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Power Point Presentation - Richard Whitman - Westside Economic

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Power Point Presentation - Richard Whitman - Westside Economic Powered By Docstoc
					Westside Economic Alliance/Clackamas
    County Alliance Presentation
           November 2008
Big Look Task Force
• The Oregon Legislature created the Big Look
  Task Force in 2005 with SB 82 (2005)

• The Task Force was tasked to:

   – conduct a comprehensive review of Oregon’s
     planning system

   – make recommendations on land-use policy to the
     2009 Legislature
Public Engagement

WATCH:    Oregon Big Look: Examining Oregon’s
          Land Use System DVD

CHECK OUT:   www.oregonbiglook.org

READ:   500,000 Newspaper inserts

ATTEND:   Town Hall Meetings Across the State
          Sept. 17- Oct. 3, 2008

SPEAK OUT:   Public Survey at meetings and online
    Public Engagement

•   11 town hall meetings, more than 1,400 attendees
•   12-page issue paper circulated to 500,000 Oregonians
•   State-wide public opinion survey of 1,800 people
•   Updates and new content for the Big Look Web site:
    www.OregonBigLook.org
•   State-wide statistical survey of 842 Oregonians across
    a spectrum of race, income, geography, and
    urban/rural.
•   Print and broadcast media stories throughout the state.
•   A 30 minute documentary, The Big Look: Examining
    Oregon’s Land-Use System
•   Full-day stakeholder meeting to review concepts
University Consortium Study

• Land Use Program effective in:

  – Preserving farm, forest areas

  – Avoiding sprawl

  – Inconclusive results regarding
    citizen participation
Main Issue Areas

• Farm, Forest, & Natural Areas

• Livable Communities

• Participation & Coordination
4 Overarching Principles

• Provide a healthy environment;

• Sustain a prosperous economy;

• Ensure a desirable quality of
  life; and

• Provide fairness and equity to
  Oregonians.
Farms, Forest, &
 Natural Areas
                Farms, Forest, &
                 Natural Areas
Issues
• How do we better identify and protect farm and
  forest lands, and important natural areas?

• For lands that are not farm or forest lands, how
  do we assure that development is sustainable?

• What non-regulatory tools should we use to
  protect farm and forest lands and natural
  areas?
Farms, Forest, &
 Natural Areas
Farms, Forest, &
 Natural Areas
          Farms, Forest, &
            Natural Areas
Resource Lands and Rural Areas—Alternatives

Proposed Legislation

•   Authorize two or more counties to petition LCDC for a
    regional definition of farm and/or forest lands.
•   Once regional definition adopted, counties may reexamine
    farm and/or forest zoning.
•   If a county does undertake this, it must also:
    –   Review and update designations of significant natural areas
        and develop a program to protect them; and
    –   Establish limits on other rural lands to assure uses are
        sustainable and consistent with carrying capacity
          Farms, Forest, &
Resource Lands and Rural Areas—Alternatives
                Natural Areas

Other Tools for Managing Rural Lands

Transfer of development rights to deal with non-
   conforming lots and cluster development that does
   occur.

Purchase of development rights and other market-
   based tools to create incentives for landowners to
   protect significant natural areas.
  Livable
Communities
                Livable
              Communities
Issues
• How can Oregon accommodate the
  1.7 million additional people
  expected by 2040?

• How do we ensure that
  communities provide the housing
  needed by workers and that we
  minimize their transportation costs?
                Livable
              Communities
Issues
• How can we ensure that there is an
  adequate supply of land for job
  growth?

• How should we pay for future
  roads, sewer, water, and other
  infrastructure?
             Livable
           Communities

Alternatives: Accommodating population growth

 Expand urban growth boundaries onto farm
  land
 Develop underutilized areas in existing urban
  growth boundaries
 Redevelop existing urban areas to increase
  density
             Livable
Livable Communities—potential tools
(continued)Communities

Other possible tools:

   Improve infrastructure financing tools to help guide
    growth to maintain quality communities
•   Make future urbanization contingent upon annexation
    to cities
•   Improve the balance between jobs and housing in
    communities
•   Encourage more regional efforts to plan and develop
    quality areas
•   Maintain certified industrial sites program
•   Continue work with communities to reduce vehicle use
   Expand urban and rural reserves to other rapidly
    growing areas of the state
   Provide for additional ―safe harbors‖ for UGB
    expansions
                   Livable
                 Communities
Recent plans for new development in the Portland Metro
area have been stymied by the high cost of building new
roads and expanding sewer and waters systems. Some are
worried that the cost of new infrastructure will drive up the
price of housing and slow economic growth. In regards to
new growth and expanding cities, which of these
statements comes closest to how you feel?

___New construction should pay for itself and taxpayers shouldn’t have
   to pay for roads, transit, sewers, water systems, and parks and enable
   developers to get rich

___Oregon needs to raise taxes and invest in roads, transit, water
   systems, and parks to support development so we can compete with
   other states in attracting jobs and reach other public goals such as
   affordable housing and densities that support transit service

___Don’t know
  Livable
Communities
                 Livable
               Communities
Legislation

• Rewrite of regional problem solving statutes to
  encourage problem-oriented regional efforts.

• Policy statement on lands added to UGBs in the
  future and annexation.

• Policy statement concerning prioritization of
  infrastructure funding for infill and
  redevelopment.
                 Livable
               Communities
Other Likely Recommendations
• Further analysis and review of state preemption
  of local authorities to generate revenue for
  infrastructure finance.

• Evaluation of property tax limitations, and effects
  on the ability of local government to finance
  infrastructure.

• OECDD and DLCD work to maintain and renew
  certified industrial site program
                   Livable
                 Communities
Other Likely Recommendations (continued)

•   Regional Economic Opportunity Analyses.

•   Safe Harbors for UGB Expansions

•   Strategic Planning and Coordination of State Land
    Use, Transportation and Economic Development
    Efforts
Coordination &
 Participation
          Coordination &
             Participation
Citizen Participation—issues and
recommendations

  Issues:
  • Complexity – Making the system understandable to the
    average person
  • Reducing barriers to meaningful participation and
    avoiding unproductive participation

  Recommendations:
  • Review statues and rules to simplify
  • Encourage mediation, streamline local processes, and
    provide ongoing education and outreach
               Coordination &
                Participation
Issues:

 State resources are limited, and should
  be coordinated to maximize their
  ability to achieve desired outcomes.

Recommendation:

 Develop a strategic statewide plan to
  identify and successfully address
  Oregon’s needs and challenges in the
  next decades, while coordinating
  limited state resources for land use
  planning, transportation and other
  public infrastructure.
October 2008/Jan. 2009

The Task Force will prepare
final recommendations,
including specific proposals to
the Legislature as well as
                                Finalize
documenting the results of
the outreach process.           Recommendations
                           October - December 2008

				
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