaft
gears. Shouldn't worry - it won't be too tight & a little too much backlash is harmless.
On my engines the fan pulley comes off easily with a puller and I presume it will come off
easily without one by just gentle appropriat e tapping with a wedge.
Sooner is good. I bought my first 5A in 1981. I was advised by a police mechanic friend to
change the timing wheel & oil pump drive so I went out & bought the parts. Within a week of
doing so & on my first mot orway trip the fibre wheel failed damaging 11 out of t welve valves.
The new timing wheel was on the back seat at the time. I'd had the car 10 days when it
happened.
Personally I wouldn't try to do t his without also removing the sump completely. It's not that
much additional aggro, the only extra c ost is a new sump gasket and some oil - and it avoids
the risk that you'll damage both the front edge of the sump gasket and t he crankshaft oil seal
when trying t o refit the timing cover. The problem you'll find is that there isn't any clearance to
allow you to keep the bottom of the cover clear of the sump while you negotiate the crank seal
over the end of the crank. You might also take the opportunity to flatten the mating fac e of the
sump, whic h will inevitably have been dimpled by over tight ening the bolts and in all
probability leaks as a result.
I tend to agree. I did my first one with t he sump off (I had to - it was full of bits of fibre wheel)
& my second with the sump on. The points Nick mentions caused real difficulty. There are
other benefits too like cleaning the congealed gunge off the screen filt er.
You probably know that the steel wheel is going t o be noisier than the original but I t hought I
better mention it in case y ou don‟t and get a shock when you first start the car again. On our
5A it was very noisy but on the coupe it seemed to make little difference so it varies from
engine to engine but the noise does decrease with time – s ounds a bit like a supercharger
which is quite nice.
A word of caution...... there has been lots of very good advice - and I would endorse the sump
removal as gasket damage and poor front cover alignment is quit e likely. HOWEVER from
bitter and stupid personal experience.... DO NOT BE TEMP TED TO USE A HAMMER TO
GET THE NEW TIMING GEAR ONTO THE CAMSHAFT !!!!. You will end up driving t he
blanking plug from the rear of the engine and then the gearbox will have to come out. Use a
bolt to draw the wheel on instead. Hope I caught you in time.




                                                                                                   12
13




Camwheel Change, 2.




                      13
14

I hope this weekend to replace the Timing Wheel with a Steel one. Is it as simple as removing
the Cover, replacing the Timing Wheel by aligning the marks, refitting the Cover and all
sorted? Could I expect problems removing the Crank Belt Pulley, I am unsure if my Puller will
fit the Pulley so are there any Hints/Tips in removing it. I believe that I do not have to worry
about backlash or any adjustments, is it just a bolt on replacement. I will be replacing Gasket
and Oil S eal. If anyone has any ideas that will make this job easier I would be grateful for
suggestions.
It's as you say. The front pulley will come off OK - might take a tap with a wooden drift but
they normally just pull off by hand. The cover seals at the bottom against the sump gasket &
is held by a number of sump bolts so you need to either take great care not to tear the sump
gasket or better still have a replac ement to hand. At worst you'll only need to replace the
section under the front cover. If yours is the early engine (front dipstick) you need to cent re
the cover when fitting it. The later one self-centres. As far as backlash is concerned take t he
advic e of the person from whom you bought the timing wheel.
The Engine is the type with the dipstick near Plug Number Two, close to the servo. I am
getting t he wheel from B urtons who say it's a straight change no backlash adjustment ? Do
you know if this is correct? Being t he lazy old git that I am s hould I remove the front cross
member? It looks a bit tight if I try with the cross member in place.
I'd remove the cross member. To do so loosen all fasteners slightly then use a jack on one
chassis rail below the cross member location to take some of the weight of the car. Remove
fasteners & release X-member. You can remove the jack until you come to refit the cross
member - it just helps free it & helps it to drop into the correct position upon replacement. A
light coat of grease on the cross member end plates helps as well & prevents corrosion.
There is no backlash adjustment as such. Originally it was set using a selecti on of c rankshaft
gears. Shouldn't worry - it won't be too tight & a little too much backlash is harmless. On my
engines the fan pulley comes off easily with a puller and I presume it will come off easily
without one by just gentle appropriate tapping with a wedge.
Not a difficult job. Line the two marks, one on the old cam wheel and one on the
crankshaft....once you have taken the timing case off of course. Undo the bolt that holds the
cam wheel in plac e and draw off the wheel, some slip off some need a bit of thinking
about...yours will probably be t he latter. I s eem to remember t hat there was insufficient room
to get a puller in behind the cam gear but if it is a Ford there are some holes that you can use.
Slide the new wheel on making sure that the marks line up. Put a smear of locktite on the cam
bolt don't forget the large thrust washer and tight en up to 40 -45 lbs. The tricky bit comes now
when you refit the timing case. If you decided not to replace t he sump gasket, I never have
when doing t he job, then you will have to be careful when you take the case off not to destroy
the bit of the sump gasket that the case sits on. What you do when you fit the case is to apply
gasket cement; I prefer Red Hematite (made by the same people as Hylomar by the way) to
both surfaces and then fit the case into position. While you are doing all this think how lucky
you are t hat it is not a 2.8 when the gear wheel is alloy and the crankshaft pinion is changed
as well...and no skiving off not taking the sump off for that char ade I can tell you. When you
first run the steel cam gear it will be noisy most of them are, but don't worry it will settle down
and in about 7K you will hardly hear it........a bit like living next to a railway line.
A word of caution...... there has been lots of very good advice - and I would endorse the
sump removal as gasket damage and poor front cover alignment is quite likely. HOWEVER
from bitter and stupid personal experience.... DO NOT BE TEMP TED TO USE A HAMMER
TO GE T THE NEW TIMING GEA R ONTO THE CAMSHAFT !!!!. Y ou will end up driving t he
blanking plug from the rear of the engine and then the gearbox will have to come out. Use a
bolt to draw the wheel on instead.
On a slightly different note, is it possible to check if the cam wheel has already been replac ed
by a previous owner without disturbing the timing cover, sump and the associated gaskets?
Can you see the timing wheel if you remove the fuel pump for example and peer in the hole in
the cover with a torch? Is a replacement wheel obviously different to the original fibre wheel
when viewed wit h a torch through a small hole?.
The original wheel was dark brown, the nylon one has greyish / opaque teeth with a metal
centre and the SS one is rather obvious grey and all metal. Yes you probably can see which
you have through the Fuel pump hole with a torch.
You probably know that the steel wheel is going t o be noisier than the original but I t hought I
better mention it in case y ou don‟t and get a shock when you first start the car again. On our
5A it was very noisy but on the coupe it seemed to make little difference so it varies from



                                                                                                14
15

engine to engine but the noise does decrease with time – s ounds a bit like a supercharger
which is quite nice.
Sooner is good. I bought my first 5A in 1981. I was advised by a police mechanic friend to
change the timing wheel & oil pump drive so I went out & bought the parts. Within a week of
doing so & on my first mot orway trip the fibre wheel failed damaging 11 out of t welve valves.
The new timing wheel was on the back seat at the time. I'd had the car 10 days when it
happened.
Personally I wouldn't try to do t his without also removing the sump completely. It 's not that
much additional aggro, the only extra c ost is a new sump gasket and some oil - and it avoids
the risk that you'll damage both the front edge of the sump gasket and t he crankshaft oil seal
when trying t o refit the timing cover. The problem you'll find is that there isn't any clearance to
allow you to keep the bottom of the cover clear of the sump while you negotiate the crank seal
over the end of the crank. You might also take the opportunity to flatten the mating face of
the sump, which will inevitably have been dimpled by over tightening the bolts and in all
probability leaks as a result.
I tend to agree. I did my first one with t he sump off (I had to - it was full of bits of fibre wheel)
& my second with the sump on. The points Nick mentions caused real difficulty. There are
other benefits too like cleaning the congealed gunge off the screen filt er.




Camshaft Removal with Heads on.




                                                                                                   15
16

Nice easy one for today ... is it possible to remove the camshaft without removing the cylinder
heads?
Technically yes but y ou have to lift or t ake out the cam followers in order t o extract the
camshaft. If they then fall back in when the s haft is out I think you could have a job getting
them replac ed. They are matched to the cam they have been running on. If you are putting
the same camshaft back in then it is OK to use the same followers in the same places but if
you are putting a different camshaft in then you must put either new followers in or the
followers that have been running on that camshaft in their res pective places.
Thanks for that - I have a feeling the car has a hotter cam ( a steel timing wheel and tubular
exhaust is in evidenc e) s o I thought I‟d have a look when I pull the engine out. I'm assuming
of course that a spec. will be stamped someone on it.
The standard c am has not hing stamped on the back end of the cam but K ent, P iper etc
usually put the cam code number on the back end. So you have to take it out to see.




Carb Overhaul.




                                                                                            16
17

This weekends stuff is an overhaul of the Carb, A Webber 40 DFAV. In the Kit is one small O
ring and four flat white plastic/nylon "things". The exploded view of the Carb is vague. It
shows the O ring going to the bottom of the Carb but where ?. The flat plastic things are not
shown, what are they and where do they go ?. They are about One inch in length by three-
quarter inch wide (very approximate) not square at the ends but cut at an angle of about 45
degrees. Any advice gratefully received.
They are the throttle spindle bearings/seals. All will be obvious when you strip the carb. You
need to remove the butterflies and spindles to replace them. Don‟t forget to loctite and 'open'
the screws when you finish on the butterflies.
If the small O ring is the one shown as 7 in t he Haynes exploded diagram it seals the choke
vacuum pull-down connection to the carb body. The auto chok e varies the position of the
choke flaps depending on manifold vacuum - high vacuum, flaps more open, low vacuum,
flaps more closed. It effectively reduces the amount of choke applied when on a steady
throttle but is ready to apply more choke if acceleration is called for. Engine vacuum is sensed
via a drilling in the carb body. Which is sealed to the auto choke housing by the O ring.
An earlier ans wer suggested spindle bearings / seals. I am not as familiar wit h you carb as I
am with the 38DGAS so replaceable spindle bearings didn't occur to me. From your
description of the plastic parts they will be the spindle bearings.
Those are the parts that will roll int o a tube to form spindle bearings.




Clutch Fluid Type.




                                                                                             17
18

I have nice new Clutch Master and Slave Cylinders (Lucas Girling). What fluid would you
use? Latest spec would be kind to the Cylinder bores. Early spec not too much of a problem
as I normally change fluid every 2 years. I have heard differing views about the latest spec
fluid with early type cylinders.
DOT3 brake fluid is what the seals were made for.
DOT 4 works for me replace every 2 years
The latest stuff has never given me any trouble. Nor has silicon fluid.
I have found fluid that says specification to DOT3 and DOT4 but is synthetic, Is it OK?
I always use the latest spec fluid which at the moment is 5 point something as it should be
compatible with everything which has gone before. I am one of the unlucky ones who had a
problem with the brakes on my 5A when using silicone so I have not used it since.
Some DOT 3 & 4 seals will swell in silicone.
I thought I would ask the question to Luc as Girling. I have found out that Lucas were bought
out by a Company called T. R.W. The tec hnical department of T. R.W. says DO NOT use
silicon or any synthetic fluids, vegetable fluid s hould be used and the specification should be
DOT4. I did say that the Clutch was not "Safety Critical" but they were very precise about not
using Silicon etc fluid.
From bitter experience. It not only swells the seals using silicone on systems that aren't
designed for it, it sort of 'rots' them as well (or swells them t o the point of nipping in the bore
and getting lumps torn off)! Y ou can go from stiff movement to sudden fail in a short time, and
the length of time it takes to get to the first stages is variable. Don't use the stuff anymore as it
was a bike brake that failed, luckily negated by massive engine braking, and a drum rear
brake! Always use Dot4 now, without fail (both senses of the phrase).




Clutch/Overdrive Slip.




                                                                                                  18
19

Perhaps someone c ould advise on a clutch problem? As long as I let the clutch out fully and
move through the gears c arefully he car pulls away fine. Uphill in a high gear the re is no slip
when accelerating no matter how hard I try or how steep the hill. If I try a racing start (high
revs and balance with the clutch) or come up to a roundabout and try to balance the high
revs with t he clutch to join the flow there is virtually no drive until I let the engine idle and
almost come to a standstill and repeat the careful approach. I don't know if I have explained
that very well but my question is, is this sign of needing a new clutch or is there s omething
that needs to be adjusted.
Cannot think it is anything other than the clutch although not slipping under heavy loads uphill
etc is quite unusual.
Remember that there are "clutches" in the overdrive too; there is a uni-directional thing and
two hydraulically operat ed band clutches. Could it be that something's preventing the
overdrive hydraulic system from fully releasing its pressure until the overdrive oil -pump has
stopped rotating [i.e. when the car has come to an almost-stop?
Would a reasonable test of this be to drive a fair while without engaging O/D and if I don't
have the problem drive with O/ D and see if it slips? Or is this too naive? What could cause the
O/D hydraulics to hold pressure?
A test of sorts would be to try accelerating hard when the car is first used that day & before
the OD has been in use. It isn't the best test because the OD circulates oil throughout its
operating cylinder and control all the time the input shaft is rotating (i.e. whenever the car is
moving). The oil returns to the OD sump via a bypass that is open unless the OD solenoid is
operated. When the solenoid IS operated (OD s witched on) the bypass closes & OD
operational pressure (set by a relief valve) is available t o move the cone clutch & engage t he
OD. E ven t his is an over-simplification becaus e the pressure relief & solenoid valve work
together & the by pass still maintains a low residual pressure to ensure t he OD operating
cylinder is full of oil & ready to rapidly operate t he clutch when needed. It follows therefore
that anything that can restrict or affect the operation of the solenoid valve or pressure relief
valve can cause the OD to malfunction. A pressure t est would diagnose it correctly but
removing the OD s ump, cleaning the filter gauze, magnet and solenoid valve would not be
wasted effort & could easily cure the fault. If the (normal gearbox) clutch doesn't slip under full
throttle hill-climbing it is unlikely to be the problem.
When the O/d clutches were failing on my now dead 6a, the engine freewheeled if I took my
foot off the t hrottle with the O/d disengaged. If the O/d was in, then normal action took place.
You could have a weak diaphragm or pressure plate, or even a lazy hydraulic system
(slave/master cylinders sticking). Thes e would cause the same sort of effects.
Just to reinforce what has said: - pound to a penny it‟s the overdrive clutch, NOT the clutch
between the engine & gearbox. Many people do not realis e there is a clutch within the
overdrive unit.

The next part was added March 2005.
How can you tell if a slipping feeling when accelerating is due to the clutch or the OD? I have
a suspicion the clutch is on its way out (90k) but am not certain as the OD unit has previously
been replaced due to slippage.
The overdrive unit contains a one-way (metallic) clutch which transmits torque directly through
the unit when travelling forwards in direct drive (overdrive not engaged). The friction clutches
only come into play when the overdrive is engaged (and forwards gear is selected) or when
travelling in revers e. Therefore, if you get symptoms of slip in third of fourt h direct gear, the
clutch is likely at fault, becaus e neither of the friction clutches in the overdrive should be
unduly loaded. Virtually all of the torque transmitted through the overdrive should be via its
one-way clutch. If you get slip in overdrive third or fourth, or reverse, then sus pect the
overdrive. On my 3litre V6 Coupe, overdrive slip was most noticeable when reversing. I
managed to drop the transmission out without too much difficulty to do the repairs. Rem oving
the gearbox/overdrive assembly obviously exposed the clutch. It should be fairly easy to work
on. Incidentally, mak e sure that the overdrive lockout s witch is functioning. It prevents
overdrive engagement in first and second gears (when the torque output from the gearbox is
higher than t he overdrive is int ended t o take) and in reverse. Overdrive in reverse is like
selecting two gears at once (inside the overdrive). Travelling forwards, with overdrive
engaged the one-way clutch free-wheels as the output shaft rotates faster than the input.
Travelling backwards, with overdrive engaged t he one-way clutch prevents the output shaft
from turning faster than the input despite the best efforts of the epicyclical gears. The



                                                                                                19
20

overdrive's internal clutch will be forced to slip (unless something else breaks) and will
overheat rapidly. I think that's what must have happened on my car (previous owner's fault)
based on the burnt conical clutch linings and bits of broken overdrive lock -out s witch found
during repairs.
The c one clutch transmits drive whether the OD is engaged or not. The roller cam / sprag
clutch has an assisting function only. I was going to go through the whole operation of the OD
then I found this:
I understood that was the pot ential problem in telling the difference - that the OD clutch is
always engaged? It seems like a clear decision is tricky but: its worse when the car is hot.
Does not tend to do it in lower gears although hard acceleration in first can slip. Have never
really noticed it in reverse but I don‟t tend to reverse very fast. The slipping is periodic - can
accelerat e ok then it slips then it stops slipping again. The OD switch and lock out are fine.
If it‟s clutch slip, It can be made worse by “gently” putting some pressure on the pedal just
before it happens (throttle/speed-wise). Try it in O/D 3rd and Non-OD 4th at the same speeds;
If it does it the same in both at the same engine speed, then it probably isn‟t the O/D.
I'm looking at a diagram of the Laycock LH unit in my Scimitar Coupe shop manual, Section
U, "Overdrive", pages 2 & 3. It has a fairly clear cross-section diagram to explain how the
overdrive works. There is a cone clutch with friction linings on both inside and outside
surfaces of the cone. The cone clutch slides backwa rds (relative to the car) and forwards on
splines which form part of the sun -wheel. The overdrive input shaft passes through t he cent re
of the sun-wheel, but rotates independently of it. The input shaft is attached to, and rotates
with, both the planet carrier and the inner race of a uni -directional clutch. The outer race of
the uni-directional clutch is attached to, and rotates with, the ring-gear. When the overdrive is
not engaged, the cone-clutch slides rearwards under s pring load. The inner lining fric tion face
connects the sun-wheel to the ring-gear, locking them together. The input shaft drives the
planet carrier, but since the sun-wheel and ring-gear are locked toget her, the entire epicyclical
gear train spins as a solid unit and output speed is t her efore equal to input speed. This
mechanism operates both for forwards and during over-run and reverse. When travelling
forwards only (not during over-run or reverse) the uni -directional clutch also provides a solid
drive connection between the input and output shafts. When the overdrive is engaged, the
cone-clutch slides forwards under hydraulic pressure. The outer friction surface engages with
the inside of the overdrive casing, thereby preventing rotation of the cone-clutch and t he sun-
wheel. The input shaft continues to drive the planet carrier, so now t he ring-gear (which is
connected to the output shaft - remember?) rotates faster than the planet carrier, and henc e -
overdrive. Since the output shaft is rotating faster than the input, the uni-directional clutch
over-runs (or free-wheels, if you prefer). Okay, so how do you tell if the overdrive cone-clutch
linings are shot? Well, if the inner lining is gone, the sun -wheel and ring-gear are not locked
together firmly. The uni-directional clutch will transmit forwards torque when the overdrive is
not engaged, but it cannot do so during over -run or reverse. Hence, if the overdrive slips
during over-run or reverse, but not when forwards and not engaged, suspect the inner clutch
cone. If the outer clutch cone is shot, the sun-wheel will not be locked stationary, allowing the
input shaft to speed up until it matches the speed of the output shaft, at whic h time the uni -
directional clutch will take over. Therefore, if, with the overdrive engaged, the engine revs rise
to match the revs required for direct (overdrive not engaged) drive, but no higher, then
suspect the cone-clutch outer liner. If slippage is n't limited t o these conditions (probably isn't,
based on my understanding of your comments) then the clutch is probably at fault.
Excellent description! In fact most OD problems stem from the s olenoid and pressure relief
valve (which also controls speed of engagement) both of which are affected by lack of, or
dirty, oil and by a blocked screen filter. The cone clutch is an incredibly robust device that
would require serious abuse to damage. The only other OD killer is a failed inhibit or switch (or
a solenoid valve that doesn't release) - if t he car is reversed under these conditions the roller
clutch can be damaged. One thing that hadn't occurred to me - is the clutch pedal returning
far enough to fully release t he master cylinder? With the pedal fully released there should be
a small amount of clearance bet ween the end of the push rod & the master cylinder. You c an
test by pressing the pedal by hand. If there is none & the clutch line remains under slight
pressure the clutch may partially release as everything warms up. It's a long shot but worth
checking - as is the slave to clutch arm adjustment.




                                                                                                  20
21




Cutch/Overdrive Slip 2




                         21
22


I‟ve looked back through t he messages and cannot find anything - how can you tell if a
slipping feeling when accelerating is due to the clutch or t he OD? I have a suspicion t he
clutch is on its way out (90k) but am not c ertain as the OD unit has previously been replac ed
due to slippage. Also, has anyone else been successful in changing the clutch without
removing the engine as per the article in SLICE - I wondered, is it actually any quicker?!
The overdrive unit contains a one-way (metallic) clutch which transmits torque directly through
the unit when travelling forwards in direct drive (overdrive not engaged). The friction clutches
only come into play when the overdrive is engaged (and forwards gear is selected) or when
travelling in revers e. Therefore, if you get symptoms of slip in third of fourt h direct gear, the
clutch is likely at fault, becaus e neither of the friction clutches in the overdrive should be
unduly loaded. Virtually all of the torque transmitted through the overdrive should be via its
one-way clutch. If you get slip in overdrive third or fourth, or reverse, then sus pect the
overdrive. On my 3litre V6 Coupe, overdrive slip was most noticeable when reversing. I
managed to drop the transmission out without too much difficulty to do the repairs. Removing
the gearbox/overdrive assembly obviously exposed the clutch. It should be fairly easy to work
on. Incidentally, mak e sure that the overdrive lockout s witch is functioning. It prevents
overdrive engagement in first and second gears (when the torque output from the gearbox is
higher than t he overdrive is int ended t o take) and in reverse. Overdrive in reverse is like
selecting two gears at once (inside the overdrive). Travelling forwards, with overdrive
engaged, the one-way clutch free-wheels as the output shaft rotat es faster than the input.
Travelling backwards, with overdrive engaged, the one -way clutch prevents the output shaft
from turning faster than the input despite the best efforts of the epicyclical gears. The
overdrive's internal clutch will be forced to slip (unless something else breaks) and will
overheat rapidly. I think that's what must have happened on my car (previous owner's fault)
based on the burnt conical clutch linings and bits of broken overdrive lock-out s witch found
during repairs.
The c one clutch transmits drive whether the OD is engaged or not. The roller cam / sprag
clutch has an assisting function only.
I understood that was the pot ential problem in telling the difference - that the OD clutch is
always engaged? It seems like a clear decision is tricky but: its worse when the car is hot.
Does not tend to do it in lower gears although hard acceleration in first can slip. Have never
really noticed it in reverse but I don‟t tend to reverse very fast. The slipping is periodic - can
accelerat e ok then it slips then it stops slipping again. The OD s witch and lock out are fine.
Second point is it‟s a GTC: can I tell the garage categorically that it‟s possible to remove t he
clutch without engine out! I.e. I have not looked but you can reach all the bell housing bolts
and slide the gearbox back once mountings and prop shaft are off.
In engine compartment: * disconnect top & bottom hoses * unbolt PAS pump & attach it to
the suspension cross member * remove air cleaner From wheel-arches: * disconnect
exhausts at the manifold outlets * remove start er motor * slacken engine mount rubbers
Underneath: * prop shaft * gear linkages at gearbox end * wiring to gearbox & Speedo cable
* clutch slave * place jack under gearbox * remove c ross member (unbolt from chassis & rear
rubber mount) Lower the jack until the tail housing is as low as the jack will allow all the time
checking the engine for fouling / anything you've missed. Jack it up again until you can place
a support under the rear of the sump. Turn the trolley jack so its handle is facing the rear axle
then place a scissor jack on the rear of the trolley jack & adjust to contact the rear of the OD.
Remove the bell housing shield & all bell housing bolts (easiest using a long extension &
socket from underneath). CAREFULLY wiggle the box by pulling/pushing on the tail housing
until it is free. You can remove it carefully by rolling the trolley jack back by hand & adjusting it
& the scissor jack as you go. Once clear of the engine lower the jacks fully & roll it off them as
gently as possible. Two people are useful here because the box will fall off the jacks as soon
as the 1st motion shaft clears the clutch unless it is prevented from doing so. You need the
car on axle stands at full height & a sheet of 3/4" plywood under the car makes the jack roll
easily & cushions the gearbox as it is t aken off the jacks. I did this job four times on my own
GTC - it takes around 1 1/2 hours taking it slowly & around 40 minutes if pushed.
You're right - the OD cone is either hard against the body or hard against the carrier. Y ou
have checked the gearbox oil level I assume? What you are describing sounds more like t he
OD & there are a number of options before removing the box.
I'm looking at a diagram of the Laycock LH unit in my Scimitar Coupe shop manual, Section
U, "Overdrive", pages 2 & 3. It has a fairly clear cross-section diagram to explain how the



                                                                                                  22
23

overdrive works. There is a cone clutch with friction linings on both inside and outside
surfaces of the cone. The cone clutch slides backwards (relative to the car) and forwards on
splines which form part of the sun -wheel. The overdrive input shaft passes through t he cent re
of the sun-wheel, but rotates independently of it. The input shaft is attached to, and rotates
with, both the planet carrier and the inner race of a uni -directional clutch. The outer race of
the uni-directional clutch is attached to, and rotates with, the ring-gear. When the overdrive is
not engaged, the cone-clutch slides rearwards under s pring load. The inner lining friction face
connects the sun-wheel to the ring-gear, locking them together. The input shaft drives the
planet carrier, but since the sun-wheel and ring-gear are locked toget her, the entire epicyclical
gear train spins as a solid unit and output speed is t herefore equal to input speed. This
mechanism operates both for forwards and during over-run and reverse. When travelling
forwards only (not during over-run or reverse) the uni -directional clutch also provides a solid
drive connection between the input and output shafts. When the overdrive is engaged, the
cone-clutch slides forwards under hydraulic pressure. The outer friction surface engages with
the inside of the overdrive casing, thereby preventing rotation of the cone-clutch and t he sun-
wheel. The input shaft continues to drive the planet carrier, so now t he ring-gear (which is
connected to the output shaft - remember?) rotates faster than the pl anet carrier, and henc e -
overdrive. Since the output shaft is rotating faster than the input, the uni-directional clutch
over-runs (or free-wheels, if you prefer). Okay, so how do you tell if the overdrive cone-clutch
linings are shot? Well, if the inner lining is gone, the sun-wheel and ring-gear are not locked
together firmly. The uni-directional clutch will transmit forwards torque when the overdrive is
not engaged, but it cannot do so during over -run or reverse. Hence, if the overdrive slips
during over-run or reverse, but not when forwards and not engaged, suspect the inner clutch
cone. If the outer clutch cone is shot, the sun-wheel will not be locked stationary, allowing the
input shaft to speed up until it matches the speed of the output shaft, at whic h time the uni-
directional clutch will take over. Therefore, if, with the overdrive engaged, the engine revs rise
to match the revs required for direct (overdrive not engaged) drive, but no higher, then
suspect the cone-clutch outer liner. If slippage is n't limited t o these conditions (probably isn't,
based on my understanding of your comments) then the clutch is probably at fault.
If it‟s clutch slip, it can be made wors e by “gently” putting some pressure on t he pedal just
before it happens (throttle/speed-wise). Try it in O/D 3rd and Non-OD 4th at the same speeds;
if it does it the same in both at the same engine speed, then it probably isn‟t the O/D. I‟ve
changed the clutch in my old 5a by just removing the gearbox (trolley jack, prop shaft off, lots
of jiggling), but having done that, there‟s much more involved taking t he engine out to do it
(plus access to the clutch is better), apart from removing the exhaust manifolds…apart from
that it‟s only the need for an engine crane/block and tackle whic h sways which way you go!.




                                                                                                  23
24




Clutch won‟t Disengage.




                          24
25

The clutch seems to be stuck and won't dis engage although the pedal and cable system still
seem to be working OK. I think t he plates must be stuck together with rust from standing idle
for many years. I'm sure some of y ou guys have come across this before and can point me in
the right direction for freeing it off? I'm not really up to dismantling it all.
………………………………………………………………………………………
Start the engine and have it warmed up in idle, so that it will restart immediately. Put in first
gear (or reverse if there is a wall in front of the car), pus h the clutch pedal completely and
crank. The engine will fire and the car will move, keep t he pedal down and due to the
pressures and forc es involved the clutch will be freed after a few meters. Lots of strange
noises , but it will survive.
…………………………………………………………………………………………
If you c an extricate the car from its parking place simply warm it up then stop the engine, put
it in gear, restart & drive off. Keep the clutch pedal held down & go for a short drive changing
gear without the clutch. Apply throttle to drive jerkily - it will free fairly easily.
…………………………………………………………………………………………
My suggestion for what its worth (used on numerous occasions). Put back of car up on stout
axle stands. Chock Front wheels. Start and warm engine up. Stop engine and engage 2nd
gear. Re-start engine and run at approx 2000 rpm for about 2 mins. You should hear a loud
bang as the clutch plate comes off the flywheel. All with out moving the car.




Decoke.




                                                                                              25
26

Can t he vast experienc e of the group give me, a novice, advice on the do's and don‟ts of a
Decoke on an Essex engine block.
I would go the whole hog and pop the pistons out and fit new rings - glaze bust and clear all of
the carbon - check that the valve seats are ok - not sunken - lap them in if required. I would
be surprised if there is much carbon build up any way - the days of leaving a ring around the
piston have all but gone.
*replace all valves, springs, caps, collets & pushrods in their original positions after removal
*remove heads & with the valves & springs still in plac e degreas e & clean the heads using a
couple of different wire brushes in an electric drill clean all carbon out of the combustion
chambers
*wash the heads off again then remove all valves, springs, caps etc
*clean out the exhaust (and inlet if necessary) ports using a powered wire brush. A void t he
valve seats.
*clean the gasket surfaces until shiny using wire brush & wire wool
*put each valve in t urn into an electric drill (in a vice or bench stand) and use a sharp tool,
wire wool & emery paper to clean the back of the valve head. A void the seat and stem
*if the seats in the head are nicely sharp and angular grind eac h valve in turn using fine paste.
Lubricate the valve stem. Rot ate the valve back and forth whilst pressing it lightly against the
seat. Lift the valve of the seat after eac h grind & replace it in a different position.
*once you have an even, grey, surface to both valve & seat move on to the next valve
*if the seats in the head are not sharp and angular, if they appear to be‟ hammered', or if
there are seriously burned and pitted areas they will need to be re-cut before the valves can
be ground in. If t his is the case examine the valves themselves very carefully as they may be
damaged & needing replacement
*clean off the heads carefully, lubricate the valve stems with Moly & refit the valves & springs
*block off all orifices in the top of the block. Cover the cylinders you aren‟t working on.
*turn the crankshaft so the piston you are about to work on is a BDC then lightly grease the
bore. Move the piston back to TDC then us e the drill -mounted wire brush to clean the crown.
Take care not to dig into t he aluminium surface. Stubborn areas can be scraped using a
sharp piece of scrap aluminium. Vacuum as much debris from the bore as you can then move
the piston a short way down the bore so you c an cle an the top lip - aluminium scraper & wire
wool. Wipe t he grease & dirt off the bore wall then move the piston to BDC & wipe again.
Repeat for all bores.
*clean the gasket surface of the block until it is shiny & wipe both it and the gasket surfaces of
the cylinder heads with thinners until they are grease -free.
*replace heads. Whilst the heads are off it's worth examining the block and head waterways
&cleaning off any deposits. The block in particular will have a lot of sediment in the cylinder
cooling passages that can be loosened with an old screwdriver then flushed out when the
engine is back in one piece. With the heads out of the way the core plugs behind the exhaust
manifolds are easy to access - worth changing them if they are in poor condition.
The only thing I would add to the comprehensive schedule of works!! Is that I would replace
ALL accessible core plugs irrespective. I think I would also try to remove any debris in t he
block with compressed air or water (having covered the bores and anything el se critical!).
Sometimes it's easier to get debris out this way as it can be more direct. Perhaps use both
methods. Time spent getting a clear cooling system is time well spent. I have just gone
through an engine out rebuild down t o the last nut, bolt, was her and gallery plug. The engine
in back in but not yet connected up. But I'm confident that the energy spent trying to be
particular about things is time well spent.
What do you mean by glaze bust? Is wire brushing the tops of the pistons to harsh?
If y ou are going as far as fitting new rings to the pistons you have t o take the shine off t he
cylinder walls ( glaze busting ) you can buy a circular sandpaper tool to do this from most
engine rebuild/parts suppliers. Fits into an electric drill so it only takes a few seconds per
cylinder.
In my opinion wire brushing t he tops of pistons is too harsh. E very scratch you leave in t he
combustion chamber is somewhere for carbon to start collecting, in fact it promotes its growth
and adhesion. I fit is localised it can cause pre-ignition, sort of defeating the object of a
Decoke in the first place. A bit of copper central heating pipe flattened at the end is ideal for
carbon scraping. Always try to use something soft er than the material you're cleaning to do
the scraping.




                                                                                               26
27

I did mine buy s oaking them wit h the larts washer fluid and then using and dishwashing
brush. It was hard work but I was pleased with res ult.
A really easy way of removing carbon from almost anything is to soak the components in "
petrol fuel injector cleaner - Forte' make s ome) - the c arbon just washes away with no
scraping. Great for clogged piston ring grooves too.




Disc Groove. Trunnion Bolt.



                                                                                     27
28


My SE5 brakes are not bad - surprising when you look at the disks, The outer 20mm are rusty
pitted + not nice, and the inside face has a groove running around the centre of t he face. The
outer pitting I put down to a period of inactivity, but the groove on t he back I have just figured
out what is causing it. While greasing the Trunnions I noticed that the Trunnion to wishbone
bolt and nut is rubbing the disk on full lock. Can anyone tell me if the bolt should be positioned
so the nut is in front of, or behind the wishbone, or do they all do it? (I don't want a new pair of
disks going the same way!)
Usual wis dom on this is that a little stub screws into the top of the Trunnion that interferes with
a similar casting on the vertical link, so reducing steering lock just enough to stop the brake
disk scoring. My se6 has neither screw nor int erferenc e for reasons I cannot figure, if yours
are not screwed in - than that may be the ans wer. As to the bolt direction - I can't remember
but it indicates that (for offside) threaded end points rearward - I think. (On a se6a)
Common problem this on all GTE's. Apart from the stop at the rear of the Trunnion not limiting
the movement on full lock I t hink it may in part be due to the closeness of the Trunnion
physically. Perhaps bits of grease jumping across from the Trunnion to the disc or may be
water splashing across in the wet - I don't know but my stop works ok and I still get the same
effect. We have no rear guard plate on either of our GTE's perhaps this also makes a
differenc e - we removed them as they scraped against the rear of the disc - irritating noise.
A couple of tips about disc scoring, one cheap and one not so cheap. The cheap tip is
grinding a bevel on the Trunnion bolt. The expensive tip, and most likely the cause in the first
place, is renew the vertical link. 'Oh my God why!' I hear you exclaim. The reason my financial
challenged friend is that over the years, and perhaps someone has not been as active with
the grease gun as they should have been...., the shoulder, that‟s the bit at the top of t he
thread on the vertical link, wears a slight hollow and this allows the Trunnion to 'tip‟ from the
vertical and this in turn allows the Trunnion bolt nearer the disc. And the rest as they say in
the case of the disc, is history.
Just replaced discs at the weekend, and wa nted to avoid scoring from Trunnion bolts. My car
only had a steering stop on one side, and this was all dented and rusty. It was 20.5 to 20.7
mm in diameter and was bolt ed to the casting with what I think used to be a 5/16" BSW. I
made 2 new stops, diam eter 21.0mm. This is just big enough to stop Trunnion bolts from
scoring discs without taking away too much steering lock. I had to drill out castings and re-t ap
a bigger size. Be warned, I needed a 14" long drill to get access. If your stops are intact, I
suppose you could try just wrapping with shim stock and retaining somehow? Or gluing a
shim to the little horns that touch the stops?
Disc fouling by Trunnion bolts / nuts can be prevented by grinding a 45 degree chamfer on
50% of the Trunnion bolt head and replacing the castellated nut with a nyloc (and no they
don't come loose!). You still need lock stops but their adjustment is a lot less critical.




Door Adjustment.




                                                                                                 28
29

Well the car is great I am just trying to work out how to adjust t he doors to fit, how do you get
to hold t he nuts that the hinge csk screws go into, with the hinge in the way, is there a way or
do you need to take the car to bits!
It‟s nice to ans wer a question instead of asking for onc e! Y ou might have to take the car to
bits. Although I have not been adjusting doors to fit, I have recently complet ely removed the
doors and hinges. The countersunk set bolts you mention are intended to mount the hinges to
the body as opposed to a facility for adjustment. If you need s ideways adjustment; where t he
hinges disappear into the door, they hold the door with 4 elongated holes. If the door is
dropping i.e. height adjustment it might be that the hinges are badly worn. I think you can get
hinge repair kits. If you do need access to the nuts from the csk set bolts, remove the blower
in the foot well, y ou will find that the 'middle' csk bolts are fitted to a tie plate, remove this
plate first (also secured to the foot well side wall). With this plate removed the other 2 hinge
nuts are accessible. If you have to add rust to the equation, then I can empathize!




Fit Rear Window Seal.




                                                                                                29
30

A friend of mine who owns a 5a asked me yesterday how best to fit a new rubber seal t o his
rear hatch frame. I don't know I said, but I know where I can find out. So how about it experts,
lets have some hints and tips on how best to fit a rubber seal to the rear hatch frame of a 5a.
I presume you mean the glass frame s eal, rather than t he outer one. Well, I sus pect I did not
at all do what's probably recommended.. The strip you can buy from e. g. GW to seal this (it's
just flat rubber strip, not U shaped etc.) requires a lot of compression to get it in, and good
alignment. I did not like that idea. Instead I b ought considerably wider (but somewhat thinner)
rubber strip from Woollies, cut it to length, put a bead of transparent silicone seal inside the
frame (big half), and laid the rubber on the floor. Then a strip of goo on upper surface of
rubber, place window right way around on rubber, in the goo, carefully wrap rubber round side
edges, pick whole lot up (careful!) and drop into frame, which was propped standing upright.
Then try to fit top half without getting sealant everywhere (some hope). Then I squeez ed
together with ratchet tie-downs, did up the clamp plate screws (remember to put them in!) and
waited. Once it had all set enough, I went around t he rubber which now stuck out about 1/2"
all round t he flange, with a sharp knife, and cut it off. A fter all that, I hope it was the glass
frame u meant !
Not sure about a 5a, but on my 6b there isn't a rubber seal - it looks like the screen is fitted to
the hatch-frame using some sort of black rubber-in-a-tube type of mastic. It's *not* the
ubiquitous silicone-rubber-in-a-tube bathroom sealant, it's somewhat softer and less -shiny.
But it doesn't leak ! Food for thought?
As for using sealant bus windscreens are stuck in with a very sticky black mastic which c an
cope with large gaps and has high shear strength, the name escapes me at the moment.
Could be Sikaflex? Black polyurethane, stiffer than silicone, real shit -to-a-blanket stuff, use
allot in boats. Bostik Matrix 500 is similar. A very impressive goo.
The stuff you are looking for is indeed Sikaflex. Two main types ,the one that never really
sets, leave this one alone, and t he one t hat sets like rubber this is the one to use. Wonderful
stuff, nothing better for repairing that big black rubber bumper or repairing t hose cracked
windscreen rubber seals. It‟s like liquid rubber, mask up apply and bingo saved yourself a
new rubber. Just two things to bear in mind. It cures quite quickly in the tube when opened, so
wrap it up well and have a few spare nozzles for the next time. The other thing is don't get it
on your hands...unless you like wearing gloves, as it don't come off.




                                                                                                30
31



Fitting Piston Rings and Gap Position.

Reliant Workshop Manual says 180 Deg opposite, ot her Manuals I have mak e no mention of
it. Piston Ring Gap position? If Gaps 180 deg opposite where would the gaps go? Front or
Rear of Piston? (Engine from a 1974 SE5a).
Unless there is instruction to the contrary I always put the top ring gap in line with the
gudgeon pin and the other in line with the opposite end. I a void putting them on the pressure
face of the piston.
Normal practice here is to space the rings at 120 degrees with no favoured start/finish point
for the first ring. Take care getting the rings ont o the piston - and then into the bores as they
can shatter. We use a cone shaped adaptor that fits the bore - and then the piston with its
rings sitting freely are gently pushed down the cone into bore whilst uniformly compressing
the rings to the piston diamet er. If you are lucky enough to re -use some pistons from your
engine - and the groves are a bit gummed up - then petrol injector cleaner is brilliant at
softening the gum and carbon - whic h can then easily be washed away with brake cleaner.
Whilst the engine is in pieces - take a good look all over the block - you will notice a lot of
small Allen key type bolts/bungs - remove them all and use the same fluids [fresh solution] to
clean these oil way drillings out too - it will help prolong the life of the rebuilt engine by
allowing the oil to flow where it needs to without the engineering equivalent of ""hardening of
the arteries". You maybe amazed at what you manage to clean out.
I had always presumed that piston rings would move around when the engine was running,
but from the answers I presume that this is not the case?
Knew I'd seen it somewhere. Top ring 150' offset from the oil control top ring, Middle ring 150'
offset from top oil ring in opposite direction. Oil control ring is - Top Middle back of piston
(opposite arrow/mark on top), 'spring ring thin g' 25mm offset from that, bottom is gap with t he
mark at the front.
When you say offset where do you start to measure from? Piston Front ? Back?
Yep. I thought that as well! Lot easier to draw than explain! But if you start in the order they go
on, so bottom oil control ring with the gap at the front and work up from there. Spring gap
25mm off the centre of the back, etc. Gaps on top rings are positioned to maintain the best
seal on the compression stroke, as the piston rocks very slightly on each stroke.




                                                                                                31
32


Fitting Poly Bushes.

I am in the midst of rebuilding my front suspension, new polybushes, new shocks and also
converting to power steering while I am at it; however, I seem to have come to grief with fitting
the polybushes. What is the recommended practice for fitting t he bushes? The bus hes have
a chamfered lip on each end, presumably to retain in the suspension arms, which are making
it difficult to fit t hem. I originally assumed these would c ompress while the bush pushed or
pulled through into the suspension arm, but all that happens is that the bush buckles and
twists and doesn‟t enter the hole. I have tried using various diamet er pieces of tube to try and
guide/ restrain the bush while I use a G clamp to push through to no avail. I have slobbered
the bush etc with fairy liquid, still no change. The rubber bushes which where originally fitted
where cut through the centre and fitted from both ends, similar to the Trunnion bushes, but I
presume this would be a no no as it could compromise the performance of the bush. Any
recommendations would be welcome.
The answer is liquid s oap. Make all parts 'soaping wet' and you'll be surprised how easy they
will slip through. Best thing is to remove all the parts from the car and fit the bush es in your
workshop.
When I fitted mine they also distorted and looked like they would not go in. however this
method works. 1) Get yourself a bolt that will go through the bus h and the required hole and
fit a large was her t o each end. The washer must be large enough so as not to pull through
both the hole in the suspension arm and the hole in the polybus h 2)assemble the whole thing
a follows - bolt, large washer, polybus h, suspension arm, large washer, nut with a bit of
grease on t he bush and t he metal 'hole'. 3) Tight en t he whole thing up keeping it as parallel
as possible as you do so. The poly bush will go in so far and then it will distort as one edge
grips and it will twist. It looks like it will tear but it wont. Just keep tightening and all of a
sudden the bush will pop into the hole. Then just remove the bolt and washers. It should then
be possible to push it into place by hand. If you are fitting the ones with metal inserts fit them
in the same way after the bush is in place.
I used 1/ 2" drive sockets and a vice. The bush s at in 1 socket (tight fit) with about half its
length protruding; the socket walls stopped it buckling right over. Place the wis hbone -bus h-
socket into the vice and wind in. Once you have it in half way put the socket on the other side
of the wishbone (to allow the bush edges to pop out) put it back in the vice and wind it again.
Other have used a socket but instead of a vic e a threaded rod through the wishbone bush
and socket then pulled it through. Dropping the bush into boiling hot water for a few mins
first seemed to make it easier for me but it was still a case of keep on trying until it pops in.
Key question: should I grease or not, I seem to remember a comment about not using grease
with polybushes, bet ween bush and wishbone, as the grease and poly may be incompatible?
If possible I would prefer to drill and tap the wishbones and fit small grease nipples to extend
life and smooth out any suspension movement.
There must not be any relative movement bet ween the polybush inner face and the pin. The
whole purpose of the assembly is that the bush distorts in torsion to provide wishbone
movement. The polyurethane of the poly bush is not a good bearing material and it will wear.
IMHO this is not a good way to do it but that is the design. Rubber is a better and soft er
material but its life is not so good. Citroen use a poly bush with a needle roller bearing inside
it so they get the road isolation and freedom of movement and it works well.
It is very important that the inside surface of the wishbone "eye" through which the polybush
has to slide is clean of all rust and left-over bits of old rubber bush etc. This doesn't mean you
just give it a quick rub with abrasive paper - it needs to be nice and shiny-bright, almost as-
new. I used a small circular drill -mounted wire brush (small enough to fit through the hole), but
you could use a flap wheel or wrap some emery cloth around the end of a cut -off bolt with a
slot in it. I was amazed how much easier this made it to fit the bush - with some grease, it just
sort of "popped" in using a vice. I didn't soften the bush in hot water as I found t hat allowed it
to distort too much, but even so it did go a bit of a funny shape before it went in.




                                                                                                32
33




     33
34

Fitting Rear Brak e Cylinders.

I've just replaced both the rear brake cylinders with new. I struggled with the Retaining plate,
Spring plate and Distance was her and managed to fit them all back in place. But I made a
pig‟s ear out of replacing the rubber dust cover. Has anybody else made a success of fitting
these and can pass on any words of wisdom to me.
They certainly aren't easy. You need t he wheel cylinder & mounting devic es (& back plate in
the area of the cylinder) very clean. Assemble without the rubber. When you're happy with the
assembly push the rubber (coated internally with red brake greas e) over the handbrake arm.
Its lip fits under the edges of the retaining plate. Do not attempt to fit it at the same time as the
wheel cylinder / mounting parts. Although the diagrams in Haynes & other manuals lead you
to believe it goes on as part of the mounting assembly this is not the case.




                                                                                                  34
35

Fitting Shocker Bushes.

Anyone know how to get new shocker bus hes in - tried tonight and gave up.
I got my local friendly metal basher to cut down a piec e of 35mm diameter t ubing and
cut/close up/weld one end to about 25mm (or the diameter of the ey elet on the shock). Soak
the bush in hot water to make supple. Grease eyelet/tube and bush, Clamp a long M8 (or
similar) bolt in the vice, push t he bush as far as possible in the tube. Then sandwic h the
whole lot (shock eyelet, tube with bush in) onto the bolt, large washer and nut on the end and
wind it all up with a box spanner. Hold it all together while you do it and it pops into place
eventually. I did one with out the inner stainless steel tube fitted and then one with it fitted. It
seems debatable as to which is best. One mak es it hard to fit the tube afterwards and t he
other makes it harder to get the bush in the eyelet (1st try got stuck in the end of the tube and
then shot across the garage floor when I tried to get it back out. I don't know how I would
have got them in any other way. The Poly is ve ry resilient and despit e being crushed to death
down the tube sprang back to perfect shape in the eyelet.
As far as I'm concerned 'polybushes' shouldn't be used for shocker ends on something like a
"Se" Scimitar because these bushes are under a high static load [basically they carry the
weight of the car] and polybush-type bushes will suffer 'cold flow' effects with time. In this
application you need a hard rubber with plenty of 'filler' [carbon-black] in it to resist the effects
of cold flow.
The ones I have are the metalastic ones. Must admit to being a bit thick, I didn't think of using
a bolt t hrough to draw t hem together, I tried using t he vice but it was too fussy with all t he
sockets and things.
One thing to be careful of is to make sure never to try drawing a Metalastic bush into anything
by applying pressure to the inner bonded- in tube part. If you do there's a risk the inner part
will come unbonded from the rubber. It 's not immediat ely obvious that this has happened, but
if it has the life of t he bush will be measured in miles, as the inner tube rotat es in the torn
rubber rather than the rubber itself taking the torsion.
And lightly grease the inside of the damper eye & the outside of the bush.




Fitting Windscreen/ Rubber.



                                                                                                  35
36


I was wondering if any one has any useful tips for fitting the rubber on an SE5. My problem is
that unlike the rubber for the SE6 which come as one piece, the SE5 rubber is open ended
and obviously needs gluing. My questions are: 1. Is the rubber supplied to the correct length
or does it need cutting. If it does need cutting then what is the best way of measuring t he
correct length before cutting? 2. Where is the best place to put the seam? I notice with the
old rubber that this seam lies vertically on the driver‟s side. Is this the best place for the join?
at present this join is a source of leaks - any ideas ?
The rubber is supplied too long and I stuck a piece of string round the windscreen aperture to
get the correct lengt h. I did try fitting the rubber into the aperture but this wasn't very
successful. The join on my old screen was in the middle at the top so this is where I put mine
but I have sinc e seen others wit h the join in the middle at the bottom. The best advice I c an
give when fitting is to choose a very hot day as it makes the rubber a lot easier to fit. I tried
mine in t he spring on a cool day and didn't have any luck. I then waited for a hot day I t he
summer and it was far easier. You will also need at least one helper. I assume you know that
to fit it you need to put the rubber round the glass and the put sash cord into the outside
groove. wit h the ends hanging down from the top. This is a lot easier said than done. Y ou
then put the bottom part of t he screen into the aperture and with someone pushing on t he
outside and you on the inside pull the cord round the lip and hopefully it will pop in OK. The
easiest option of course is to get a windscreen fitter to fit it but a lot more expensive. Dermot
might have some extra advice as he has, I believe, recently fitted one to his SE5A.
If you have not already removed the windscreen from the car t hen the old rubber seal can be
carefully cut away using a Stanley knife. I do not think that the new rubber is necessarily cut
to the right length, and it is important not to cut it too short. When I did my 5a I felt that it was
better if the rubber was a little overlong so that the ends could be compressed together into
position. I did a fully lubricated trial run at fitting the windscreen into the res t of the seal before
cutting the rubber to length. Probably at this stage it is then worth marking t he spot and
removing the rubber from the car so that you can get a good straight edge. Regarding t he
join, I copied the existing and mine is half way up the passenger side, with the join in the
silver plastic insert being halfway up the driver‟s side. I had not done a windscreen before. I
found that I needed a lot of lubricant, and that the windscreen did not want to go back in
place. In fact I would not have believed that it was possible to fit my screen to my car had I
not removed the self same screen from the self same car. I was working on my own and had
to make several attempts before I succeeded. Maybe it would be easier with an assistant, but
I am not sure. However I am sure that the correct tools would help. I was pleased that I had
not used some sort of setting rubber lubricant sealer because I struggled wit h mine over
several evenings. (And I still don't think that the s hape of my car really matches t he shape of
my screen.) A small point it that so that I could put the screen down somewhere safely
without moving it far when it was slippery with lubricant I was ready with towels or a sheets on
the roof of the car.
I just fitted a new screen to my 5a, as some readers will know, having seen my search for
one! So, answers; 1/ Rubber comes in a lengt h (cut over length). You must trim it. The way I
did it was to fit the rubber to the screen aperture, using a rubber hammer where needed to get
into place, then I cut it about 1/2" over length, there being enough give to force the rubber
ends into place. It 's important that the 2 c ut ends are square. Be very sure that it's all fully
home! 2/ I agonised over join position, and ended up with... vertically on the drivers side... 3/
You must fit the rubber to apert ure, then fit screen int o hole, forget about other ways, I could
not do it any other way! 4/ I am very pleased I did NOT use sealant, since it would have been
a horrific mess. 5/ I found hardest bit to be getting windscreen reasonably centralised, if it's
not DEAD ACCURA TE then you can't make the rubber fit, and once it's 80% in, you can't
move the screen around any more... 6/ I used blunt screwdriver and a lot of care to lever
rubber over the screen.
I used the string met hod on my screen, but I did have to wait for a hot day, and it was a new
rubber seal and it wasn't joined at the end but it was one hell of a job and it sounds as though
Dermot's way is easier. I also didn't us e any sealer when fitting but I have since run some all
the way round where the screen sits in the rubber as it did leak a bit. This was very easy to do
and a lot less messy than when fitting.




                                                                                                     36
37




Five Speed Gearbox.




                      37
38

I am thinking of fitting a five speed ford g/b to my SE5. I have in the past seen several that
have this conversion. I can fabricate my own peddle box, and have a spare engine to allow
me to work out how to fit it. I wondered if any one who has done this can tell me how it
affected their MPG. Also can any body tell me which of the many five speed ford boxes are
best suited to the job? Although a owner for four years this is my first time on this site so hello
to one and all.
I've no experienc e of the MT75 although I've heard good things about it. The type 9 (lat er
versions) is probably easiest to fit. If you're car is at pres ent manual OD the type 9 5th speed
is slightly higher so mpg at cruise should remain t he same or improve. Only the clutch pedal
itself needs to be altered.
The V 6 bell housings are longer than the straight 4 bell housings and thus the V6 g/boxes
have a longer 1st motion shaft in order to reach the spigot bearing in the flywheel. The 4
cylinder g/boxes will physically fit the V6 bell housing and thus fit the V6 engine, B UT t he 1st
motion shaft will be floating as it will not reach the spigot bearing. Things will work for a while,
in fact it is a common hot rod mod to fit the 4 cylinder box to V6's, but then hot rods very oft en
do not have a very long life anyway, so a short lived g/box still outlasts the car.
MT75 that was attached to the granny engine recently fitted to my 6a was muc h wider and
would have been one hell of a squeeze to fit. The chassis rails on the 5 cannot possibly wider
apart than the 6 can they? E ven Reliant couldn't get more space under a narrower car surely ?
The chassis rails on a 5A are considerably closer together than on 6-series cars.
Go for a type-9 [5-speed Capri, early Mk.3 Granada, early Sierr a] but make sure you get one
that's had the lay shaft modification (did any survive more than 25,000 miles without it?) and
remember to use the correct oil with it [red synthetic, *NOT* old -fashioned EP90!] if you want
a decent change quality when cold. You'll need to frig the bell housing yourself as the bolt-
pattern is different to the Essex-type housing: either make up a spacer or find a Flowtech
Racing alloy bell housing (rare as hen's teeth) or the housing from a 2.5-litre Mk.1 Granada or
a Corsair 2000E is supposed to work too [but these are even rarer than hen's teeth!]
Depending on how lucky you are the existing Prop shaft may or may not fit. You'll probably
have to make up a spac er to go bet ween the rear support of the gearbox and t he cross
member in order to get the Prop shaft to run at the right angle.
I went into this a while ago and decided t hat the type-9 is by far t he best bet. It‟s a fairly easy
fix as all you need is a 1/2 inch adaptor plat e drilled and tapped where necessary. Most MT75
boxes came with int egral bell housings and these are of no use.




Flickering Ignition Warning Light.




                                                                                                  38
39

Anyone point me in t he right direction please? The red ignition warning light has started to
flicker on and off, not all the time, sometimes when accelerating, sometimes when coasting
along, sometimes on t he overrun. The alternat or is about a year old, the fan belt 3 months
and tight. Where to look first?
It's invariably caused by a failing alternator. Most commonly one of the excitation diodes but
in some cases it's caused by the regulat or or brushes.
Try changing the diode, plate in the back of the alt ernator. You can get one from any mot or
factors.
Have a look at the diode pack in the alternat or - look for one of the solder joints bein g dry, I've
had this couple of times.




Free Play in Steering.




                                                                                                  39
40

I have a bit a free play in the steering, which appears to be emanating from inside the rack.
Does any one have any suggestions as to what this could be and how to go about c orrecting
it?
If it really is inside the rack and not from one of the UJs t hen there are 5 possibilities: one or
more of the ball joints are worn (2 inside t he gaiters, two connecting to steering arms); or t he
rack damper needs adjustment. Outer ball joint repair is obvious, inners can be adjusted aft er
removing gait ers (dismantle & check for wear before adjusting), and the damper is covered by
a plate. There are two plates near the pinion: the one you DON'T want is in line with the
steering shaft & adjusts the pinion bearings. The one you need acts at right angles to the
pinion shaft & presses the rack bar against the pinion. There are shims under the plate that
can be removed to adjust the damper pressure (t he damper is a shoe t hat is pressed against
the rack bar by a s pring). My own view is that if the play is within the rack its best removed &
checked out on the bench.
Thanks for the info, there is a small amount of play and it was enough to get an advis able last
MOT. As the next MOT is due soon, I thought I had better get around to seeing what I could
do. It is not the outer ball joints and I don't think it‟s the inners either (but will check now y ou
mention it) so that leaves the rack damper. Looks like it is best to remove i t then.
Assuming it's a manual rack it's easy to do, it gives you a chance to check out the pinion seal
& bearings and possibly the rack bush.




Front – Rear Springs.




                                                                                                  40
41

Is anyone out there able to tell me how I can tell if my spare springs and shockers are front or
rear ones? Currently they are apart in a box that I acquired with the car. The previous owner
cannot remember even if they are a set so they might be front springs and rear shock or vice
versa. Or indeed they may be a set for either front or rear. There just has to be a way of
telling what‟s what.
As for front and rear I cannot help directly but if the springs you have are the same wire
diameter i.e. the diameter of the spring material and the spring is t he same overall diameter –
it is not unreasonable to suggest that they are the same strength springs. Another way is to
put the springs on end (assuming t hey will stand up on a horizontal surface) and put a plank
across both of them (about 2 feet apart). The springs should be the same height to within
about 2 – 3 mm or less. Put a heavy weight e.g. a kerbstone or a large bucket of wat er
accurately between the two springs. If both deflect the same distance they are the same
strength. If one spring is noticeably different in compression then I would suggest that the
lower height is the less strong and may be the front one. This relies on the assumption that
the spring material in both is the same metal alloy and temper
The front shock absorber has a greater distance between the mounting eye and the spring
seat than the rear ones. As to the springs I've swapped them end to end before now with no
noticeable difference. If they are your spares can you not compare t hem with those currently
on the car? I doubt whether a kerbstone would produce sufficient deflection for a comparison
to be made as Scimitar springs are very stiff. As well as length and wire thickness the number
of coils also has an effect on the spring rate.
I had a look at the ones on the car and to my eye they look identical. I even measured t he
thickness of the spring wire with a calliper gauge and they are the same to within a few thou
(on my car any way). That 's the sort of clue I was looking for regarding the eye to spring seat
dimension. I shall have a look and a measure of the ones on the car tonight.
As you so rightly said (I measured them last night) the front shocker "has a greater distance
between t he mounting eye and t he spring seat than the rear ones". It‟s not a lot (just under
10mm in my case) but enough to measure. So it appears that I have indeed got two spare
rear shocks. The springs now are anyone‟s guess, (they measure 360mm free length) but
mine is that I have a set.
If the distance between the spring mounting shoulders is @ 14" fully extended then the
shocks are rears; if it's closer to 12" then they're fronts.
As I said mine are 360mm which is just over 14" and what you say confirms what I thought.




Gear Select Problems.



                                                                                             41
42


Today, the gear select totally failed. It started with reluctance to select 3rd& 4th however
within t hirty minutes, all gears were impossible as if the gear lever was hitting a brick wall. I
coaxed the car back home and found the nylon bushes on the gear rod                  ('72 t wo rod
gearbox) were missing, they were replaced during the rebuild, but aft er replacing them, it
was still impossible to select any gears.
Does it feel like the gears are being selected when you change gears while at a standstill? I
assume you checked the clutch actuator was actually moving when you press the pedal?
Had the same problem on my SE6a. Proved to be a few different things all adding up to no
gears. First was the clutch not working properly. Leaky seals internally, old plastic pipe
expanding, and slave cylinder upside down. Second was state of the oil in the box itself, on
Graham Walkers recommendation now using 20/50 which is working fine. Third is the wear in
the linkages and setting of them, which is a halfway hous e between set up correct and t aking
up the slack at the moment till I can get a rose jointed linkage made up. But after all t hat lot I
now have a gear change that works well 95% of the time.
If you cannot get a gear with the engine running then it sounds like the clutch plate is not
clearing when you depress the pedal - that's in addition to your gear selection problems. I
have come across this problem before when the bolts bet ween the engine and bell housing or
the bell housing and gearbox were loose and when the pedal was depressed it just pushed
the two apart - it does not need a lot of movement.
In response to your comments. I could select a gear by: 1. Switching off the mot or 2.
Selecting a gear and holding the gearlever in place 3. Pushing in the clutch pedal 4. Switching
on the mot or and then slipping the clutch t o start rolling. That is how I got home. The clutch
actuating arm seemed to move when we were testing the clutch.
Check to see if the clutch is disengaging properly. If not and you have checked the hydraulics
look for a cracked release arm.
I found that both the large and small seals in the master clutch cylinder are badly perished.
Also, I need two nylon bushes for the external actuating arm on the gearbox, someone please
help.......If I can get my hands on one, I can turn up a copy in phosphor bronze.
I would stick with nylon if I were y ou for the bushes. PB needs constant lubrication and does
not like dirt contamination. If you can get hold of Nylat ron GS it is the bee‟s knees. Outlasts
PB by 3 or 4 times. Machines like PB – high speed low feed and coolant. Use at least 0.010”
clearance.
I wish that I could obtain any bush in any material. Graham Walker cannot supply the items
and I would dearly like to find at least one so that I could copy it. Any suggestions?




Gearbox Check Adjust.



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43


It isn't possible to test for anything other than all five gears. However you can: examine the
assembly for gasket & oil seal leaks & replace as required remove the OD sump plate & clean
the magnet & screen remove the OD solenoid & clean & (electrically) t est. Shorten the 1/2 &
3/4 selector levers by 1 1/4"And onc e back on the car re-fill with Moly gearbox additive.
Interesting comment about shortening the selector leavers, more information please. The oil
in the B ox, I have read somewhere in a past post about using 20w 50. Any comment? I have
also read the P DF files about Moly. Am I correct in assuming that there would be t hree types
of lubricant/additive, One for Gearbox. One for Engine and Grease for rest of Car. If t his is
correct what are the exact names for the products as the only thing I have with Moly on the
Tin is Copper Slip, not a good idea putting that in the Engine or Box !!!. ( Only Joking ).
Shortening the levers is a recognised improvement to the cha nge action. There are many
other improvements that can be made but that is the simplest & others can be done later. The
gear change has a very long throw & feels sloppy compared to more modern 'boxes -
shortening the levers improves t hings dramatically. I f you are stripping & cleaning t he
gearlever mechanism itself also consider shortening the 3/4 bias spring - it is incredibly strong
& something else that doesn't help easy gear changing. Just mount the mechanism in a vice
& try it then alter the spring to suit you. If you overdo it I have a spare you can have. Gearbox
oil should incidentally be EP80 or 90 (+ the additive).
I mean the ones on the gearbox. 1 1/4" is a lot - but the change will be much better for it. If
you think I may be wrong (I'm not because I did my own!) simply re-drill them at 1 1/4" up
from the existing hole thus making the mod reversible.
Clambering aboard your comments on shortening the levers may I make a comment. I did the
mod years ago after the great Robin Rew wrote a bit about it in Slice. I found his s uggestion
of 1" made the gearlever into a 's witch' A fter a lot of trial and error I found that drilling another
hole in the leaver no further than 3/4" up from the first was ideal. And only on the third and
fourth not on the first and second, the bottom two gears work ed better with the longer throw.
The change from s econd into a short throw third was ideal. Another point to make while
anyone is in 'oil on face drip 'mode is to adjust the gear rods. With the c hange in neutral y ou
will find that there is a hole at each side of the change mechanism (we are speaking under
the car here wrigglers) and if you pus h a suitable drill through from one side to another it will
lock the levers in place. You then undo the bolt that holds the t wo parts of the rod together on
one of t he rods and extend the rod out as far as it will go, i.e. taking up t he slack so to speak.
Repeat this for the other rods. This will mean a better feel to the gear change as the lever has
no longer got to take up the slack before it informs the gearbox of your intentions.
While the Gearbox is out and easy to get at it would be a good idea to replace the Selector
Seals that are in the side cover.




Gearbox Oil.




                                                                                                    43
44


I have 2 litres of Ford 75W-90 BO transmission oil (bought for an SS1 sierra gearbox, but we
no longer have the SS1). Does anyone know if this is OK for my 1974 SE5a gearbox
In my 6B 4 s peed with overdrive I have t ried EP80W/90, Straight EP90 and 75W/90(semi -
synthetic). Look on the can of Ford oil to see if it conforms to or exceeds API GL4. Also see if
the term "semi" or "part synthetic" is mentioned. If they are you will be fine using it, since it will
meet or exceed Reliant's requirements. Personally I find EP 90 t oo heavy in the box -it runs
quietly but stiffens the change and makes synchro less effective when cold. EP80W/90 is
good but for winter/ all year use I much prefer 75W/90. E ven on c old winter mornings the
gearshift feels "warmed up". I have not noticed any noise increase and the semi synthetic
stuff I use has shear strength capabilities far in excess of the stresses encountered in the box.
Also the overdrive operates quicker. I get marginally better mpg due t o the lower drag but I
have got 75W/90 in the rear axle as well.
The 75W90 is perfectly suitable for t he Scimitar gearbox and overdrive and as has been
stated it does reduce the losses in the box due to the lower viscosity. It improves further when
a dose of moly is added again due to lowering the friction losses. In most parts of the wo rld
they will define oil as `semi' synthetic. I always used to think that semi meant 50% but it does
not in the case of oils where semi means that some synthetic base oil is used. This can be
10% synthetic base oil and 90% straight mineral base oil or virt ually any level provided some
synthetic is in the mix. Except in Germany where it means 50%.
Modern oils can be up to 35% additive. These cover antioxidants, detergents, foam
suppressants and antiwear additives. There are others used to a lesser extent e.g. slippy
additives to reduc e friction wit hin the oils, tacky additives used in gear oils and so on. These
are designed for modern engines, usually to help to cure problems that the engine designer
cannot solve. Designers are pushing up engine temperatures to improve thermal efficiency
and the oils have to cope with it. Designers want oils to last longer so changes have gone
from 3,000 to 15,000 miles. So oils become loaded with more and more additives. Some of
the additives have surface acting barrier lubricants to try to reduce cold-start wear which is
when wear rates are highest. In overdrives, auto boxes and synchro c ones the drive torque is
transmitted t hrough brak e bands or cones which rely on friction. However the brake bands
grip with considerable over-kill so that the brak e band cannot slip in use. The use of
Molybdenum Dis ulphide, zinc dithiophosphate etc in an overdrive or auto box would seem to
be contrary to t he effectiveness of the brake band system but the overkill is sufficient to
maintain a good grip and transmit the drive torque. If the grip maintained by the bands was so
close to yield the bands would be worn out anyway and should be adjusted or replaced. In
these cases the use of such friction reducers makes the overdrive or auto box much sm oother
in operation and will prevent the galling and wear that occurs as the bands tak e up their grip.
Therefore the overall result is an improvement.
According to my oil supplier the semi synthetic 75W/90 gear oil which they make has a very
modern package of additive blends which will definitely not have any adverse effect on
overdrive units. |It is very inert and shear and temperature stable and the strongly preferred
choice. In fact the EP80W/90 is apparently more likely to occasionally affect certain makes of
older overdrives, although even this is negligible for most applications. EP oils do have
additives in them which can attack phos phor bronze. So a knowledge of the gearbox
construction is always handy. For our Scimitars it would seem that the modern semi synthetic
75W/90 a very safe bet... Whilst I understand and respect the reas ons for the use of
molybdenum disulphide additives, I personally do not use them in the gearbox/overdrive unit
due to the inevitable, albeit very slight, reduction in friction which could slightly soft en the grip
of the overdrive cone and marginally reduce synchro efficiency in the box. Moly definitely
reduces friction and is a wonderful product in engines and axles. Mind over matter prevents
me from having it in the box, although many other wise Scimitar owners have used it for years
without ill effect. In fact they feel that box and overdrive actually work better with moly.
Overdrive manufacturers/rebuilders do not recommend it. It is not my intention to rekindle
another long moly debate but tagged my comment on to the main message since you were
asking about additives.




                                                                                                   44
45




Gearbox Removal.




                   45
46

I've hit a s nag and wonder if anyone can help. The gearbox doesn‟t seem t o be as described
in the manual and I can‟t work out how to remove the gearlever. From under the car I‟ve
disconnected 2 selector rods and the gearbox mounting ( it‟s still attached to the engine but
that‟s all disconnected ready to go). I've removed t he console and if I look through the hole I
see an Allen key bolt, I removed that - nothing seems to happen. Is the lever held in by a big
bolt ... I can‟t really see what‟s going on and don‟t want to blindly take off every thing I can see
! B TW the manual didn‟t warn me the gearbox oil would flood out off the back when I removed
the Prop shaft
OK don‟t panic, do not remove the rods from the gearbox end, and remove the split pin
washer type things by prising them away from the flat bit and sliding them off. stick some tape
round them, and number them, for easy re assembly. and leave them attached to the box, this
way the adjustment is not lost.
But how do I get the gearlever off? I was expecting to see a remote gear change - instead it
appears to be attached directly to the top of the gearbox ? I could only see 2 rods from
underneat h - which I have separated (maybe needlessly?) If I look through the hole in the
transmission tunnel it looks like there maybe 2 bolts holding it all on - but they are awk ward to
get to and I don‟t really want to undo everything on t he off chance I strike lucky ? I was
wondering whether it‟s a non standard gearbox as the o/d wiring is certainly non standard -
though the hole in the transmission seems to be in the right place.
There isn't a hemis pherical cap through which the gear -lever projects, and which can Be
screwed off with effort (spring loaded underneath), is there?
If that is the gearbox I think you are describing – it is a hell of thing to dismantle on the car.
Drop the box out and then you can dismantle the lever mec hanism. It is a disaster of a design
and is pretty hopeless as a gear change system – too much free movement.
How do I get it out ? I was hoping t o pull it out along with the engine. You are right - the gear
change was inc redibly woolly - though I found the remnants of plastic bushes which had
disintegrated leaving a mechanism res embling "waving a fag-end in a drainpipe". Is this a non
standard gearbox - or just Reliant using whatever parts were on offer that week ? I knew I
shouldn‟t have sold my spare gearbox - which looked totally different
Getting t he engine and gearbox out is relatively easy. Take the exhausts off and all pipes,
wires connections etc. Fasten a lift point on the carb flange on the manifold (having taken t he
carb off first). Undo the prop shaft behind the box and undo the gearbox mounting plate. Undo
the engine mounts and lift. The gearbox and engine will at about the right angle for a clean
removal. You will find it is pretty heavy.
The conclusion of that particular story ... it turned out I have the early type gearbox and the
gearlever is removed by getting a thin set of adjustables thru the gearbox tunnel hole and
undoing a very large nut. Easy when you know how ... and have a decent light source!




Removing Gearbox.




                                                                                                 46
47

Please Note: This all relates to a 1972 SE5a with a 1974 Engine and Gearbox.

This is my version ( Don Kennedy ) of removing the Gearbox with Engine in the Car. I had
removed and fitted the Engine, Gearbox and Overdrive as a complete unit a few months ago
so I thought I would see how difficult it would be just removing the Gearbox/Overdrive with the
Engine in the Car. My first comment is while it can be done by one pers on (I did it on my own)
I would recommend t hat at least two people do the Job. The main reason is the weight of t he
Gearbox and Overdrive, it is VERY heavy. Reason for removing the Gearbox so soon aft er
the rebuild?, the new Clutch Release Bearing started squeaking. I had read about doing this
and part of the advic e was to disconnect the Exhaust down pipes at the manifold, I managed
to do this without disconnecting the Exhaust and without risking damage to any part of t he
Exhaust or manifold. Have small bags to put bits, nuts, bolts etc in and writ e on the bag what
they have come from. This is especially important if you are not expecting to complete the job
that day, it is very easy to forget and a lot simpler when reassembling.

Disconnect Battery.
Remove Carburettor Air Cleaner.
Undo the Top two bolts that go from the top of bell housing to Engine.
Reverse Car ont o Ramps.
Jack up front of Car and put on Axel stands. If you want to get the Gearbox out from under
the Car you will need at least 16 inches clearance under the Chassis for the bell housing to
clear.
Before getting under the Car make sure it is safe and is not going to fall etc.
A Scimitar landing on you is guaranteed to give you a sense of humour failure.
Remove Rear end of prop shaft to axel bolts.
Remove Front end of prop shaft from Overdrive, (Mine has a flange like the Axel E nd). I
believe s ome have t he prop shaft that slides int o the Overdrive. If so take care as when
removed the Oil will escape. Drain Gearbox oil before removing prop shaft if t he Prop shaft is
the type that slides into the overdrive.
Disconnect leads to overdrive solenoid and inhibit switch at base of gearlever.
Disconnect leads to reverse light switch.
Remove plate between chassis sides under bell housing.
Disconnect Speedo Cable.
Disconnect Gear linkages at base of Gear lever. Use some string to tie to the Overdrive.
Disconnect Clutch Slave Cylinder, tie to one side. No need to disconnect the hydraulics.
Make sure the battery is disconnected before proceeding.
Remove two bolts holding Starter Motor. Slide Motor forward.
Use scissor jack to support engine under sump. Use a piece of wood bet ween Jack and
Sump to prevent damage. There is no need to lift the Engine, just support it.
Remove Plate at bottom of bell housing.
Support Gearbox (Around the middle of the Gearbox ) with Trolley Jack, this requires a Trolley
Jack with wheels to enable you to move the Gearbox etc. If the ground is uneven it would be
an idea to have a large sheet of wood t o help it roll. It could be very difficult to move
otherwise.
Remove bolts half way up bell housing and bottom of bell housing.
Remove Rear Gearbox mount plat e; undo the centre bolt then the four bolts onto the chassis.
Now comes the time to separate the B ell housing from the Engine. Using a screwdriver gently
lever between the Engine and Bell housing, when they have parted a small amount you will
need to turn the whole unit anticlockwise (As viewed from the rear). The reason for this is the
“Bump” in the bell housing that t he Starter Motor shaft went into will catch on the Chassis,
turning it before the B ell housing gets to far from the Engine will allow the whole unit to be
lowered to the ground, failure to do so WILL result in the Bell housing getting snagged on the
left side of t he chassis. Once the Bell housing has turned enough (It will be obvious) t he
whole lot can be moved away from t he Engine. Take care not to allow any weight to be tak en
by the first motion shaft (This is the shaft that comes out of the front of the Gearbox, goes
through the Clutch Friction Plat e and into the Flywheel) this can be difficult as the weight is
being taken by the Trolley Jack and you need to turn it. If you are just replacing the Clutch the
whole unit can be left on the Trolley Jack away from the E ngine but take care as it could very
easily slip off, I used a piece of wood 2”x 2” across and underneath where the Bell housing
and Gearbox joins. This piece of wood was held up and against the bottom of the chassis.



                                                                                              47
48

There were times when this piece of wood was in the way but I felt happier knowing it was
there.

 As all the good books say reassembly is the reverse of the above. If you have never replac ed
a Clutch before make s ure you have an alignment tool to align the Friction plate wit h the
Flywheel Spigot Bearing. Trust me, trying to use the Gearbox first motio n shaft or bits of
round wood etc will result in hours of buggering about. I learnt this many years ago. If you are
doing this alone (Mad Fool) it is difficult to get the First Motion Shaft t o go through t he Clutch
Friction Plate and int o the Flywheel Spigot Bearing. The “Secret” is to get the balance of the
whole Gearbox etc correct on t he Trolley Jack. Slightly back from the c entre of the gearbox is
about right. When the balance is correct it is quite easy to align so spend some time getting
this balance correct. Take care, if the Gearbox etc comes off the Trolley Jack it will be a
bugger to get back on by your self due to the weight. The only difficult part could be refitting
the Bolt on the Top of the Starter Motor. I found this was best done from below, with the
correct length extension on the socket,. Do not tighten the bottom bolt first as this will cause
problems fitting the top one. Make sure all bolts etc are fitted and tightened
 (Another reason for putting the bits in bags, if all the bags are empty you must have fitted all
the bits).

If y ou have never attempted this type of Job before I would recommend y ou give y ours elf t wo
days. If you have done this type of job before and you hit no snags it could be done in less
than 5 hours.

Good Luck.




Gearbox Selector Oil Seals.




                                                                                                 48
49

Finally got my GTC jacked up and got underneath to find t he reason for t he oil slick from t he
gearbox. The selector shaft seal or seals are not doing their job. I quickly got on the phone to
GW's and ordered a whole set of seals for the gearbox & overdrive. My question, is it
possible as Matthew from GW says to replace the seals without removing the selector cover
or the gearbox as a whole as I did on my previous Se6a? Anyone achieved this and any tips; I
don't really fancy a gearbox out right now.
Yes I have done it, all you have to do is remove the arm and be very very careful not to push
the shaft back into the box, you can prise the old seal out with a screwdriver. It helps if you
have a nut on the end of the shaft to stop it getting away from you - once the seal is nearly out
you can remove the nut. If you mess up it just means that you have use plan B and take t he
cover off.
It's perfectly possible - the only snag is that without removing the selector cover you can't
polish the shafts to prevent future leaks. The levers engage flats on the shafts & the flats tend
to have very sharp edges. There is no particular difficulty in removing the side cover so you
can replace the seals in comfort. However if you need to do the job with the cover in place: -
remove one lever at a time - prise out the seal taking care not to push the shaft in towards
the gearbox, greas e the shaft & seal area - plac e the seal over the shaft rotating it so it 's not
damaged by the flats - us e a spac er & the original nut to force the seal in place - replace
lever & move on to the next one.




Getting at Wiper Wheel box es.




                                                                                                 49
50

Has anyone replaced wiper Wheel boxes on an SE5? My wipers are o n their last legs, too
stiff, need replacing. Motor is OK. Some helpful comments seem to say access is behind t he
heat shield at back of engine. I removed mine this weekend but there s eems no way to reach
Wheel boxes. You can just about touc h nearside one with one finger with a hard push but no
way to do anything. Driver‟s side seems impossible to get at. Is it necessary to cut into t he
fibreglass, this might be easier from the dashboard side. Any help welcome please, also
where to get the bits.
I've no experience of a 5 but your description of access to them suggests it's similar to 5A. If
so you need to first undo the large nut on the end of the motor, remove the motor mounting
nuts then wit hdraw motor rack cable (remove wiper arms first!). Then remove the nuts holding
the Wheel boxes to the body (the large chrome ring nuts below the arm splines). If the Wheel
boxes are salvageable it's often better to cut the nuts (Dremel handy) rather than risk the alloy
wheel box threads. Once the nuts are off y ou can p ush the Wheel boxes simultaneously into
the car so that you can reac h the two nuts on the back of t he NS wheel box. With these & the
wheel box back plat e removed you can separat e the assembly into OS box + link tube, NS
box, and motor to NS box tube & fish it all out. You may find bent steel water guards behind
each wheel box that come out at the same time.
On my SE5 the Wheel boxes are accessed via removable panels behind the carpet above
each foot well. The panels are held in plac e by self tappers and mas tic.
If you remove the cover of the Wiper Motor, remove the lever that connects the Round Cam
to the inner cable you c an remove the cable from the wiper motor. You can now pull the
Cable ( Make s ure that the wiper boxes are unbolted from t he scuttle panel ) toward the front
of the car. This will move the right wiper box toward the hole that is exposed after the cover
on the bulkhead is removed. You will now have easier access to the wiper box. Once this one
is removed you can now push t he cable in the other direction to push the left wiper box
toward the access hole.




Grinding Inlet Valves.




                                                                                              50
51

I read somewhere that one of the valves (inlet or exhaust) has an alumis ed coating and
should not be ground to re-seat it. Is this true and does it mean t hat the valve need replacing
if it does not appear to seat cleanly?
I ignore that instruction. When doing a valve job I always profile the valve and its seat to take
off sharp corners that cause vortices and then lap them in. I have not lost a valve yet.
The aluminium coating on the inlet valve is an assembly aid that ensures a perfect seat with
no grinding for a new inlet valve. Once the engine has been used & requires subsequent
maintenance the valve can be ground or re-cut as required (as normal).




Head Gaskets.




                                                                                              51
52

My loss of coolant problems could perhaps be relat ed to the fact that coolant pisses out of the
head/block joint. Could also ex plain the gurgling noise exhaust gases in the c oola nt. Never
having done a head gasket before, could someone tell me: Is it ever possible to just replace
the gasket, and everything to be okay? If I need to do some skimming, is it usually the head
or the block, or bot h? Are there big differences bet ween gasket brands and gasket ting
compounds? Can I buy thick gap-filling gaskets which reduce t he need to skim? Does one
always replace both sides on the basis that overheating which has caused one to go would
cause problems with the other?
Yes. Gaskets age; they can also suffer electrolytic corrosion round the waterways if the
engine has been run wit hout antifreeze (though this is more commonly seen in aluminium
engines). You shouldn't use gasket compound on head-gaskets in any case. The gasket
contains an impregnation of sealing compound which will be squeezed out to make the seal
as part of the normal tightening-s equence and subsequent heat-cycling as t he engine warms
and cools. Using additional gasket-compound on head-gaskets is a crutch t o fix a problem
which should be rectified by other means ! One tip: use reputable-brand gaskets. I've us ed
Payen in the past, but best of all are " Reinz" (who produced the original gaskets for Ford).
Cheap-brand gaskets are usually a disaster. Given that you have t o pull the inlet -manifold off
to do either side, I'd do both while you've got the engine stripped.
I had a similar problem about 18 months ago and not wishing to take the car off the road
during the small amount of time that it runs in the summer, I (on advice from an old country
mechanic ) used a block of "Bars Leaks" as a temporary meas ure. Amazingly the leak stopped
within seconds and to date has not reappeared. I was a bit sceptical about possible cooling
problems but after two summers so far not problems. So the temporary "get me through the
summer" bodge has turned into a semi-permanent repair. It‟s worth a try for a couple of quid.
My old 6A blew both its head gaskets in fairly quick succession reasonably soon after I
bought it. Being fairly new to it all back then, it took me a while to diagnose t he first failure
because an Essex doesn't turn its oil into mayonnaise as a symptom of the condition (as
there are no oil ways in the head). Instead what happens, of c ourse, is the cooling system
gets over pressurised and t he coolant just gets blown out of t he overflow (not always easy to
see). I have often wondered how many owners of 6As blame the design of the cooling system
for their overheating problems when all along they have a blown gasket they do not know
about! The second failure occurred rat her s pectacularly late one autumn night at speed on
the A12 - great plumes of steam which didn't half make t he following car back off! However -
coming to the point of my ramblings - both sides were OK just with new gaskets. No skimming
required. Use decent gaskets. I got mine from Scimpart. The other t hing to remember is that
the tightening torques given in the Brooklands Owners Workshop Manual were at some point
deemed not tight enough by Ford, but this didn't get into th e good old (??!!) Brooklands book.
IS TR that a Ford service bulletin (others may have the definitive word) recommended final
tightening to around 90 lb ft, rather than t he 65lb ft that was earlier recommended and
reproduced by Brooklands. Presumably the re vision reflected blowing problems in practice
with the lower figure.




Heat er Repairs.




                                                                                               52
53

I am getting very little output from my 5a heater fan (1972-76 type). It has 3 settings: Off on -
no noise no extra output on - some noise and a gentle breeze from the windscreen vents. I
thought I might investigat e the fan in t he side panel of the driver‟s foot well, but is held on by
what the manual calls 'Tapit'. I cannot undo these with a screwdriver and I cannot prize t he
panel off. Am I missing something here are these fit forever devices?
No you're not missing anything - they're very difficult to remove. Use a pair of side cutters to
cut the plastic 'head' & the nail thingy off, remove the covers, retrieve t he bits then replace
with nylon self-t apper ins erts, cup washers & SS self tappers. Then you can get the covers off
in future.
You need to have the air set to off when using the fan motors - if it is on then the air goes
outside. When the fans are off the vent needs to be on to allow ram air int o the car. Having
said that the standard fans in the 5's are pretty much useless - we replaced ours by ones from
a VW of some kind but that was years ago and I cannot remember which kind - probably
Polo. Some modification of the fixings were required but it is a job worth doing.
They are not meant to come out – only Reliant could have thought that one up. Grind them off
with a Dremel.
Before you go riving the fans out just try replacing the switch first. That was my problem on
the 5a. Switch was worn and it provides feeds to each of the fans. I had no air at low speed
and some at high. If I flicked the switch a couple of times it would suddenly start working
properly.




Heat er Valve.

Since buying my car I've been unable to switch the heater onto "Hot". When I operate the
lever it will only move 1/2 way between hot & cold. I removed the side panel in t he driver‟s
foot well and discovered that the lever operat es rods and pulleys which in turn operate what



                                                                                                 53
54

appears to be some sort of valve/piston thingy which seams to be seized. My question is, can
I try some sort of penetrating oil or WD40 on it to try and release it ? And if I do release it
(even with a bit of force) am I likely to cover myself in coolant or knacker the thing completely
?
………………………………………………………………………………………
Whatever advice you get you can be sure that what will happen will be the opposite.
Released mine with WD40 but what will happen to yours is in the hands of the gods.
…………………………………………………………………………………………
If it 's seized it will leak when freed. It isn't needed for t emperature control (there's a mixer flap
valve over the matrix to do that ) & it isn't fitted later Scimitars using the same heater. The
simple fix is the best: remove & discard the operating rod; remove the screw clip holding it
together; remove the innards but keep the screw clip, cover & diaphragm outer ring; using
either the remains of t he diaphragm or a suitable 'O' ring as a s eal insert a metal disc (2p fits
IIRC); fit a small nut & bolt through the (now vacant) plunger hole adjusted so that it presses
the disc onto the seal when the cover / clip is replaced; dry carpets 'cos I forgot to say you
need to drain coolant before starting.
…………………………………………………………………………………………
Thanks for your help. Can I leave the seized piston where it is and just disconnect the rod that
actuates it, leaving the other rod & pulley where they are?
……………………………………………………………………………
To get a hot heater in a 5a the car has to be on fire!. The thingy you refer t o is best removed
but not before you drain the cooling system. Remove it and solder a 2p piece over the hole.
Connect the input to the heater matrix t o the rear wat er c onnection on the inlet manifold and
the other heater connection to the back entry of the water pump. There is a write up in Slice
about removing the heater on a 5a - not easy. Reliant fixed the place for the heater and then
built the car around it and you remove most of the front interior to get at the heater.




Ignition Warning Light.




                                                                                                    54
55

Anyone point me in t he right direction please? The red ignition warning light has started to
flicker on and off, not all the time, sometimes when accelerating, sometimes when coasting
along, sometimes on t he overrun. The alternat or is about a year old, th e fan belt 3 months
and tight. Where to look first?
It's invariably caused by a failing alternator. Most commonly one of the excitation diodes but
in some cases it's caused by the regulat or or brushes.
Try changing the diode, plate in the back of the alt ernator. You can get one from any mot or
factors.
Have a look at the diode pack in the alternat or - look for one of the solder joints being dry, I've
had this a couple of times.
You will probably find that the brushes have worn through the copper on the slip rings. this will
cause the alternat or exciting field to collapse and energise, causing the warning light to "flash"
A new alternator rotor and rebuild or an exchange unit will be required. Try your local LS UK or
motor factors for an exchange unit.




Inlet Valve Coating.




                                                                                                 55
56

Is the aluminium coating on inlet valves required or can you get away without it? Some friends
of mine say it‟s not required what do you think?
It's there when new probably as an assembly aid. It 's irrelevant in normal use - just treat the
valves / seats as though they weren't coated.
Ford put an aluminium coating on to quickly bed in new valves without the need to grind/lap
the seat fac es in new cylinder heads. On worn heads unless the seat and seat angles have
been expertly recut back to original then I would hand regrind the seat face with an old but
good valve, and when the seat has a nice even matt finish very lightly lap (grind with fine
paste) the new aluminised valve in to ensure a good gas s eal - but don‟t overdo it. If it‟s an old
but good valve then just go ahead and grind it in as usual.




Lifting off Body.




                                                                                                56
57


Any advic e on the preparation would be greatly appreciated. How               many people will be
needed? The body is almost completely empty of fixtures and fittings to minimise the weight.
The body is deceptively heavy. Y ou will need at least 4 strong people but 6 are preferable
because you have to lift the body surprisingly       high and at an angle to get it off the rear of
the chassis. If you don't use a gantry make s ure you have something to put underneath to
support it in case you get stuck. Also double check that there is nothing left attached t o the
body and the chassis like the rear         washer pipe, which I forgot. The good news is that I
found it easier to remove than replace. Also make sure you have got something flat for the
body to sit on as if it is off for a long time it does tend to settle and can twist out of shape
slightly making it a bit awkward when you refit it.
Another thing to remember when lifting the body off is that the rear end is "locked" over the
rear chassis so you have to lift the front to an angle of about 30% from the horizontal and then
"walk" the body off t he rear. You cannot just raise the body straight up. I had about 8 people
helping me but I also left the doors, seats and all the glass in. The only problem I had was
that the rear lights cables were wrapped around the chassis so I had to cut the cables rather
than have every one standing holding the body while I untangled them all. One other bit to
remember is to disconnect the Speedo cable. You may well find that you have missed a
couple of bolts (there are about 30 in all) so it‟s easier t o let them rip through the fibre glass if
you don't have enough time to play around.
I lifted at the wheel arches first and Put a length of 4 X 4 timber across the front suspension
mountings then lifted the body up with a sling from the centre of the engine bay.
My gantry was a farm tractor loader, "makes for a easy lift a little at a time"
The best way as many said, is a bit of wood across the front mount points to pick up the front,
however make sure that the wood goes right ac ross into the wheel arches, so that the stress
gets distributed up the vertical sides of the inner wings, not only on t hose horizontal platform
areas where it bolts down. Also, those plat forms are often deformed/det eriorated, perhaps to
the point of not really being connected to the body... Something I did when putting body back
(as well as strengthening those platform areas with mat) was to get a lump of s/s plate,
shaped suitably, and put it bet ween platforms and fibreglass, make it bigger t han t he
platforms to spread the stress, make it stick out 1" or more to outer sides s o that the vertical
inner wings get some loading, the standard platforms don't do that.




Master Cylinder Repair and Bleed Nipples Seized.




                                                                                                   57
58

I have discovered my 5a's Master cylinder is leaking, (fluid is ending up in the foot well aft er
running down the pedal.... 2 problems ...... Graham Walker's don't do a repair kit just new
cylinders, does anyone know of a repair kit supplier? Alternatively does someone have a kit or
serviceable master cylinder for sale for less than £85! Second problem, Bleeding the brakes
once master fettled. The bleed nipples on the Girling front callipers are stuck solid and have
been rounded off by previous owners. Does anyone have a good method for getting t he
buggers free short of drilling them out?
1st buy a new one or one of the same size which will fit - considering the age of the car it‟s
likely that its past its sell by date. 2nd mole grips and blowlamp - but be careful don't set fire
to the car. Failing that its back to the drill or easy outs if y ou have them and are lucky. Not
good news is it.
Can't help you with the first bits. Other than check with your nearest motor factors for a seal
kit... I've been lucky on a few things so far. Bleed nipples.... Plus Gas and stud extractors, and
spanner, all at once. A fter that you are looking at either new callipers, or swapping the brake
lines for motorcycle style ones with a banjo fitting, and then using a banjo with bleed nipple
built in. Old motorbike dodge... tenner for the bolt as opposed to several limbs for a Japanese
calliper.
Try hitting the bleed nipples with a hammer. Us e a heavy hammer & sharp blows. Hit squarely
so they don't break but don't be afraid of distorting t hem a little. Then use a Mole wrench set
very tight. You'll need new ones anyway. If they shear as you try to undo them they 'll do so
fairly neatly & have a hole through to centre the drill. In my experience they're fairly easy to
drill out as long as you're careful not to drill too deeply - you can feel the end of the 'pilot' hole
& that is when to stop drilling.
Had the same problem not long ago, got a repair kit from a local motor factor Part No.
SP1967 cost £4.79
Thanks for the bleed nipple shifting suggestions, heat, hitting and mole grips did the tri ck. I
sourced a Girling M/C repair kit from an excellent specialist Paul Hunt at
www.powertrackbrakes.com £9 and on my doormat the next morning.




Overcharging & Alternate Alternator.



                                                                                                   58
59


My 17ACR alt ernator would appear to be o vercharging. At idle it gives about 14. 4 volts at the
battery, but raise the revs a bit and it goes almost up to 20 volts which is obviously not right.
What's gone wrong? Is it the volt age regulator t he alternator itself? My real fear here is that it
will       damage            my         almost         new       battery.     Any        thoughts
would be appreciated as I'm not an electrical person at all.
The regulator is built into the alternator body - about the only thing which would cause it to
over volt apart from the alternator being duff would be high resistance connection on the earth
side - i.e. the alternator body not being connected to the battery -ve via the engine. More
likely a duff alternator - cheap enough in scrap yards but worth going for a larger one while
you are on.
Definitely sounds like the voltage-regulator has gone and died in "maximum
charge" position. It will not do the battery any good - I had this happen on a Mini once, and
the battery was boiled dry in a day or so. Get a new alternator. I'd suggest trying to get a
Bosch "K1-55" instead of the Lucas one. The Germans seem to understand voltage-
regulating a lot better than my namesake ever did. The K1 -55 has the same plug connector
as the 17ACR so it's a direct swap.
I just junked the 17ACR from my SE5 recently and as luck would ha ve it - an old alternat or
from a 1600cc Escort/Orion Diesel fitted in all ways - mount and plug connection. The body is
bigger but the output is brilliant.
Does anyone know of an alt ernative higher output alternator to fit the GTE which I might find
in my local second hand car parts merchant (scrappy)???.
The 2.9 Scorpio uses a 90 amp device. It 's mounting is slightly differently to the ACR type &
you would need to alter the adjusting strap.
I didn't give you any detail though so t ake care. The differences I've noticed are that the
adjuster lug is diametrically opposite the mounting lug as opposed to the 120 degrees (I think)
of the Lucas type. There are the usual two connections - one to charge the battery & one to
light the WL but they 're not on a plug. IIRC the charge out put is a stud with a nut on - can't
remember what the WL one is. If you'd prefer more detail before you visit the scrappy I have
one of these alternators & could get whatever info you want off it. It's the one I int end to use
on my 5A.
Use the Bosch alternator from the 2.8 available from Andrew page. Turn it over and it fits
straight on. No problem.
That may be the same as the 2.9 (it's a Bosch as well) & is mounted adjuster down on t he
2.9. I've just looked at the one I have - I haven't t ried it on any Scimitar engine. I'll copy a
photo to you - if it is the same it's a bit more info for everyone.
More or less any off an 80-95 ish Ford. I just went to local scrappy and asked for a Lucas one
"from a Ford from the late 80's -90's" and he had a dustbin full (literally) for £10 each, it fitted
directly, plugged straight in, just needed the casing "twisted" (unbolted and bolted back in
another position) to make the mount bolts line up. The pulley was already correct. Of course
it's only 55A, but I've not found a problem, scims don't have too much extra electrics, even
with my 100W lights : v)




Overdrive Faulty after 20 Miles.




                                                                                                 59
60

I wonder if anyone can shed any light on my Scimmy's latest (minor) problem. The car is an
Se5 with early style gearbox and LH type overdrive. The problem is that for the first 20 miles
of a journey the overdrive engages and disengages happily and normally, but after that it just
refuses to engage or even t ry to engage. My first thought was that it might be a p roblem with
the inhibit or switch so I organised a "bypass" switch. However no joy with that the overdrive
still fails to engage after approximately 20 miles use. Although far from a major problem it is
just a wee bit annoying so any ideas would be welcome.
Two things spring to mind. Give the filter a clean out and check the oil level or replace the oil
in the gearbox. Both are cheaper to start with before you get to the replacement stages.
Cheers I shall have a look at that. I think I can rule out oil level as it was topped up very
recently, perhaps some crap has gone in and blocked a filter. There appear to be t wo
(according to the workshop manual) a sump filter and a relief valve filter.
Dave, 95% of all o/ d problems I've ever had were low oil. Even if I didn't think so on first
inspection.
I had the opposite on my 6a. The OD would come on, and stay on, off its own volition. After
draining the oil, cleaning t he filters and pressure relief valve it was still doing it. In the end I
replaced the solenoid, sod of a job to get it off but did the business. On investigation it
appeared t o be "gummed up". I guess the heat and pressure was causing things to swell ???
Maybe you are getting the same sort of problem? My car had been sitting for a couple of
years ... I put it down to that.




Overdrive Faulty.




                                                                                                  60
61

After many years off the road my 5a is now up and running. However there seems to be a
problem with the overdrive. It was working on a test flight last week - but now is n‟t. It seemed
to work fine with no funny noises or smells. I've bypassed the inhibitor and now have c urrent
to the solenoid with the switch on ... but nothing seems to happen. I've topped up the gearbox
oil too. The gearbox is all coming out soon - are there any tests I can do t o determine where
the problem lays before I start replacing things?
With the car having been off the road for a good while all sorts of funny things can happen
with the oil (and fuel). Water has a long term chemical effect on the additives in oils which can
cause sediments and gums. You ran it for a while to distribute the gunge all round the box
and it has probably gummed up the solenoid valve that actuates the O/ D unit. If it is coming
out anyway get it on the bench and strip it down, clean everything inc the solenoid valve,
hydraulic relief valves, passageways etc and check the brake materials. If everything seems
to be OK renew the main oil seals and reassemble. Or have it professionally overhauled –
cost about £200 – and it should be as good as new.
Silly question - what should I clean it with?
When you have it all apart use something like kerosene and a brush to remove all the crud
that collects. Clean the filter the same way and if you get down to a fully stripped box you can
put all the non-electrical bits in t he dishwasher – when t he better half is out shopping
preferably – I understand they don‟t appreciate the benefits of a dishwasher.
Worth unscrewing the solenoid and cleaning it - you can take the spring off it and give it a
slight stretch at the same time. Also the filters under the cover at the bottom of the gearbox
could be clogged, remove cover and unscrew filter.




Overdrive in Other Gears.




                                                                                              61
62

I saw a recent post suggesting that enabling OD in second would provide a useful 7 speed
box. Is there a downside to this, and why didn't Reliant/Ford do it in the first place? Is it that
heavy acceleration in 2nd OD can damage the OD? Or is this just a theoretical concern? I
was at Prescott hill climb recently and noticed that several TR5s/6s used OD on 2nd as an in-
between ratio - wit h a fast clutch less change of course - whereas I was stuck with either
doing the whole run in second and revving higher than I really wanted to, or changing
between 2nd & 3rd which just slowed things up. And I was going slowly enough in the first
place... Any thoughts? Can I safely use OD in 2nd for hard acceleration without breaking
anything?
………………………………………..
I have used OD in 2nd for many years without any apparent problem in the OD unit. If y ou
overload it it may spin being a friction clutch. If this persists then damage will result. I always
use moly in engine and gearbox/OD and have had no problems with the OD.
…………………………………………………………..
The danger is making sure you don't select first + O/D as that could be too muc h torque for it
AND you NEVER repeat NEVE R select reverse + O/D as that will bust it completely. I made a
complicated arrangement for my rally Coupe years ago when it had the gearbox with the big
gap between 2nd/3rd. It involved a relay and a switch on the front of the clutch pedal and a
power transistor. So you could call it in second, then as you hit the clutch it dropped out as
you went into 3rd. I found you could never manually synchronise the switching unless you
have 3 arms. Then the ordinary switch worked in 3rd & 4th as normal.
……………………………………
My understanding of Overdrive's is limited but a question please. When the Overdrive is
activated by the solenoid the fluid is applied under pressure t o engage the O verdrive. This
fluid pressure is from an internal pump in the Overdrive unit. The drive to this pump is from
the rotation of an internal shaft (Output Shaft?). If the Solenoid is activated when reverse or
first gear selected (When Car stopped) there would be no rotation of the drive shaft and so no
pressure, and so the Overdrive would not be operational, and so no immediat e damage would
occur when revers e selected until some speed obtained. If the solenoid was activated when
first gear selected the overdrive would not engage until some speed ac hieved. The speed
expected during reverse would not be great enough to obtain the required pressure to engage
the overdrive and so damage unlikely ???. I may be completely wrong in my assumptions and
if so I would be interested in any comments.
………………………………
There is a uni-directional sprag clutch in an overdrive unit which is there to allow differing
rotational speeds of shafts. It is not part of the actual overdrive engagement clutch. If the
vehicle is reversed with the overdrive clutch engaged the differential rotational speeds of the
shafts caus e the disintegration of the sprag clutch. It can be seen in the sectional view in t he
Autobooks manual. The sprag clutch is t here to prevent a freewheel effect in the overdrive
train.
………………………………………………
Logically you are correct but: the pump is a positive displacement device & requires little
movement to achieve full pressure - certainly only a few strokes and definitely not "some
speed". If the car is stopped with OD engaged (no inhibitor for instanc e) it will remain
engaged for a short while & residually pressurised for some longer time. Movement of the
pump will fully re-engage it almost immediately.




                                                                                                62
63




Overdrive Problems.




                      63
64

I need some advice before I dismantle more than necessary on my overdrive. I‟ll try and
explain how it reacts when engaged. I changed the solenoid, but t hat did not help. When I
select engage to overdrive it dose not engage, but then again it seems to engage because,
when I drive say 110 km and slip the speeder with my foot I can feel that the engine does not
brake t he car. But if I disengage the overdrive, the engine starts to brake the car at onc e. I
have changed oil and filled it to level. Could it be t he relief valve that needs a cleaning? Or is
it the pump that needs cleaning? Perhaps some of you have experienced the same kind of
problem and can give me some advice on this one.
Sounds as if the epicyclical brake band is not functioning - worn out or the hydraulic
engagement is not functioning. The latter could be due to lack of generated pressure due to
faulty relief valve. That would explain the slipping when engaged but positive drive when not.
Before taking the whole gearbox to bits it is worth while removing the bottom plate (talking the
later overdrive here) and unscrewing the filters and getting rid of the build up of dirt I'm sure
you will find in them. I would also take the solenoid plunger and its spring apart and slightly
extend the spring and clean all the bits with it. I did this to our 5A when we started to get long
delays before the overdrive engaged and when it did go in it went in very gradually - not the
normal punch. The whole job will only take you a couple of hours .




Paint Stripping.




                                                                                                64
65


I've t aken the plunge and started to remove the paint from the Coupe (doing some glass -fibre
repairs, anyway ). I know that, at some point, I'll wish I had never started. Luckily there are
only two coats (original c oat plus later res pray). I'm adopting the 'chisel' tec hnique, with a
view to taken it back to the gel coat. It 's working, but is soul-destroying monotonous and time-
consuming. Is there an easier way? I've heard of chemical strippers t hat don't attack
fibreglass, used on marine hulls for example. Anyone come across these? Or am I dreaming?
……………………………………………….
Nitromors have a fibreglass specific product, perhaps try chandlers?
………………………………………………………
Nitromors for fibreglass still attacks but at a lesser rate and gives time to wash it off before
damage. However it is still very messy and I abandoned using it and went back to chisel
skidding. Sanding with an orbital sander maybe a better option.




Rear Axel Breat hers.



                                                                                              65
66


Where, exactly, is the breather for the rear axle? I as told to make sure that I unblocked this
before greasing the bearings?
There are three "breat hers" and if you are talking about greasing then I assume you mean the
small holes on the opposite side of the axle t o the greas e nipples. The real axle "breather" is
about half way along the right side (viewed from the rear) of the axle just above half way up.
All holes are about 2mm therefore can be difficult to find if blocked - wire brush normally
shows them up.
The breather holes to pass out excess grease for the bearings are on the axle facing
rearwards just inboard of the brake back plates. There is another hole which is the breather
for the differential casing.
Also, on the same topic, is the axle tube hole (diff breat her) just a hole, i.e. before it gets
blocked up with crud, some crud actually gets inside to float around in t he oil? Other cars I've
known had a 'proper' breather thing, a screw in fitting wit h a bell type cover to let air in/out but
keep the crud away, and these were always on top of the diff casing.
Yes it is just a hole ! I found the best way to clear it out was using a drill bit twisting it in my
fingers to pull the muck out of the hole as I unblocked it.




Rear Axel Filler Plug.




                                                                                                  66
67

I've just bought a SE5a and I have a question to ask which I'm s ure will sound real stupid to
all you seasoned Scimitar owners. However, in spite of my blushes, I need to ask 'cos I'm
stuck. I went to check my rear axle oil today, but didn't even succeed in removing the filler
plug. One of the arms from the Watts linkage runs very close to the plug, so much so that I
couldn't get a tool in to undo it. Is there an easy way to do this ? Surely it can't be necessary
to remove the linkage arm just to check the diff level!.
Yup I'm afraid so. It‟s a pain isn't it? If anyone knows how to do it without disconnecting the
link I shall be most impressed.
I've found that if you jack up one side of the axle and leave the other on the ground you c an
move the linkage just enough to get access with a long slender t ool (the dumbbell type
wrenches don't stand a chance). The only thing is you have to let it back down on the flat
when you fill it to ensure t hat the level is correct. I find this a bit of a faff, but t hen compared
to taking the linkage off, well….
I found this and swapped the drain plug for the filler plug as one is long and the other short
then it will come out wit h out removing the linkage, they both have the same thread so it
seemed to work.
If you need spares they are standard plumbing fittings, available at any plumbing merchant.
I have replaced the s quare "hole" plug with a square "stub" plug so I can get an adjustable
spanner on it. Before I did this I could get a 1/ 2" ratchet drive between the link and the axle - it
was from a Gordon socket set so perhaps these are not as thick as other makes. You can
get a bolt head or a nut welded onto the plug when you finally get it out so it is easier the next
time if you cannot find a stub plug.

Re diff plug try using a 1/2 inch ratchet drive out of a socket set in the hole these can some
times fit in behind the linkage even if you only get enough turns on it to loosen it of it helps.
The easiest way is to remove one bolt from the offside arm where it attaches to the centre‟
diamond' and simply swing it out of the way. This is a two minute job on a well maintained
car.




Rear Axel Oil Seal.




                                                                                                   67
68

I am intending to replace the pinion oil seal this weekend on my GTC, and would appreciate
any tips to ease the task from the collective wisdom of the group.
When I did mine I expected to use a little home made slide hammer to pull the old one out -
no chance, I had to damage the old one by the judicious use of an old screwdriver. Make or
get some kind of drift to at least start to press the new seal into place, I used the pinion nut to
pull the drift onto the new seal and finished it off with a hammer. If the pinion is rough wh ere it
passes through the lips of the seal, you can alter that position with the aid of some deep
gasket type material behind the seal to move it slightly forward onto a better surface on the
pinion. Not too sure about pre loading and collapsables, I tight ened the nut to its specified
torque - worked fine. I seem to remember I had to arrange some kind of 'bar' effort to stop the
pinion turning too; it was a bit tricky keeping the car still whilst hanging that many lb/ft off t he
pinion nut. Dexion frame springs to mind, cut to shape wit h a couple of bolts through at the
right plac e.
You probably have the collapsible spacer which applies pre -load to the diff. One problem with
this is that when it is collapsed, it can spread out so that it is too big to remove through the
pinion hole - y ou then have a wonderful time attacking it ! The last axle I did, I replaced t he
spacer after a struggle, and torqued it down as per the manual, but the previous one I did I
used the technique that Robin Rew developed. This involves marking the exact position of the
nut before removal, and then replacing the nut in exactly the same place, and then turning it
an extra bit - but I'm sorry, I can't remember the exact amount of turns. This technique
certainly worked for me, and the axle was fine.
DON'T FORGE T TO CHECK OUR BREA THER HOLE IS CLEA R AND WAS NOT THE
REASON FOR THE FAILURE IN THE FIRS T PLA CE.
Alyn is right about marking the nut. I have had good results by punch marking the nut and
then tight en up just back to the mark and no further. When you put the prop shaft back on put
a smear of Hematite on the flange surface, what can happen is the oil from the dif finds its
way down the bolt and fills up the space between the prop shaft and the pinion flange and
then centrifugal forc es a mysterious oily spray on the body area near the axle.




Rear Axel Ratio.




                                                                                                  68
69

Does anyone k now what rear axle ratio is supposed to be fitted to a 1970 se5 with - 4 speed
(NO O/D); - 4 speed (with O/D); - auto 'box. Actually I am looking for a narrow (s e5 or 5a)
axle with 3.07 gearing. On which cars were these fitted?
The short answer is: Not very many ! I don't have my copy of Don Pither's 'bible' handy, to
look at the years, but as I remember, some autos had 3. 07, but e.g. the 73 aut o 5a I had, had
3.31, so does my 74 5a manual o/ d. The manuals say that for autos up to chassis 453500 it
was 3.07, then 3.31 from 453501... Manual non o/d was 3.07 from chassis 931001, but there
were not many manual non o/d models made... Manual o/d's were all 3. 31 I think(?)
Does anyone know what rear axle ratio is suppos ed to be fitted to a 1970 se5 with - 4 speed
(NO O/D) - 4 speed (with O/D) - auto 'box 3.07 to all of the above (but there was less than a
dozen autos made in 1970 - alt hough only introduced as an option at chassis 451729 - first
factory auto with documented evidence is 450799) Actually I am looking for a narrow (se5 or
5a) axle with 3.07 gearing. On which cars were thes e fitted? Auto & mod up t o 453500 (1972
Up rated engine) 4 sp manual from 931001 to 93x6615 (more around than you may think).
BTW, Jim, what does mod mean? Manual Overdrive A nd stand I correct that 45xxxx is the
code for auto and OD Se5's and 93xxxx is the code for a four speed? no - the sequential
chassis coding for GTE's started at 450001 in A ug 1968 until 454030 in 1972.(S abre 4 was
S200xxx, Sabre 6 was SS300xxx, SE4/a/b was SC40xxxx, SE4c was SC425xxx) when the
revis ed front suspension was introduc ed in 1972 the chassis numbering was restarted at
931001 (no I don't really know why - it would have been logical to do it when the 5a was
introduced in Oct 71!) Note - very early on - the 93 became separated as 93/ 1021 and lat er
as 93x2600 (although all 3 numbering met hods were used throughout the 5a life! )




Rear Wheel Cylinder repair and Sizes.




                                                                                            69
70

Does anyone know offhand whether these cylinders can be repaired with a seal kit or if they
need to be completely renewed? I have one which is weeping. Are they common to any oth er
classics?
I repaired mine with a seal kit about 5 years ago and they are still fine. I think it depends if the
bores are badly scored or pitted, in which case I would renew them. Graham Walkers and
other Scimitar Suppliers usually have them. However jus t for information they are from t he
export version of the TR6 which had 7.5 bores, whereas the UK TR6 had 7.0 bores.
Spot on, thank you. I thought they looked the same. I'm ordering some parts from a triumph
supplier (RIMME R BROS) for my spitfire so I thought I might as well save on postage and
order some new scimitar brake cylinder seals as well.
It depends on how bad the cylinders are. They may just need a seal kit or light honing but
new complete units are not an arm and a leg at GW and you will; have the satisfaction of
knowing they are correct.
Isolate the rear brakes as a possible cause close them off with a brake hos e clamp (unless
you're using braided hoses) & try a careful test drive.




Rear Chassis Cross Member.




                                                                                                 70
71

My lack of not e taking whilst dismantling my project 5a has 'bit me on the bum'! I‟m stripping
the chassis down and at the rear most point of the chassis there is, in my c ase, a very badly
rusted assembly that looks to be a rear cross member of some sort. I first assumed this was
part of the chassis but it looks to be bolted onto the main structure at t he rear. Due to its
condition it is hard to tell what it was for, other than support for a tow bar fixing. What other
things would be fixed to it, rear bumper? Is this available from our dealers and who do folks
most recommend for supply and advice on this and other chassis replac ement bits.
Yes - I was puzzled by this extra bolt -on cross-member when I re-built the rear chassis of my
5a. The conclusion I came to was that it was an adjustment to allow the length of the chassis
to match the length of the body!! If this is so, then it would be attached so as to be as close to
the back end of the rear chassis proper as possible before mating the body and chassis. Then
it would be loosened and slid backwards to take up any space between chassis and body
before being re-tightened. It is attached via elongated slotted holes apparently for this
purpose. Without this, attaching a tow-bracket might bend and crack the fibreglass at the rear.
But perhaps there is yet another explanation...... As far as replacement is concerned, I us ed
rectangular-section tube to fabricate a replacement very simply.
The bar at the rear chassis is indeed for sliding back in order t o bolt the body on precisely,
avoiding distortion e.g. around bumper bolts (bumper/body bolts to it) or add-on tow bars.




Rear Hatch Hinge Pins.




                                                                                               71
72

Ok I am looking for anyone who has had this problem and solved it. 197 3 SE5a rear hatch
hinge pins. Driver‟s side has rusted off due to lack of care in the past. This has to be the worst
bit of design I have ever seen – Question how to fix it without cutting the roof off.
I had to do this with my original 5a. The hinge arran gement is just a long flat bar with t wo bits
of round bar welded on the ends. The whole thing is glassed in t o the underside of the roof. I
got a replacement hinge from Graham Walker and cut it in half as only one side had gone
(like yours !). I then pulled back the headlining and carefully ground away the fibreglass that
held t he hinge in place until I had half of it exposed. Still using a small angle grinder I cut t he
flat bar in two and removed the dead section. The new piece just slotted into the groove left
by the old one, and it was an easy job to re -glass it in. You just have to be very careful not to
go right through the roof!! Eye protection and a dust mask is advised, as you'll be working on
your back with the cutting going on above you.
It looks to be a real B*****d of a job. How far under the fibre glass is the flat bar? What are we
looking at - a couple of mm or ½”.
Well - it WAS many, many moons ago! I seem t o remember that the actual glassing -in was
pretty poor, and that once I'd start ed to cut the glass, I could "encourage" it away a bit. I think
it was only one layer of matting, but I could be wrong. It took me a weekend to do the whole
job - but a lot of time was spent weighing the job up and convincing myself that I had to go for
it!.




Rear Hatch Lock Repair.




                                                                                                  72
73

Anyone got a s pare boot/hatch lock kicking around? Or know where/how I can change t he
lock barrel. It shuts fine, but the key doesn't lock it anymore! Not a good state of affairs.
Take the whole assembly out including the rod which links it to the latch. Drive out the pin
which attaches the rod to the lock assembly, and also is the rot ation stop for t he bit you turn
with your fingers. You can now remove that inner section which contains the barrel. A bout half
way along the inner section, a little off the centreline is the aperture for the cross -ways pin
which retains the barrel. Drive it out. The barrel may not fall out easily, if it's corroded in there
you may need to pull it out with a piece of bent wire. Put a nail or a piece of stiff wire all the
way into the key slot, to prevent the lock's wafers from springing out of the side of the barrel
when you remove it. The wafers are small pieces of brass plate wit h a hole in the middle
through whic h the k ey passes. However, they are more likely to be seized, which is the basic
problem. The barrel has an off-centre pin on its end, which engages with a slot in t he
trans verse lock bolt which slides in a square -section slot at the bottom of the barrel recess.
(As the barrel turns 90 degrees, it makes the bolt prot rude and engage with a square aperture
in the outer part of the lock assembly. Once the barrel is out, you can remove the bolt. If it's
seized, you may need to punch it out. Decorrode and clean all the parts. Punch any seized
wafers out of the barrel slots, together with the remains of their tiny springs, which will
probably be broken. Clean the wafers, and clean out the slots they slide in, as well as
removing the remains of any springs. Check that the wafers run freely in their slots, and refit
them with new springs, RS order code 386-398 (0. 18mm wire, 1.45mm OD, and 7.95mm
long). If you still have the original key, then make sure you refit the wafers in the original slots,
because the different positions of the holes in the wafers match the profile of the key. If like
me you don't have t he original key, then t ake the repaired lock to a locksmith and they can
work out the correct key shape and make new keys. Mine cost £8.50 t o have two keys made
up to fit the lock. Now you c an lubricate the barrel and refit it, together with t he sliding bolt,
before driving in the retaining pin to keep the barrel in place. Then fit the inner assembly to
the outer housing, re-engage the rot ation spring, fit the link rod and drive back in the stop pin.
It's easier than it sounds, it just needs patience. Give it a go.
Take out the lock, internal barrel, fit any key in the lock, and file off the brass bits that stick
out, that key and only that key then fits, this also works on passenger doors, if you have 20
different keys for your Scimitar.
Or do what I have done - fit an electric solenoid and do away with the keys altogether!




Rear Wheel Bearing Removal.



                                                                                                  73
74


Hi everyone, the rear wheel bearing has "g one" on my GTC but can't get the old one off, t he
workshop manual refers to a "Reliant s pecial puller" for removal, is there any other way to
remove it that a non mechanically minded owner can achieve.
Your big problem will be to get the drive -flange off the end of the half shaft. I burst a hired
hydraulic hub-puller in trying. Easy solution is to take out the 4 bolts that hold the brake back
plate to the axle, disconnect the handbrake cable/brake-cylinder hy draulic line, then use a
slide-hammer to pull the entire bearing, half shaft, drive-flange and back plate out of t he axle-
tube together. Then take it to an engineering workshop that have a press rat ed at least 32
tons, and ask them to split the drive -flange from the half shaft. Give t he guy a tenner when he
manages it, if his press bursts in the attempt - well, it was clearly faulty! Once they 've done
this the rest is easy - unless you need different-sized shims to set the bearing end float ! The
shims are no longer available in sensible sizes - in the end QRG sent me some second-hand
ones and I was able to make up a shim -pack to give the correct end float.
I have not done one myself but understand that they can be removed with careful use of an
angle grinder. I believe the procedure is to remove the half shaft from the car using a slide
hammer. Than remove the outer race leaving the collar on the shaft. Then carefully grind
through this until there is not much metal left being careful not to nick the shaft. Then split the
race with a steel chisel.
Yes that idea will remove the old bearing but you still have to get the new bearing on which
involves removing the flange. Previous advic e is sound tak e it to a shop with a big press and
gets them to do it. I broke 2 pullers trying to do mine and it was only £20 to get the engineers
to press it off so don‟t even think about that route. You will also need a clock gauge and
maybe some spare shims to set the preload with the new bearing too.




Rear Wheel Stud Removal.



                                                                                                74
75


Hi all, how do you remove a rear wheel stud on a 5a and where can I get a new one (dodgy
thread)?.
Hit it on the end with a hammer not sure if the half shaft as to be pulled to let it completely
free as I did mine with the half shaft out any way. Chances of y ou getting t he hub of are a
million to one without a 50 ton press.
Just drive it out towards the brake plate - it's just a friction fit. The stud has splines on it - t he
hole in t he hub doesn't until the stud is driven in. It can be wiggled out without removing t he
hub but you'll need to remove the brake shoes for clearance. I can't remember whether it will
foul the brake plate but if so & you can't get it out just release the bolts holding the brake plate
& tip it slightly or drill a hole in the brake plate & fill it with a grommet afterwards. A simpler
alternative if the threads are only slightly damaged is to buy a die to clean them up?
You may well find that the stud will not come out due to insufficient clearance between t he
hub and the back plate. On mine a previous owner had cut the studs short so as to replace
them with the consequence that they only held the wheels on with about four threads - I had
to disassemble the axle and took the opportunity to replac e bearings and seals.
Although I haven't tried it should be possible to remove the bolts & tilt the brake plate & if that
fails not hing is lost because the hub will need to come off & as you say it would be very
unwis e not to do seals & bearings whilst in there.
Mmmm?? They can't all be the same then; because I definitely replac ed all my rear studs
without the need to break the hub taper. Quite honestly I cannot remember it being that
difficult as I would have remembered had it been. That 's on a 5a by the way.
The confusion could be because there are different lengt h studs and I presume the longer
ones would be more difficult to get out.
I can confirm that Reliant did fit different lengt hs of studs on the rear axels, and if its the
longer ones they will not come out without dismantling the hub or why not just cut it short then
push out easily. I can‟t see it causing a problem if the new stud you get is a couple of mm
shorter than the rest the supplier wouldn't supply them if they did not do the job.




Removing Gearbox.




                                                                                                    75
76

Can I take the gearbox out from below with the engine in place ? If so can I separate the
overdrive 1st to reduce the weight and finally are they any pitfalls I should be ready for ?. I
have decided to remove the prop shaft, gearbox and bell housing, so I can get to it easier.
The (I guess SE5 or early 5a) gearbox is a heavy old lump, so be careful and use a t rolley
jack. You'll have to remove the gear lever first (there's a small 3/8" bolt which locks the BIG
bolt at the bottom on the lever itself). Apart from that, it's just cumbersome. Get the front up
on a set of ramps or very good axle stands, and make sure your trolley jack will reach high
enough. An extra pair of hands would be useful as well...it's very tricky as a one man job. Just
watch out for the wiring to the inhibitor/reverse light switch on the top of the box that is doesn't
catch anywhere and wreck the switch. You'll have a hell of a time finding a replacement... Be
prepared for a load of EP80 flowing down your arm when the back of the gearbox comes
down.
You can take the box out & leave the engine in place. It 's not necessary (or wise!) to remove
the OD first. Do all the engine bay work before you jack up the car then get it as high as
possible on ramps or (preferably) four axle stands. Disc onnect: Exhausts Prop shaft Water
hoses Alternator The hose from rear of head or carb to heater Speedo cable from gearbox
Clutch hydraulics. Remove the air cleaner Remove the starter Slacken front engine mounts
Support gearbox on a trolley jack Remove ge arbox cross member & rubber mounting Lower
the gearbox a little at a time & check you've missed nothing in the engine bay. You need to
see the rear of the box almost on the ground. Jack it up again so that you can get the lift pad
of the trolley jack under the gearbox casing immediately behind the bell housing. Jack it up so
that you c an place a scissor jack on the rear of the trolley jack to support the tail housing.
Raise the whole assembly to give clearance for the box to slide clear of the engine then,
before removing bell housing to engine bolts, put a support under the rear of the sump. Lower
the jacks together so that the support takes a share of the weight. Remove bolts & using t he
jacks as a trolley you can maintain the correct gearbox to engine a ngle and wheel the whole
lot backwards to disengage the input shaft. Once it's clear of the engine lower the jacks then
roll the box off them onto some ply wood so y ou can drag it out from under the car without
damage. I don't know which model you have and there are slight differences. Go slowly -
they'll be pretty obvious.
Great explanation. I forget I would have to slacken the engine mounts ! I have a 1972 se5.
Will the rotated engine clear the tubular cross members, as the redundant water pump seems
mighty close to the top cross member ? I presume I also need to remove the starter motor.
Where is the reversing s witch wiring located. My reversing lights work but I cannot find t he
switch on the gearbox ?.
You may have to remove the cross member (it 's a whil e since I had a 5A ) but wait till you start
tilting the engine - it 's surprising how dec eptive the position of the pivot point (engine mounts)
is. If yours is the front sump engine it may still have the extra cross -tube under the rear of t he
sump & you'll also need to remove this. The OD switch & reversing light switch are one unit
on top of the box. Yours is the early box without the 3 rod linkage & someone else has
already explained how to remove the gear lever. I did suggest you remove the start er!.
Thanks for the help I managed t o gear the gear box and overdrive as complete unit out of t he
car. However I could not get the gearbox output shaft low enough to clear the chassis cross
bridge as the sump at front of the engine was hitting the lower cross mem ber. This cross
member is welded t o the chassis so could not be removed. My solution was to slide t he
gearbox back off the engine horizontally along t he tunnel and drop the bell housing first.
There was only just enough room, and I don't know how I am going to get it back in! The
clutch slave cylinder needed a 6 foot scaffold pole and a monkey wrench to t wist out of the
bell housing. A quick scrub wit h a wire brush and it drops back in very easily, it is amazing the
power of a little corrosion ! It looks like a repair kit will solve my problems as the bore seems
fine. Looking at the gearbox linkages while the gearbox is out, I thought I might solve my
gearlever rattle. The forward back connecting rod is very loos e have any of you improved t he
design ? I also thought about increasing the throw on reverse as it seem very close to 4th
gear.
It turned out I have the early type gearbox and the gearlever is removed by getting a thin set
of adjustables through the gearbox tunnel hole and undoing a very large nut. Easy when y ou
know how ... and have a decent light sourc e !

The next part was added March 2005.




                                                                                                 76
77

Has anyone else been successful in changing the clutch without removing t he engine. - I
wondered, is it actually any quicker?!
In engine compartment: * disconnect top & bottom hoses * unbolt PAS pump & attach it to
the suspension cross member * remove air cleaner From wheel-arches: * disconnect
exhausts at the manifold outlets * remove start er motor * slacken engine mount rubbers
Underneath: * prop shaft * gear linkages at gearbox end * wiring to gearbox & Speedo cable
* clutch slave * place jack under gearbox * remove c ross member (unbolt from chassis & rear
rubber mount) Lower the jack until the tail housing is as low as the jack will allow all the time
checking the engine for fouling / anything you've missed. Jack it up again until you can place
a support under the rear of the sump. Turn the trolley jack so its handle is facing the rear axle
then place a scissor jack on the rear of the trolley jack & adjus t to contact the rear of the OD.
Remove the bell housing shield & all bell housing bolts (easiest using a long extension &
socket from underneath). CAREFULLY wiggle the box by pulling/pushing on the tail housing
until it is free. You can remove it carefully by rolling the trolley jack back by hand & adjusting it
& the scissor jack as you go. Once clear of the engine lower the jacks fully & roll it off them as
gently as possible. Two people are useful here because the box will fall off the jacks as soon
as the 1st motion shaft clears the clutch unless it is prevented from doing so. You need the
car on axle stands at full height & a sheet of 3/4" plywood under the car makes the jack roll
easily & cushions the gearbox as it is t aken off the jacks. I did this j ob four times on my own
GTC - it takes around 1 1/2 hours taking it slowly & around 40 minutes if pushed.




Removing Paint.



                                                                                                  77
78


The car was over painted some years ago. The paint is very thick and in places is lifting cle an
off the gel coat. My question - what is the most effective way to remove the remainder of t he
paint now that I have picked off all the loose without any gel coat damage.
I have a personal favourite for dealing with old fibreglass but it really only applies if doing a
"Major Refit" and given t hat you have started by carefully picking off loose paint probably
won't apply. Anyhow the met hod is to sandblast it. Not with shipyard grade stuff but with finer
grit, more the size of beach sand. I have used this on large boats, fibreglass motorcycle pet rol
tanks and the trickier parts of my Scimitar and it easily removes the paint and any dodgy gel
coat, it exposes delicate air bubbles under the surface and importantly it etches out any gel
coat cracks (stress cracks) so that it is clear where you need to grind out and make good).
The surfac e you are left with is rough, something like the texture of 60 or 80 grit sandpaper
but is easily filled with spray filler which you may be going to use after other remedial w ork
anyhow. It may sound drastic but I regard it as being overall quick and easy, take a small
fibreglass part along to your local sandblaster for a t rial. On boats, where t here has been
osmosis or otherwise compromised gel coat, I have applied 600g/sq m of solvent free Epoxy
straight onto the sandblasted surface followed (without sanding) (apply when surface will take
a fingerprint but not sticky) by Jotun "Penguard HB" high build epoxy primer. This has been
very successful and I kick myself for not doing the same on the Scimitar. Don't use any
Polyester products on top of Epoxy unless fully cured, best to apply some paint on top of t he
high-build epoxy (after sanding) and t hen it 's safe to use regular body filler. The 600g/sq m
has to be applied in a number of coats, wet-on-tacky. The downside of this method is that
however much you mask up (using Duct tape) the grit seems to get in every where so OK if
you are pulling much of the interior and maybe lifting off chassis but not appropriat e for a
quick repaint.
Orbital sander and lots of time worked for me. I start ed wit h 60 grit disks until I neared the last
layer of paint then went to 320 for the last layer. I tried paint stripper even stuff for boats but it
wasn‟t much use. I even t ried the expensive stuff that‟s a paste you spread on cover with t he
cloth supplied and then peel off but went to the old tried and tested sander in the end. May be
car paint is harder to dissolve than boat paint I don‟t know. I did try regular Nitromors on a
small area and it did work really well but as I thought might happen it made a mess of the gel
coat.
I will probably get a slating for this, and I thought he was mad at the time, but the result was,
the best gel coat re spray I have seen. Use ORDINA RY NITROMOURS. It only takes off one
coat at a time. Stop after each coat, and wash it off until you get to the last coat. Then sand
the whole car, primer filler, and sand off, normal primer and sand off again. Normal primer.
Paint. do not sand by hand [unless unavoidable] as this leaves strange angles and light lines,
you don‟t see until the final coat, if there are any imperfections, you wont see them until the
paint sinks, in 3-6 mont hs time, then its too late.




Removing Trunnion Bolts and Fitting Trunnions.




                                                                                                   78
79

The question is there a "Secret" in removing the B olt, One side turns easy but the other side
is VERY stiff. I can turn it a bit by putting a Socket and Bar on the bolt and using a Trolley
Jack pushing against the Bar. The Bolt "Jerks" about half a flat. Any Ideas to help? I do not
have access to heat to apply to the bolt etc.
If you cannot get heat to it then you can try hammering it out (you will need a counter weight
at the bolt head end to do this properly) - I once also had to split into t he three parts
(disconnecting the wishbones) and doing one at a time. You can also grind away the Trunnion
as you are fitting a new one - relieves some of the pressure.
If the Trunnion bolts have been in for some great time the best tool to use is the universal
rotary getting off tool - sometimes called an angle grinder. Grind into the brass of the Trunnion
close to eac h side and it will c ome adrift after a few minut es. Brutal - yes but quick and
effective.
Don't forget that you need to remove the spring/shock mounting plate in order to correctly
assemble the new Trunnion. IMHO it's also always best to completely remove the lower
wishbones and repair to a warm, dry workshop to clean up the eyes so the new bushes will fit
properly - and with the front wishbone disconnected from the car and from the s pring plate
you can grind the head off the Trunnion bolt and remove the wishbone from the Trunnion,
rather than vice-versa without reversion to excessive force or heat.
Interesting comments. "You need to remove the spring/shock mounting plate in order to
correctly assemble the new Trunnion." I have not fully read t he Manual yet so your comment
is "Interesting".
Chris Lloyd was fond of saying that if you asked 10 Scimitar owners how to change a
Trunnion you'd get 11 ans wers, and I don't have time - at work - to run through all of mine, but
for my money you need to bear in mind that the Trunnion pivot works by locking the Trunnion,
all four washers, the dust seals and the stainless steel sleeves together on the bolt so that all
rotate as one within the nylon bushes - which do not rotate - in the wishbone eyes. In order
for this to happen on assembly the wishbone eyes need to be free to find the correct position
as all the components are pulled together by the bolt, and disconnecting the wishbones from
the spring/shock mounting plate is the only way to do this. Otherwise you risk the wishbone
eyes being too far apart and preventing it all tightening up correctly. If it's not all locked
together then the Trunnion will rotat e on the bolt and wear as fast as a very fast thing, or, if
you force it together, you'll put a bending stress on the wishbones that they will not thank you
for. You also need to ensure that the sleeves rotat e smoot hly in the nylon bushes - which
means cleaning all the rust and scale off the inside of the wishbone eyes, but not with a file or
you might make the holes too big - and that the sleeves protrude from the bushes just enough
to allow them to be gripped when the bolt is tightened: if they don't then the bushes will be
pinched as the bolt is tightened and will seize on the sleeves, again inducing premat ure wear.
While you're about it you may wish t o drill the eyes 'end on' to allow you to fit a grease nipple
into each one. (MS2 CV Joint grease, what else?) Correctly assembled the Trunnion pivot
should just allow the upright to rotate - top ball joint disconnected and hub, calliper etc fitted -
under its own weight: once you've achieved this you can bolt up the spring plat es and t hus fix
the positions of the wishbones.
Try copious amounts of penetrating oil & continue to turn the bolt half a flat at a time. If it
doesn't free the least damaging & most certain option is to remove all the parts from the car
then cut off t he head of the bolt with a hacksaw. The new bolt will not seize in the new
Trunnion provided it's greased on assembly. Whilst the lower wishbone is off drill a hole
centrally into each outer eye. When the wishbone is on t he c ar t he hole is vertically upwards
into the gap between the nylon top-hat bearings. Tap the holes to take 90 degree grease
nipples which on assembly can be arranged to point fore & aft. Occasional shots of (Moly)
grease will keep water out of the bushes & prevent the steel sleeve from rusting (which is
what destroys the nylon bushes). Correctly assembled & greased at least once a year before
winter the front suspension outer assembly will last over 70K without further dismantling.




                                                                                                 79
80




Removing Wiper Boxes and Tubing.




                                   80
81

How does one remove the Bundy tube and Wheel boxes. I've disconnected the motor and the
nuts from the top of the Wheel box es. But I can't get them out from underneat h. Seems a hell
of a fiddle to me.
Pull out t he drive rack if you haven't already. Remove the centre (approximately triangular)
bulkhead cover behind the engine. Reach up into this & release the two nuts (3/8 AF IIRC) on
the NS wheel box. This will free t he motor to NS wheel box Bundy & one end of the w/ box to
w/box Bundy. The NS w/box can now be removed through the centre opening, as can (wit h a
bit of wiggling) the OS w/box & short Bundy. Watch for the two water shields (bent steel)
falling out - you'll need to replace them.
If you remove the cover of the Wiper Motor, remove the lever that connects the Round Cam
to the inner cable you c an remove the cable from the wiper motor. You can now pull the
Cable ( Make s ure that the wiper boxes are unbolted from t he scuttle panel ) toward the front
of the car. This will move the right wiper box toward the hole that is exposed after the cover
on the bulkhead is removed. You will now have easier access to the wiper box. Once this one
is removed you can now push t he cable in the other direction to push the left wiper box
toward the access hole.




Replace Axel Oil Seal.




                                                                                            81
82

Is it possible to change the prop shaft flange oil seal on a 4HA (004 18) axle without having to
reset the bearing preload?

If this axle has the collapsible spacer, can t he original preload be preserved by punching
alignment marks on locknut and flange?
Yes it is perfectly possible. The pre -load should NEVER be reset on used bearings anyway. If
the spacer isn't collapsible there's no problem. If it is do as you say & punch mark the nut &
flange. When you come to re-tighten ensure you turn the nut very slightly past your mark. You
will not cause t he spacer t o collapse further but you will ensure the nut is tight. Collapsible
spacers conjure up an image of a flimsy piece of tube that will concertina at the drop of a hat.
In fact it's very heavy tubing with a pressed channel in the centre. It is VE RY difficult to
collapse it - even when it's new.
Just to add to what Tony has described GW do a 'new improved' oil seal which does work
better than the standard one but is just the same t o fit. I have fitted one recently and no leaks
not even a weep.
When I did mine I marked t he nut / flange /shaft and just put it back the same as it came
apart. I even counted the number of turns to take the nut off. My biggest pr oblem was fitting
the new seal as it's an interference fit (old style). I used a (VERY ) large socket to drive it
home square and without damage. Never leaked since. No experienc e with the new type from
GW so it may be easier to fit. Just don't bash it in with a hammer, keep it square and take
your time. Not a hard job to do.
Just a reminder - check that the breather hole is clear as this being blocked is often the cause
of the oil seal failing due to the build up of pressure inside the axle.
Just to add my tuppence worth, I used the GW neoprene oil seal (original is leat her and
needs to be soaked in oil for a day) on my 6b and did 50k mile without a drip, make s ure y ou
clean up the flange where the old seal was running with very fine emery paper, or if t he
groove is more than a few thou you may have to consider a new one. The collapsible spac er
is supposed to deform at around 140 ft lbs, mine took over 200 ft lbs! So if you stay under 140
ft lbs you will be OK.




Changing Selector Oil Seals




                                                                                               82
83

There have been a lot of past‟s posts about changing the Gearbox S elector Oil S eals with
Gearbox fitted in Car and with the cover in plac e. Part of the information has advis ed to be
careful about the shafts. It must be easier (and better) to remove the cover. (I know the Oil will
need to be drained). If the cover is removed is there anything that will "Spring out". If it is as
simple as removing the Cover will it go back on without problems, i.e. with new seals the
three shafts will be tight into the seals. So can it be done by removing the Cover wit hout any
problems?
………………………………………………………………………..
Nothing will spring out. When you have it off dismantle it completely & polish the seal contact
area on the shafts & any sharp edges where the levers fit with fine emery cloth. Reassemble
the cover without the seals fitted. Fill the seal rec esses with Moly greas e then ease & rotate
each seal over its shaft. Press into recess using a socket. Doing it this way, rather than fitting
the seals before reassembly, ensures that the seals aren't damaged by the lever flats on t he
shafts.
……………………………………………………………………..
Remove the cover with the levers in place - it comes off in one piece with no worries about
accidentally pushing a shaft in. Incidentally there's no dr ama involved anyway - the only
reason to worry about displacing a shaft & losing a detent ball into the gearbox is if y ou
desperately didn't want to remove the side cover to retrieve the ball. And as I said that can't
happen anyway with the levers still attached because there are no loose parts.
………………………………………….
For some reason my brain cell thought that the c over would come off and leave the levers in
place. (I will have to look at the manual tonight). But by what you say all I need to do is to
unbolt the cover and the levers (and forks?) come off with the cover. That sounds too easy as
the seals can be replaced on the work bench and the cover with the levers refitted (easy to
locate?). You do worry me though with the comment about the detent ball.
…………………………………..
Just to be clear: if you leave the external levers fitted to the side plate & then remove the
whole thing the selector fork assembly is removed in its entirety. Nothing is loose, nothing can
fall off, and you can take it to your workbench. It really is that easy. As is replacement.




Replace Rear Axel Pinion Seal.




                                                                                               83
84

Can anyone tell me how easy is it to replace a rear axle pinion seal?
Fairly easy. First, remove prop shaft. Then mark the position of the Big Nut with respect to
the pinion threaded-bit-that-protrudes-through-nut. Remove nut, use a puller t o remove t he
drive-flange from the pinion splines. Dig out old seal, fit new one. Refit the drive -flange and
then tighten the nut up until the marks you made in stage [1] align again. Don't tighten the nut
any further, or you can collapse t he collapsible - spacer inside the diff pinion-bearings; this will
screw up the running clearance of the pinion-bearings, and Mr. Timken's Rollers will likely get
all hot-and-bothered as a result. You should be able to do it in about 30 minutes.
The secret is to pop mark the nut and the pinion and the when you bolt the flange back on line
up the pop marks.
Also count the number of turns of the nut; and ens ure the axle breather hole is clear (or you
are likely to be replacing the seal again before long).
Don't forget to count the exact number of turns it takes to remove the nut. Get it wrong by one
turn and it's time for a new spacer!




Replacing Heater Matrix.




                                                                                                  84
85

I just got my new heater matrix. Now, the thing is, does anyone have any tips on the removal
of the old one and replacing it with new. I shall be operating tomorrow, hangover permitting,
and probably Sunday, much to the missus's disgust as she had plans for my weekend,
something about sofa shopping. I do have the Reliant workshop manual, which I find very
hard to follow, not enough pictures, has phrases I don‟t understand, ok for example, where do
you find the baffle in the cooling system?, as it says' to fill to 1/4' over baffle ' last weekend me
and a mate (Triumph boy) stood for hours trying to locate a baffle or even figure out what it
might look like. Why didn‟t Haynes do an Se5a book?. Anyway I‟ll look thru archives, and if
anyone has done it recently and knows of any pitfalls please let me know.
Did mine a few years ago and if I remember rightly this is roughly what I did. 1. Drain t he
water (Bolt on bottom of radiator. ) 2. Remove hoses to heater matrix (engine compartment) 3.
Remove centre console (Screws at front edge and under rear ashtray) 4. Remove side pieces
of carpet trim eit her side of the lower dash 5. Remove dash (instrument part). What I did was
to undo the screws and pull the dash forward, after removing heater control knobs, giving
access to remove Speedo cable and oil pressure gauge pipe and undo wiring harness
connectors. 6. You can then remove t he heater unit. 7. Remove matrix and replace with new.
Also replace any foam bits that have disintegrated or fallen off. 8. Then as they say in all good
manuals refitting is a reversal of removal. 9. Refill with at least 33% anti-freeze mix and look
for leaks.
Oops forgot to mention removing the steering wheel as it makes it a damn site easier to
remove the dash.
I already have the das h out, as I got a 'new' one which is now all fitted out with clocks etc and
wired, correctly I hope, I took it out last week as when I found a split hose it stopped me doing
any more work on the cooling, I have a new radiator installed, and some new hoses, though
talking to Nigel at QRG apparently mine has a strange T bar at the back of the system where
it goes into the heater. Anyway, I take it the matrix is easy enough to pull out, do you have to
take off the round air vents on the centre dash(above heater controls)?.
Mine had a strange T piece in the hoses at the back where it goes to the heater when I got
mine too. A fter restoring it I couldn't remember where it fitted and I asked someone and they
didn't know why it was there. I surmised it was bec ause it been converted t o a manual choke.
I changed it so the hose from the back of the water pump goes to t he t op pipe on the heat er
matrix and the hose from the back of the inlet manifold to the bottom pipe. Y ou don't have to
take the air vents out just pull the black corrugated pipes from the back of the vents. If y ou
have t he dash out the heater unit is easy enough to remove. If I remember correctly it's held
in by 4 * 1/2" nuts which should be fairly obvious. Then it's just a matter of dismantling t he
heater unit.
Hmmm, very peculiar, mine doesn‟t have a manual chok e, (not that I‟ve found any way) but
the auto chok e has never really seemed to work either, that could well be the reason! The car
has always been a bitch to warm up. The guy at QRG told me that the hose should be
connected straight into the heater as well, whic h the existing does but the other half goes to
the carb (I think). I think I have the DGAS (single carb) but if there is no manual choke, how
would I know if the aut o choke is still in place? I mean what does it look like or what do I look
for, around or in the carb?. Could someone have put a manual choke on it, and then taken off
when selling the car and left it totally choke-less?




                                                                                                  85
86




Replacing Heater Matrix 2.




                             86
87

I'm sure I've seen threads on this before in the dim and distant past, but I confirmed yesterday
that my 5a heat er is leaking (not muc h but leaking never the less). I had a look at the
workshop manual and the job looks horrendous talking about removing das hboards,
windscreens and the like. Surely this is not correct is it? I really hope not as this might just be
the final straw in my scimitar ownership. Can anyone who has done the 5a heater matrix
replacement job tell me what in reality is involved?.
I am in the process of doing this – spare car breaking to update current car. I am sure others
are ahead of me in this but it does not look to be as bad as it first appears. Remove dash
panel and undo multi plugs, oil, S peedo etc. 4 bolts hold a GRP frame in place that the dash
panel mounts to. One bolt is accessed through the top of the glove box – peel back the top
lining and you find a hole that allows entry to a socket spanner. Remove frame, drain wat er
system. The heater matrix is exposed and by removing a few bits and piec es on it will come
out.
The job is not as difficult as it first appears. I would add one piece of advice: whilst it is out do
away with the water valve. It serves no useful purpose (later versions of the same heater do
not have it), is prone to leaks and slows down the flow of water through the matrix. If you have
the matrix rebuilt ask for the valve to be omitted otherwise remove the end & plunger & re-
seal with an O-ring & 2p coin.
After a few evening of contortionism, cursing and general unease (thinking I shall never get
this together again!) I have finally managed to remove t he leaking heat er matrix from my 5a. I
can obviously get this repaired (i. e. recored etc) but after the time and effort involved in
actually doing this job I really do not fancy having to do it again in a couple of years time and
would prefer to get a brand new one. I have tried the usual traders (GW etc) but none c an
help. I would doubt if Reliant had this made as a Scimitar only part. Does anyone know if t he
5a matrix (or indeed the entire heater unit) came from another mainstream car for which
spares might still be available.
I wouldn't worry about a rec ored matrix. The only parts re-used are the end tanks & a recore
is as good as a new one. The only things you can do to mak e it last (& it has lasted 25+ years
so far) are to make sure the cooling system is as clean as possible & to use 50% antifreeze
mix. The heater matrix is the best (only) filter in the cooling sys tem - a point often forgotten
when sediment in the engine block is disturbed by core plug replacement etc.




Replacing Rear Shoes and More.




                                                                                                  87
88

I need to replac e the rear shoes on my 5a - Does anything else need replacing - springs etc?
I know I will need to re-set the movement, but is it a simple case of take the old ones off and
put the new ones on?
It should be but there are other jobs whilst you're in there (as ever). The wheel cylinder must
be free to slide in the brake back-plat e - and it won't be. Study the assembly in the manual.
It's easy to release the clips & clean & lubricate the things but only if you know in advance
how it's assembled. Use Copperslip on the back plate, wheel cylinder and clips and on t he
handbrake lever pivot (under the wheel cylinder). Wipe off excess. I'd also peel back the
cylinder rubbers taking care not to pull the pistons out. If there's fluid in there you need to
either re-rubber or replace the wheel cylinder. If there is no fluid and both pistons are free
pack the rubber boots with brake rubber lubricant (red stuff). You can use very small
quantities of Copperslip on the shoe ends (where t hey rest against the stops / wheel cylinder
pistons) and under the retainer (anti-rattle) spring clips in the centre of each shoe. Make sure
the leading edge of each s hoe is chamfered - if not create a short (1/2") chamfer with a
coarse file. Clean out the drums with coarse emery paper. This will ease the rust step on t he
inside & outside edges of the wearing su rface & will lightly roughen the drum to help bed t he
new shoes. Clean t he brake back plate where it's inside t he drum. Apart from the above it is
as you say: take the old ones out & put the new ones in!
Check that the handbrake cable isn't seized - I find that when I put grease in the nipples on
the cable (even a new one) it comes out at the lever end not the wheel end and of course
that's the end that gets wet/salty/mucky and so seizes. I've resorted now to drilling a 1/ 8 hole
in the cable adjuster so I can put oil in. It's covered by a short piece of old fuel pipe to keep
the grot out, I hope.




Steering Rack Oil.




                                                                                              88
89


Just been reading S LICE, there's an article about changing the gait ers on a 5a rack. The
point I noted was that when removing the gait er you loos e all the oil from the rack. Is this the
same for the 6a manual rack? I changed t he gaiters on mine a c ouple of months ago and
there was no oil, so I'm a bit concerned that I'm running the rack dry ! On the same subj ect
how do you check the oil level in the rack, there's no obvious dipstick type check, do you just
keep pumping oil in until it overflows. From what I recall from Don Pither‟s book the power
rack for the 6a was from the Rover S D1. Does anyone know if it was modified by Reliant or is
the SD1 power rack easily fitted?
The only reas on you would have oil in the manual rack is if the end bearing has failed - i.e.
not tight and allowing oil to pass it. As to how muc h oil as far as I know there is nothing
specified - I have fitted a grease nipple at the point where the column meets the rack - there is
a nut you can remove on the top and replace it with the nipple. I give it a few squirts with a
grease gun - oil and moly grease mixture - onc e a year.
There should definitely be oil inside the gaiters; the amount that should be in the rack is listed
in the service manual but this assumes you're filling a rack from empty - the exact amount to
put in after one-sided gaiter-replacement is hard to guess (you don't know how much oil is still
in the rack)... I usually fill the thing by clamping the fat end of the gaiter to the rack outer tube
then pushing the nozzle of my oilcan in between the gaiter and the track -rod-end, pump in a
cupful of oil, pull the nozzle out and quickly put a hose-clamp on to hold the gaiter to the rod-
end.
Whilst the Reliant Autobooks manual isn't very clear on the subject of lubrication - the Austin
1800 manual is. The Reliant manual (5/5A) rack is a LHD 1800 rack. It should contain 1/3 pint
EP90 injected into one gaiter (or half in each side) before fitting the outer gaiter clip. It's well
wort h injecting a complete pack of gearbox Moly + EP90 to make up 1/3 pint. Don't use
grease & under no circumstances leave it dry.
Do you know if this applies to the 6a manual rack as well?
As far as I'm concerned it applies to all manual racks & to the lube (as opposed to hydraulic)
circuit of most conventional PAS racks. I know some of the more modern ones use grease but
I suspect that's because it's easier to store & handle the racks. With sufficient oil / Moly in I
would not expect to have to rebuild a rack throughout the life of the car. Once grease is wiped
off the section of rack that slides through the rack bar bearing or is displaced by the pinion or
inner ball-joint bearings it can't flow back in that easily. Just try stopping EP90 flowing back in.
Looks like I'll have to get mine oiled sharpish. Anyone got any idea about the S D1 fitting t he
6a?
The 6a uses a modified S D1 power rack. I looked into just how modified and it is a lot. The
distance bet ween the mounting hole etc being the main one. So I couldn't get one through the
SD1 dealers that would fit.




Steering Rack Play.




                                                                                                  89
90

I've noticed that there is some play in the inner ball joints on my steering rack. However the
movement isn't just 'slackness' instead it is spring loaded ( I assume that there is a spring
behind the ball ). I have the rack off the car at the mo and the ball joint ends look to be
adjustable but only by using special t ool and a big vice. I was just wondering if anyone knows
if this play should be evident at all? Is it correct?.
There should be no play (spring loaded or otherwise) in the inner ball joints. In fact on first
assembly they are (over) tightened to an extent determined by how much effort is needed to
move them. If it's a power rack the nuts need to have a locking pin or indent (can't remember
which) drilled out before they can be removed. The manual rack (IIRC) has a locking was her /
lock nut arrangement. In eit her case the adjustment is simple if the joints are undamaged.
Removing the power rack nut is not!.
You can shim the spring when you get it all apart if it is not strong enough. I think its there to
take out any "shock" to the steering.
It‟s not a power rack and the adjustments are not nuts but completely round with a notch (for
a C-Spanner?). The notch is also on the rack itself and the 'nuts' are crimped into this notch.
Complicated. I'll see what I can do by taking them apart.
According to the manual (a copy of which can be obtained from Graham Walkers) t he
assembly should be pre-loaded to between 32 and 52 lb/in. The springs do indeed act as
"shock-absorbers".
The only critical part of this is removal of the nut without damaging the rack threads . If
necessary sacrifice the nut then replace it. If t he rack threads get damaged it's not even fit to
exchange. The pre-load on the joints is measured wit h a spring balance on the tie rod - when
they are correct they're very stiff to move by hand. The spring simply takes up minor
subsequent wear - it's not a shock absorber Alyn. If you have t he time this is all best done
with the rack off the car - you are so close to a full overhaul that the extra tasks to complete it
aren't worth putting off.




Sticking Brakes.




                                                                                                90
91

Can anyone help with my SE5a sticking brakes problem? I've replaced the rear wheel
cylinders, one of the front callipers and the master cylinder (which I understand from QRG is
not the std. type fitted to a SE5a but is a larger BMC type that has the outlet positioned to
clear the s ervo which is also non standard) The car was a non runner and from the first time I
drove it the brakes occasionally stuck on slightly, a quick dab would release them. It is getting
wors e and occasionally the pedal will stick down. Also when pushing the pedal hard when
stationary a rough resistance can be felt and heard (clunk ) half way through the travel. When
the engine is stopped and the servo pressure has dissipated there is no clunk. It sounds to
me like the master cylinder is sticking, but I'm loath to s pend another £60 to find that it's
something else. Anybody had anything like this?
Consider disconnecting & blocking off the servo vacuum pipe. Try a test drive wit h no servo -
it sounds very like the servo is at fault.
Tony is right. This is the characteristic of a failing Girling Powerstop servo. This is the one
with the toilet roll (bobbin) shaped filter on top (rather than the Lockheed type with the UFO
shaped breather). Worst case it can put the brak es on suddenly wit hout warning. It uses
vacuum to both apply and assists in release of the brakes. It can lose vacuum on this side
applying the brakes - hence the sticking. Best (safest) option gets a new servo.

Girling Servo information cam be found at:

http://www.head2head. free-online.co.uk/Rover/servo. htm




Sticking Overdrive.



                                                                                              91
92


Has anyone experienced t he o/d unit sticking on or off? Ours sort of intermittently does not
engage in t hird gear plus when t he car is reversed it now makes a whirring noise and is hard
to reverse. I can only think that the unit is not fully disengaging. Could it be a solenoid
problem or a mechanical issue in the unit?
Had the same problem over a long period. Overdrive would sometimes not fully engage and
then when it did would not disengage. Annoying considering you cannot reverse in overdrive.
Had to s witch the car off for 10 seconds restart then reverse. Looked at several things at t he
time from solenoid, inhibitor switch and the overdrive filters which I cleaned out on several
occasions. Finally gave up and bought a recon. Overdrive from GW. This run great for one
month and believe it or not problem came back. This led to me giving up with O/Ds. I came to
the conclusion that as the gearbox and OD use the same oil The crap from the g/box (through
wear) blocks the filters etc especially on disengaging and draining the gearbox oil for refill
may not be enough to clear all material. I did have a new solenoid with the O/ D and no
residual voltage could be found on this when faulting. I.e. earthing problems although this is
the main reason for not engaging along wit h low oil in the g/box.
The normal reason for an OD not engaging is lack of oil pressure. This is often due to the ball
on the solenoid valve not seating properly. This can sometimes be cured by removing the
solenoid assembly and tapping the ball sharply. Could also be a faulty pressure relief valve -
you can remove this from the OD and clean it thoroughly. The usual reason for an OD not
disengaging is a faulty isolat or s witch. If you try and reverse with it engaged you will damage
the overdrive! Could also be a stuck OD clutch - give t he brake ring (in middle of OD) a sharp
tap with a soft mallet. Electrical faults cannot cause a good OD to 'stick on' as pressure is only
developed in the unit when the solenoid valve is closed. It is possible, I suppose, for the valve
to jam but I've never seen this happen and, considering the pressure on one side of it (<400
PSI), is unlikely.
Not engaging is often caused simply by low gearbox oil. First thing to check. Sticking on is
classic for seized inhibitor switch. This is found by the gear selector mec hanism and can be
got at from underneath with a bit of help from above with the g aiter removed. Reversing with
the OD still engaged can be terminal for the unidirectional clutch. This will then lead to no
drive at all! Replacement is not the end of the world and spares are available form several
sources.




Sticking Overdrive. Clean Filters.



                                                                                               92
93



Laycock Overdrive. J Type. Fault is if driving at speed (65 plus mph) for more than 10 miles
the Overdrive does not normally disengage. Problem does not occur if speed kept below 65
mph. If Car stopped it will disengage when pulling away. What I have read it could possibly
need Pump and Filters cleaning. The Solenoid has been cleaned and appears to be working
OK. Would I be correct in thinking that Filters (Items 29 and 36) are t he ones to clean and
Relief Valve (62 etc) is the one to clean. I have never been here before so is there any thing I
need to take care of, i.e. when undoing is there anything t hat is spring loaded etc and will
need to be taken apart with care or is it just undo, clean and reassemble. Is there anything I
should be aware of?
You are correct. In theory the relief valve (once removed) should not be dismantled but it
comes apart easily & I've stripped & reassembled two without ill-effect. You will need to make
a peg spanner to remove the plugs covering the filter & relief but they should not be difficult to
remove. The symptoms you describe suggest a sticky or blocked relief (or solenoid which
you've cleaned) - the screen filter (& if I remember correctly a magnet) causes sluggish
operation but is obviously worth cleaning anyway.
In addition when I cleaned mine while taking the solenoid apart I also slightly stretched t he
spring as it had been in its compressed state for such a long time I thought it may need the
"relief".
Many thanks for the replies. Would I be correct in assuming that all I need to do is remove the
bottom (Sump) filter? This will enable me to remove the covers (Ones with the holes for the
peg spanner to go on). This will allow the filters / pistons to "Drop" out or do they "Drop" out
with other bits. Will there be something to surprise me or is it as simple as they "Drop" out,
clean and refit.
As long as you do them one at a time and not over a place where the bits can drop and be
lost you should have no problem - normally the filter is so clogged up with muck (like
aluminium dust) that you will be amazed that it worked at all.
One of the plugs has a ball bearing behind it ... mind that doesn‟t disappear. Not that it ever
happened to me of course ;-)
Many years back (about 8 or 9) I also had O/D problems and cleaned/refurbished the Unit
(LH) but there was a lovely little (about 1/16" small B all Bearing) held in situ on top of a
wobbly Valve Return Spring. Absolute pig and a nightmare to find it on the stone drive at
night. Having looked in the Workshop Manual it appears it could be fairly straightforward.




Sticky Steering Rack and More.




                                                                                               93
94

Having investigat ed a slight problem with my steering, I have isolated the problem to t he
steering rack. The rack is difficult t o move by hand and sticks before moving freely when t he
initial stickiness is overc ome. Has anyone experience on servicing t he rack and changing t he
shims to adjust preload etc is it simpler to find a second hand rack?
First ensure it IS the rack by disconnecting both ends and the steering column UJ as the
Trunnions and UJ can cause similar symptoms. Manual racks are simple things so is there's
no play on the internal ball joints just take it off the car then check as follows:
Stiffness could be:
1) Lack of lubricant
2) Over tight damper
3) Failing pinion ball races
4) Incorrect type of rack bush
Remove the damper plat e (2 bolts @ 90 degrees to the pinion shaft. Check that the damper is
oily. You can now check the pinion shaft turns freely & has no play (up/down & side-to-side).
By attempting to move the rack bar itself (NS end relative t o the rack housing) you can check
the bush is OK. You can also drain the oil to see what state it's in. At this point you should be
able to tell whether any remaining stiffness is the pinion shaft bearings or the rack bush. The
rack bush is bronze not plastic. The rack is a BL 1800 LHD rack which when fitted to these
cars had a plastic bush. In the Scimitar application it was fitted with a phosphor -bronze bush
because the plastic one would not like t he heat from the radiator. The PB bush is held with a
screw through the alloy NS end of the rack.




Stiff Steering.




                                                                                              94
95

I have just started to get very stiff steering on my 5A. I thought originally it may be the
Trunnions/upper wishbones, even though they are greased regularly. But, after disconnecting
each side from the rack, they are both free. Has anyone had this problem, if so what is the
answer? I have also discovered that if I jerk the steering wheel it moves in or out some 25mm.
Could this be associated with the problem?
How about the joints down the c olumn have you oiled them of late - oil in the rack might help
as well - I fitted a greas e nipple in plac e of the nut on the top.
I'll give that a try. P.S. I assume gearbox oil for the rack?
Yes.
25mm up & down on the column is potentially life -threatening! The only thing preventing the
column coming away in your hands is a shallow groove with a (by now) rapidly -wearing bolt
through it. Tighten the pinch bolts connecting the column to UJs & rack. Check the UJs for
stiffness & wear. If the rack shows no signs of leaking it should contain oil - if it is leaking
replace gaiters.
Have you ascertained were the movement is coming from? The scimitar has a collapsible
column, so called because it is formed of two shafts that are at a slight angle to each other.
Movement can arise from the following: 1. The UJ is not clamped to the splined end of the
shaft. The result is that the shaft moves in and o ut of the UJ. 2. The shaft connected to the
steering wheel is not adequately support ed at its mounting point as it passes through t he
bulkhead (this is laminat ed in). Pulling on the steering wheel end results in the two shafts
becoming aligned (the angle b etween them reduces) and the wheel moving towards the
driver.
A common fault is that the grease in the top universal joint dries out due to the proximity of
the ex haust pipe. I use mot orcycle chain grease, graphite if you can find it, on both of t he
universals. Cover the exhaust pipe when you spray the top joint or it will smell and smoke on
start up. It fizzes and searches its way right into the needle rollers in the joint. Do this at every
service especially the top. The slackness is almost certainly due to the pinch bolt being
slack........or you are pulling too hard. One other point while on the subject of steering column
universals, make sure they are lined up, each end the same. If you look in the parts book you
will see what I mean.
I topped up the rack, sprayed the u/j,s with chain greas e, but it is still stiff. I will tackle t he
column bearings next. Tony, you were right about the end play being the upper u/j. When
pulled, the column slides in it but the pinch bolt will not tighten anymore. Surely t he column
shouldn't move in the u/j if the bolt is tightened as muc h as possible, or has something worn?
Bill, that was a good suggestion re the cardboard covering the exhaust when spraying the
grease.
It seems likely that either the UJ clamp area splines are worn although I'm puzzled that the
bolt won't tighten anymore. You should be able to tighten the bolt until it either strips its thread
or breaks in two. If you mean that the gap in the clamp is fully closed then the splines are very
badly worn & you need a new UJ. If not try a new nut / bolt. The column bushes are unlikely
to make the steering stiff. To fully check the steering you need to disconnect the upper UJ
connection to test the column & (with the wheels off t he ground) test the rack. If you c an't
decide which part is stiff separate the column as above the separate the rack end ball joints
from the steering arms. Test each part separately.
There was a gap in the u/j and, after liberal applications of WD40, I did manage to tighten t he
pinch bolt. Column now secure.




                                                                                                  95
96




Strange Brake Pedal.




                       96
97

I am having problems with brake peddle feel: occasionally the peddle c an feel very soft or
extremely hard, this tends to happen if turning o n full lock or reversing. Very disconcerting. I
have been told this is "brake pad knock back" which can be reduced by checking calliper
alignment. I have the SE5a workshop manual but cannot find specific mention of such a thing.
Any ideas ? The brak es have been rebuilt in the last three years and the servo and master
cylinder reconditioned.
I have exactly the same problem with my SE5A. I was told that it was probably the discs or
the wheel bearings so I replaced both and there has been some improvement as the pedal
doesn't go as far to the floor as it did before. It is still very disconcerting though. Someone
else suggested calliper alignment but like you I have been unable to find any mention of it in
my manual so if you get a solution let me know.
Cert ainly will do. But so far t he response is "calliper being not well aligned with the disk, disk
warpage, or disk side-to-side movement".
It's highly unlikely to be e. g. calliper misalignment. It might be disk warp but again unlikely,
Scimitar disks don't get that stressed. However it's quite likely to be wheel bearing play. ANY
will cause some knock back. And manuals tend to make dire statements that t here MUS T be
play etc, in fact I'd say that you s hould adjust for the abs olute minimum of play, in fact none if
possible. I don't see why those taper rollers need play in this situation. My own way of
adjusting play; Tighten centre nut with torque wrench to about 20-30 ft/lb whilst spinning
wheel. Undo the minimum you can t o just release the end load & line up wit h a split pin hole
(usually it's very clear when it's released). Check for play, if there's perceptible play I'd do it
up again & try again...
Although pad knock-back can be mitigated by all the suggestions you've received so far it
can't easily be completely cured. The upright carrying t he hub, disk, wheel etc. is relatively
flexible and twists marginally when stressed i.e. on full lock. You can demonstrate this by
trying to turn the steering whilst the wheel is restrained by a kerb. If you lie underneath the car
whilst an assistant tries to turn the steering you can observe the effect. One other problem
that exacerbates the effect is a stiff calliper piston: normally the piston seal allows some
movement of the pad (in or out) then returns the piston to w here it was. (The seal flexes a
small amount before it allows the piston to slide through it.) If the piston is stiff it remains
where it's pus hed by the disk - and it only moves back when you next apply the brakes.




                                                                                                 97
98

Stub Axels.

I understand that t he hubs/stub axles were changed between the SE5 and SE5A (Later ones
being stronger). I have just stripped the car, and the stub axles are identical in diameter to the
spare I have which was 'guaranteed' to come from a late SE5A. The axle‟s measures 1 inch
diameter. at the inner bearing area, and 3/4 inch at the outer. Have I already got SE5A stub
axles, or is my spare from a much earlier car? Interestingly, the back axle is the later 4HA
type, although by the chassis number, this is quite an early (mid 1970) car).
There were only two types of stub axles fitted to the 5 to 6B range. The difference bet ween
"early" & "late" (in Haynes parlance!) was that later stub axles used a larger outer bearing and
were therefore thicker at the end ne arest the nut. The inner bearing didn't change. I don't
have any to conveniently compare but 3/4" sounds like a later stub axle.




                                                                                               98
99


Switch Part Numbers.

Can anyone give me the Lucas part numbers for the wiper switch and the headlights switch
on the se5a?
Some while ago a good store man at the local Lucas parts was good enough to copy the
Lucas parts for me.

Wiper Switch: 1972-1975      Pt No 39126A

Light switch: 1972    Pt No 35849A

                1973-1975 Pt No 39481A
Do you have the part numbers for the other dash switches and the dimmer, as they all need
replacing - unless there is a way to reprint the logos on them all as they have all worn off! I've
given up the hope of trying to find illuminated switches that fit the large apertures. The dimmer
has packed up complet ely and I have had to bypass it.
The part numbers are as follows.

Windscreen Wiper: 1972-75 PT 39126A

Rear wiper: 1972-75 PT 39807A

Washer front and back: 1972-75 PT 39806A

Spot lamps: 1973-75 PT 39811A

Panel light: 1972 on P T 78489A




Tracking and Camber.




                                                                                               99
100

Can someone tell me the recommended toe -in for my 5A. I cannot find it in the manual
anywhere. It's parallel or, if you're cautious like me, toeing in a tiny bit.
 It is mentioned in the Autobooks Manual. Anybody have the same info for a 86 GTC, I've just
changed the rack and need to do the tracking. Also the steering wheel is now a bit off cent re
and rotating one spline takes it the ot her way. I assume this can be rectified by "tracking"
both wheels in one direction???. Tracking is parallel for t he GTC. To do it all properly so that
the wheel is central you need to: centralise the rack (pull the inner end of each gaiter off &
measure from the back of the inner ball joint to the end of the rack tube); put the steering
wheel on so it's in the straight-ahead position; have the tracking adjusted so that when the car
is travelling straight ahead the steering wheel remains in the s traight-ahead position. All this
should only need doing once: in fut ure tracking can be adjusted so the wheel is straight.
As I'm old and I sometimes rec all odd bits of technical information IIRC the Toe In should be 1
degree. I stand to be corrected but I'm pretty sure that this is correct.
Well done you are quite correct. The figure of parallel is with a weight in both front
seats.......ask at your local Quick Fit they should have a couple of dummies that they can use
for the purpose or failing that they can use two punters that have their nose pushed up
against the glass in the 'Keep your nose out of our workshop!' room. No, well set it as 1mm
toe in and when you put your own body in the seat the tracking will then be parallel. And most
important you will not get that tyre wear on the outside of the front tyres that seems almost
compulsory on a scimitar.
So the negative camber that is on my front suspension means I will not get faster wear on the
inside of the tyres, rather will it all balance out to produce even wear after all.
The correct setting for the camber angle is 0 degree - 1degree positive so I would suggest that
you reset yours if it is negative. Not a big job. Make up a piece of wood that is just long
enough to rest on the rim of the wheel top and bottom and not foul on the tyre. Make it approx
20mm wide and 40 mm thick and make very sure that the 40mm thickness is exactly parallel
for its full length. Put the car on a level surface and make sure that the front suspension is
well settled, i.e. not been jacked up for a considerable time. Turn the wheels in the straight
ahead position. Place the piece of wood on one of the front wheels, north to south, thick bit
toward you, touching the wheel rim at the top and bottom. Place a reliable spirit level on the
wood, preferably one that is as long or longer than t he wood. The rest is pure grunt and
sweat. By inserting or removing the shims behind t he upper wishbone fulcrum ( the bracket
that is bolted to the chassis by 4 x 3/8 bolts which the top wishbones are attached to) get the
bubble in the middle on the level. In effect, the wheel straight up and not leaning in or out.




                                                                                             100
101

Trunnion Steering Lock Stops.

Non power steering 6a The Trunnions have a removable bolt fitted which buts up against the
steering lock stops. So, if the Trunnion is fitted incorrectly (i.e. it is screwed onto the vertical
link too far) and, on full lock, it is the part of the Trunnion int o which the removable bolt fits
that comes int o contact with the steering lock stop, thus reducing the amount of steering lock
available. Question: Does the steering stop lock bolt have to cont act the lock stops and if it
doesn't (as described above) is the Trunnion too far 'on' the vertical link? In any manuals /
books I have checked it's not possible to discover what an obvious answer looks. My car is
as above, & checking the caster shows a setting of 6 degrees. Clearly way out, confirming
incorrect Trunnion fitment, I wonder? A nyone ever come ac ross this what seems incorrect
Trunnion fitment before.
If the stop were not there your track rod end would cut a groove in your brake disc.
Hi, nearly correct, it‟s the Trunnion bolt which cuts the groove,
As Steve pointed out, it is the Trunnion bolt and bush cups which would rub against the discs
if you had no Trunnion stops. I should know. My 6B rubs the discs! B ut rather oddly the
Trunnions as supplied by GW for the 6B do not have any stops built in. Nor is there any
tapped hole to screw a stop into. (Anyone else had that one?) Concerning castor, you need to
check three things:- 1) Are the upper wishbones in the right position. It is possible t o swap
them over diagonally to shift the upper ball joint position backwards or forwards. If the more
rounded curved one is at the front it will pus h the upper ball joint rearwards with respect to the
Trunnion. This is the power steering arrangement. I think the non power has the curved upper
wishbones to the rear (others with non power will doubtless advis e if I am wrong here) 2)
Look at the lower wishbone support mountings, which bolt on to the main chassis legs. These
asymmetric mountings can be swapped from side to side and s hift the location of the lower
arms, and hence Trunnions, backwards or forwards. Clearly if you move the lower arm s
backwards you will reduce the castor and vice versa. These mounts were also the subject of
a factory recall due to mechanical weakness so compare through files or GW website to make
sure you have the up rated ones. 3) There are two types of Trunnion - one for power and t he
other non power, cast and mac hined at different angles.
The 6B does not have lock stops - the Trunnions supplied are correct.




Fitting Trunnion Bolts.



                                                                                                101
102


The Manuals have conflicting information and this is another Job on the GTE I only want to do
once. I have a box of New Bits; it contains Trunnions, Trunnion Kits, Wheel Bearings and
other stuff. When fitting the Wheel Bearings is it correct to fit the bearings dry (No Grease), fit
the Hub to t he S haft with the Seal (Fibre bit) bet ween Inside B earing and B ack Plate) and
tighten until no play and hub turns OK, then make not e of the position of t he Nut, then undo,
apply grease to bearings then reassemble until nut correct and fit split pin. When fitting t he
Trunnions, do I screw them up until no play or is there a "Correct Way" of how far. The
Trunnion Kit, There are Four Washers, Four Washer Type Things that look as if they hold t he
Washers and "O" rings, and Inserts (Tube Thingies) and plastic Insert Things. I ha ve made
some Stainless Inserts in the hope that the Bolt will not rust to them in the future. I assume
that the "O" Rings are an attempt to prevent wat er from getting into t he assembly. When
fitting the kit what order do the bits go, i.e. When putting the Bolt through the wishbone what
order do the Washers, "O" rings, Inserts, Plastic Inserts go.
Assemble the bearings - as they come with no additional grease - and no seal fitted. Adjust
for zero play then back off to the nearest split-pin castellation. Mark the nut & stub axle then
remove nut. Pack the hub completely with Moly grease leaving room for the stub to pass
through. Fit the inner inner (if you s ee what I mean!) well greased then fit the oil seal. (The oil
seal should have grease squeezed into the felt until it's fully soaked - oil as mentioned in t he
manual has a habit of spraying the back of the disc.) Fit hub to stub, grease out er outer then
fit out er inner. Refit nut as marked then split pin. Leave hub cap empty & refit. Screw
Trunnions on as far as possible then check they allow movement from lock -to-lock. Trunnion
kit: Each wishbone eye should be assembled as follows:* slip a thin lipped washer over a
plastic top hat (washer lip outwards)
* Push assembly into wishbone arm ey e
* Do this for other side of eye
* Fit the O ring thingies one around eac h plastic top hat brim
* Push in the stainless inserts lightly greas ed coat the hat brims & O rings with grease.
* Place the steel washers inside the lip of the lipped washers covering the hat brims with their
O rings.
* Repeat for wishbone arm two
* Refit to Trunnion with new greased bolt & tighten to correct torque * check Trunnion is free
to rotate within wishbones .
I am sure you are explaining the Fitting of the Trunnion Kit OK but I seem to ha ve difficulty
understanding.
Which bit is causing difficulty? It's one of t hose jobs that's easy to explain with the bits in your
hand but not so easy with words alone. The thin steel cups fit against the wishbone eye open
(lipped) side outwards. The plastic bush slips through, into the eye, to hold the cup in place.
An O ring goes inside this assembly, around the rim of the top-hat, then a washer is plac ed
against the 'brim' of the top-hat. The washer seals against the O ring to k eep water & dirt out
of the bush. This washer, and its partner on the other side of the eye, is in cont act with the
stainless sleeve and rotates with the sleeve.
I think Tony's bearing and Trunnion fitting instructions are brilliant, apart from a little proof-
reading slip in the last line: " * check Trunnion is free to rotate within wishbones " should read
* check Trunnion B OLT is free to rotate within wishbones " I think Tony 's second message
clarifies the essential point that the: Trunnion Trunnion bolt " penny washers " stainless
sleeves ALL form a solid, clamped assembly on the bolt and rotate as one unit WITHIN the
nylon top-hats; that are themselves fix ed within the wishbone eyes along with t heir lipped
washers and O rings. I hope this is of help and doesn't confuse you more! P.S. this is why the
Trunnion bolt/nut need to be done up damn tight to ensure all the c omponents mentioned do
stay clamped together and move as one. By damn tight I believe 40 - 50 ft-lb is correct. A trial
assembly on the kitchen table should help; I know it did for me when I did it for the first time
22 years ago.




                                                                                                 102
103




Unleaded & Head Gaskets.



                           103
104


Assuming that the se5a needs a conversion to run on unleaded, how can I c heck? The
previous owner to the one I bought the car off rebuilt the engine and it hasn't been run since,
so can I just take one of the heads off to check without causing any problems and without
needing a new gasket?
E very time you disturb any gasket on the Essex engine - you will need to replace the gasket
with a good quality one....I didn‟t mention price guys.... : -) You may be able t o tell if the valve
seats have been replaced or indeed fitted as most original heads used the cast seats that
were machined directly into the cast iron - a small batch did not. E ven if seats have been
fitted - you may find that depending on the manufacturer of the seat - that the valve masks the
seat if fitted. Also - there will be those - and myself is included here - who will tell you that for
normal use - the use of unleaded is ok without modifications. This is the subject of much
debate - and I don‟t think that even the historic vehicle movement has been able to endorse
any sort of action or product - other than to tell people that if they are unsure - then get the
heads modified. I ran my SE5a for years and many thousands of miles without any mods
apart from changing the ignition timing - just be reasonable and quite gentle in your use of
those horses.
I can only endorse the above comments. If you disturb a gasket in most cases you should
replace it. This is most import ant with head, inlet manifold and exhaust gaskets. I will leave
the fuel pump gaskets in place and the rocker box gaskets and I never get leaks. I have run
my Essex's for years with leaded valves without any problem with valve seat recession. I
sometimes drive relatively quick and sometimes on a quiet road, usually on the Yorkshire
moors I will let my foot get a bit heavy. It goes like a gem, never overheats or suffers stress.
But if you are having the heads off and the pennies are in the bank put inserts in.
Based on the replies I'll run it as it is. I thought that perhaps as the engine hadn't been run,
then the gasket sealant wouldn't have been released from the head gasket materi al - but if
you both are running on unmodified heads, then so shall I ;)




Voltmeter Reading High (Intermittent).




                                                                                                 104
105

Hi - a while ago I mentioned the fact that the voltmeter on my then newish (and henc e still
slightly unfamiliar) SE6B was running at 15 volts whic h seemed a t ad high. A change of
alternator did not have any effect, and as the battery was not boiling off, bulbs blowing etc I
put the problem down to a dodgy gauge (for which there seemed to be precedent from others'
experiences - thanks for the reports of those by the way). Then one day after rec onnecting
the battery after doing some work on something (fitting the c ooling fan relay I think), I noticed
that the voltmeter had settled down to a more normal level - around 13.5 volts (all these
readings are engine running without load), and this then turned out over the next days and
weeks to be a steady reading. By now thinking it was maybe just loose battery connections all
along (and hey, what 's 50 quid for a new alternat or?) I thought the problem was solved and
got on with other things...like the s udden failure of my clutch slave cylinder! However, t he
voltmeter's back to it's old tricks again - up to 15 volts with no load. This happened suddenly
yesterday. I know for a fact the battery and alternator c onnections are tight, the alt is brand
new, the battery has the correct level of electrolyte, so I am at a loss. The only thing I have
disturbed recently that is electrical is the earth braid from the clutch slave cylinder bracket to
the chassis. Whilst it is difficult to see why this would have the observed effect on t he
voltmeter, I ran a quick check by earthing the engine to the negative terminal on the battery
with a jump lead anyway. Sure enough, this did not alter the 15 volt reading so it would not
appear to be that. Does anyone have any suggestions? Could it still be a dodgy gauge (i.e.
not only dodgy but inconsistently dodgy - seems unlikely?!). Or was I along the right lines with
the dodgy earth braid - maybe somewhere else though? I'd be very grateful for any thoughts.
I guess my main worry is blowing up something expensive like the ignition module.
Check the voltage across the voltmeter itself with a (preferably) digital meter. If the voltage is
OK it's the (car) voltmeter. Y ou c an adjust it if you're careful. You may find it to be of interest
whilst you have a digital meter to hand t o check the voltage at various points with lights on
etc. You'll be surprised at how much is lost in the wiring, Fuse box & switches!
I had a small event with the 6a this morning in that the Volt meter went way up to the red bit
15v + . I looked at it in a threatening fashion for a while but it refus ed to drop again on t he
journey. When I got home I went in t o get my digital meter and then re-started the car, the
meter went up high again so I popped the bonnet and measured across the battery. Now this
is where it all gets a bit hazy because it read either 13.6 or 14.6, and I can't remember which
but either way it didn't make the 15, as the es v on the das h indicat ed and I do recall saying to
myself, hmm that 's ok. I wobbled the connector on the back of the alternator expecting a
small neon sign to pop up saying 'that was it, you fixed it' but surprisingly it didn't but I do
notice on subsequent journeys today the dash voltmeter has read normally. Concluding, I
suspect that as the dash met er was momentarily reading high, yet the actual voltage was
relatively normal and the dash meter is the item having the small problem. Reflecting further, I
think the alternator connector wobble was a waste of effort.
Well mine seems to be back to normal again now as well, for no particular reason I c an
discern! By "normal" I mean an indicated 14v (engine running with no load). When it was
reading 15 under these conditions the battery voltage was 14.1 I think, by my digital meter. A
little higher than the nominal 13.8 of a 12v battery but as nothing seems to be blowing up I
think I will just keep my eye on it for now...
The no-load output of a car alternator is normally 14.2 minimum - most have an upper
tolerance higher than this. A nominally 12v lead acid battery needs to be brought up to 14.2 to
achieve full charge. 13.8 is the volt age most suitable for maintenance, storage or float. Most
so-called 'smart ' car battery chargers attempt to charge to 14. 2 then drop back to 13.8 to
maintain full charge. They don't all achieve this of course!




                                                                                                105
106




      106
107

Wind Noise at Speed.

I have owned my 5a for 2 months and love it, all except that is the wind noise (not me the car)
Anything over 70 MP H creat es unbearable amounts of wind noise, especially from the driver‟s
side. at 80MPH the window frame starts to flex, the faster you go the more the window seems
to get sucked out and the noisier it gets. Is this normal, I hope not? Is there a cure? The door
seal's seem OK and the and window frame does not seem to be loose. Any ideas, or am I
destined to be deafened whenever I travel anywhere at speed?.
Take off the door panels and check the condition of the fixings of the window frame (2 top and
bottom) These can rust away and it 's quit e hard to see the movement from outside. If t hey're
ok adjust the door striker plat es on the doorpost so that the door fits snugly when closed. If
you still have a problem take off the doorframe seal and check that a 5/16 drill bit or similar
just fits all the way round between the window frame and the frame lip. If not adjust the frame
fixings you checked earlier. If all that doesn't work you need new door and frame seals !.
Hi to cure this problem make sure you have good door body seals and that the window frame
lip seals have not become hard as they need to grip the alloy roof guttering channel.
Found that wind noise was much reduce d when the rubber flaps in the rear extractor vents
were put t he right way round so air is extracted from the cabin. P resumably this creates a
slight negative pressure (sucking the doors into the seals??) worked for me.




                                                                                            107
108


Wiper Wheel Boxes Removal.

Has anyone replaced wiper Wheel boxes on an SE5?. My wipers are on their last legs, too
stiff, need replacing. Motor is OK. Some helpful comments in SLICE (thanks to Stuart Conner)
they seem to say access is behind the heat shield at back of engine. I removed mine this
week end but there seems no way to reach Wheel boxes. You can just about touch nearside
one with one finger with a hard push but no way to do anything. Driver‟s side seems
impossible to get at. Is it necessary to c ut into the fibreglass, this might be easier from t he
dashboard side. Any help welcome please, also where to get the bits.
I've no experience of a 5 but your description of access to them suggests it's similar to 5A. If
so you need to first undo the large nut on the end of the motor, remove the motor mounting
nuts then wit hdraw motor rack cable (remove wiper arms first!). Then remove the nuts holding
the Wheel boxes to the body (the large chrome ring nuts below the arm splines). If the Wheel
boxes are salvageable it's often better to cut the nuts (Dremel handy) rather than risk the alloy
wheel box threads. Once the nuts are off you c an push the Wheel boxes simultaneously into
the car so that you can reac h the two nuts on the back of t he NS wheel box. Wi th these & the
wheel box back plat e removed you can separat e the assembly into OS box + link tube, NS
box, and motor to NS box tube & fish it all out. You may find bent steel water guards behind
each wheel box that come out at the same time.
If you remove the cover of the Wiper Motor, remove the lever that connects the Round Cam
to the inner cable you c an remove the cable from the wiper motor. You can now pull the
Cable ( Make s ure that the wiper boxes are unbolted from t he scuttle panel ) toward the front
of the car. This will move the right wiper box toward the hole that is exposed after the cover
on the bulkhead is removed. You will now have easier access to the wiper box. Once this one
is removed you can now push t he cable in the other direction to push the left wiper box
toward the access hole.




Bleeding Clutch.



                                                                                             108
109



Having mounted a new clutch slave cylinder (Lockheed TR6) I trying to bleed t he system with
no success. Filled up the reservoir, opened bleeding at slave cylinde r, wife pushed pedal and
holds, closed bleeding screw, wife released pedal. Doing this several times has no effect to
get the air out. At the bleeding screw there first came bubbles and the fluid, but the master
cylinder seems to ret ain air inside. Does anyone know about this effect. (in advance: it is not
he wife pushing the pedal!!!!) Is it possible that the master cylinder sucks air instead of fluid
during releasing movement? In case of needed replac ement: can I use a master brake
cylinder as clutch master cylinder? Clutch slave cylinder has 7/8 bore.
……………………………………………
Clutch bleeding is always awkward because you are pushing air down whilst all the time it's
trying to rise back up the pipe to the master cylinder. There are two methods that always
work: Remove the slave & raise it up to the level of the MC with the feed pipe still connected.
Bleed it in this position then replace it. Use a pressure bleeder. If available a Guns on
Eezibleed is sensibly priced and makes brake & clutch bleeding a one -person job.
……………………………………………..
Ensure that the bleed nipple is fitted to the upper most connection and the feed pipe to t he
lower. I got it the wrong way round with the same result that you are experiencing.




Rear Wheel Beari ng Removal.



                                                                                             109
110



Remember reading that rear wheel bearing removal can be difficult. Is the best way written
anywhere?
………………………………………………………
You need a very good hub puller and maybe a slide hammer.
………………………………………….
The only hard part is removing the hubs: they either fall off or are immoveable. If you have
access to an hydraulic hub removal tool (or c an make a simpler device from a 4" pipe flange)
then you might get them off. If you can't the easiest way is to remove the brake plate bolts &
pull the whole assembly out of the axle. Then you can take it to someone with a decent press.
Reassembling it all is easy.
……………………………………………………..
As described in Slice issue 192 July-August 2003 use the following methods.:-From an
industrial plumber supplier get a 4.5 pcd pipe flange and blanking plug-they are forged steel
(they don‟t cost much and well worth owning) Plug is t wo inch taper BSP, hollow with male
head. The supplier will know exactly what you are talking about when you ask for thes e two
items.
 1. Screw plug by hand into flange.
 2. remove hub nut and washer then replace them with the nut fitted loosely first followed by
the washer on the outside...i.e. few thou gap bet ween nut and hub.
 3.Greas e wheel studs and place the flange over them. The hub nut fits up inside the hollow
plug. Fit washers and nuts onto studs and take up slack.
 AT THIS POINT I W ILL NOTE THA T IN ORDE R TO GE T AN ORDINARY NUT ONTO THE
STUDS SO IT WAS FLUS H WITH THE S TUD E ND i.e. maximum number of threads
engaged as I was fearful of stripping the stud threads. I HA D TO UNS CREW THE B LANK
PLUG A ND THE RE WERE ONLY ABOUT TWO TO THREE THREAD TURNS E NGAGE D IN
THE FLA NGE !!! P LAY WITH S TUD NUT/PLUG COMB INA TIONS TO GE T THE BES T
AMOUNT OF THREADS P OSSIB LE ENGAGED (EVEN REMOVE WASHE RS under wheel
nuts ). Flange must be square to the hub.
 4. Tighten up each wheel nut a half a turn at a time in rotation by hand to take up the initial
slack. Now with a spanner and tommy bar keep repeating the half turns till the hub
disengages with a pop or a BANG. I was wincing at the t orque I was finally applying via t he
tommy bar thinking either the stud threads were going t o strip or the plug threads were going
to strip, and author Max Willis had a two foot pipe added to his tommy bar.
 NOTES.
 a. If you put the hub nut on t oo snug and the hub gives up easily you may not notice it letting
go and may be t rying to pull hub and hub nut off!!! not good. So at some stage you may want
to satisfy yourself that the hub is still stuck by releasing the stud nuts and checking that th e
hub nut is still very free of the face of the hub, then reassemble and keep repeating the half
turns. I ended up doing both my GTE and GTC virtually at the same time and all 4 hubs
parted, two with a whimper and two wit h a bang.
 b.CAUTION DO NOT HIT THE PLUG WITH A HAMMER TO ATTE MP T TO CRA CK THE
TAPER AS YOU MAY DO WITH A NORMAL P ULLER THE IMPACT COULD DAMAGE THE
WHEEL BEARINGS.
 c. If all else fails and you have to remove the back plate, as advised elsewhere and pull t he
hub+bearings+shaft off the casing you may find this to be a bit of a problem.
Apparently they just pull out (says one of the professionals) Mine did not! the first lot were
removed by taking the nuts off the back plate bolts and putting and old car wheel, with t he
same pcd (Ford/Vauxhall??), onto the studs with wheel nuts and with the hub nut done up
and hammering the wheel - this of course ruined the bearings but there seemed no other way
round it --I hasten to add that this bit was done by my normally good local garage who were
going to make up new radius arm brackets. ( I should explain this was done before I bought
the flange and did it all the easy way.) I eventually used two fairly fat nuts and bolts bet ween
the hub and axle case to push the hub/bearing out from the casing end. Just screw nut onto
bolt till it fits between hub and axle then unscrew nut - you may think of a better pusher but
the above work ed a treat NOTE I did this when the BA CK PLA TES WERE ALREADY OFF
and I was adjusting the half shaft end float so cant remember whet her the bolts would bear on
the axle casing with the plates on -- I suspect not – in which case back to hammering old
wheel and renew bearings!



                                                                                             110
111

 d. While you have hubs off it is well worth checking each half shaft end float with a dial gauge
as excessive end float will very quickly damage the internals of the diff. If you haven‟t got the
workshop manual for all the figures, again it is well worth buying from the club (on CD) or
elsewhere. When you take the bearings out be careful with the shims between the bearing
retaining plate and the casing --- the thick thirty thou ones are still not too difficult to get but
the thinner ones are VERY scarce. 3 thou 5 thou 10 thou.
 ANYBODY THROWING AWAY A XLES PLEASE REMOVE THE S HIMS AND DONA TE
THEM TO THE CLUB OR ONE OF THE SUPPLIERS. Queensberry did luckily get their
hands on some just as I was getting desperate and unable to find any.
 SALISBURY A XLES - the manufacturers are still going and were very helpful (they only had
limited supply of shims for their own us e and were a bit reluctant to part wit h too many.
Further Hint -Graham Walker supply a bearing and seals kit at a reduced price to buying all
the items individually (I found out the hard way by buying just the oil seals for the GTE
thinking the bearings were all right then having to buy the bearings after the above old wheel
and hammer job) Hope this has not been too long winded but I always welc ome as much
description and reas ons as possible as I find it takes so much guessing out of the job.
d. DO NOT USE A NORMA L THREE LEGGE D P ULLER W ITH A POINTE D E ND TO TRY
AND P ULL THE HUB OFF. APART FROM DIS TORTING THE HUB THE POINT WILL GO
INTO THE HOLLOW END OF THE HA LF SHAFT AND E XPA ND IT. SOME PREVIOUS
IDIOT HAD DONE THIS ON MY GTE AND THE SHAFT WAS SO E XPANDED THA T HE
HAD TO FILE AWAY THE THREADS COMPLE TELY BEFORE THE HUB NUT WOULD GO
OVER THE E ND OF THE S HAFT AND ENGAGE WITH THE THREA D FURTHER UP. I HA D
TO RUN A DIE UP THE HALF SHAFT A ND IT CUT A GOOD WAY INTO THE E XPA NDE D
END OF THE SHAFT. I ALS O FOUND THE NUT WAS CRA CKED RIGHT THROUGH!




                                                                                                111
112

Grease Squirting out of Trunnions.

I know this subject has brought varying opinions among scimitar gurus but I‟m not sure what
to do here. Last year I rebuilt my front suspension with all new bushes and Trunnions.
E verything s eemed fine and I passed t he MOT no probs. A fter the first 250miles I put her up
on jacks to grease the Trunnions. On the drivers side I pumped fresh grease in till it oozed out
the top like its suppos ed to. when it came to the other side some oozed out the top but the
'penny' partially popped out and grease came out the bottom. As I have read many articles
about Trunnions before that said this is a tell tale sign that the Trunnion is no good. So I
phoned the trader that I purchased them from and I was told that its not a big concern, just tap
it back in with a hammer and it should be OK. Now it seems that every time I go to grease
them they get worse and I keep having to tap both sides back in and now its at the point
where grease will only come out the bottom. I was thinking of taking them off and squeezing
the bottom of the brass carefully in the vice to prevent them from popping out or screwing
them out 1 t urn to leave more space at the bottom (in case the vertical link is putting pressure
on them). Anyone have any tricks or should I just bin them and get new ones? I don't want to
leave it go because it could be possibly dangerous. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
………………………………………………………………………………………
Mine are fairly new on my 6a and they do the same so I don‟t think new ones will be much
better. I have heard (probably on this group) of them being soldered in place, but when I tried
it my blow torch was n‟t big enough to develop enough heat for the job. I was thinking of t rying
oil or thinner grease next time in the hope it might flow around the joint better without building
up pressure like grease does.
………………………………………
They should be lubricated with a very thin or soft grease, preferably a moly grease. You can
use gear oil with moly. The pressure required to push the grease through is forcing the plug
out of t he bottom. Tap the plug back in and with a cent re punch just peen in the outer edges
of the brass Trunnions so as to create a positive lip to hold the plug in. But use a light very
mobile grease. I believe on the Triumph 2000 gear oil was specified.
…………………………………………….
I solder mine in from new and have not had a bottom pop out since I start ed doing this -
another trick is to cut another oil way up the Trunnion to reduce the effect of a possible
blockage. I also use a mixture of oil ( ep90) and grease not just grease.
………………………………………………………..
Regarding fitting, you talk about backing them off slightly - I believe that is the correct
technique for fitting them, it's certainly the w ay I've always done them, they should not be
done up tight to the end of the thread, otherwise there is a danger that when the steering is
turned to full lock it may bind or that the upright will be screwed too far into the Trunnion,
applying pressure to the end cap.
……………………………………………………………
For lubric ant, personally I use Moly Greas e, but this has been debated over the y ears with
some people using a mix of part oil/part grease and s ome recommending oil. Reliant
recommended grease, but I think when the suspe nsion was originally designed oil was used.
(I sus pect the most important thing is that it's done properly and regularly, rather than exactly
what 's used!).
……………………………………………………….
Another trick is to place anot her jack with a thick washer or suitable coin on under the
Trunnion, wind it up till there is a good load on it and then apply the greas e pressure.
…………………………………………………………………
There are three issues here.
 1. Assuming the Trunnions s upplied are properly made with the end caps properly fitted (i.e.
adequate groove and peening over) and t here is the proper groove machined from t op to
bottom of the threads, then it would take excessive pressure via the grease to pop the ends
out and something would have to be blocking the movement of the grease whic h would
otherwise come out of the top of the Trunnion.
 2. As previously discussed in RSSOC SLICE a light molybdenum grease is good - or mix
with heavy oil if you must or even just use heavy oil.
 3. I feel that for a trader to advise to just knock them in with no furt her remedial work is
irresponsible. Who were they from so we can all avoid getting substandard items/advice?? To
cure your problem however I am afraid means taking Trunnions off. Check that there is a



                                                                                              112
113

groove running top to bottom at right angles to a nd just beyond the threads inside t he
Trunnion (see SLICE article) and that the groove is just deeper than the bottom of the thread
depth. Thoroughly clean the Trunnion and end cap for soldering in position. Ensure there is
an adequate groove for the cap to sit in. The cap should be slightly dished and difficult to get
into the groove. The cap needs to be knocked into position with a large dished punch -
reason- if you get it right the dished cap flattens out and gets tightly wedged into the groove -
get it wrong and all you do is make a dent in the cap which actually shrinks it and makes it
smaller!! Using a fairly sharp punch you can also go round hitting the Trunnion just away from
the edge of the join - that is the peening somebody els e spok e about - this obviously puts
many small dents in the Trunnion so the metal is stretched out over the end cap. Again the
proper fitting of the end cap by the manufacturer should have rendered this not necessary.
Now comes the clean bit- it must be clean for soldering. Us e a small gas blow torch or very
large soldering iron to solder round the edge of the join of the cap to the Trunnion (this is only
belt and braces for what should be a properly engineered job in the first place). When
soldering you can use a flux. A wonder fluid for us e when soldering is Bakers Fluid it cleans
up the metal a treat being c orrosive (remember to wash off all trac es aft er finishing soldering.
The only source I know is from Axminster power tool centre at Axminster Devon and
Faversham in Kent - www.axminster.co.uk or 0800 371822 and the item order numbers are:
BAK125 for 125 ml at 4.34 pounds or BAK 250 for 250 ml at 6.13 pounds.....they do mail
order. (anyone knowing of anot her source in N Devon or around Exeter please let me know).
The workshop manual on the CD does not go into detail but, If I remember, the fitting
sequence is to screw Trunnion on till it bottoms then unscrew it till it is in its correct alignment
(if this is less than half a turn you will need to unscrew another full turn -but please check this
in the article in SLICE --(common sense c an prevail here. remember t he front wheel only
moves through about 90 degrees lock to lock so it only needs unscrewing enough so that on
full lock there is a clearance between the upright and th e Trunnion).




Ride Height




                                                                                                113
114


I hope in the next couple of weeks fit new Shocks and S prings. They are adjustable types and
I would like to adjust the ride height to "Normal" before experimenting. What is the correct ride
height for a 1972 SE5a. Tyre profiles could make a small differenc e so is the measurement
from the wheel arch to the ground or from the wheel arch to the centre of the wheel. Is this
measurement the same at the Front and Rear. This relates to my question a while ago. GA Z
Shocks and up rated Springs purchased and when units fitted I will take pictures and give my
thoughts.
………………………
The book says ground clearance ( chassis ) 5.5" (140mm) - sounds about right but you can
play with it to suit your own preferences with your new shocks.
……………………………….
Where is the ground clearance measured - at the lower edge of the bump tray under the
radiator???
…………………………
Chassis main beams - either side of the engine and beside the rear cross tubes.
…………………………….
A strong school of thought via the Rew was that the lower wishbones
should be parallel with level ground for a good handling set up.
……………………………




Ignition Switch Operation and Repair




                                                                                             114
115

Acknowledgment to
Dennis Nicholas



This      is     how      it   works....will    assume       no     knowledge      of      electrics.
1. The ignition switch has 4 terminals numbered 1 2 3 and 5 (4 is not used)
2. The battery positive voltage is connected by a fairly thick brown to terminal on the ignition
switch.
3. With key on off position (o r removed) not hing is connected inside the ignition s witch.
4. With the key turned to the first position 1 is connected to 5 which puts positive voltage only
on the radio/ aerial motor through green/slate wire.
5. With key turned to second position (normal position when you are driving) 1
is connected to 5 and 3. (Turn to third spring loaded position and 1 is connected to 3 and also
to 1, white/red which supplies voltage to start er solenoid - 5 is disconnected in this position.
6. Terminal 3 -WHITE wire is the positive voltage to supply all the bits of the car that work
only when the ignition is switched on so it goes to a joint from which several white wires are
taken to various bits of the car.
7. one of these goes direct to the warning light. The ot her s ide of the warning
light has a brown and yellow (thin) wire that goes to the alternator IND t erminal which is
connected to diodes inside, which in turn are connected to the coils that generate the voltage
and also to the field coil and regulator which controls the amount of magnetic field and hence
the amount of voltage generated in the coils.
8. When the voltage being generated at the diodes/field coil/IND terminal equals the battery
voltage from the ignition switch white wire, no current flows and the ignition light goes out.
9. Therefore possible faults:- a. With key in off position t here should be no voltage on ignition
switch terminal 3. (and hence none on the thin brown/yellow at the alternator). Check
with a meter ( or a 12V light bulb wit h the main body connected to negative of
battery and a wire soldered to little contact on the base used to probe onto
points to be tested) for voltage at terminal 3 if voltage present then there is
a problem in the ignition switch. Remove the terminal from 3 and if i gnition light
goes out and t here is still 12 volts on terminal 3 you have found the problem.....a short inside
the ignition switch.
a.1. The ignition s witch can easily be dismantled for inspection and cleaning if you are careful
when bending the metal casing where it is crimped in 3 places to ret ain the fix ed plastic body
with the terminals mounted on it. A small grub screw holds the switch in position on the end of
the ignition key/lock body. This is on the back (towards the seat) side of t he assembly and
when removed will allow the switch to pull off the end leaving a flat spade inside the key/lock
body - that is the bit that turns the insides of the switch round when the key is moved. Inside
the switch is a rotating plastic body with 3 hollows. There are 3 springs - one in each hollow
that press on an oblong copper contactor plate which rotates to connect to the output
connections 2,3,5. On the other side of the rotating plastic body is a ball bearing that sits
between the body and the metal bas e to provide positive location stop points for each of the
ignition key positions. (indent ations in the metal body ). Also on the same side is a spring
round the shaft to provide spring loading when key is rotat ed to position 3 to operat e the
starter motor. Be assured not hing goes ping and disappears across the room when taking it
all to bits! Just be careful when opening up not to drop the 3 springs and the ball (the other
spring is fairly well held captive in the plastic rotor). You will be able to work it all out when
you see it in bits. Clean all parts and smear contacts with electrical contact grease. Ordinary
grease for ball. It may be that the shaft that turns the rotating plastic and contact plate has
worn and t he plate is in the wrong position so is in position 3 when it should be in position
zero and when you turn the key to position 1 the plate goes to position zero!-Unlikely because
of the spring loading. OR b. Positive of battery is connected by 2 thick brown to alternat or
which is thus always live. Since there should be no connection on the whit e wire side of the
ignition warning lamp to anything with t he key in off position there may be a short to earth
somewhere along this white wire and an internal fault in the alternat or
allowing battery voltage through t o the ignition warning light via brown and yellow then
via s hort t o earth (battery negative) and hence light on with key off....when key goes to on
then the same voltage is supplied to both sides of lamp and light goes out BUT that would
also produce smoke as battery would be connected direct to earth!!



                                                                                                 115
116




Rear Window to Body Seal.




                            116
117

The rear Window to Body Seal is in good condition except over the years it has bent outwards
away from the body. Can I take it out and refit so the seal becomes tight against the body.
…………………………………………………………….
The rubber normally has a slight bend but can be reversed. The Rear Window will have to be
removed to remove t he rubber. Not a difficult job. The only thing to take care with is when
closing the Rear Window is to make sure that the Seal bends outwards and does not become
bent inwards. The seal will eventually take the shape and not twist inwards. The Rear Window
may need more of a shove to close.




Axel Oil Seal2.

I‟ve searched the archive and found some helpful stuff on replacing the pinnion oil seal, but
don‟t know if this is my problem. There is definitely a leak, but it seems to be from the inside



                                                                                            117
118

of the prop shaft fl ange where the nut is and not from round the outside of the flange where it
meets the diff casing. Is this normal?
…………………………………………………………………
I have heard of this one before and yes I think oil can get out down the splines and out behind
the nut. A solution is to use some instant gasket on the prop shaft/pinion drive flange mating
faces.
……………………………………………………………………………..
I knew about t he breather on the axle tube from previous posts on t his site but not about t he
ones opposite the grease nipples. I think that I will firstly try fitting the axle with the seal as it
is and then use the instant gasket on the prop shaft flange as suggested. I can always change
the seal later if I need to.
……………………………………………………………………………….
Also, to paraphrase Michael Caine, not a lot of people know about the 2 vent-holes on t he
rear wheel-bearings themselves. They are exactly opposite the wheel -bearing grease-nipples
[i.e. facing forwards] and tend to get blocked up by road grot. The result is that when you next
give the rear wheel -bearings a couple of pumps of the grease-gun, t here's nowhere for t he
pressure to be released except either through the inner seal [greas e goes along the halfshaft
and int o the axle-tube] or the outer seal [grease comes out round the drive -flange and into the
brake drum]. Neither of these are good ideas! Find, and clean out, all your rear axle vent -
holes !
………………………………………………………………………………..
Armed with my new oil seal from GW, I finally dismantled the rear oil seal on my GTC in hope
of stopping the drip from the diff. Unfortunately the flange, pinion is quite grooved from the old
oil seal and I think will also have to be replaced. The question is whether I should then also
get a new collapsible spacer and go through t he whole process. I remember Val W alker
telling me some years ago with my Se6a that one should always replace all the components
together as a seal by itself will not affect a long lasting repair.
…………………………………………………………………………………..
Unless your axle needs an overhaul don't bother, it is a major job. Was t he oil seal y ou
removed a leather one? If so, and the new one is a neoprene one then you will find that the
seal bears on a different area on the flange and you may get away with just the seal. Clean
up the flange as best you can, if it still leaks then order a new one. As mentioned recently
a smear of Hylomar or the like on the splines will prevent oil passing along them. Don't worry
too much about the collapsible spac er; my torque wrench goes off the scale at 200lbs/ft
before it starts to collapse!. The manual states 140lbs/ ft. I trust you marked things before
taking it apart ?.
………………………………………………………………………………………
I'm still unsure from y our ans wer if I replace the flanged pinion, do I need t o replace t he
collapsible spacer. The old seal was a neoprene one but a different configuration to the new
GW one. I did punch mark the nut and shaft to reassemble to the same torque. I guess the
answer really is if the flanged pinion is identical dimension depth then it should be ok.
……………………………………………………………………………………..
There is no reason to replace the spacer, it is there to set the preload on NEW bearings. As
you have already worked out your marks would only be relevant to the old flange, so it is
down to torque, as I said before it takes a lot of torque to crush t he spacer, put on the spot I
would          say         100lbs/ft       would          take        up       any         clearance.
…………………………………………………………………………………………….
Having just rebuilt my axle I would still plumb for changing the pinnion oil seal as mine
seemed fine but in actual fact was quite warn I did manage t o find a modern replacement
mechanic al seal as opposed to using a leather seal. Most bearing suppliers will match
the size of you old leather seal to a modern equivalent. I changed all the seals in my axle and
it is now as dry as a bone no leaks anywhere, don‟t forget about the breather hole (drivers
side about 30cm away from t he hub end roughly in the centre of the tube at the
rear of the car)if this is blocked it can blow your seals with pressure build up. Lastly advice
given me by Salis bury axles was to use threadlock on t he flange splines.




                                                                                                  118
119




Rear Axel Wheel Bearings ( Greasing ).




                                         119
120

Pumping grease in the nipples of the rear wheel bearings causes that the grease comes out
inside the brake drum at he shaft. Costs me a set a new brak e shoes because t he grease
went onto the shoes is there a fault ?. Is there a hole blocked where normally the grease
comes out if the bearing is filled?
…………………………………………………………………
There is a hole on the opposite side of the axle to the grease nipple which must not be
clogged up otherwise the oil seal may have failed. Not diffic ult to replace if you can get the
hub off.
……………………………………………………………………………..
There should be a leather seal to prevent this.
……………………………………………………………………………..
There is a relief hole, yes. Its 180 degrees round from the grease nipple. If it gets clagged up
with road filth there's no way for the pressure to go except - as you've discovered – by
blowing a seal. If you're lucky it blows the inner one between the bearing and the axle-tube so
the excess grease goes into the diff. You were unlucky and it blew the outer seal, greasing
your brake shoes.
……………………………………………………………………………….
To change the seal the hub has to be pulled off the taper on the half -shaft. Expect a struggle.




Oil Pump Info




                                                                                            120
121

Does anyone know the size of the oil pump pressure relief spring from a standard oil pump
(Essex Engine) as there seems to be some confusion bet ween the standard spring and a high
pressure pump spring. I know the size of the high pressure spring, 45mm uncompressed
length, 13mm diameter and 10 turns ( 10 Coils ). Possible that the gauge of wire is different
but I understand that the difference is in the size and coil/turns. Any help as always
appreciated.
………………………………………………………………….
I give this as information to those who may be interested. The information has come from a
well known and respected company who know the Essex engine very well.

The Essex Engine always had a standard pressure pump fitted. There could be some pumps
that have had shims fitted under the spring by some owners but this was not a recognised
modification, the correct way was to fit a stronger spring. High pressure pumps as supplied
are normal pumps with the stronger spring fitted. It is not advised to fit a stronger spring in a
pump that has excessive wear. There were no pumps made that had larger vanes etc in the
pump. There is a different pump that was used for competition Engines but this was for a dry
sump system. 10w 40 oil is OK unless the car is for competition use. One of the main
problems with a lower oil grade in a worn engine is the size of the mains and big end bearings
requiring a good quality oil to lubricat e and to help dissipat e the heat away from the bearing
area. The advice is if the engine is in good condition and has good oil pressure (For an Essex
engine) a lower grade oil is OK for normal use. If there is wear in t he engine that results in
lower than normal oil pressure 20w 50 should be used especially i f the engine runs very hot.
As advised this information comes from a well respected company but makes sense to me.




Rear Hub Half shaft Extractors




                                                                                             121
122

What most people overlook is that it not the extraction of the halfshaft t hat is the problem, it is
separating the hub from the shaft. It is easy to withdraw the whole shaft complete with brake
back plate from the axle using a slide hammer. The inner rac e of the bearing can then be
ground off to release the backplate and the sha ft and hub taken to a local engineering shop
who have a press and the two separated at a cost of a couple of pints.
…………………………………………
It is much easier to pull out the half shaft with the hub and bearing on it and press everything
of it takes a lot less grunt, take out the bolts on the bearing leave the back plate loos e with
everything stripped out put an old wheel and tyre on and belt it with a big mallet or hammer
this will pull the bearing out and the lot will just slide out.
…………………………………………………..

Do what I did when faced with the same problem: take out the four bolts holding the bearing-
retainer/back-plate to the axle, disconnect the handbrake cable/brake-pipe, and use a slide-
hammer on the wheel studs to pull the whole assembly - hub, ret ainer, halfshaft, bearing,
brake backplate - out of the axle tube. Then take it all to your local engineering shop and see
if there‟s anyone there who - in exchange for a few beer-tokens - will do the flange from-shaft-
separation job in their lunch hour using their big hy draulic press.
…………………………………………………………..




                                      Replacing Overdrive




                                                                                                122
123


I have gone and destroyed my overdrive (overdrive on when s witch off into reverse cue nasty
grinding noise). Thank fully I have what I believe is a spare working overdrive. I have both
gearboxes off and ready to trans fer the overdrive unit from one to the other. Is it simply a bolt
one off and bolt the other on job or is it more involved? Oh before you ask, the gearbox that
the good overdrive on is buggered! Any tips or advice would be welcome.
                      …………………………………………………………………
It is a fairly straightforward job with a few items worth noting. If the box is out its easier, with
box in you may need to 'fas hion' a spanner for one of the top large nuts i.e. cut and weld!
Makes life easier. The main thing you have to be careful of is the oil pump drive. There is a
concentric/ 'cam' piece fitted to the main shaft which the O/ D pump has to locate onto. The
pump is the vertical rod on the front of the overdrive with a small wheel attached at its base.
You need to turn the gearbox mains haft so the large part of the lobe is downwards {IIRC} or
the pump won‟t slide over the cam when you reassemble. You may be lucky and remove it by
just the four main nuts [11/16 I think], but you may have to remove the 9 or ten 7/16 nuts and
separate the o/d from the adaptor first. It may sound hard but its not. Just don‟t lose t he
woodruff key holding the cam in place or you have to take it all apart again!!!!!!! as the cam
doesn‟t turn. Check all this on the knackered unit first.
                      …………………………………………………………………
A couple of other thoughts:
1. Is the inhibit or switch working? Though I‟m not an electrical guru, I wouldn‟t have thought
that reverse polarity on the dashboard switch would in itself have been the only cause of your
problem – if you changed round the way the switch worked, shouldn‟t the inhibit or s witch still
have prevented disaster? This tends to suggest that the inhibitor switch is U/S as well, so
while you‟re messing around with the gearbox t hat would be the ideal time to fix it and get
peace of mind for the future.
2. The oil supply for the gearbox and the o/d is common, so if the gearbox that the “good” o/d
is attached to is “Donald ducked” it would be worth checking the o/d thoroughly for swarf and
other nasties and cleaning out the filter while you‟re at it.
                      …………………………………………………………………
You don't say which overdrive it is you have - the earlier ones need a lot
of care when removing the overdrive according to my gearbox man - you have
to have the gearbox with the o/d uppermost to start with.
                      …………………………………………………………………
I have replaced both types wit h the box in the car as well as on the bench.
The item requiring care is the oil pump seating correctly on the cam drive
to prevent distorting the pump 'housing' or push rod depending on model. In
fact I think letting the weight of the overdrive down onto the cam while
getting it to seat into the oil pump drive could be detrimental so I would
have advised t he opposite to having the box upright. I guess its personal
preference. The early one is more hassle due to the way the gear change linkage fits.
                      …………………………………………………………………
If I understand correctly I should strip the overdrive from the gearbox with the unit vertical and
overdrive uppermost, is that correct?
                      …………………………………………………………………
One other thing to remember for reassembling - there are two sets of
splines in the OD which need to be lined up before the gearbox shaft
will slide all the way in.
                      …………………………………………………………………
Just took both overdrives off and both are damaged. I took the rear overdrive housing off t he
theoretically good one and the small nylon worm gear is stripped and the large bearing is
shagged too. I guess I'll just try and make one good one out of the t wo. Does anyone know
which part usually gets destroyed when you reverse with the overdrive on?
                   …………………………………………………………………
I have never taken a destroyed one apart so cannot assist too much. I have however had
them apart for gasket changes and c an tell you t he clutch faces are delicate. They rely on t he
pressure to help locate, it would appear, so I would resist or be very careful how you clean
them before reassembly. I don‟t think or see why the clutch would go if you used the o/d in




                                                                                                123
124


reverse, they are cone clutches. I think it‟s more to do wit h damaging the sun gear in some
way but I don‟t really know. I suggest you talk to these guys for advice and parts: -
http://www.overdrive-repairs.co.uk/ This company was very chatty when I saw them at a
show, and is the solution to owners with a 3speed                            auto   [BW35      etc]
http://www.overdrives.co.uk/ so you may get advice from them.
                   …………………………………………………………………
I've been in a situation where I've put the car in revers e while having accidentally left the
overdrive on and all that happened with me was the clutch seemed to slip and wouldn't give
me drive until I switched the overdrive off. Not sure if it's suppose to work like that but that's
what happens with mine.
                   …………………………………………………………………
Yes I have had that too, I guess the planet gears and sun gear 'lockup' in some way and if
you‟re lucky the clutch slips. If it doesn‟t slip then you get the breakage?
                     …………………………………………………………………
The clutch that breaks is not the friction cone clutch but the „one way‟ clutch which is a steel
ring of little stepped ramps trapping some rollers. Its purpose is to prevent the engine seeing
the drive load disappear during the change over from direct drive to overdrive thus going to
max rpm. If overdrive is engaged and the car goes in reverse then all the power is transferred
from the engine to the wheels via this ring and it shatters.
                     …………………………………………………………………
For clarity it‟s perhaps worth mentioning that “ I‟ve put the car in reverse while ha ving
accidentally left the overdrive on “ is not normally a problem, as the inhibitor switch means
that as soon as you change out of third the overdrive disengages any way (regardless of the
position of the dash switch). It would *onl y* be a problem if your inhibitor switch isn‟t working.
So by far the best preventative measure is to fix the inhibitor switch – it may save you from an
expensive mishap.
                     …………………………………………………………………
I believe if you reverse with t he overdrive engaged, the c one clutch and unidirec tional (roller)
clutch actually fight by virtue of the differenc e in speed through the epicyclic gear train. The
roller clutch looses. I've done it but only very briefly and got away with it (maybe the cone
clutch slipped enough) but it was an object lesson in squirting a bit of WD40 on the inhibit or
switch!
                     …………………………………………………………………




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