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									Montana Public Safety
      Wireless
  The Road to Interoperability
     Interoperability in Montana
• The need for interoperability was observed
  in the 1980s – communications among
  multiple responders was needed for:
  – Forest fires
  – Major traffic accidents
  – Train derailments
  – Etc., etc., etc.
• A set of 14 Mutual Aid and 5 Common
  frequencies was established in 1990 to
  insure interoperability for multi-agency
  responses - Each channel was designated
  by a color
Region 25 800 MHz Committee
• The National Public Safety Plan Region 25
  Planning Committee was established in
  1991 to develop an 800 MHz frequency
  plan for the State of Montana
• Plan was completed in 1992 and
  submitted to FCC for approval
• Plan set aside a set of frequencies for
  interoperability
   Montana Public Safety
 Communications Task Force
• Established in 1994 to initiate public
  safety communications planning for
  Montana and address issues of
  ―Refarming‖
• Consultant hired to survey public safety
  agencies in the State and determine
  their priorities – interoperability and
  mobile data topped the list
• Consultant developed long range plan
  for implementation of a statewide
  system
    Montana Public Safety
   Communications Council
• Established in 1997 to develop a
  detailed implementation plan, system
  budgetary estimates, etc.
• Plan was developed for a statewide
  trunked VHF hiband system based on
  Project 25 standards
• Estimated system budget was $250
  million! A bit too much to be submitted
  to the Legislature
Montana Public Safety Communications
  Council/Statewide Interoperability
      Executive Council (SIEC)
• Council reformulated in 2002 as the State‘s
  SIEC
• Currently planning a statewide system
  based on P25, but not necessarily trunked
• Also, currently pursuing two major concept
  demonstration projects
Region 25 700 MHz Committee
• FCC established a set of 700 MHz
  frequencies for public safety use – strong
  emphasis on interoperability
• A Region 25 700 MHz planning committee
  formed in 2002 – currently developing plan
  for 700 MHz use in public safety in
  Montana
      What‘s Already Been Done
• Palisades Project – Multi-agency, shared, RF
  tower site developed by Montana Public Safety
  Communications Association & funded by
  PSWN (2001)
• Mobile Data Systems – Eastern & Western
  Montana mobile data systems currently being
  implemented (2001 – present)
  – EASTERN – Yellowstone County (in place), Butte-Silver Bow,
    Cascade/Great Falls, Gallatin/Bozeman, Lewis & Clark/Helena, MHP
  – WESTERN – Missoula (in place), Ravalli & Flathead Counties, MHP
The Montana Public Safety
      Communications
     Council/Statewide
 Interoperability Executive
          Council
          Brian Wolf
      State of Montana CIO
  The Montana Consolidation Site Pilot—
A Solution for Public Safety Interoperability
             Derek Siegle, FBI
           Wireless Montana Workshop
            Montana State University
               September 26, 2003
TODAY’S BRIEFING WILL DISCUSS
   THE DEVELOPMENT OF A
 CONSOLIDATION SITE PILOT IN
   THE STATE OF MONTANA
Specifically, this briefing will—

 Discuss the importance of wireless interoperability

 Provide a quick overview of the Public Safety Wireless Network (PSWN) Program

 Highlight the background, importance, and goal of the consolidation site pilot in Montana

 Describe the key organizations and processes involved in developing the pilot

 Provide best practices from the development and installation of the pilot

 Emphasize how the pilot can be used to address Montana‘s emerging communications needs
         WHY IS WIRELESS
   INTEROPERABILITY IMPORTANT?
 Wireless communications interoperability is necessary to—
   – Improve the ability of public safety officers to save lives and property
   – Facilitate rapid and efficient interaction among all public safety organizations
   – Provide immediate and coordinated assistance in day-to-day missions, task force operations,
      and mass-casualty incidents

 World Trade Center Attack, New York City—September 11, 2001
   – After the south tower collapsed, police helicopters relayed a message for public safety officials
     to evacuate the north tower
   – Firefighters never received the police warning because their legacy radio systems
     malfunctioned and did not interoperate with the police communications systems

 Alfred P. Murrah Building Bombing, Okalahoma City—April 19, 1995
   – In the aftermath of the attack, 117 local, state, and federal agencies responded with more than
      1,500 personnel on the scene
   – Overwhelming call volume and disparate frequencies complicated emergency response
   – Responders were forced to rely on relay runners to disseminate critical, time-sensitive
      information

                      Wireless Interoperability is a Public Safety and
                                Homeland Security Priority
 THE PSWN PROGRAM HAS LONG BEEN RECOGNIZED AS A
      LEADING RESOURCE FOR INTEROPERABILITY
            INFORMATION, STRATEGIES, AND SOLUTIONS
 The PSWN Program was the Federal Government’s first dedicated and coherent effort to tackle the
  lack of interoperability and the various impediments blocking it

 Since 1996, the PSWN Program has provided the leadership and logical approaches to overcome
  challenges to achieving interoperability at the local, state, and federal levels

 The program continues to innovate by expanding outreach efforts, implementing new solutions,
  and developing new practices that inform and shape new policy

 The program is transitioning to become a critical foundation for the umbrella interoperability
  organization SAFECOM
    THE PSWN PROGRAM WORKED WITH THE STATE OF
      MONTANA AND ITS MONTANA PUBLIC SAFETY
   COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATION (PSCA) TO DEVELOP A
                          CONSOLIDATED TOWER PILOT
                                                           State of Montana



 Pilot stemmed from a statewide initiative to enhance
  and upgrade wireless communications systems
     – Systems are integral to the safe and
        efficient completion of public safety missions

 Selected site was a single shelter on Palisades Ridge
  near Red Lodge, MT
    – Strategic location because of its use by multiple
       local, state, and federal radio users

 Goal was to upgrade and assist multiple public safety
  agencies in consolidating their radio resources                    Consolidation site
 Related objectives of the pilot include—                               at Palisades
    – Fostering resource sharing                                                 Ridge
    – Improving wireless interoperability
    – Helping launch a repeatable site collection effort
      THE USER REQUIREMENTS OF SIX PUBLIC SAFETY
      AGENCIES PARTICIPATING IN THE CONSOLIDATION
         EFFORT WERE RESEARCHED AND ADDRESSED
 These agencies included—


              BUREAU OF LAND                  MONTANA DEPARTMENT
               MANAGEMENT                      OF TRANSPORTATION




                  CARBON                        MONTANA HIGHWAY
                  COUNTY                            PATROL




               FEDERAL BUREAU                      U.S. FOREST
              OF INVESTIGATIONS                      SERVICE



       The requirements were used as the basis for developing the tower
                   design and constructing the new shelter
BASED ON THE PARTICIPANT’S INPUT, A STATEMENT OF WORK (SOW) WAS
DEVELOPED

 The SOW was created for purposes of soliciting quotations from vendors—

     – Called for a 52-foot tower and 22-foot by 12-foot shelter

     – Tower specifications included a provision that allows future modification to extend its height to 100
       feet

     – Shelter specifications called for a robust structure that could withstand harsh weather conditions


A VENDOR WAS SELECTED AND WORK WAS UNDER WAY IN JULY, 2000


Report on soil test   Work suspended                          Shelter foundation    New shelter
                                             Work
  finished and        due to fire near                             installed         delivered
                                           resumed
    delivered         Red Lodge area




                            2000                                                   2001

   July, 2000          August, 2000      October, 2000             June, 2001          July, 2001


                                                     Tower and new shelter installed in August 2001
THE CONSOLIDATED SITE REPLACES THE EXISTING TOWERS WITH A SINGLE,
SELF-SUPPORTING 52-FOOT TOWER


                                         A safety-climbing device is installed,
                                         which can be seen extending slightly
                                         above the main tower




                                         An additional 48-foot section can be
                                         added to the tower to bring the total
                                         height to 100 feet


                                         Step bolts for climbing are installed on
                                         one of the three legs of the tower
THE EXISTING SHELTER HAS BEEN COMPLETELY RENOVATED AND
IMPROVED FROM ITS ORIGINAL STRUCTURE
                                                       Equipped with
                                                       back-up
                                                       battery power
                                                       and heating,
                                                       ventilation,
                                                       and air
                                                       conditioning
                                                       (HVAC)


                      Before              After
MAIN POWER (i.e., COMMERCIAL POWER) IS DELIVERED TO THE UPGRADED
SHELTER VIA UNDERGROUND CABLES




A meter is installed adjacent to
the door of the shelter
  THE PILOT SUCCESSFULLY CONSOLIDATED THE RADIO EQUIPMENT FROM
  MULTIPLE PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCIES INTO A SINGLE TOWER AND SHELTER
The pilot yielded several best practices—

 Maintain the continuity of a single point of contact (POC) for the duration of the job whenever possible

 Consider site geography for scheduling and planning purposes

 Develop processes for documenting key design decisions to ensure the traceability of requirements

 Use a configuration control process to ensure all parties involved in the consolidation are aware of the
  design baseline and what changes are being made

 Complete geotechnical survey for multiple locations at the site, and give results to the tower and shelter
  installer prior to issuing a purchase order

 Identify all constraints that might be present at the site, discuss early on in the project, and make part of
  the request for proposals for the installer

 Consider carefully the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system requirements relative to
  the weather conditions and elevation of the site

 Develop an acceptance test checklist to ensure compliance with all requirements
MOVING FORWARD, THE CONSOLIDATION PILOT CAN BE LEVERAGED TO
MEET THE DIVERSE COMMUNICATIONS NEEDS OF THE MONTANA
COMMUNITY

 The pilot reduces the overall Palisades Ridge electronic site footprint and improves the overall quality and
  reliability of the radio communications services provided

 Local, state, and federal agencies within Carbon County are now able to communicate effectively

 The pilot project establishes a process that can cost-effectively be repeated across the state of Montana



    More detailed information about the Montana consolidation pilot can be
                      found at www.publicsafetywins.gov
  Region 25 – 700 MHz
        Planning
             Dan Hawkins,
                Chair
Region 25 700 MHz Planning Committee (RPC)
Region 25 – 700 MHz Planning
 • August 1998 – FCC designation of spectrum
   – Available no later than December 2006
   – Unused in Montana
 • January 2001 – FCC adoption of standards
   –   National Coordination Committee (NCC)
   –   State interoperability executive committees
   –   Wide and narrowband channels
   –   Interoperability channels and standards
Region 25 – 700 MHz Planning
• December 2001 – State of Montana
  activities
  – Licensure of State Channels (2.4 MHz)
     • Designation of Region 25 Planning Committee as
       executor
  – Notice to FCC on Interoperability Channels
    (2.6 MHz)
     • Designation of Region 25 Planning Committee as
       executor
• May 2002 – Convening Announced
  – 800 MHz Chair designated Jeff Brandt as
    convener
  – FCC Public Notice and mailing to over a
    thousand parties
Region 25 – 700 MHz Planning
 • July 17, 2002 – Regional Planning Committee
   – Convened
   – Officers elected
      • Dan Hawkins, Chairman
      • Leo Dutton (Lewis & Clark Co.), Vice Chairman
      • Jesse Gonzalez (City of Billings), Secretary-Treasurer
   – Working subcommittee established
   – Preliminary by-laws adopted
   – Regional plan template examined
 • August 5, 2003 - Planned RPC Meeting
   – Postponed upon MT Dept of Administration request
Region 25 – 700 MHz Planning
 • Reallocation of 4.9 GHz band
    – FCC Docket 00-32 - May 2, 2003
       • 50 MHz of spectrum
       • From federal government use, to Public Safety
       • For fixed and mobile digital broadband use
    – Channelization
       • Ten - 1 MHz channels
       • Eight - 5 MHz channels
       • Aggregation allowed to 20 MHz
Region 25 – 700 MHz Planning
 • Reallocation of 4.9 GHz band (cont.)
    – Licensing
       • Primary Uses: Mobile, Fixed hotspot, temporary fixed
       • Secondary Use: Permanent fixed point-to-point
       • Eligible Licensees
           – Every public safety agency
           – For primary uses of the whole band
           – Covering entire jurisdiction
    – 700 MHz RPC coordination for:
       • Incident management protocols
       • Interference avoidance
       • Interoperability
Region 25 – 700 MHz Planning
 • Project MESA
   – “An international partnership producing globally
     applicable technical specifications for digital mobile
     broadband technology, aimed initially at the sectors of
     public safety and disaster response.”
      • Formed in May 2000
      • Originally known as ‗APCO Project 34‘
   – Organizational Partnership
      • Open to standards development organizations
      • Currently: TIA and ETSI
   – Public Safety Membership
      • Currently: APCO, NTIA, NIJ, FBI, and others
   – www.projectmesa.org
Bridging the Digital Divide

         Dr. Bill Gillis
    WSU Center for Bridging the
         Digital Divide
   Northwest Regional
        E-Safety
       Opportunity



Promoting collaboration and data sharing
to enhance emergency response,
mitigation, and homeland security.
The Regional and National
      Significance
THE ISSUE:

How To Deal With Communications and Information
About Deadly, Unexpected Events

 Individual: Car Crashes (Leading Killer of Americans
   Aged 5-29), Suicide Attempts
  (Seattle Bridge Incident), Health Problems
  (Heart Attacks, Seizures, Strokes), Crime

 Mass: Terrorist Attacks (Oklahoma City, World
  Trade Center, Pentagon), Shootings (Columbine),
  Severe Weather ( Flash Floods, Earthquakes),
  Forest Fires, Hazmat Spills
                 The Problem:
         Emergency Communications
         Are Not in the Information Age
Emergency response communication still largely
―voice-centric‖

No statewide mechanism to capture data created
during emergency events and share among multiple
agencies and jurisdictions

Limited fusion of existing data sources (e.g. real time
traffic data, weather information, emergency medical
readiness) to support emergency response
and homeland security

No comprehensive statewide directory or ―address book‖
   Integrated Emergency Communications

                          INCIDENT
                        INFORMATION              PSAP
                        DISTRIBUTION

Federal/State/Local
    Agency


                                                      Hospital
                                                      ER
                                                      Trauma

           The Public

                                                            Police Dept.




Incident Data                          Traffic Operations
 Voice Comm.                                 Center
 Among Agencies

 Voice
Tools:
Electronic Emergency Agency Registry
&
Event Mapping

Electronic directory of ―need to know‖ parties
supporting local emergency response decisions on
data flow

Web-based event map: allow multiple agencies to
view and share incident data on an electronic map;
cost effective and useful interoperability tool for
multiple purposes
ComCARE is a non-profit Alliance of more than
85 organizations representing the full range of
emergency response and management, automotive,
citizens, communications, technology, and
transportation.
Strategic E-Safety Focus

Emphasis on creation of open
and interoperable systems creating shared data
supporting public safety and homeland security

Advocate broadly accepted vision for telematics use in
public safety-DEMAND CREATION

Sustainability through creation of market potential with
private partners (ACN, Telematics providers, data
integrators, others)
Benefits to Montana and Region

Enhance regional and interagency
effectiveness in emergency response and
mitigation through availability of shared data.

Facilitate development of new public safety
enterprises enhancing emergency response
and homeland security.

Improve response times saving lives.

Positioning Montana and Northwest as a
national leader in applying technology to
public safety and homeland security.
For more information, please contact:

Dr. Bill Gillis, Director
WSU Center to Bridge the Digital Divide
PO Box 646229
Pullman WA 99164-6229
509-335-7038
Bgillis@wsu.edu




Thank you ComCARE for providing supporting graphics
and materials for this presentation.
Questions?

								
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