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					What is a reasonable step for a particular service
provider to take will vary according to:


• the types of service being provided
• the nature of the service provider and its size and
  resources
• the effect of the disability on the individual disabled
  person
To what cost?

No ceiling figure is proposed.


The Code of Practice gives the following considerations:
• extent to which step would be effective
• extent it is practical
• cost
• disruption
• extent of resources
• resources already spent
• availability of financial or other assistance
Adjustments to physical features

Reasonable adjustments may involve:


• removal of a feature
• alteration of a feature
• provide means of avoiding the feature
or
• provide the service by an alternative means
•   raise the pavement
•   ramp and handrail
•   alternative entrance
•   virtual tour
•   raise the pavement     remove
•   ramp and handrail      alter
•   alternative entrance   avoid
•   virtual tour           alternative means
How long does the duty last?

The duty to make reasonable adjustments is a
continuing duty.


Service providers should regularly review the
accessibility of their services and consider whether
further adjustments are necessary.
DDA standards?
•   there are no DDA standards
•   the DDA is about access to services, facilities,
    employment and education not buildings
•   buildings cannot comply with the DDA
•   working to best practice standards is a reasonable
    approach
•   the DDA is civil rights legislation - it is not policed
Reasonable adjustments and good practice
guidance


The Code of Practice refers to:
•   The Approved Document M - Access to and Use of
    Buildings
•   The British Standard BS 8300:2001
•   ‘the wealth of published advice on the principles
    and practice of inclusive design’
Access audits and reasonable adjustments

From the Code of Practice:


5.42 Service providers are more likely to be able to
      comply with their duty to make reasonable
      adjustments in relation to physical features if
      they arrange for an access audit of their
      premises to be conducted and draw up an access
      plan or policy. Acting on such an evaluation may
      reduce the likelihood of legal claims against
      the service provider
What is an access audit?

An access audit:


• examines the accessibility of services and facilities
• identifies where physical barriers may compromise
  access to services
• measures the ‘usability’ of facilities within a building
  and the services being delivered from it
• compares the existing environment with good practice
  guidance
Access audits

An access audit may act as evidence in potential cases
of disability discrimination brought against a service
provider.
The National Register of Access
Consultants (NRAC)

An independent register of access auditors and
consultants who:


• have demonstrated by peer review that they meet
  professional standards and criteria
• adhere to a Code of Practice
• hold professional indemnity insurance
• undertake annual continuous professional
  development (CPD)
Code of Practice examples

In a restaurant a visually impaired person requires a
Braille transcription of the menu.

The restaurant has some Braille menus available, but in
order to cover the printing costs adds a £1.00 charge to
the bill of each customer who requires it
Code of Practice examples

In a restaurant a visually impaired person requires a
Braille transcription of the menu.

The restaurant has some Braille menus available, but in
order to cover the printing costs adds a £1.00 charge to
the bill of each customer who requires it.


This is likely to be interpreted as unlawful.
Code of Practice examples

A public art gallery is located within a listed building.
There are several steps to access the main entrance,
and it has not been able to gain consent to have these
altered.


The gallery arranges for people with mobility impairments
to use the staff entrance at the side of the building which
is level, and generally accessible.
Code of Practice examples

A public art gallery is located within a listed building.
There are several steps to access the main entrance,
and it has not been able to gain consent to have these
altered.


The gallery arranges for people with mobility impairments
to use the staff entrance at the side of the building which
is level, and generally accessible.

This is likely to be interpreted as lawful.
Code of Practice examples

A small pharmacy has goods displayed on high shelving
separated by narrow aisles. Due to space constraints it is
not practicable to alter this arrangement. On request, a
member of staff locates goods and brings them to the till.
Code of Practice examples

A small pharmacy has goods displayed on high shelving
separated by narrow aisles. Due to space constraints it is
not practicable to alter this arrangement. On request, a
member of staff locates goods and brings them to the till.


This is likely to be interpreted as lawful.
Code of Practice examples

A solicitors firm is located in a building whose front
entrance is only accessible by climbing a set of stairs. At
ground level there is a bell and a sign saying ‘ring for
disabled access’. However, the bell is not always
answered promptly, making people wait an unreasonably
long time.
Code of Practice examples

A solicitors firm is located in a building whose front
entrance is only accessible by climbing a set of stairs. At
ground level there is a bell and a sign saying ‘ring for
disabled access’. However, the bell is not always
answered promptly, making people wait an unreasonably
long time.


This is likely to be interpreted as unlawful.

				
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