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					MASSEY UNIVERSITY
 Institute of Veterinary, Animal &
       Biomedical Sciences




        BVSc V


 Administration Book

             2010
                                       CONTENTS

STRUCTURE OF THE YEAR ............................................................................ 1
               Calendar                                                                              1
               Teaching and Learning Activities                                                      1
               Learning Outcomes                                                                     4
               ANZCCART                                                                            15

227.501 – VETERINARY PROFESSIONAL STUDIES ................................... 17

227.502 – VETERINARY PUBLIC HEALTH, FOOD SAFETY & QUALITY
          MANAGEMENT .............................................................................. 23

227.503 – VETERINARY CLINICS.................................................................. 28
               Rosters                                                                             33
               Assessment                                                                          37
               Assessment Forms                                                                    48
               OWN (Extramural) Placements                                                         51
               Special Topics                                                                      54
               Composite Roster                                                                    59
               Veterinary Diagnostic Pathology                                                     62
               Portfolio                                                                           65
               Grand Rounds                                                                        70
               Poisonous Plant Collection                                                          71
               Appendix 1                                                                          72
                         STRUCTURE OF THE YEAR

There will be 3 papers in 5th Year (2010):

   227.501     Veterinary Professional Studies (9 credits; Double Semester).

   227.502     Veterinary Public Health, Food Safety and Quality Management (15
               credits; Double Semester).

   227.503     Veterinary Clinics (96 credits; Double Semester).



Calendar

Start of Rosters                                      23rd November, 2009

Christmas Break                                       24th December 2009 – 3rd
                                                      January, 2010

Rosters resume                                        4th January, 2010

Public Health (227.502) block course                  8th -19th February, 31st May –
                                                      4th June 2010

Easter Break                                          2nd April – 16th April, 2010

Rosters resume                                        19th April, 2010

Professional Development (227.501) block course       8th – 19th February, 31st May –
                                                      4th June 2010

Study Break                                           1st November, 2010

Final examinations                                    8th – 19th November, 2010



Teaching and Learning Activities

Lectures
Lectures, tutorials and other classes for papers 227.501 and 227.502 will take place all
day during the weeks of 8th and 15th Feb and 31st May.

There will be no whole-class lectures for 227.503.

Special lectures and seminars may be held and students will be advised of details of
these by individual lecturers or by notices on the fifth year notice board.

Lectures in Special Topics may be announced by the members of staff responsible for
individual special topic courses.




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Clinical Rotations
Clinical rotations will normally start at 8.00 am. Individual rosters may require students
to start earlier/later than these times, and will notify you of such arrangements.

Only fifth year students or people who have been authorised by the relevant
service chiefs can perform treatments on patients in the clinics. Treatments
should also be performed in pairs.

    All rosters will require students to undertake work outside normal university
    hours, so availability for scheduled and ‘on-call’ out-of-hours duties will be
    expected. Attendance at rosters (daytime and out-of-hours) is compulsory.


Assignments
There are also several assignments as part of the clinical papers. Details of these are
given under each paper. These have to be completed to a satisfactory standard to
complete the papers in which they are set. Obviously, the amount of benefit that you
gain from the assignments will reflect the effort and care that goes into their preparation
and presentation.


Examinations
Papers 227.501 and 227.502 will be examined at the end of second semester.

Papers 227.503 will be examined by continuous assessment and final examinations.
Each roster will be assessed during the year; marks and grades from rosters will
contribute to the overall grade for the paper. The final examinations will take place
between 8th and 19th November.

Details of the examinations and mark allocations are given in the descriptions of the
papers.


Plagarism
Massey University, College of Sciences, has taken a firm stance on plagiarism and any
form of cheating. Plagiarism is the copying or paraphrasing of another person’s work,
whether published or unpublished, without clearly acknowledging it. It includes copying
the work of other students. Plagiarism will be penalised; it is likely to lead to loss of
marks for that item of assessment and may lead to an automatic failing grade for the
paper and/or exclusion from enrolment at the University.


Insurance
Remember that you are not insured by the University against any accident or sickness
that may occur in association with your studies at Massey University. Accident
legislation helps alleviate personal financial risk to some extent. Please note, however,
that medical and personal insurance matters are your own responsibility.


Disclosure of disabilities
Any student with a mental or physical health problem which may affect performance
during the course activities is encouraged to consult the Paper Coordinator, or if
preferred, the Programme Director (Prof. N. Williamson). Students will be normally
required to participate in all course activities (e.g. laboratory/field trip), so the Student
Health Service should be consulted if doubt exists. The provision of this information is


2                                                                                 26/02/2010
voluntary, but it is important that you make known any health conditions which may
affect either your safety or the safety of others.


Pets
Pets may not be brought on to campus other than for treatment at the Veterinary Clinic.

Therefore, you may not bring your own pets into the hospital and clinics unless
expressly for investigation and treatment by a clinician. It is not possible for us to look
after animals during the day except for bona fide patients.

You must pay for all clinic services for your own pet animals, but there is a 10%
discount.




T.J. Parkinson,
Coordinator, 5th BVSc.




26/02/2010                                                                               3
Learning Outcomes


Learning Outcomes for the Bachelor of Veterinary Science Degree at Massey
University

Introduction:

The Programme Director, Veterinary Science is required to develop a statement of
Learning Outcomes for the BVSc programme in consultation with major stakeholders in
veterinary education. This is that document as developed in consultation with
stakeholders.

Considerable work has already been done overseas to define the competencies that
might reasonably be expected of a veterinarian at the time of initial registration, i.e. at
"entry level" and this work has been reviewed and refined to produce this document.
The expectations detailed below will serve as a guide to veterinary educators
concerned with the undergraduate curriculum. They may also be valuable to those
responsible for setting criteria for the registration of overseas-trained veterinary
graduates.

The development of statements of Learning Outcomes and the definition of "entry
level" competencies for the registration of veterinarians are closely related exercises.
Although they may be approached from differing points of view, there is an overall
commonality of purpose. Overseas reports reviewed include the "NOOSR/AVA
Competency Project" in Australia, the Ontario Veterinary College project on
"Professional Competencies of Canadian Veterinarians" and the "Draft Guidelines on
the Essential Competencies required of the New Veterinary Graduate" of the Royal
College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK. These provided valuable background in
developing the Learning Outcome statements that follow. Many statements included
below were prompted by and adapted from competency statements in these reports.
This document attempts to steer a middle path between the highly detailed and
prescriptive approach adopted in the Australian and Canadian reports and the more
general approach taken in the RCVS study.

The principal objective of the BVSc curriculum at Massey University is to produce a
competent veterinarian with the entry level knowledge and skills required of registering
bodies in New Zealand, the British Commonwealth and North America who has a
commitment to lifelong learning. The nature of veterinary practice in New Zealand
requires the BVSc curriculum to provide a fundamental level of competency in the
major domestic species, in meat hygiene and in public health. The Veterinary
Programme Strategic Advisory Committee for the Bachelor of Veterinary Science
degree has endorsed the learning outcomes presented below.


DESIRED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Note: These are intended to be read as if prefaced by the statement: "Having
completed the BVSc programme, the student should (or should be able to…)".

1.   Generic skills and attributes
     1.1   Demonstrate a level of literacy and numeracy that enables them to
           competently undertake the functions expected of a veterinarian.
     1.2   Communicate effectively orally and in writing.



4                                                                               26/02/2010
      1.3    Show interpersonal skills to interact effectively and professionally with
             people with whom they come into contact in their personal and
             professional lives. This includes skills in listening and understanding,
             empathy and respect for others and an ability to handle interpersonal
             conflict.
      1.4    Demonstrate the ability to find, utilise and manage information, including
             the use of modern information technology.
      1.5    Demonstrate intellectual curiosity and a desire for lifelong learning.
      1.6    Demonstrate ability to reason logically and think critically and analytically.
      1.7    Demonstrate problem solving ability.
      1.8    Make valid judgements and deductions on the basis of evidence and
             information available taking into account, as appropriate, ethical, moral
             and legal considerations.
      1.9    Demonstrate physical and mental health and self-awareness and
             strategies to maintain them.
      1.10   Demonstrate understanding of the scientific method and the scientific
             basis of modern veterinary medicine, and the ability to utilise scientific
             principles in the practice of veterinary science and medicine.
      1.11   Show well developed observational skills.
      1.12   Demonstrate adaptability and the ability to work collaboratively with
             professional colleagues, support staff and clients.
      1.13   Describe the principles and methodology of quality management and
             assurance.

2.    General Veterinary and professional attributes and skills
      2.1   Describe and comply with all legal and statutory requirements and
            obligations pertaining to veterinary activity.
      2.2   Document and comply with the ethical and professional standards
            expected of a veterinarian and in particular, those set down in the Code of
            Professional Conduct.
      2.3   Be able to describe with demonstrated understanding the special
            responsibilities of veterinarians in safeguarding and promoting animal
            welfare.
      2.4   Identify, discuss and appropriately deal with animal welfare issues.
      2.5   Discuss the responsibilities and privileges of veterinarians in society and
            the need to maintain an appropriate standard of personal and professional
            behaviour.
      2.6   Describe with understanding and use the business principles involved in
            the running of veterinary businesses.
      2.7   Accept responsibility for maintaining their veterinary knowledge and skills,
            and for their own professional development and continuing veterinary
            education.
      2.8   Use knowledge of the role of animals in the local and global societal
            context to provide appropriate veterinary treatment and advice.
      2.9   Be able to identify and interact with veterinary and animal-related
            organisations.

3.    Specific veterinary and professional attributes and skills in relation to the
      provision of primary veterinary care and other veterinary services.
      3.1    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the preclinical and
             paraclinical subjects and their application to veterinary activity.
      3.2    Obtain and record a relevant, accurate and detailed history of animals
             presented.
      3.3    Approach, handle and restrain animals in ways that are effective, safe,
             humane and ethical and appropriate to the circumstances.


26/02/2010                                                                               5
    3.4   Conduct and record a thorough systematic physical and clinical
          examination of animals presented and be able to distinguish between the
          normal and the abnormal.
    3.5   Carry out, or have carried out, such diagnostic tests and procedures (such
          as record-analysis, haematology, clinical pathology, radiology and
          imaging) as are needed to make a diagnosis, ensuring that all samples
          and records are properly identified and handled.
    3.6   Investigate and be able to evaluate environments in which animals under
          investigation are kept when needed.
    3.7   Conduct routine post mortem examination of common domestic animals
          including birds, record and report observations and initiate further
          diagnostic procedures where appropriate. Interpret post-mortem findings
          and reach tenable conclusions concerning changes observed.
    3.8   Make a tenable diagnosis or diagnostic hypothesis and a list of differential
          diagnoses based on history, clinical and/or post-mortem examination and
          interpretation of diagnostic procedures.
    3.9   Develop strategies that are appropriate to the circumstances for dealing
          effectively with commonly diagnosed conditions and diseases.
    3. 10 Conduct common therapeutic procedures on animals with uncomplicated
          diseases in a manner that will maximise the likelihood of a satisfactory
          outcome, and minimise the risk of untoward effects (welfare, resistant
          organisms) for animals concerned, public health and safety, food safety
          and quality. Record, monitor and follow up therapeutic responses and
          modify where appropriate.
    3. 11 Recognise diseases that may be exotic to New Zealand or are notifiable.
    3.12 Implement practices to control the spread of diseases.
    3.13 Safely induce, maintain and monitor analgesia and anaesthesia in
          uncomplicated cases when required, and take steps to ensure safe and
          humane recovery.
    3.14 Perform common surgical procedures in uncomplicated cases using
          appropriate techniques and procedures before, during and after surgery to
          minimise risk to the animal and maximise the likelihood of a successful
          outcome.
    3.15 Demonstrate recognition of personal limitations in dealing with unfamiliar,
          complicated or technically difficult cases by seeking further advice,
          assistance or referring such cases to others.
    3.16 Deal effectively with immediate emergency needs of animals ensuring the
          relief of pain and suffering of the animal(s) while taking into account
          ethical and legal considerations.
    3.17 Evaluate the need for euthanasia and when required, carry it out safely
          and humanely using procedures appropriate for the species concerned
          and the circumstances. In addition, recognise the sensitivity of the
          situation, the need for support of grieving clients and the requirement for
          the consent of the owner of the animal (where known).
    3.18 Communicate effectively with clients to keep them fully informed, ensuring
          that they are aware of the rationale for actions taken, therapeutic options,
          likely outcomes, costs and ethical and legal implications, to enable them
          to make informed decisions.
    3.19 Assess the need for advice and implement programmes to promote the
          health, well being, productivity and performance of animals through:
          dietary management and feeding; vaccination; preventive and curative
          treatments for common diseases; housing and general management;
          training and behavioural management and modification.
    3.20 Provide first level advice on the public health implications of animal
          diseases.


6                                                                           26/02/2010
      3.21   Describe the procedures, animal welfare, ethical and statutory
             requirements involved in the transport of animals and hygienic production
             and processing of animals for food and other animal products and the
             responsibilities of veterinarians in relation to these.
      3.22   Describe and abide by the statutory and regulatory requirements of
             veterinarians for the inspection and certification of animals and animal
             products intended for human consumption.
      3.23   Describe in detail the requirements for the production of safe food and
             other products of animal origin including the compliance verification and
             quality assurance procedures involved.

                                                   NB Williamson – Programme Director
                                                                            (4/02/10)

4.    Practical skills of new graduates
      These should include, but are not necessarily limited to, the skills indicated in the
      following extract from the Practical Work Handbook and the compulsory items
      listed in the appended Skills Book.

      4.1    Extract from the Practical Work Handbook

             Note: the list below was compiled following responses from Special
             Interest Branches of the NZVA and individual veterinarians to an invitation
             to indicate the practical and other skills that might be expected of a new
             graduate. The responses varied considerably in detail and the list is an
             attempt to provide a generic statement that covers the great majority of
             items mentioned in them. It is included in the Practical Work Handbook
             as a guide to students and to veterinarians with whom they are 'seeing
             practice'.

             "Competency Standards of Veterinary Graduates

             A recent survey of veterinarians in a range of practices indicated practical
             skills that were expected of new graduates. This is a guide to the
             expectations of practitioners of your level of competence by the time you
             graduate, and so is a useful reference point for you while you are
             developing your clinical skills doing your veterinary practical work and
             your clinical work during the course. The following is a set of general
             principles that you can use as a guide.
             A graduate, unsupervised, should be able to:

               • recognise a 'normal' animal, and be able to carry out a clinical
                 examination of all common species (including safe handling and
                 restraint; take a history; investigate temperature, pulse, respiration,
                 mucous membranes, eyes, ears, body condition, etc. using
                 appropriate techniques such as auscultation, palpation etc.); collect
                 appropriate samples for diagnosis using appropriate procedures for
                 the species concerned and the circumstances (this would include, for
                 example: taking blood samples from appropriate sites - e.g. jugular or
                 tail veins in cattle, cephalic or saphenous veins of dogs and cats;
                 collecting urine samples - e.g. by cystocentesis or catheterisation in
                 dogs and cats; collecting faecal samples); carry out basic
                 examination of such samples (this would include, for example,
                 packed cell volume, specific gravity of urine, simple dipstick
                 chemistry, faecal examination for common parasites etc.); carry out


26/02/2010                                                                               7
         humane euthanasia appropriate for the species; perform a necropsy,
         assess gross pathology and take appropriate samples for diagnosis;
     •   calculate correct doses of medication to be given;
     •   administer injections by intramuscular, subcutaneous, and
         intravenous routes (including using a pole-syringe in deer, and
         vaccinating animals), and administer fluids by intravenous or other
         appropriate routes;
     •   administer oral medications in appropriate forms (e.g. pills, pastes,
         liquids such as drenches) and include nasogastric, stomach or crop
         tubing as appropriate;
     •   apply topical medications, including to eyes and ears (e.g. ointments
         and dressings, washed, pour-ons, drops etc.);
     •   induce and monitor sedation;
     •   induce, monitor and maintain general anaesthesia in routine,
         uncomplicated cases,
     •   induce local anaesthesia in simple uncomplicated cases (e.g. cornual
         and regional limb block in cattle, and local infiltration block in dogs
         and cats);
     •   carry out minor surgical and medical procedures (e.g. drain abscess,
         suture wounds, apply bandaging, apply casts, dehorning - with
         appropriate anaesthesia, emptying anal glands of dogs, trim claws
         etc.)-,

    A graduate, with some supervision, should aim to develop expertise and
    experience in:

     • assess body condition and nutritional parameters (e.g. condition
       scoring of ruminants, estimating quantity and quality of pasture,
       performance evaluation in pig herds, assessing condition of dogs and
       cats relative to ideal weights and assessing nutritional requirements;
     • diagnose pregnancy (e.g. by rectal examination of large animals,
       ultrasound scanning,
     • abdominal palpation in dogs and cats etc.);
     • assessing breeding soundness in bulls and rams;
     • diagnose anthelmintic resistance by a faecal egg count reduction test;
     • carry out tuberculosis testing;
     • examine teeth and carry out basic dental procedures (including
       scaling and extraction in small animals, rasping in horses );
     • carry out more advanced local anaesthesia (e.g. epidural,
       paravertebral, line block, intravenous block),
     • induce, monitor and maintain general anaesthesia in compromised
       patients;
     • manage dystocia, including caesarian section;
     • carry out dehorning of cattle and velvetting of stags,
     • miscellaneous skills including such things as controlled intravaginal
       drug releasers (CIDR) application, administering rumen boluses,
       removing horse's shoes, foot trimming, urinary catheterisation.

    NOTE: you should take every opportunity to familiarise yourself with the
    above wherever possible. Please remember your experience in a
    veterinary practice is provided through the courtesy and goodwill of
    veterinarians. "




8                                                                     26/02/2010
Safety
M1     Demonstrate knowledge of isolation protocol. (Massey only)
M2     Demonstrate knowledge of chemotherapeutic protocol. (Massey only)


ANAESTHESIA
Compulsory CORE Procedures

DOG
M3  Perform pre-anaesthetic examination. (Massey only)
M4  Develop anaesthetic protocols suitable for routine procedures. (Massey only)
M5  Be able to deliver inhalational anaesthetic agents safely and appropriately.
    (Massey only)
M6  Monitor anaesthetic depth. (Massey only)

DOG OR CAT
M7   Correctly set up the necessary drugs and equipment for a routine a routine
     anaesthetic. (Massey only)
M8   Monitor blood pressure in anaesthetised patient. (Massey only)
M9   Perform IPPV correctly in an anaesthetised patient. (Massey only)
M10 Pressure check the high and low pressure systems of an anaesthetic machine.
     (Massey only)

CAT
M11    Perform pre-anaesthetic examination. (Massey only)
M12    Develop anaesthetic protocols suitable for routine procedures. (Massey only)
M13    Be able to deliver inhalational anaesthetic agents safely and appropriately.
       (Massey only)
M14    Monitor anaesthetic depth. (Massey only)

HORSE
M15 Perform pre-anaesthetic examination. (Massey only)
M16 Develop anaesthetic protocols suitable for routine procedures. (Massey only)

Additional procedures (not compulsory)
A1     Observe/participate in general anesthesia. Horse
A2     Demonstrate the methods of basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
A3     Recognise + effectively manage / treat pain. Dog
A4     Recognise + effectively manage / treat pain. Cat
A5     Recognise + effectively manage / treat pain. Horse


SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE AND SURGERY
Compulsory CORE Procedures

M17    Present appropriate case at afternoon medicine rounds. CASE 1. (Massey
       only)
M18    Present appropriate case at afternoon medicine rounds. CASE 2. (Massey
       only)
M19    Present appropriate case at afternoon medicine rounds. CASE 3. (Massey
       only)
M20    Present appropriate case at afternoon surgery rounds. (Massey only)
M21    Scrub-up, gown, and close glove in preparation for surgery. (Massey only)
M22    Display a working knowledge of surgical instruments, equipment and implants
       (including suture material). (Massey only)


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M23    Display an appropriate knowledge of surgical anatomy and recognised
       procedures for a surgical case under your care. (Massey only)
M24    Interpret clinical pathology results for a case of appropriate complexity. CASE
       1. (Massey only)
M25    Interpret clinical pathology results for a case of appropriate complexity. CASE
       2. (Massey only)
26     Dispense and correctly label medications. CASE 1
27     Dispense and correctly label medications. CASE 2
28     Dispense and correctly label medications. CASE 3
M29    Write a full prescription for one of these medications.(as if for a medical
       pharmacy)
30     Perform a PCV and TPP on a blood sample.

DOG OR CAT
M31 Obtain a thorough, detailed and appropriate history for a medical case (referral
     or on-going case). (Massey only)
M32 Care for a hospitalised medical case of appropriate complexity and present the
     written medical case record in SOAP format. CASE 1. (Massey only)
M33 Care for a hospitalised medical case of appropriate complexity and present the
     written medical case record in SOAP format. CASE 2. (Massey only)
M34 Provide comprehensive case managementinstructions to a client (diagnosis/
     diagnostic tests,discharge advice, giving medications, on-going patient
     requirements). CASE 1. (Massey only)
M35 Provide comprehensive case management instructions to a client (diagnosis/
     diagnostic tests, discharge advice, giving medications, on-going patient
     requirements). CASE 2. (Massey only)
M36 Design a preventive health care programme for a dog/cat (e.g. feeding,
     vaccination, etc.). CASE 1. (Massey only)
M37 Design a preventive health care programme for a dog/cat (e.g. feeding,
     vaccination, etc.). CASE 2. (Massey only)
M38 Obtain a thorough, detailed and appropriate history for a surgical case (referral
     or on-going case). (Massey only)
M39 Care for a hospitalised surgical case of appropriate complexity and present the
     written surgical case record in SOAP format. (Massey only)
M40 Neuter a female animal. (Massey only)
41   Perform an orthopaedic examination.
42   Perform a neurological examination.
43   Develop a surgical fracture plan for a suitable case.
M44 Calculate daily energy requirements and formulate a nutrition plan for a
     hospitalised patient. (Massey only)
45   Recommend an appropriate Prescription Diet.
46   Calculate expected / actual daily water intake.
47   Record and interpret an ECG.
48   Perform a BP & explain how to determine cuff size.
49   Perform a dental prophylaxis procedure.
50   Perform a Schirmer Tear Test.
51   Instil Fluorescein, examine cornea and nasolacrimal drainage.
52   Correctly instill ophthalmic medication.
53   Measure SG and Dipstick examination of urine.
54   Collect an ear swab for cytology, stain with Diff-Quick and interpret.
55   Correctly instill otic medication.
56   Collect a fine needle aspirate, prepare a smear, stain with Diff-Quick and
     examine.
57   Prepare an impression smear (skin lesion, tissue), stain with Diff-Quick and
     examine.


10                                                                          26/02/2010
58     Perform a complete fundic examination.
59     Collect appropriate samples for bacterial, viral or fungal culture.
60     Collect skin scrapings and examine for ectoparasites.
61     Collect coat brushings and examine for ectoparasites.
62     Perform a Wood's lamp examination for dermatophytosis.

DOG
M63    Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination. (Massey only)
64     Demonstrate correct and safe restraint.
65     Correctly perform IV injection (cephalic vein) or collect blood sample.
66     Correctly perform IM injection.
67     Correctly perform SC injection.
68     Perform an otoscopic ear examination, viewing tympanic membrane and
       canals.
69     Monitor hydration of hospitalised animals: Clinical parameters
70     Administer fluid requirements to dehydrated animal SC (calculate vol required
       vol/site, appropriate fluid).
71     Administer fluid requirements to dehydrated animal IV (insert catheter, select
       fluid, delivery).
72     Administer oral medication.
73     Collect jugular venous blood sample.
74     Obtain a urine sample by cystocentesis.
75     Express anal sacs.
76     Perform a rectal examination and interpret findings (dog).

CAT
M77    Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination. (Massey only)
78     Demonstrate correct and safe restraint.
79     Correctly perform IV injection (cephalic vein) or collect blood sample.
80     Correctly perform IM injection.
81     Correctly perform SC injection.
82     Calculate expected / actual daily water intake.
83     Monitor hydration of hospitalised animals: Clinical parameters
84     Administer fluid requirements to dehydrated animal SC (calculate vol required
       vol/site, appropriate fluid).
85     Administer fluid requirements to dehydrated animal IV (insert catheter, select
       fluid, delivery).
86     Administer oral medication.
87     Collect jugular venous blood sample.
88     Obtain a urine sample by cystocentesis.

SMALL MAMMAL
89   Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination.

CAGE BIRD
90   Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination.


SMALL ANIMAL TRACK
Compulsory TRACK Procedures

Small Animals
T1    Placement and management of naso-oesophageal feeding tubes (and nasal
      O2). (Massey only)
T2    Placement and management of oesophagostomy tubes. (Massey only)


26/02/2010                                                                        11
T3    Diet selection for assisted feeding. (Massey only)
T4    Placement and management of thoracotomy tubes. (Massey only)
T5    Thoracocentesis. (Massey only)
T6    Arthrocentesis & interpret a direct smear of joint fluid. (Massey only)
T7    CSF collection. (Massey only)
T8    Bone marrow collection. (Massey only)
T9    Urinary tract catheterisation (male and female). (Massey only)
T10   Cystocentesis. (Massey only)
T11   Prostatic wash. (Massey only)
T12   Trans-tracheal wash. (Massey only)
T13   Tracheobronchial wash. (Massey only)
T14   Blind nasal biopsy. (Massey only)
T15   Diagnostic peritoneal lavage. (Massey only)
T16   Lacrimal duct canulation. (Massey only)
T17   Lymph node fine needle aspiration. (Massey only)
T18   Care for a case with a closed and open drain. (Massey only)
T19   Apply a RJB. (Massey only)
T20   Apply a foot bandage. (Massey only)
T21   Apply an Ehmer sling. (Massey only)

Additional procedures (not compulsory)
Small Animals Additional Procedures
A6     Express bladder. Dog or Cat
A7     Administer oral medications. Small mammal
A8     Administer tube feeding (choose appropriate diet, design daily feeding
       schedule, prepare diet, administer). Cat & Dog
A9     Administer an enema. Dog
A10 Observe a CSF collection and submission of appropriate samples to the
       laboratory.
A11 Observe an endoscopy.
A12 Observe thoracocentesis.
A13 Observe abdominocentesis and/or peritoneal lavage.
A14 Observe tracheal wash / bronchoalveolar lavage.
A15 Perform a rectal examination and interpret findings (bitch).


PRODUCTION ANIMALS
Compulsory CORE Procedures

CATTLE, SHEEP, DEER
91   Administer oral medications.
92   Correctly perform s/c injection.
93   Correctly perform i/m injection. (SEE BELOW FOR CATTLE). Sheep & Deer

CATTLE
94   Properly restrain a cow in a head bail.
95   Put on halter correctly. Cow
96   Use nose grips to restrain a cow.
M97 Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination. (Massey only)
M98 Correctly diagnose pregnancy by rectal examination (100% correct on 10
     consecutive cows). (Massey/Externship only)
99   Correctly identify ovarian structures (CL, follicle) per rectum. Cow
100  Place mouth gag correctly.
101  Pass stomach tube or probang.
102  Collect a milk sample for bacteriology.


12                                                                              26/02/2010
103  Collect a blood sample (jugular or caudal vein)
104  Correctly perform intramuscular injection into the anterior part of the neck.
M105 Demonstrate the ability to correctly dispense and label PAR medications.
     (Massey only)

DEER
M106 Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination. (Massey only)
107  Correctly perform IV injection or collection of a blood sample (jugular vein) in a
     conscious animal.
108  Participate in body condition scoring.
109  Participate in ultrasonographic diagnosis of pregnancy.
110  Participate in sedation and reversal of sedation.
111  Participate in analgesia of the antler.

PIG
M112   Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination. (Massey only)
113    Correctly perform s/c injection.
114    Correctly perform i/m injection.
115    Obtain a blood jugular venous blood sample.


Compulsory TRACK procedures

CATTLE, SHEEP, DEER
T1   Liver biopsy.
T2   Intradermal injection (cattle or deer).

CATTLE
T3   Pass intrauterine catheter (recto-vaginal technique). (Massey/Externship only)
T4   Ultrasound diagnosis of pregnancy. Cow
T5   Anaesthesia of horn (cornual block).
T6   Correctly perform epidural anaesthesia.
T7   Correctly inject into the jugular vein.
T8   Administer metabolic fluids.
T9   Lift and tie up a cow’s foot properly.
T10 Undertake corrective trimming of a cow’s hoof.
T11 Correctly perform i/v injection.

DEER
T12    Body condition scoring.
T13    Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pregnancy.
T14    Sedation and reversal of sedation.
T15    Participated in the use of pole syringe for immobilization or i/m injection.
T16    Analgesia of the antler.
T17    Complete Herd Health project. (Massey only)

SHEEP
T18 Breeding soundness examination of Ram.
T19 Ultrasound diagnosis of pregnancy.

HORSES
Compulsory CORE Procedures
116  Catch, halter and lead a horse.
117  Pickup and clean all four feet.
118  Apply hoof testers.


26/02/2010                                                                            13
119    Apply a twitch.
120    Administer oral medication.
121    Correctly perform s/c injection.
122    Correctly perform i/m injection.
123    Correctly perform i/v injection.
124    Obtain a jugular venous blood sample.
125    Place an intravenous catheter.
126    Record the identity of a horse.
M127   Perform a complete and thorough clinical examination. (Massey only)
128    Perform and interpret a PCV/TPP.
129    Perform and interpret a faecal egg count.
130    Be able to identify abnormalities in conformation and gait (forelimb & hindlimb
       lameness).
131    Remove and put on a cover.
132    Examine and float a horse’s teeth.
133    Bandage a horse’s limb.

COMPULSORY TRACK PROCEDURES
T1  Safely perform a rectal examination. (Massey/Externship only)
T2  Taking and interpreting plain radiographs. (Massey/Externship only)
T3  Safely perform a nasogastric intubation. (Massey/Externship only)
T4  Collection and submission of samples for laboratory testing, (including
    interpretation of results). (Massey/Externship only)
T5  Perform/participate in a complete orthopedic exam. (Massey/Externship only)
T6  URT endoscopy. (Massey/Externship only)
T7  Ultrasonographic examination of palmar metacarpal/metatarsal structures.
    (Massey/Externship only)
T8  Neurologic examination. (Massey/Externship only)
T9  Ophthalmologic examination. (Massey/Externship only)
T10 Euthanasia (watch video). (Massey/Externship only)
T11 Ultrasound examination of the thorax. (Massey/Externship only)
T12 Ultrasound examination of the abdomen. (Massey/Externship only)
T13 ECG recording and interpretation. (Massey only)
T14 Preparation for genital examination in the mare: Tail wrap and tie, wash
    perineum. (Massey/Externship only)
T15 Examination of the genital tract by rectal palpation. (Massey/Externship only)
T16 Examination of the genital tract by trans-rectal ultrasonography.
    (Massey/Externship only)
T17 Examination of the genital tract by vaginal speculum. (Massey/Externship only)
T19 Palpation of scrotum and testes of stallion. (Massey/Externship only)

Additional procedures (not compulsory)
A16 Abdomenocentesis.
A17 Preneural nerve block.
A18 Intrasynovial analgesia.
A19 Transtracheal or endotracheal aspiration.
A20 Brondioalveolar lavage.
A21 Epidural anaesthesia.
A22 Collection of uterine culture/cytology.
A23 Collection of uterine biopsy.
A24 Caslick procedure.




14                                                                          26/02/2010
ANZCCART

Ethical guidelines for students in laboratory classes
involving the use of animals and animal tissues

Introduction
The use of animals or animal tissues in laboratory classes
is a privilege that brings with it responsibilities. These
responsibilities go well beyond the need to avoid cruelty to
animals and involve a genuine commitment to their welfare
and a respect for the contribution they make to your            Australian and New Zealand
learning. Outlined below are principles to consider in         Council for the Care of Animals
helping you to meet these responsibilities and to derive         in Research and Teaching
maximum benefit from the use of animals in laboratory
classes.

Principles to consider
1.    Consider why animals or animal tissues are being used in the laboratory
      The justification for using animals should be to enhance educational outcomes, while
      recognising that at the same time there is the potential for harm to animals to achieve
      these outcomes. Consideration should always be given to whether the educational
      outcomes could be achieved without the use of animals or animal tissues. Every student
      and staff member should be mindful of the Three Rs (Replacement, Reduction, and
      Refinement) when working with animals in a teaching environment.

2.    Consider the requirements for animal welfare and animal handling
      At all times the welfare of the animal you use is your responsibility not just your
      teacher's responsibility. This can be considered as a ‘duty of care’. If you are
      required to handle animals during a laboratory class, it is important to follow the
      instructions of staff in the correct handling and restraint techniques for the
      species with which you are working.

3.    Consider the regulatory environment
      The use of animals in research, testing and teaching is regulated in New Zealand
      by legislation under the Animal Welfare Act 1999. This Act has an underlying
      principle of a ‘duty of care’. It also requires approval from an institution's Animal
      Ethics Committee (AEC) for work in the teaching environment that uses animals.
      Gaining this approval involves justification for using animals (species and
      number), the means by which animals will be handled and, if required, humanely
      killed, and the educational outcomes of the laboratory work balanced against any
      potential harm to the animals used. The skills of the staff involved and the
      supervision of the students are also evaluated. In fact, the questions raised by
      AECs should be those asked by each student regarding the use of animals in
      their laboratories.

4.    Consider your own views in using animals or animal tissues in the
      laboratory
      You should discuss the use of animals and animal tissues with other students
      and staff. Opinions should be formed and aired, with appropriate justification, in
      an open and accepting environment. You should feel free to make suggestions
      that might improve future laboratory classes, and to this end, student opinion
      regarding the use of animals in teaching should be encouraged.

5.    Consider your responsibility to make sure that good use is made of the
      learning opportunity



26/02/2010                                                                                15
     You should know what underlying principles are being taught in the class and
     understand the details that illustrate those principles. This involves reading
     background material from lecture notes and references before coming to class,
     reading the laboratory manual before the class, and being generally prepared to
     maximise the learning experience. Use every opportunity, within the approved
     scope of the class, to develop manual, observational, and recording skills.



ANZCCART has the following objectives:
 • to promote excellence in the care of animals used in research and teaching and
    thereby minimise any discomfort that they may experience;
 • to ensure that the outcomes of the scientific uses of animals are worthwhile;
 • to promote the Three Rs (Replacement, Reduction and Refinement) as they
    apply to the use of animals for scientific purposes; and
 • to foster informed and responsible discussion and debate within the scientific and
    wider community regarding the scientific uses of animals.
Websites: www.rsnz.org/advisory/anzccart/ and www.adelaide.edu.au/ANZCCART/




16                                                                         26/02/2010
         227.501 – VETERINARY PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

Weeks of 8th and 15th February and 31st May.


Credits Value:      9                          Semester:       Double


Campus:             Turitea                    Mode:           Internal


Calendar Prescription
Elements of the legal system regulating veterinarians. Professional ethics and
obligations to the public and state.           Veterinary professional organisations.
Veterinarians as communicators and educators. Maintenance of physical and mental
fitness and safety as a veterinarian. Veterinary business management.


Pre- and Co-Requisites
Enrolment in this paper requires successful completion of the 5th Veterinary
examination by passing all papers in BVSc 4, under the conditions specified in the
BVSc regulations (pp 230-231, 2009 Massey University Calendar).


Restrictions
Only students enrolled in the 5th year of the BVSc degree may enrol in this paper.


E-learning Category
Web enhanced.


Paper Co-ordinator
Prof. Norm Williamson, IVABS, Room 1.54, Extn 5057


Other Contributing Staff
Dr David Tweed, Dept of Management, Extn 2805
Mr Bill TeBrake, IVABS, Room 3.05, Extn 7123
Ms Janet Reid, INR – Ag Hort Sys Mgt, Extn 5268
Dr Dianne Gardner, School of Psych. Albany, Extn 9034
Mr Bruce Cottrill, Dispute Resolution Centre (PN), Extn 81068
Mr John Ross, Student Counselling Service, Extn 5935
Mr Nick Roskruge, Kaitautoko Maori, College of Sciences, Extn 2611
Dr Toby Mundel, Institute of Food, Nutrition & Human Health, Extn 2224
Prof Frazer Allan, IVABS. Extn 5070
Dr Ian Scott, IVABS, Extn 2193

External Contributors
Dr. Ron Gibson, Chairman, Veterinary Council of New Zealand
Dr. Caleb King and others, MAF Biosecurity New Zealand, Upper Hutt
Mr David Blackwood, Medical Assurance Society




26/02/2010                                                                           17
Aim
This course aims for veterinary students to understand professional and personal
aspects of being a veterinarian, including their obligations to themselves, their
colleagues, their profession and society.


Learning Outcomes
A student who successfully completes this paper will be able to:

1.   Describe and demonstrate an understanding of the ethical framework in which
     veterinarians operate within various veterinary endeavours.

2.   Show that they understand the Veterinarians Act (2005) and the role of the Code
     of Professional Conduct for Veterinarians.

3.   Show an understanding of the legislative process and laws that pertain
     particularly to the veterinary profession.

4.   Show an understanding of business methods and management.

5.   Recognise veterinary organisations operating in New Zealand and elsewhere and
     show an understanding of their roles.

6.   Show communication skills and strategies appropriate for veterinarians.

7.   Demonstrate awareness of influences on physical and mental fitness and
     knowledge of strategies for their maintenance.


Assessment

Alignment of Assessment to Learning outcomes

Assessment                  Learning Outcomes Assessed               Contribution to
Description                                                           Paper Mark
Assessment                  1.   2.   3.   4.    5.   6.   7.

Mid-course test                                                            30%

Project on the Code of
Veterinary Professional                                                    20%
Conduct

Final examination                                                          40%

Careers Assessment
                                                                           10%
Task

Completion of practice                                             Must be satisfactorily
management project                                                      completed




18                                                                               26/02/2010
Deadlines and Penalties

Assessment                            Due Date / Deadline        Penalty

Mid-course test                      Tuesday 1st June 2010

Project on the Code of
Veterinary Professional
                                      Friday 30th July 2010      5% per week
Conduct

Final examination                             TBA


Careers Assessment Task               Friday 23rd July 2010

Completion of practice
                                     Friday 1st October 2010     late fee of $30-00.
management project



Assignments

Project on the Code of Professional Conduct. (20% of final mark for the paper).

This assignment is due to be submitted to the Undergraduate Office, IVABS by 30 July
2010.

A significant proportion of complaints against veterinarians are made by veterinary
colleagues. The Code of Professional Conduct of the Veterinary Council of New
Zealand guides the standard of behaviour expected of veterinarians. Review the Code
of Professional Conduct and explain how adherence to the code should act to minimise
situations where veterinarians bring complaints against veterinary colleagues.

Provide your answer clearly in a paper of 1000 to 1500 words maximum.


BVSc Life Skills - Year 5 Careers Assessment Task
In Year 2 we looked at personality styles and in particular at our strengths and
weaknesses and our likes and dislikes. We used the Personality Styles inventory (PSI)
– which is a version of the Myers Briggs Type Inventory – to assist you explore “the
kind of person you see yourself as being”. In this work you will have determined your
‘personality code’.

For this task you are now required to revisit your code in the light of the experiences
that you have had since then, in particular in your rotations and any other work
experience. If you no longer have your “code’ and the related explanation you can
download it from http://ncsss.cua.edu/adobe/Inventory.pdf (or can ‘google search’
”hogan champagne personality inventory”). Re-read the explanations and reflect on
how accurately they describe you and your reactions to your experience in the BVSc
and in the professional workplace.

You should now use between 500 and 700 words in total for the following tasks:

1.    Record your code and, if applicable, any new code that you feel is more accurate.



26/02/2010                                                                             19
2.   If accurate, your code should ‘predict’/describe most of the areas and
     experiences that you particularly enjoyed on your course and in your practical
     work. It should also describe how you approached situations.

     Describe those activities and experiences which were congruent with your code
     and those that were not. In doing so you should outline the nature of this
     congruence or lack of congruence.
                                                                        45 percent

3.   Based upon your personality code and your experience of vet practice, draft a
     paragraph - or two - in which you outline your professional goals. This should be
     based upon your “personality style” and should encompass:

       •   how, at this stage, you think you would like your career to develop
       •   what you want from a work role
       •   what you seek from a work setting
       •   how your personality code influences your professional goals
       •   the emphasis that you place on work within your wider life – that is, your
           desired ‘work – life’ balance.
                                                                             40 percent

4.   Draft a ‘career objective’ that you could use in your CV. How to do this will be
     outlined in depth in the Life Skills session on CV development. This statement
     should:

       •   use some of the information from task 4 (above)
       •   outline the particular work role that you seek
       •   show why you want the role you seek
       •   detail why you are the ‘ideal’ candidate.
                                                                           15 percent


Requirements to Successfully Complete the Paper
The achievement of a pass mark of 50% in all assessments and submitting a
satisfactory Veterinary Practice Management assignment.


Learning Programme
The paper will be presented as a series of approximately 30 lectures at the Palmerston
North campus during the ‘On campus’ weeks of the BVSc 5th year. There will be two 3
hour tutorial sessions and approximately 24 hours of self-directed project work will be
expected, including the completion of the practice management project. It is
anticipated that students will spend approximately 30 hours studying the subject.


Student Time Budget
Lectures and workshops                      33 hours
Assignments                                 35 hours
Study                                       40 hours
Examinations and tests                       2 hours




20                                                                           26/02/2010
Timetable

Lectures:

Date      Time         Location    Title                                   Lecturer
8 Feb.    1pm          ICLT        Veterinarians and the Law               Williamson
10 Feb    1pm          ICLT        Extension in Veterinary Practice        Reid
11 Feb    10am         ICLT        The VCNZ                                Gibson
11 Feb    11am         ICLT        The VCNZ                                Gibson
12 Feb    1pm          ICLT        Organic Farming & Alternative Therapy   Scott
15 Feb    8am          ICLT        Coping with Stress                      Gardner
15 Feb    9am          ICLT        Coping with Stress                      Gardner
16 Feb    8 am         ICLT        Maintaining Physical Wellbeing          Williamson
17 Feb    1pm          ICLT        Starting a Career                       Ross
18 Feb    8am          ICLT        Personal Financial Management           Blackwood
18 Feb    1pm          ICLT        Maintaining Physical Wellbeing          Toby Mundel


31 May    9am          ICLT        Effective Communication                 TeBrake
31 May    10am         ICLT        Effective Communication                 TeBrake
31 May    4pm          ICLT        Veterinary Medicines Changes Workshop   Wayne Ricketts
1June     8am-9am      ICLT        Dispute Resolution                      Cottrill
1 June    9am-5pm      ICLT        Exotic Disease Workshop                 McFadden

2 June    8am          ICLT        Mid-Course Test

2 June    9am          ICLT        Veterinary Business Management          Tweed
2 June    10am         ICLT        Veterinary Business Management          Tweed
2 June    11am         ICLT        NZVA                                    Allan
2 June    12am         ICLT        NZVA                                    Allan
2 June    2pm-5pm      ICLT        Career planning workshop                Ross
3 June    8am          ICLT        Veterinary Business Management          Tweed
3 June    9am          ICLT        Veterinary Business Management          Tweed
3 June    10am         ICLT        Veterinary Sales                        TeBrake
3 June    11am         ICLT        Veterinary Sales                        TeBrake
3 June    12pm         ICLT        Maori Culture and Veterinarians         Roskruge

(4 June - All Day      Prelude to Practice      NZVA, VetLearn, IVABS)

Tutorials:
1 June    9am – 5 pm               Exotic Diseases Workshop                King
2 June    2pm-5pm                  Career Planning Workshop                Ross et al.


Proposed Feedback and Support for Student Learning
Students will be able to contact lecturers based in Palmerston North by dropping by
there offices or by phoning and making appointments, phoning out of town lecturers
and via e-mailed questions. If there is difficulty in making contact advice should be
sought through the paper coordinator.

The turnaround time for assignments will be no more than three weeks from the due
date. It is important to note that the specified timeframe applies only to those
assignments submitted by the due date, and does not necessarily apply to those
submitted late.




26/02/2010                                                                               21
Textbook and Other Recommended Reading
Code of Professional Conduct, Veterinary Council of New Zealand, 11th Floor, Kordia
House, 109 Willis Street, Wellington.

The Veterinarians Act (2005).
Veterinary Council Web site: http://vetcouncil.org.nz
New Zealand Veterinary Association: http://vets.org.nz
MAF Web Site: http://www.maf.govt.nz


Conditions for Aegrotat Pass
If you are prevented by illness, injury or a serious crisis from attending an examination,
or another compulsory assessment element that occurs at a fixed time and place, you
may apply for an aegrotat consideration.

To qualify for an aegrotat pass on the final examination, you must have attempted at
least 40% of the total formal assessment and your performance must be well above
the minimum pass standard, so that the examiners can be confident that you would
have passed the paper if you had completed the missing assessment. You must apply
on the form available from the Examinations Office, the Student Health Service or the
Student Counselling Service.


Conditions for Impaired Performance
If you consider that your performance in, or preparation for, an examination, or another
compulsory assessment element that occurs at a fixed time and place, has been
seriously impaired by illness, injury or a serious crisis, you may apply for an impaired
performance consideration.       You must apply on the form available from the
Examinations Office, the Student Health Service or the Student Counselling Service.


Plagiarism
Massey University, College of Sciences, has taken a firm stance on plagiarism and any
form of cheating. Plagiarism is the copying or paraphrasing of another person’s work,
whether published or unpublished, without clearly acknowledging it. It includes copying
the work of other students. Plagiarism will be penalised; it is likely to lead to loss of
marks for that item of assessment and may lead to an automatic failing grade for the
paper and/or exclusion from enrolment at the University.


Grievance Procedures
A student who claims that he/she has sustained academic disadvantage as a result of
the actions of a University staff member should use the University Grievance
Procedures. Students, whenever practicable, should in the first instance approach the
University staff member concerned. If the grievance is unresolved with the staff
member concerned, the student should then contact the College of Sciences office on
his/her campus for further information on the procedures, or read the procedures in the
University Calendar.




22                                                                             26/02/2010
     227.502 – VETERINARY PUBLIC HEALTH, FOOD SAFETY &
                    QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Credits value:    15                                  Semester:     Double


Campus:           Manawatu                           Mode:          nternal


Calendar Prescription:
The principles and practical applications of veterinary public health, meat hygiene and
quality assurance programmes. Veterinary aspects of the quality assurance of foods of
animal origin to meet national and international standards. The application of quality
management to veterinary professional activities. Control of residues, zoonoses and
food-transmitted diseases. Practical experience of food industries obtained through
placements for work in an abattoir.


Pre- and Co-requisites
Enrolment in this paper requires prior passing of all papers in BVSc4, under the
conditions as specified in the BVSc regularions (see Massey University Calendar 2010)


E-Learning Category
Web-enhanced


Paper Coordinator
Debbie Prattley, Lecturer in Veterinary Public Health, IVABS.
Office: Hopkirk Institute, 2.30
Email: D.J.Prattley@massey.ac.nzPhone: extn 81186


Other Contributing Staff
Professor Nigel French, Professor of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, IVABS.
Extn 81188
Dr Garry Udy, New Zealand Food Safety Authority, Verification Agency
Guest lecturers from NZFSA and other organisations
EpiCentre staff


Aims
 • To integrate information presented in all BVSc papers that is relevant to
     veterinary activities that contribute to public health.

 •    To understand the epidemiology and ecology of zoonotic and foodborne
      pathogens in the context of risk management of these agents in New Zealand.

 •    To understand the principles underpinning veterinary involvement in assuring
      food quality and safety, including meat hygiene and inspection, and quality
      assurance responsibilities of veterinarians from ‘farm to plate’.




26/02/2010                                                                          23
 •   To have detailed understanding of public health and societal issues related to
     animal agriculture and their impact on industry and trade.


Learning Outcomes:
Each student having completed this paper should have a clear understanding of:

1. The range of roles and responsibilities of veterinarians pertaining to public health.

2. Epidemiological and ecological principles relevant to veterinary public health.

3. Important zoonotic diseases in New Zealand and internationally, including
   emerging diseases.

4. Major microbial, chemical and physical hazards associated with animal products.
   National and international regulatory approaches to controlling foodborne hazards.
   Factors affecting meat quality and meat hygiene.

5. Animal welfare aspects related to animal transport, lairage and slaughter
   procedures.


Alignment of Assessment to Learning outcomes

Assessment                      Learning Outcomes             Contribution to Paper
Description                          Assessed                         Mark
Assessment                   1.   2.    3.    4.  5.
VPH Portfolio                                                           25%
PUH roster assignment                                                   15%
Mid-year exam                                                           20%
Final exam                                                              40%


Assessments and Deadlines

Assessment                 Due Date / Deadline        Late Penalty          Paper
                                                                          completion
                                                                         requirement
VPH portfolio              30 April 2010               5% per day            Yes
PUH roster assignment      28 May 2010                 5% per day            Yes
Case reports x3            29 October 2010                                   Yes

The turnaround time for assignments will be no more than three weeks from the due
date. It is important to note that the specified timeframe applies only to those
assignments submitted by the due date, and does not necessarily apply to those
submitted late. Work that is handed in later than 5 days after the due date will not be
marked.




24                                                                              26/02/2010
Additional Requirements for Paper Completion
1. A mark of 50% must be gained in the final examination, plus 50% in the overall
   paper in order to successfully complete the paper.

2. The Veterinary Public Health practical roster must be completed, including the PUH
   roster assignment.

3. You must complete three reports on cases you have seen in your clinical rosters,
   one EACH for companion animal, production animal and equine cases.
   Instructions are given in Appendix A. Reports may be handed in at any time
   throughout the year, but the due date for completion of all case reports is
   Friday 29 October 2010.


Student Time Budget:
A 15 credit paper equates to 12.5 hours per week, studying 4 papers full time equals
50 hours per week.

1.   Formal contact time
     Lectures                                35 hours
     Field experience                        24 hours
     Discussion groups/presentations         38 hours

2.   Independent study
     Assignments                             30 hours
     Seminar preparation                     10 hours
     General study                           50.5 hours

     Total                                   187.5 hours


Textbook and Other Recommended Reading, Online Resources
Zoonoses in New Zealand. C.R. Wilks and M.W. Humble, Veterinary Continuing
Education Publication No. 178, Second Edition 1997. This is available from Vetlearn,
cost is approximately $15. Alternatively it can be accessed free of charge from
SciQuest.


Conditions for Aegrotat Pass and Impaired Performance
If you are prevented by illness, injury or serious crisis from attending an examination
(or completing an element of assessment by the due date), or if you consider that your
performance has been seriously impaired by such circumstances, you may apply for
aegrotat or impaired performance consideration. You must apply on the form available
from the Examinations Office, the Student Health Service or the Student Counseling
Service.

To qualify for an aegrotat pass on the final examination, you must have attempted at
least 40% of the total formal assessment and your performance must be well above the
minimum pass standard, so that the examiners can be confident that you would have
passed the paper if you had completed the final examination. You may also apply for
aegrotat consideration for other compulsory assessment elements (such as Semester
Tests) that occur at a fixed time and place if you are prevented by illness, injury or a
serious crisis from attending.




26/02/2010                                                                           25
Plagiarism:
Massey University, College of Sciences, has taken a firm stance on plagiarism and any
form of cheating. Plagiarism is the copying or paraphrasing of another person’s work,
whether published or unpublished, without clearly acknowledging it. It includes copying
the work of other students. Plagiarism will be penalized; it is likely to lead to loss of
marks for that item of assessment and may lead to an automatic failing grade for the
paper and/or exclusion from reenrollment at the University.


Grievance Procedures
A student who claims that he/she has sustained academic disadvantage as a result of
the actions of a University staff member should use the University Grievance
Procedures. Students, whenever practicable, should in the first instance approach the
University staff member concerned. If the grievance is unresolved with the staff
member concerned, the student should then contact the College of Sciences office on
his/her campus for further information on the procedures, or read the procedures in the
University Calendar.


APPENDIX A
Lecture Outline and Teaching Schedule

An introductory lecture will be given at 8.30am, Monday 8 February 2010 in ICLT. It is
very important that you attend this lecture as you will receive information about your
Veterinary Public Health rosters, the composite roster and other course components at
this time. During the weeks of 8 and 15 February you will be in lectures and tutorials
between 8a.m. and 5p.m. daily. A detailed timetable will be given to you at the
introductory lecture.


Format for case reports
You must complete three reports on cases you have seen in your clinical rosters, one
EACH for companion animal, production animal and equine cases. Each report must
discuss the veterinary public health aspects of the case (see outline below). The
reports should be approximately one A4 page in length and must be completed to a
satisfactory standard. Sub-standard reports will be returned to you for revision and re-
submission. Reports may be handed in at any time throughout the year, but the due
date for completion of all case reports is Friday 29 October 2010. You can use
cases that you have written up for other rosters but you will need to change the focus
of your report to reflect the veterinary public health aspects.

Make sure that your name and student ID number are included on each report. Reports
should have a cover sheet attached and be put into the assignments box.

Be aware that you are REQUIRED to submit these cases and as such you will not be
eligible to complete the course and graduate until they have been completed to an
acceptable standard and marked.

See over for example.




26                                                                             26/02/2010
Name/ID: e.g. Fluffy; Dairy herd                     Date: 29 February 2010

Clinic: Dr Doolittle’s                               Veterinarian: J. Herriot

Identity (patient (type, breed, age, sex), farm type etc): e.g. 10yo male neutered
Doberman;
300-cow Friesian dairy herd

History: Brief description, e.g. diarrhoea of 3 days duration

Aspects of patient history alerting you to potential VPH risks: Differential
diagnoses for diarrhoea include potentially zoonotic pathogens

Physical findings: Brief description

Aspects of physical exam alerting you to potential VPH risks: Diarrhoea with
potentially zoonotic
cause and skin disease that is possibly ringworm, which is also zoonotic

Differential diagnoses: Give your 3 most likely differential diagnoses

Diagnostic tests/procedures: Brief description

Diagnosis and prognosis: Nutritional diarrhoea and ringworm. Good prognosis with
appropriate treatment.

Aspects of diagnosis alerting you to potential VPH risks: Brief description

Animal treatment, as planned, recommended and/or instigated: Brief description.

Management of VPH aspects of case (include treatment of the animal, advice
given to owner, actions taken by you etc): This is most important! Don’t leave this
part out. Note the emphasis on VPH aspects.

Reflection upon the case. What have you learned from this case with respect
to veterinary public health?




26/02/2010                                                                            27
                    227.503 – VETERINARY CLINICS

Credits Value:          96                      Semester:     Double


Campus:                 Turitea                 Mode:         Internal


E-learning Category
Web enhanced.


Paper Co-ordinator
T.J. Parkinson
Room 1.59 Vet Clinic; Ext 7883, E-mail: T.J.Parkinson@massey.ac.nz

Other Contributing Staff:

Name                              Leader of    Contributes to
Danielle Aberdein                              NEC1, NEC2
Mike Archer                                    EQM1, EQM2, EQT3
Ros Carslake                                   SAHT, SAH, STSAC
Jennifer Burke                                 FSC/AHE, AHES, FSCS
Harry Carslake                                 EQM1, EQM2, EQT3
Marcia Clarke                                  ANA
Nick Cave                                      SAHT, SAH, STSAC
Paul Chambers                                  COM1, COM2, ANA, AN2
Mark Collett                                   NEC1, NEC2
Angus Fechney                     SAH, SAHT    SAHT, SAH
Pania Flint                                    AHE, AHES
Deb Prattley                      PUH          PUH, COM1
Brett Gartrell                    WLD          WLD
Alex Grinberg                                  COM1, COM2
Angela Hartman                                 IMA, IMAT
Cord Heuer                                     COM1, COM2, PUH
Kate Hill                                      SAHT, SAH, STSAC
Simone Hoskin                                  AHE, AHES
Eloise Jillings                                NEC1, NEC2, COM1, COM2
Alastair Johnstone                             NEC1, NEC2
Paul Kenyon                                    SBA, SBS
Richard Kuipers von Lande                      SUR
Richard Laven                                  FSC, FSCS, AHE, AHES
Kevin Lawrence                                 FSC, FSCS, AHE, AHES
Ben Leitch                                     SAHT, SAH
Joe Mayhew                        All Equine   EQM1, EQM2, EQT3, EQE, EPP,
                                               EQSI
Nicola Moffatt                                 IMA
Shasta Mendez                                  ANA
Kerri Morgan                                   WLD
Steve Morris                                   SBA, SBS
TBA                                            SAHT, SAH
John Munday                       NEC1(2)      NEC1, NEC2


28                                                                       26/02/2010
Eric Neumann                                       AHE, AHES
Jenny Nixey                                        FSC, FSCS
Mark Owen                           IMA            IMA
Kathy Parton                                       COM1
Fred Pauwels                                       EQM1, EQM2, EQT3
Debbie Pratley                                     PUH, COM1
Bill Pomroy                                        COM1
Wendi Roe                                          NEC1, NEC2
Ian Scott                                          COM1
Nicola Smith                                       ANA
Stefan Smith                                       SBA, SBS, AHE, AHES
Kevin Stafford                                     COM1
Mark Stevenson                                     COM1
Alan Thatcher                                      FSC, FSCS, AHE, AHES
Keith Thompson                                     NEC1, NEC2
Sonia Torwick                                      IMA
Vicki Walsh                         ANA,           ANA, COM2
Dave West                           SBS, SBA       SBA, SBS
Bridey White                                       WLD
Norm Williamson                                    COM 1, AHE, AHES, FSC, FSCS
Peter Wilson                        AHE(S)         AHE, AHES
Jenny Weston                        FSC(S,)        FSC, FSCS, AHE, AHES
Andrew Worth                        CVE            SAHT, SAH, CVE


Aim
To provide clinical instruction and opportunities to gain experience in the management
and prevention of disease in domestic animals.


Calendar Prescription
This course provides tuition, demonstration and clinical experience in surgery,
anaesthesia, medicine, epidemiology and theriogenology of animals; health and
management of production animals; diagnostic procedures, including imaging,
necropsies and laboratory tests; and diagnostic reasoning. Students will need to
complete all compulsory elements including external placements and will be provided
with opportunities to gain further experience in chosen areas.


Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete this paper will be able to demonstrate:

1.   (a)     Comprehensive skills in diagnosis, diagnostic reasoning and problem-
             solving at a standard appropriate for entry to practice. This includes the
             ability to recognise specific diseases and the general signs of disease in
             domestic animals and
     (b)     Skills in the cost-effective use of imaging and other aids to diagnosis;
             expertise in interpreting and reporting pathological data, (including gross
             lesions detected during necropsy and from clinical laboratory testing); the
             ability to relate these results to clinical problems.
     (c)     An ability to appropriately maintain and manage case records.




26/02/2010                                                                           29
2.   (a) Comprehensive skills in case management, including the ability to plan and
          apply appropriate therapy and management to prevention and cure disease.
     (b) The ability to correctly prescribe and dispense therapeutic agents, in
          accordance with national legislation.
     (c) Awareness of personal limitations and cognisance of when and where to
          gain assistance in handling cases including referring them as appropriate.
     (d) The ability to reflect upon their own performance as a clinician

3.   (a)   Competency in the use of local and general anaesthesia, to a standard
           appropriate for entry to practice.
     (b)   An understanding of the importance of effective control of pain; the effective
           use of appropriate methods for the management of pain.
     (c)   Appropriate management of euthanasia
     (d)   Consideration for the welfare of animals as an integral part of the
           management of disease.

4.   The ability to perform routine veterinary medical procedures to a standard of
     competence that allows them to be registered as practicing veterinarians.

5.   The ability to perform routine veterinary surgical procedures (including post-
     operative management) to a standard of competence that allows them to be
     registered as practicing veterinarians.

6.   Appropriate management of critical and intensive-care patients; the ability to
     manage veterinary emergencies.

7.   (a)   Understanding of the importance of the control of exotic diseases amongst
           domestic animals and demonstration of knowledge on how to proceed when
           one is suspected.
     (b)   Understanding of the importance of the control and prevention of endemic
           infectious diseases amongst domestic animals.
     (c)   Understanding of the inter-relationships of health and productivity in
           agricultural animals.
     (d)   The ability to give rational, cost-effective advice on appropriate management
           practices for livestock production
     (e)   A comprehensive understanding of the role of the veterinarian in biosecurity
           and food safety (including in the context of therapeutic substances)
     (f)   An understating of the importance of zoonoses in clinical practice.
     (g)   Practices that maintain the welfare of production animals as an integral part
           of livestock production systems.

8.   (a)   An ethical, professional attitude at all times to their work. This includes
           interactions with the public, clients and their animals; interactions with
           university staff, practicing veterinarians, support staff and fellow students.
     (b)   An understanding of the business and management of veterinary clinical
           practice.




30                                                                            26/02/2010
9.    (a)      A strong appreciation of the role of research in the scientific underpinning of
               the veterinary profession.

10.   (a)      The ability to undertake self-directed learning.
      (b)      That they have advanced their knowledge in a specific aspect of veterinary
               science in which they have a particular interest

                   Roster assessments    Assignments                 Learning Objectives
                                                                     assessed
 Small
 Animals
                   Primary accession                                 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7b,f, 8, 1
                   Medicine                                          1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10a
                   Surgery                                           1, 2, 3a,b, 5, 6, 8, 10a
                   Anaesthesia                                       1a,c, 2, 3, 6, 8, 10a
                   Imaging                                           1b,c, 2d, 8a, 10a
                   Track rosters                                     10b
                                         Exemplary SOAP              1c, 2a, 4
                                         Surgical case report        1c, 2a, 5
                                         Anaesthetic record          1c, 3a,b
                                         Discharge letter            2a, 8b
                                         Radiation safety quiz       OSH
                                         Imaging quiz                1b
                                         On-line hospital quiz       OSH
                   Final examination                                 1-7
 Production
 Animals
                   Farm Service                                      1, 2, 3c, 4, 6, 7, 8
                   Externship                                        1, 2, 3c, 4, 6, 7, 8, 10a
                   Animal Health                                     3c, 7, 8,
                                         Feed budge                  7c,d
                                         Paper presentation          9, 10a
                   Track rosters                                     10c
                                         Short case reports          1, 2, 7
                                         Track case journal          1, 2, 7, 10b
                                         Track exemplary case        9, 10a
                                         Deer herd profile           7 c,d
                   Final examination                                 1-7
 Equine
                   Internal roster                                   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10a
                   Externship                                        1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
                   Track rosters                                     10b
                                         Short case reports          1, 2
                                         Track exemplary case        9, 10a
                                         On-line hospital quiz       OSH
                   Final examination                                 1-7
 Pathology
                   Necropsy roster                                   1a,b, 2d, 4
                                         Paper presentation          9, 10b
                   Final examination                                 1a, b, 7a, 7f
 Other
                                         Epidemiology report         7b,c, 9
                                         Poisonous plants            1a
                                         Grand rounds presentation   9, 10a, b
                                         ESS documentation           2d
 Skills book                                                         Primarily 3, 4, 5, 6




26/02/2010                                                                                       31
Pre- and Co-Requisites
Enrolment in this paper requires prior passing of all papers in BVSc 4, under the
conditions as specified in the BVSc regulations (see Massey University Calendar
2009).


Restrictions
No restrictions.


Learning Activities
The paper will consist of:

i)    34 weeks of rosters, plus an additional 2 weeks in the mid-semester break of
      Semester 2, Year 4.

ii)   A one-week study break and two weeks of final examinations in November, 2010.




32                                                                        26/02/2010
Rosters

Arrangements for rosters:
i)   The 5th BVSc will start 23rd November 2009. Students may take any rosters that
     are offered (or obtain external placements/seeing practice) etc at any time after
     that.

ii)    Rosters will not take place during 2 weeks over Christmas, 2 weeks over Easter
       and during:

        •    2 weeks in lectures/pracs in 227.501 Veterinary Professional Studies and
             227.502 Veterinary Public Health, Food Safety & Quality Management (w/c
             8th and 15th February, 2010), plus one week abattoir placement (organised
             as part of rosters).

        •    1 week in 227.501 Veterinary Professional Studies and 227.502 Veterinary
             Public Health, Food Safety & Quality Management (w/c 31st May, 2010).

iii)   You will be required to undertake:

        •    Core rosters 20 weeks of compulsory ‘core’ rosters (227.503) at Massey
             University or in commercial practice contracted by Massey to provide clinical
             instruction (‘Externships’) between November of Year 4 and November of
             Year 5, plus one week abattoir placement (227.502):

 Wk          Roster Name                        Description Of Roster
 1              EQM2          Equine Massey 2 week block for All Students
 3          EQM1 OR EQE       Equine Externship at Massey or Matamata for all Students
 4               SAH          Small Animal Hospital -4 week block for All Students
 8             IMA/ANA        Imagining and Anaesthesia – 2 week block for all Students
 10              CVE          City Vet Externship for all Students
 11           FSC/AHE         Farms Service Clinic/Animal Health 2 week block for all
                              Students
  13            RPE           Rural Practice Externship at Te Awamutu or Morrinsville
                              for all Students
  14            Y4C           2 weeks in 2007 Mid semester break doing spring calving
                              for all Students
  16           NEC1           Necropsy Roster 1 for all Students
  17           NEC2           Necropsy Roster 2 for all Students
  18          COM1            Composite Roster 1 for all Students
  19          WSPCA           Welfare at SPCA Wellington or Auckland for all Students
  20           PUH            Meat works visits for all Students

        •    Year 4 Dairy Practice. The 2 weeks in a dairy (rural) practice (Weeks 14
             and 15) will have been undertaken during the 2nd semester mid-semester
             break in year 4 (this is part of the production animal core).

        •    Nine weeks of ‘track’ rosters.
             There are 8 tracks available:
              i. Mixed Practice
              ii. Small Animals
              iii. Production Animals
              iv. Equine
              v. Production Animal/Small Animal


26/02/2010                                                                             33
      vi. Equine/Small Animal
      vii. Production Animal/Equine
      viii. Special

     Rosters in these tracks are as follows:

                                      EQUINE TRACK
        1-3       EQT3      3 week block at Massey
        4,5       EQE       2 x 1 week Equine Externship
        6,7       EQSI      2 week block at Equine Practice in Christchurch
        8,9        ST       Any Special Topic except STSB & STEQ

                                        SMALL ANIMAL
        1-4       SAHT      4 week block at Massey
        5-6       ECC       2 week block at VSG in Auckland
         7       STSAC      1 week of Small Animal Clinic Labs compulsory
         8         ST       Special Topic except STPHM, STDHM, STSB,
         9         ST       Special Topic except STPHM, STDHM, STSB,

                               PRODUCTION ANIMAL TRACK
         1       AHES       1 week Animal Health Spring at Massey
         2       FSCST      1 week Farm Service Clinic Spring at Massey
         3       PASM       1 week Spring Medicine, Farm Service Clinic at Massey, Te
                            Awamutu, Morrinsville or Vet South Winton
         4        SBA       1 week Sheep and Beef Autumn at Massey
         5        SBS       1 week Sheep and Beef Spring at Massey
         6       STPHM      Compulsory Special Topic Applied Production Animal Health
                            & Management
         7       STDHM      Compulsory Special Topic Applied Dairy Herd Health &
                            Management
         8         ST       Any Production Animal Special Topic
         9         ST       Any Special Topic

                                       MIXED TRACK
         1       AHES       1 week Animal Health Spring at Massey
         2     EPP/SAPP/    1 week of either Equine Private Practice/Small Animal Private
                EQE/ECC     Practice/Equine at Matamata or ECC at VSG
         3       FSCST      1 week Farm Service Clinic Spring at Massey
         4        SBA       1 week Sheep and Beef Autumn at Massey
         5        SBS       1 week Sheep and Beef Spring at Massey
         6       PASM       1 week Spring Medicine, Farm Service Clinic at Massey, Te
                            Awamutu, Morrinsville or Vet South Winton
         7        STEQ      Equine Special Topic
         8       STSAM      Small Animal Special Topic
         9         ST       Any Special Topic

                              PRODUCTION ANIMAL/EQUINE
         1       AHES       1 week Animal Health Spring at Massey
         2     EPP/SAPP/    1 week of either Equine Private Practice/Small Animal Private
                EQE/ECC     Practice/Equine at Matamata or ECC at VSG
         3       FSCST      1 week Farm Service Clinic Spring at Massey
         4        SBA       1 week Sheep and Beef Autumn at Massey
         5        SBS       1 week Sheep and Beef Spring at Massey
         6       PASM       1 week Spring Medicine, Farm Service Clinic at Massey, Te
                            Awamutu, Morrinsville or Vet South Winton
         7        STEQ      Equine Special Topic
         8       STSAM      Small Animal Special Topic
         9         ST       Any Special Topic



34                                                                          26/02/2010
                                 PRODUCTION ANIMAL/SMALL ANIMAL
               1       AHES       1 week Animal Health Spring at Massey
               2       FSCST      1 week Farm Service Clinic Spring at Massey
               3        SBA       1 week Sheep and Beef Autumn at Massey
               4        SBS       1 week Sheep and Beef Spring at Massey
               5       PASM       1 week Spring Medicine, Farm Service Clinic at Massey, Te
                                  Awamutu, Morrinsville or Vet South Winton
               6       ECCMT      Externship at VSG
               7        SAPP      Small Animal Private Practice
               8       STSAM      Small Animal Special Topic
               9         ST       Any Special Topic

                                         EQUINE/SMALL ANIMAL
              1-4      SAHT        4 week block at Massey
               5       EQE         Equine Externship at Matamata
               6     EQM1/EPP      1 Week Equine at Massey or Equine Private Practice of your
                                   choice
               7        STEQ       Equine Special Topic
               8         ST        Special Topic except STSB,
               9         ST        Special Topic except STSB,

                                            SPECIAL TRACK
              1-10                 By Arrangement


Special track
It is recognised that some students’ preferences will not fit into the above categories.
Individual students are therefore allowed to negotiate a programme of study. In
particular, students who wish to follow a zoo/wildlife option are encouraged to present a
plan for their rosters over the year. They will normally be expected to undertake
additional rosters, externships and/or special topics in the small anima/production
animal/equine areas, as well as in the zoo/wildlife area.

Students who wish to follow a research track may also negotiate a programme of
study. This may include the 9 weeks of track, or may extend into additional option
weeks. Students wishing to follow a research track are encouraged to identify and
discuss their interests with potential supervisors as early as possible.

It should be noted that students need have a strong academic record to cope with the
rigours of a special track. THERFORE, you must have at least a B+ GPA to be
considered for a special track.


Seven weeks of OWN (Extramural Study)
• During these 7 weeks, you are expected to spend time in commercial veterinary
   practices, either in New Zealand or overseas. You are limited to 2 weeks in any
   one practice/placement, except with specific permission (Paper Coordinator or
   Undergraduate Administrator (Sharon)).
• You may choose additional work in the Farm Service Clinic or the Wildlife Ward in
   lieu of up to 2 weeks of OWN.




26/02/2010                                                                              35
Placement in Teaching Institutions outside Massey University
As part of your OWNS weeks or as part of a special track, you may negotiate to have
placements in overseas veterinary teaching hospitals, or other training institutions,
recognised. Such placements will require prior approval.

No externships/OWNS can be changed once the placement confirmation form
has been submitted to the undergraduate office without Tim’s approval and
Sharon being notified before you make contact with the school or practice to
advise them of the change. Making changes without prior approval will result in
the externship/OWN not being counted and you will have to repeat another in
order to graduate.


Special Topics
All students are required to do two special topics (three for production animal trackers).
These are selected prior to the start of the academic year.

Special topics available in 2010 are:

     9-Aug    30-Aug        7-Jun        10-May        7-Jun         5-Jul       21-Jun
                                                                                 16-Aug
 STSAM         STCP         STIMA        STPHM         STDR        STSOU         STEQ

 28-Jun       20-Sep        13-Sep       19-Jul       13-Sep      27-Sep         12-Jul
 STAMS        STBEH          STSB        STID         STHM         STBUS         STGS

 23-Aug       18-May
STAQUA        STDHM

STSAM: Small animal medicine                  STAMS: Avian medicine and surgery
SPCP: Clinical pathology                      STBEH: Animal behaviour
STIMA: Imaging                                STSB: Sheep and beef (field trip)
STPHM: Applied Production Animal              STID: Intensive dairy management
Health & Management
STDR: Deer                                    STHM: Holistic medicine
STSOU: Field trip to Southland dairies        STBUS: Business and practice
                                              management
STEQ: Equine                                  STAQUA: Aquaculture
STGS: Field trip to Waikato dairies           STDHM: Applied Dairy Herd Health &
                                              Management




36                                                                             26/02/2010
Assessment

There are four components to the assessment of this paper:

1)   Continuous assessment during Rosters. All rosters are assessed (including
     externships and OWN weeks: some are for formative feedback).

2)   Final examinations in each of the main groups of domestic species.

3)   Portfolio, case reports and assignments.


1)    Continuous assessment

      In each roster you will be assessed on a variety of competencies, under five
      headings:

        •    professional attitude
        •    clinical ability
        •    knowledge
        •    communication
        •    specific technical (‘mastery’) skills

      Each will be assessed on a 4 point scale (excellent, good, marginal, fail).
      Mastery skills will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

      Note that the grade you are awarded for the Roster is not necessarily the sum of
      the grades for the individual component: if you are regarded as being deficient in
      a critical area of the roster, you can be awarded a marginal or fail grade despite
      having passed the other components.

      Roster assessments are designed to assist in the development of your skills in
      the following areas:

     i)      technical, clinical and problem-solving
     ii)     client communication and interpersonal interactions
     iii)    ethical behaviour
     iv)     health and safety.

      and to summatively assess your performance in the discipline. Please be aware
      that attention to Health and Safety guidelines and helping to maintain a safe and
      tidy environment in which to work are required to score highly in all categories.


      General Criteria for Assessment
      Each roster has different components to the evaluation, which are discipline-
      based. Thus, for example, in Imaging, you have to be able to take and interpret
      radiographs and in Animal Health you have to provide accurate animal husbandry
      advice to a farmer. In Necropsy, they will relate to your ability to perform and
      interpret a post mortem examination. General criteria for assessment for each of
      the areas are given over the page (but detailed components vary from roster to
      roster).




26/02/2010                                                                           37
     Criterion             Excellent              Good                   Marginal              Fail
     Professional attitude
     Professional          Very mature clinical   Interest is clearly    Sometimes late;       Late; lacks interest;
     judgement and         demeanour;             shown; knows           Poor personal         unacceptable
     development           responsible and        limits; responsible    presentation;         personal
                           reliable               and reliable;          and/or poor case      presentation. Case
                                                  acceptable case        management;           management
                                                  management             and/or                jeopardises animal
                                                                         compromises           welfare
                                                                         animal welfare
     Assigned tasks        Displays initiative    Always competes        Inconsistent effort   Unreliable
                           but knows limits       assigned tasks         does not always
                                                                         complete assigned
                                                                         tasks
     Participation in      Very good team         Good team              Interest is           Disinterested, does
     rosters               member, above          member,                inconsistent,         not participate in
                           average interest,      dependable,            minimal               discussion,
                           consistently           interested,            participation in      unavailable when
                           dependable             communicative,         discussion,           needed
                                                  available when         inconsistently
                                                  needed                 available
     Clinical skills
     History               Thorough,              Thorough and           Important             Generally
                           complete and well-     complete               information often     incomplete;
                           organised                                     not included;         disorganized;
                                                                         symptoms not          important
                                                                         elicited              information missing
     Physical              Accurate (including    Accurate               Tendency to be        Incomplete;
     examination           subtle changes)                               superficial; lapses   superficial; cursory
                                                                         in sequence, major    or inaccurate;
                                                                         findings missed       major findings
                                                                                               missed
     Technical ability     Outstanding            Proficient; pays       Minor deficiencies    Generally careless
                                                  attention to patient   in technical skills   or inept
                                                  comfort
     Animal handling       Empathetic and         Handles animals        Animal handling       Unacceptable
                           skilful                correctly, with due    poor
                                                  regard to their
                                                  welfare
     Knowledge
     Knowledge             Outstanding            Displays a good        Minimal level of      Knowledge is very
                           knowledge;             grasp of the           knowledge;            limited.
                           exceptional            discipline, a aolid    inaccuracies and/or
                           understanding;         fund of knowledge      serious gaps in
                           very current                                  knowledge are
                                                                         evident
     Use of knowledge      Outstanding            History and            Difficulty in         Consistently unable
                           integration of         physical               developing            to develop a
                           clinical               examination are        differential          differential
                           presentation with      integrated to arrive   diagnosis and plan    diagnosis or plan
                           theoretical            at a satisfactory
                           knowledge              differential
                                                  diagnosis and plan
     Self-directed         Excellent use of       Uses resources for     Inconsistent effort   Consistently poor
     learning              resources for SDL      SDL appropriately      in SDL                effort in SDL
     Communication
     Client skills         Excellent rapport      Establishes trust      Has difficulty in     Poor
                           and communication      and effective          developing            communication
                           of medical             relationships with     effective             with clients; lacking
                           information to         clients                relationships with    respect, empathy
                           clients                                       clients               and integrity
     Interaction with      Consistently           Responsible and        Does not always       Often creates
     clinicians            responsible and        reliable; gets along   work well with        friction;
                           reliable, respects     well with most         team;                 disrespectful;
                           others' opinions;      people and works       demonstrates lack     usually untidy
                           successful in          as part of a team      of sensitivity or     and/or
                           working with others                           maturity              unprofessional


     In addition, most rosters include either a test or assignment. Marks for these are
     given in the roster assessments. However, you should note that it is possible to
     be awarded a marginal or fail grade for a roster even if you pass the marked
     component.



38                                                                                                    26/02/2010
      Roster assessments and feedback
      If you are awarded a Marginal or Fail grade, you will be invited to meet with the
      Paper Coordinator and/or Roster Leader to discuss the reasons for this result.
      During the year, the Roster Leaders will meet to identify any student whose
      performance is giving cause for concern, so that counselling and remediation can
      be initiated before the student is at risk of failing.


2)    Technical skills
      There are two categories of skills in this section:

      1)     Compulsory skills (some are ‘core’ and some are ‘track’).
      2)     Skills that you need to develop, which are self-assessed as part of your
             development through the year.


      Compulsory skills
      Details of these are contained in the red ‘mastery skills’ booklet and/or in the ESS
      sheets. These lists are in two parts. The first is a list of techniques in
      which students are required to demonstrate proficiency. This is a
      course requirement for the paper, which means that you cannot graduate
      until you have met the criteria for completing these techniques, as
      described below. It is your responsibility to ensure that you carry out the
      techniques and that you get your ability assessed and signed off as and
      when you perform each technique. Clinicians cannot be expected to remember if
      you did a particular procedure some time ago… so you MUST get them signed
      off at the time.

      The second list of techniques is mostly those in which you should be
      proficient, but includes others which it would be profitable for you to have
      seen / participated in. These do not have to be signed off, but you will
      probably want to either tick them off yourself when you are confident in
      your ability, or even to get a Massey veterinarian or other practitioner to
      sign off, if you wish. These are not compulsory, but indicate the level of
      technical proficiency that you should expect to achieve before graduation.

      ALL CORE compulsory techniques (i.e. 100%) MUST BE signed off by the end
      of the last week of rosters.

      You also need to have compulsory track procedures signed off. You MUST have
      at least 85% of the procedures for your track if you are doing a Production
      Animal, Small Animal or Equine track. If you are doing a Mixed Track, you must
      have 50% of all the procedures for all of the three tracks signed off. You are also
      encouraged to get the non-compulsory “Additional Procedures” signed off, but
      these are not assessed and do not contribute to your total.

      Mastery skills can be signed off by any registered veterinarian, except where they
      are specified as “Massey Only” (which can only be signed off by Massey vets-
      including Practitioners in Residence) or as “Massey or Externship” (which can
      also be signed off by externship practices (i.e. Matamata Veterinary Services
      Equine Hospital, CentralCityVets, Animal Health Centre Morrinsville, VetEnt Te
      Awamutu, South Island Equine Externship Canterbury, Veterinary Specialists
      Group Auckland, Wellington Zoo.



26/02/2010                                                                             39
     Procedures which are signed off by vets outside Massey or its externship must
     also have their name printed and, if done overseas, must also have their
     practice stamp. This is so that we can verify that procedures have indeed been
     done: we will randomly audit 10% of books/procedures

     Completed Red Books MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 29th OCTOBER 2010.


     Development skills
     There are a large number of skills that you need to develop during your final year
     at Massey. Many of these are listed on the ESS web site.

     You will need to enter the ESS “skills” roster regularly and log your progress in
     developing these skills. This will help you to identify (a) skills that you are getting
     on well with and (b) those that you need to work on (or which you’ve never tried).
     You will be required to submit evidence of the use of this ESS roster page as part
     of your case reporting portfolio (see below).


3)   Final Examination
     There will be a final examination, which will comprise four sections, Small Animal
     Studies, Production Animal Studies, Equine Studies and Pathology.



     Small Animals:              one 3 hour computer and/or Powerpoint based
                                 examination.

     Equine:                     one 2 to 3 hour computer and/or Powerpoint based
                                 examination.

     Production Animals:         one 2-3 hour multi-station clinical examination, plus
                                 three oral examinations.

     Pathology:                  one 2 hour computer and/or Powerpoint based
                                 examination.



4)   Portfolio

     At the end of the year, you will be required to submit a portfolio of case material.

     This will include:
     1)    An exemplary SOAP, Surgical case report, Anaesthetic record and
           Discharge letter (SA rosters).
     2)    Four short farm animal case reports (see FSC roster).
     3)    Three short equine case reports (see Equine).
     4)    Your Grand Rounds presentation.
     5)    Evidence of using the ESS skills database.
     6)    Your completed ‘red book’.
     7)    An exemplary case report for your track. (SA requisite to be advised)


40                                                                               26/02/2010
Requirements to Successfully Complete the Paper

Passing and failing rosters
To pass the roster outright, you need to get an Excellent, Good or Pass grade.

If you get a Fail grade, you will need to successfully repeat the roster before you can
complete the paper.

Marginal grades are neither passes nor fails. That is to say, it is recognised that not
everyone is strong across the board, so your performance in a particular roster may not
be up to speed. Hence, a small number of Marginal grades will not affect your ability to
pass the paper.

However, a series of Marginal grades is taken seriously, as it means that your
performance has not been satisfactory across a number of rosters.

Each time you get a Marginal or Fail grade in an assessed roster (see Table), you will
be awarded ‘demerit’ points:- a little bit like with a driving licence. You can carry up to
8 demerit points, but, if you reach 9 you will be awarded a Conditional Fail of the
paper. You will be notified (at any stage of the year) if this happens. (Note that
although Failed rosters have to be repeated and successfully completed, you will still
carry the demerit points forward).

 ‘Demerit points’
 Roster                                 ESS Code    Weeks    Assessment      Marginal(Fail)
 Core
 Y4 Spring Medicine                     Y4C           2           S               1(1)
 Small Animal Medicine                  SAH           4           S               2(3)
 Imaging/Anaesthesia                    IMA/ANA       1           S               2(3)
 Equine                                 EQM2          2           S               2(3)
 Equine (externship or additional       EQE/ EQM1     1           S               1(2)
 internal)
 Farm Service Clinic/Animal Health      FSC/AHE       1           S               2(3)
 Rural Practice Externship              RPE           1           S               1(2)
 Necropsy 1                             NEC1          1            F              NA
 Necropsy 2                             NEC2          1           S               2(3)
 Composite 1                            COM1          1           NA              NA
 City Vets                              CVE
 Welfare at SPCA Wellington or          WSPCA         1           S               1(2)
 Auckland
 Abattoir                               PUH           1        227.502
 Track
 Small Animal Hospital for trackers     SAHT          2           S               3(4)
 Emergency Critical Care for trackers   ECCMT         2           S               1(2)
 Equine Track                           EQT3          3           S               2(3)
 Equine Externships                     EQE/EQSI      2           S               1(2)
 Equine at Massey                       EQM1
 Equine Private Practice                EPP           2           S               1(1)
 Small Animal Private Practice          SAPP
 Farm Service Clinic, Rural Practice    PASM          1           S               2(3)
 Externship or Vet South Winton
 (spring)
 Animal Health (spring)                 AHES          1           S               2(3)
 Farm Service Clinic Spring Tutorials   FSCST
 for trackers
 Sheep and Beef (autumn)                SBS           1           F               NA
 Sheep and Beef (spring)                SBA           1           S               2(3)
 Special Topics



26/02/2010                                                                               41
 Special Topics                         ST***              1      NA               NA
 ‘Seeing Practice’, including Wildlife ward and Wellington Zoo
                                        OWN               (7)      S              1(1)

If you receive a Conditional Fail you must:

 •    Complete all remaining rosters and the final examinations.

 •    Undertake a programme of remedial clinical education, as directed by the Paper
      Coordinator and Roster Leaders. You may be required to do this before or after
      the final examination and thus you may be required to stay on after the end of the
      standard examination period.

 •    Sit a supplementary practical/oral clinical examination at the end of your
      remedial programme. Where possible this will be fitted into the November
      examination period.


 •    Failure at this practical/oral clinical examination will mean that you have failed the
      supplementary examination of this paper.

 •    You have to pass rosters in order to pass the paper: passing the final exam but
      failing rosters will mean that you have failed the paper.


Passing and failing the final examination
You will need to pass each section (small animals, production animals, equine studies
and pathology) of the final examinations (pass mark = 50%) to pass the paper. Failure
in any of the sections will result in you failing the paper. Normally, failure in 1 or 2 of
these exams will result in you being invited to do a supplementary examination in just
those subjects, but failure in 3 or 4 will mean that you need to be reassessed in all 4
subjects.


Plagarism
Massey University, College of Sciences, has taken a firm stance on plagiarism and any
form of cheating. Plagiarism is the copying or paraphrasing of another person’s work,
whether published or unpublished, without clearly acknowledging it. It includes copying
the work of other students (current or in previous years). Plagiarism will be penalised;
it is likely to lead to loss of marks for that item of assessment and may lead to an
automatic failing grade for the paper and/or exclusion from enrolment at the University.
Software may be used to detect plagiarism in your work.




42                                                                               26/02/2010
Contributing Marks

  Final examinations: marks
                                                                                                       % of
  Subject     Component                   Material Assessed                     % subject              paper
  Small animals

                   rosters                core SAH, IMA/ANA                           50

                   final exam             core SAH, IMA/ANA                           50                 20
  Equine
                   rosters                EQM2                                        50
                                          EQE or EQM1 for core
              final exam                                                              50                 20
  Production animals
                                          core FSC/AHE, RPE, Y4
                   rosters                spring                                      35
                   steepechase                                                        25
                   oral                                                               30
                                          Epidemiology and poisonous
                   other                  plants                                      10                 20
  Pathology
                   Necropsy roster                                                    50
                   Final exam                                                         50                15
  Cases                                   Grand Rounds                                                   5
                                          Case Portfolio                                                10
  Track                                   All track rosters                                             10
                                                                                                        100


Passing and failing 227.503

                         Rosters                                               Final exams


          >9 demerits              ≤9 demerits                    Pass all sections        Fail any sections


       Conditional Fail


       Remedial rosters            Pass any Fail                    Pass exam              Supplementary
                                     rosters                                                   exam

        Supplementary
       clinical/oral exam


                         Pass supp exam                                Pass supp exam


        Fail supp exam                                                                     Fail supp exam

                                   Pass rosters                   Pass final exams

          Fail 227.503                                AND                                    Fail 227.503


                                                   Pass 227.503




26/02/2010                                                                                                     43
Contribution of roster marks
Roster grades will be converted into marks, as follows:

                     Excellent                             9.5
                     Good                                  6.5
                     Marginal (below 9 DPs)                4.5

Anyone who has already had an assessment on the old 5-point system (which
included a ‘Pass’ grade), will be awarded 5.5 marks for those grades.


Grades
The paper 227.503 will be awarded a single official grade by Massey University.

Unofficial grades for the small animal, equine, production animal and track components
of the paper will be awarded by the Paper Coordinator and communicated from the
IVABS Veterinary Programme Office.


Student Time Budget
8.00am – 5.00pm (Monday to Friday) + out-of-hours duties, as required on evenings
and weekends.

It should be noted that most of the rosters also require you to be available for out-of-
hours duties, as required by clinical staff. Details of arrangements for out-of-hours
duties are given in the descriptions of each roster.

*These are nominal time budgets. STUDENTS MUST BE AVAILABLE FOR
WHATEVER OUT-OF-HOURS DUTIES ARE REQUIRED BY ROSTER LEADERS.


Attendance:

     Attendance at all rostered practical work is required and is compulsory.
            Attendance for out-of-hours duties is also compulsory.

If for any reason you cannot attend (e.g. through illness, bereavement, etc.), you must:
     • inform the instructor in charge of the roster immediately.

If you cannot contact him/her:
     • leave a message with the clinic office or the Undergraduate Administrator
        (phone 350 5222).

If you become unwell and need to leave during a roster:
     • make sure that the member of staff who is running the roster is made aware
        that you are leaving.

These instructions are very important for the administration of impaired performance or
aegrotat applications!

If you need to be away for some other reason (e.g. international sport fixtures,
conferences, etc.), see the Roster Leader or Prof. Parkinson, who will see if your
request can be accommodated.




44                                                                             26/02/2010
Permission for absence will NOT be given for activities such as job interviews, which
should be arranged during your free time.

   Whatever the reason for absence, you will normally be required to make up the
   roster time that you have missed (even for a single day), and to complete any
   assignments or other marked material that is outstanding. This is to ensure
   that you have not missed out on important bits of the curriculum:- some tasks
   are only done once or twice during the course, so it is important that you don’t
   miss out on them. If you have a medical certificate for illness or for aegrotat
   consideration, give this to Prof. Parkinson.

   •   Alternatively, the Programme Director (Prof. Williamson) may be contacted; but
       ideally only if reasons for missing classes are very personal.

Failure to attend rosters without any good reason will be regarded as a failure to
complete the course properly. Hence, skiving off rosters will result in you either having
to repeat the roster before you can graduate, or, at worst, having to repeat the
year/withdraw from the course.


Deadlines and Penalties
See above.


Conditions for Aegrotat Pass
If you are prevented by illness, injury or a serious crisis from attending an examination,
or another compulsory assessment element that occurs at a fixed time and place, you
may apply for an aegrotat consideration.

To qualify for an aegrotat pass on the final examination, you must have attempted at
least 40% of the total formal assessment and your performance must be well above
the minimum pass standard, so that the examiners can be confident that you would
have passed the paper if you had completed the missing assessment. You must apply
on the form available from the Examinations Office, the Student Health Service or the
Student Counselling Service.


Conditions for Impaired Performance
If you consider that your performance in, or preparation for, an examination, or another
compulsory assessment element that occurs at a fixed time and place, has been
seriously impaired by illness, injury or a serious crisis, you may apply for an impaired
performance consideration.       You must apply on the form available from the
Examinations Office, the Student Health Service or the Student Counselling Service.


Student Support

Feedback and Support for Student Learning
The primary purpose of assessing rosters is to help you with your clinical development,
so each roster will provide you with the opportunity to reflect on your own abilities as
well as providing you with feedback from staff.

Rosters are the core of final year teaching; hence, staff are committed to ensuring that
you get as much as possible out of them. Ultimately, what you get from rosters is up to
you:- it is your learning opportunity, make the most of it.


26/02/2010                                                                             45
Hence, many rosters that are not summatively assessed will also provide you with
feedback.

However, the Clinical training programme assumes that students are sincerely
interested in veterinary medicine and that there is a desire to work with dedication.
You are urged to think and act as veterinarians. The staff wish you to be aware of your
limitations, but at the same time be capable of independent thought and responsible
action! Lack of initiative, inattention to schedules, absences, inappropriate dress and
perfunctory performance of assignments will not be tolerated.


Feedback will be provided through the ESS site. It will follow a general format.

1)       You complete a self-assessment on the Monday after your rotation.

2)       At the same time, you are asked to evaluate the roster. Note: clinical staff will not
         have access to the evaluation, even though you submit it on the same form.

3)       Staff will then assess you, as explained above.


Feedback aims to:

     •    be specific to the problem in hand.
     •    be based on an actual event.
     •    be focused on important issues.
     •    help you to correct a problem as soon as possible, or allows you to know that
          you are performing within or above an acceptable standard.
     •    reassure you and be supportive.
     •    be non-threatening.
     •    provide you with a mentoring system, so that you can develop your own
          strategy and style within a safe environment.

If you wish for more detailed feedback on a specific problem you have, then we
encourage you to seek further guidance from the teachers of that particular rotation.
Furthermore, if you do not understand the feedback given to you, or wish for further
clarification, then again seek the teacher involved and ask for assistance.

Note that you are expected to be capable of looking up factual knowledge you are
unsure about or which you do not know. If you need guidance on how to source
relevant information please contact the staff member concerned. But remember that
part of your training is for you is to develop independence.


Marginal or Fail Grades
If you are awarded a marginal or fail grade, you will be given a letter that invites you to
discuss your performance in the roster with your clinical teachers and, in the case of a
fail, requires you to repeat the roster.

If you are concerned at a mark or feedback that you receive in your formal roster
evaluation, or wish for further explanation of the assessment or guidance on how to
improve your performance, then contact the staff member concerned. If you are
unable to resolve difficulties in this way, see the paper coordinator, Prof. Parkinson.



46                                                                                 26/02/2010
Staff will meet on a regular basis to review students’ performance across all rosters. If
you are amassing Demerit Points, you will be given the opportunity to consider
strategies for improving your performance in rosters. The aim is to make sure that you
never get to the 9 point threshold!

An example of the form that you will receive for your assessment and your self-
assessment/evaluation form follow. These are accessed through ESS, via the IVABS
web-site (ivabs-ess.massey.ac.nz).




26/02/2010                                                                            47
Assessment Forms

NAME: ____________________________________
       BVSc V Roster Student Self-Assessment and Formative-Feedback Form

                                       ROSTER
                                       STUDENTS NAME                                                            Date:
                                       Summary of cases/procedures/investigations/tutorials etc.
 Student to complete Self Assessment




                                       Achievements




                                       Areas for Future Study




NB The following sections will not be visible to roster teachers/leaders

 An appropriate supply of                                         Strongly     Agree        Neutral      Disagree       Strongly
 relevant clinical material was                                   agree                                                 disagree
 available in this roster
 The workload was                                                 Strongly     Agree        Neutral      Disagree       Strongly
 commensurate with my clinical                                    agree                                                 disagree
 learning in this roster
 I had meaningful participation                                   Strongly     Agree        Neutral      Disagree       Strongly
 in the management of cases                                       agree                                                 disagree
 Feedback was timely and                                          Strongly     Agree        Neutral      Disagree       Strongly
 constructive                                                     agree                                                 disagree

What aspects of this roster helped your learning?


What aspects of this roster hindered your learning?


What aspects of this roster could be improved?


                                                   Clinical supervision by the teacher is of a high standard
                                             Strongly      Agree        Neutral     Disagree       Strongly     Did not teach
                                              agree                                                disagree    me in this roster
Name 1
Name 2
Name 3

Other comments

Overall rating for the roster
  Excellent              Good                                                Pass             Marginal              Poor


48                                                                                                                   26/02/2010
Grievance Procedures
A student who claims that he/she has sustained academic disadvantage as a result of
the actions of a University staff member should use the University Grievance
Procedures. Students, whenever practicable, should in the first instance approach the
University staff member concerned. If the grievance is unresolved with the staff
member concerned, the student should then contact the College of Sciences office on
his/her campus for further information on the procedures, or read the procedures in the
University Calendar.


Help

   If you are having difficulties of any kind to do with this course, please call by to
   discuss the problem and solutions with the course controller Tim Parkinson, or
   with the appropriate Roster Leader, with the Programme Director or any other
   member of staff in whom you can confide. Don’t leave the problem unresolved
   - ask for discussion earlier rather than later. Use the Student Counselling
   Service if appropriate.


Dress

Clean protective clothing is essential at all times when working with animals in the
clinics and hospitals. Covered in footwear is required to be worn in the IVABS building
at all times.

For the Small Animal Hospital a clean white coat, in a good state of repair, and
stethoscope are necessary. It’s a good idea to bring a spare clean white coat to work,
in case the one you are wearing becomes heavily soiled. For surgeries, dress that you
should have acquired for practical surgery classes in earlier years is necessary.

It is strongly recommended that you keep spare clean clothing available.

On Farm and equine rosters (including Sheep + Beef, Animal Health and Farm Service
Clinic) and for practicals to the Large Animal Teaching Unit clean coveralls (you are
advised to have two pairs available at Massey) and protective footwear are required, as
well as a stethoscope, thermometer and a notebook + pen. Bring appropriate warm
clothing and wet weather protection on rainy days. You will often need to bring a
packed lunch, especially in the spring. There is often limited room available in the
vehicles so minimise what personal effects you bring with you, particularly while on
Farm Service calls.


Name Badges

NAME BADGES MUST BE WORN DURING HOSPITAL-BASED CLINIC PERIODS.

When on farms, labelling of overalls with first and family names, using a paint-
pen, is preferred to wearing badges.




26/02/2010                                                                                49
Smoking

         Smoking is prohibited in the hospitals, surgeries, vehicles, at LATU
         and on farms.


Professional Conduct
During your final year, you will be expected to develop the skills and habits of a
professional person. The following notes are prepared to help you develop clinical
habits which will serve you well all of your professional life.

Tact, patience and compassion are necessary for a sound veterinarian/client
relationship and for relationships with fellow veterinarians and people in allied
professions.

Students should note carefully that the relationship between a veterinarian and a
client is a confidential relationship and considerable discretion must be exercised in
discussing cases with people outside the roster group. Students must respect this
client confidentiality, and not release information on cases that they see.

Clients allow you to participate in the examination and treatment of their animals as
part of your education.

Therefore:

     •    Do not belittle clients’ views.
     •    Do not criticise clients’ actions. If criticism is needed this must be
          handled by the veterinarian in charge.
     •    Remember that, even though you are final year veterinary students, many
          clients, particularly farmers, know more about their subject than you do.
          Therefore it is better to listen than to talk, and to observe than to jump to
          conclusions.
     •    Do not ‘muscle’ clients out of the way (it is their animal).
     •    Do not muck around in the presence of clients. They are not amused by
          student humour and not impressed by puerile behaviour.




50                                                                                 26/02/2010
OWN (Extramural) Placements

The Aim of OWN placements (veterinary practical work) is to provide you with
experience of veterinary practice. At the end of your OWNS, you should have
achieved the following Learning Outcomes:

1) Demonstrate an appreciation of the business and management of the veterinary
   practice, including:

         how the services are marketed
         how the practices deal with client enquiries
         how after-hour services are provided
         how new clients and drug representatives are dealt with
         how drugs are ordered and dispensed.

2) Have developed your skills in dealing with the public and clients, including how you,
   as a professional person, should interact with clients.

3) Have developed and improved your technical and clinical skills (particularly
   conducting clinical examinations, reaching diagnoses, instigating appropriate
   therapy, giving advice, managing emergencies).


Minimum requirements for Veterinary Practical Work
You are required to undertake:

 •   6 weeks of Veterinary Practical Work during Years 3 and 4 (this is required by
     Regulation 10 of the BVSc Massey calendar).
 •   2 weeks in a dairy practice during the spring-calving period of Year 4 (Y4C
     roster).
 •   7 weeks of OWNS during Year 5.

You are, of course, both welcome and encouraged to do more than the minimum.
Feedback from veterinarians and new graduates make it clear that the more time they
spent in practices whilst students the better prepared they felt for starting work as a
veterinarian.


Credit for OWN placements
Conditions for OWNS to be counted towards the 7 weeks required are as for ‘seeing
practice’ earlier in the programme.

You may normally only do a maximum of TWO weeks in any one practice, unless
specifically agreed in advance.


Contact with the practice
It is up to you to make arrangements and/or to obtain Paper Co-ordinators agreement
for OWN placements.

Once you have done so, you must register to attend at the Veterinary Practice through
the Undergraduate Office, at least 2 weeks prior to commencement of the placement.




26/02/2010                                                                           51
You will receive packs which will have:

     o   An introduction letter to the Veterinarian (in a sealed envelope).
     o   Assessment form which you are to complete before handing to the Veterinarian
         on your last day.
     o   A Freepost envelope which is also to be handed to the Veterinarian.

You may ask the Veterinarian to complete the assessment form and place in the
supplied envelope on your last day to ensure that the assessment is done and bring
back with you to Massey when you return or post it yourself.

NOTE. You are required to lodge completed details of your OWN placement with
the Undergraduate Office AT LEAST 2 weeks before going there. Failure to do
so, or submission of incomplete forms will result in the placement not being
credited.

You are also responsible for ensuring that the supervising veterinarian returns
the assessment forms to Massey.

Requirements
 • All work must be supervised by a veterinary surgeon who is registered in the local
    territory (e.g. in NZ the vet must be registered with the VCNZ, in the UK the vet
    must be registered with the RCVS, etc).
 • Minimum experience is at least one week in each practice, attending for full days,
    and for the dates indicated on the practice certificate. You must complete at least
    five days to give credit for a week. If the 5th day is a public holiday, you are
    expected to make up time (e.g. by weekend duties, additional days etc) to make it
    up to a minimum equivalent of 5 days. Note, however, that you are ALWAYS
    expected to be available for out-of-hours duties, weekend surgeries, emergency
    work etc., according to the normal working schedule of the practice.
 • Supervising veterinarians will be asked to assess your performance. Note that
    OWN rosters contribute to your overall assessment for 227.503.
 • OWN placements should normally be in commercial clinical practices. However,
    placements may be allowed in zoos, animal charities, overseas veterinary
    teaching hospitals, etc, provided (a) you are under the direct supervision of a
    registered veterinarian and (b) you have discussed the placement with the Paper
    Co-ordinator, who agreed that the placement will be accepted as OWN.
 • Up to one week of Farm Service Clinic or CityVets (i.e. extra weeks beyond those
    which are compulsory) may be accepted as OWN. Again, this will need the
    agreement of the Roster Leader.


Legal Aspects
When a veterinary student is engaged in veterinary practical work in New Zealand, the
supervising veterinarian is responsible and legally liable for your actions. (For a copy
of the Insurance coverage for Vet students working engaged in veterinary work
experience overseas and requested by the practice to have indemnity insurance cover,
please refer contact to the Practical Work Office for more information.)




52                                                                            26/02/2010
Expectations

Courtesy and Goodwill
Remember at all times that extramural experience is provided through the courtesy and
goodwill of veterinarians. Your actions or inaction could jeopardise this relationship for
future veterinary students.

When you are on an external placement, you are representing Massey University as
well as yourself, so a high standard of professional behaviour is expected.

Remember that external placements can be a valuable time to assist you with future
job opportunities.


Good Practice
 • Make contact with the practice principal well in advance.
  •   Check with the practice principal a week before you attend.
  •   Be punctual and reliable.
  •   Participate actively and with enthusiasm.
  •   Be courteous and polite to both staff and clients at all times.
  •   Maintain client confidentiality.
  •   Discuss cases with veterinarians privately (i.e. not in front of clients) unless
      specifically invited to comment. NEVER criticise a veterinarian’s decisions in
      front of a client.
  •   Maintain an acceptable standard of dress. This is usually ‘smart       casual’, but
      some practices require more formal attire. Jeans, shorts and           jandals are
      generally unacceptable. You will normally be expected to provide       appropriate,
      clean, protective clothing (including weatherproof garments for farm   animal (etc)
      work).




26/02/2010                                                                             53
Special Topics

STSAM: Small Animal Medicine
This course will be taught by Drs Pru Galloway and Liz Norman both of whom are
adjunct Massey University lecturers. Dr Galloway is the Hill’s Pet Nutrition adjunct
lecturer in feline medicine and she runs a feline referral service, ‘Catmed’ in Lower
Hutt. Pru is a registered Specialist in Feline Medicine and has received training at the
University of Bristol. Dr Norman, a Sydney graduate, received her small animal
medicine training at Glasgow Veterinary School and is a member of the Australian
College of Veterinary Scientists. Pru and Liz have put together an excellent array of
clinical cases upon which their teaching will be based. The course will consist of three
full days of case-based learning, interspersed with concise “wet labs” and/or slide
presentations relevant to the cases under discussion. At times, the class will be
divided into smaller groups for problem-solving sessions. Expect to be challenged and
asked to contribute your thoughts. This course is proudly sponsored by Hill’s Pet
Nutrition.

Participating Staff – Liz Norman, Pru Galloway


STCP: Clinical pathology
The special topic in veterinary clinical pathology builds on the core (227.401) clinical
pathology course and allows selected topics to be explored in greater depth and
breadth. The format is a combination of tutorials, case discussions, practical sessions
and slide review sessions. Participants will have the opportunity to develop further
skills in practical and theoretical clinical pathology. Assessment will be based on
participation in class discussions.

Participating Staff – Sandra Forsyth, Keith Thompson, Eloise Jillings


STIMA: Imaging
The special topic in Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging builds on previous imaging
components of the course. It will allow selected topics to be explored in greater depth
and breadth. The format is a combination of tutorials and case discussions. Topics
covered will not only involve radiology, but will also include the alternative imaging
modalities of CT, MRI, and ultrasound. Participants will be expected to provide both
written and verbal radiological reports and to participate actively in case discussions.
Assessment will be based on attendance and this participation in class discussions.

Participating Staff – Mark Owen, Imaging staff


STPHM: Pastoral Management
This special topic is designed to fill in a number of the “big picture” aspects of
production animal science which underpin most of our clinical activities as farm animal
veterinarians. Its contents ranges from production systems, farm economics through to
soils, agronomy and fertilizers. There will be field trips to various farming systems and
input from experts in a wide range of disciplines. It is compulsory for Production
Animal Trackers and recommended for Mixed Trackers

Participating Staff – Dave West




54                                                                             26/02/2010
STDR: Deer
This special topic will give students opportunity for advanced practical clinical and
production medicine experience with deer. One day will involve practical procedures
such as handling, injections, sampling, liver biopsy, ultrasound scanning, intradermal
injection etc. Advanced tuition will be provided on deer herd medicine, reproduction
and production with detailed case material provided. There will be an off-campus
circuit to veterinary practices with significant deer activity, along with selected
commercial deer farms upon which students will be exposed to intensive management
systems and the broad spectrum of veterinary involvement.

Participating Staff – Peter Wilson, Pania Flint


STSOU: Dairy Field trip to Southland
Dairy farming in the South Island is considerably different to that in other parts of the
country and becomes more extreme the further south you go. This week-long special
topic which is sponsored by the Society of Dairy Cattle Vets, various Southland
practices and Venture Southland will expose keen dairy students to the different ways
of managing both dairy farms and veterinary practice through Southland winter
conditions and when dealing with large herds. The key points are the much larger herd
size and the housing systems, and how these impact on animal health issues.
Students will need to make their own way to and from the venue (Winton). The week
will consist of a mixture of farm visits to look at wintering options, as well as tutorials
from local veterinarians on managing large herds, nutrition and mastitis investigations
as well as considering aspects of veterinary business management and managing the
vet-client relationship. Assessment will be based on participation and enthusiasm as
well as a short presentation to be prepared and delivered during the week.

Participating Staff – Jenny Weston


STEQ: Equine
This course entails advanced study of equine diagnostic procedures and therapeutics,
and is modelled on a graduate veterinarian “short-course”. The subjects covered in the
course vary from year to year but will be similar to the 2006 course. Last year’s course
was comprised of upper airway endoscopy, dentistry, review of mare reproduction and
examination per rectum, podiatry, diagnostic ultrasonography, radiography and
radiological interpretation, and nasogastric intubation. The course will emphasise
supervised, ‘hands on’ experience; as well as tutorials and demonstrations.
Assessment will be by attendance and participation.

Participating Staff –Michael Archer & Equine Staff


STGS: Grass Safari
Dairy practice offers one of the main employment opportunities to veterinary graduates.
This course is kindly sponsored by the Dairy Cattle Veterinary Association and will
involve a visit to a number of leading dairy farms. Examination of herd management
and feeding strategies will be undertaken and individuals or small groups will examine
specific aspects of farm management along with leading dairy cattle veterinarians from
the Dairy Cattle Veterinary Association. Assessment will be by attendance and
participation.

Participating Staff – Tim Parkinson



26/02/2010                                                                              55
STAMS: Avian Medicine and Surgery
This topic will involve lectures, cases studies, workshops and field visits to aviaries to
give students a deeper understanding of approaching avian medical, surgical and
pathology cases seen commonly in practice. It will concentrate on birds kept as
companions and aviary species.

Participating Staff – Brett Gartrell and wildlife residents


STBEH: Animal behaviour
Behavioural problems are one of the most frequent reasons owner’s bring their pets to
small animal practitioners. Interest in the field is increasing dramatically as modern
behavioural management techniques are complemented by a growing range of
behavioural modifying drugs. In this course, a series of case records, both historical
and on-going, will be used to illustrate methodology of companion animal behavioural
medicine. Students will participate in specific training exercises. Assessment will be
based on attendance and participation.

Participating Staff – Kevin Stafford


STSB: Sheep and beef (field trip)
This course is kindly provided by the Society of Sheep and Beef Cattle Veterinarians,
NZVA. The main co-ordinators will be Dr Trevor Cook, Manawatu Veterinary Services
and Dr Paul Hughes, Taihape Veterinary Services. The course will involve visits to
high performing sheep and beef cattle farms in the Manawatu, Rangitikei and Taihape
districts to examine management, especially health management and the role of rural
veterinarians in helping farmers optimize productivity. While the details have yet to be
finalized, it is anticipated that at least one evening will be spent in a rural centre such
as Taihape, providing an opportunity to preview and review farm visits and meet
informally with veterinarians. Assessment will be by attendance and participation.

Participating Staff – Dave West


STID: Intensive Dairy Management
This course provides an introduction to intensive dairy management. The New
Zealand dairy system is primarily based on milk production from pasture; this is not the
norm in most dairy industries in the developed world. Most cattle in those countries are
housed for at least part of the year and are fed much higher levels of non-forage
systems. This course will focus on the challenges problems and benefits associated
with such systems, with emphasis on nutrition, lameness and reproduction.
Assessment will be by attendance and participation.

Participating Staff – Richard Laven


STHM: Holistic Medicine
This course provides an introduction to holistic and integrative medicine. It will outline
the principles and philosophy and introduce students to the most common modalities;
acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine, homeopathy, herbs, Bach flower
remedies nutrition and nutraceuticals. Discussion of particular diseases (cancer,
arthritis, etc) will be used to demonstrate how these modalities can be integrated into
conventional practice. An overview of ethical obligations, client/case evaluation, and
resources available will be introduced. A workshop environment will encourage


56                                                                              26/02/2010
interaction and practical sessions will enable hands-on experience. Assessment will be
by attendance and participation.

Participating Staff – Liz Thompson, Christ Ward, Viv Harris, Anne Bladcock


STBUS: Business - Becoming a great Veterinarian
From veterinary student to great veterinarian! The course provides you with some of
the fundamental building blocks required to succeed as a veterinarian from the
perspective of your work colleagues, peers and clients. Then learn from your clients’
perspective what it takes to be a great veterinarian and how this will position you as a
valued asset to your employer. This is an interactive topic; all participations will be
required to get involved, learning from your peers and yourselves.

Participating Staff – Bill Te Brake


STAQUA: Aquaculture
Selected aspects of aquatic animal health in production and non-production systems
are studied. Understanding how both the physical and biological environments affect
aquatic animals in temperate culture systems will be developed through practical work
with shellfish, salmonids, case studies and field work. Assessment will be by a single
cooperative assignment (approximately 2,000 words). The assignment will be problem
based and of an integrated style with strong relevance to New Zealand aquaculture
industries.

Participating Staff – Peter Davie


STSAMOA: Samoa
Experience the life of a volunteer veterinarian, and contribute to the health and welfare
of dogs and cats in Samoa. A unique opportunity awaits a group of adventurous and
self-motivated students who would like to take an elective in small animal
surgery/animal welfare with the Animal Protection Society based in Apia.

An NGO, the APS receives most of its funding from WSPA and IFAW and employs one
full time and many periodic volunteer veterinarians. Based on the island of Upolo they
also cover the beautiful island of Savii renowned for its unspoilt beaches and forested
areas. To make the experience more useful and to lessen the requirement for
supervision by the APS a Massey staff member will be present in Samoa for the
'elective roster experience'. Students can expect to share in the activities of the APS
over their week in Samoa.

The APS runs a small clinic at which it performs basic surgical and medical
procedures. They also run village desexing runs and the ambition is to have 2-3 of
these per week. Each visit involves travel to the site, erection of a field hospital and
desexing 30-odd village dogs. The conditions are basic, and you will experience
aspects of traditional village life and see first hand cultural differences in the
role/treatment of pet dogs. In addition the APS runs educational trips to schools and
performs house calls and cat neutering runs to local businesses.

Each student will be required to roll their sleeves up and actively help, doing whatever
is needed to help the APS during the week, including cleaning, packing instruments
and loading vehicle, anyone not prepared to muck-in need not apply. You can expect
to perform some neutering surgeries, bearing in mind that the anaesthetic regime (no


26/02/2010                                                                            57
gas) requires reasonable speed. Dog castrations are guaranteed, spays will depend
on availability and expertise demonstrated on neuters. Airfares and accommodation
must be self-funded by attending students. Massey University will not be providing
funding for this experience. Accommodation (basic) has been offered by the APS.

Participating Staff – Massey Vet


QUASI ROSTERS

EQSI
This Externship will take place at two practices in the Canterbury (Canterbury Equine
Clinic and Rangiora Veterinary Clinic). Canterbury Equine Clinic operates a primary
case accession and equine referral clinic in Christchurch. The clinic moved to
Prebbleton in 1993, and has grown from a three vet to seven vet practice during that
time. Rangiora Veterinary Clinic provides reproductive services via Dr Bruce Taylor to
a number of large studs in the region, including Nevele R Stud, and Wai Eyre Stud.
You should note the clinics are commercial operations, so whilst students are very
much welcomed and will be given as much opportunity as possible to participate in its
clinical activities, the practice’s clients and the well-being of their animals is its primary
concern. It will last for 2 weeks, and can be counted as a week of OWN or as one
special topic. Assessment will be via ESS.


VETSOUTH EXTERNSHIP
Dairy practice offers one of the main employment opportunities to veterinary graduates.
This externship is offered by Vet South and will involve a visit to their (mainly) dairy
practice in Southland, during the spring (August to September). Spring medicine, with
a lot of opportunities for gaining experience in obstetrics, will be the focus of the
externship, along with examination of herd management and feeding strategies. The
externship will be open to Mixed Production Animal trackers. It will last for 2 weeks,
and can be counted as your week of spring medicine plus a week of OWN or as one
special topic. Assessment will be via ESS.




58                                                                                 26/02/2010
Composite Roster


Roster Leader: Tim Parkinson


Other Contributing Staff
Farm Animals                     Jenny Weston
Parasitology                     Bill Pomroy
Microbiology                     Magda Dunowska
Pharmacology, toxicology         Paul Chambers, Kathy Parton
Surgery                          Andrew Worth, Richard von Kuipers
Clinical Pathology               Eloise Jillings, Keith Thompson,
Anaesthesia                      Vicki Walsh
Epidemiology                     Norm Williamson, Mark Stevenson
Public Health                    Deborah Prattley, Veterinarians from MAF FSA
Animal Behaviour, Welfare        Kevin Stafford, Rachel Stratton
Ophthalmology                    Craig Irving


Aims
 • To promote the practical application of knowledge gained previously in public
     health, pathology, clinical pathology, microbiology, pharmacology and
     parasitology.

 •   To revise and extend skills in medicine, surgery, anaesthesia and imaging.

 •   To develop skills in the cost effective use of laboratory tests and in the
     interpretation of laboratory results.


Attendance
Attendance at all roster sessions is compulsory. Any lost time must be made up before
the end of the year. In the event of absence, make sure you contact the roster leader.

Reporting locations for the Composite Roster vary with each activity (see schedule).
Starting time is 9.30am and 2.00pm unless otherwise stated.


Assessment
There is no overall assessment of the Composite roster. However, failure to attend
roster sessions (without good reason/permission) will constitute failure of the roster.

Some elements of the roster are directly assessed during the roster (and contribute to
the final examination mark for 227.503), or are assessed as part of the Skills Book.
Details of these are given elsewhere.

All of the material covered during the tutorials of the Composite roster may be
examined during the clinical steeplechase and/or orals at the end of the year.




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Roster Timetable
Composite rosters will run for 6 weeks from 20th September till the week of 25th
October.


Epidemiology Presentations
The objective of this experience is to have you evaluate a study in order to start you on
the process of critical review, a key skill that a graduate should possess. Another
objective is to provide you with constructive criticism of your small group presentation
skills.

1.   Select a veterinary epidemiological study of interest from the literature, but do
     not select a case study, i.e. NOT a study of an individual case or herd outbreak.
     Add your selected paper to the list outside Room 1.54. Choose a paper that is
     not already listed.

2.   Evaluate the paper, bearing in mind class guidelines from lectures in 4th year
     epidemiology for evaluating epidemiological literature and using the factors that
     are appropriate for the particular study that you choose.

3.   Prepare a 10 to 15 minute formal spoken presentation to critique the paper for
     the 2nd roster Composite practical session.

4.   Papers which you choose may be excellent or poor examples of epidemiological
     studies or have strong and/or weak points.

5.   Prepare a brief (1 page is fine) written critique of the paper and hand it in at the
     end of your seminar presentation.

As a part of this exercise, your presentation will be evaluated and criticism given with
regard to -

            Content
            Interest
            Presentation skills

This exercise is an opportunity for you to gain further experience in your skills of oral
presentation. It is hoped that constructive criticism may help to further develop your
skills in this area if this is needed.

In presenting material, it is useful if you speak from memory or notes rather than to
read your presentation. The use of cards or overheads may help in this. Pace the
delivery so that people can follow your points. If illustrative materials, tables or graphs
are presented, explain them by pointing to the relevant items of interest or the points
that you wish to make.

The presentation should be made with an introduction, the main body of the critical
review and a conclusion. It is valuable if the introduction briefly describes the study or
trial in the reviewed paper. In the conclusion, your opinion of the strengths and /or
weaknesses of the paper should be stated.




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65
26/02/2010




             COM1
             Mon                     Tues                       Wed                     Thurs                   Fri
             8:00   Animal           8:00    Animal             8:00    Microbiology    8:30    Ophthalmology   8:00    Public Health
                    Behaviour                Welfare/Euthanasia                                 Craig Irving            Public Health
                    Kevin Stafford           Kevin Stafford
                                     10:30   Clin Path          10:00   Pharmacology                            10.00   Clin Path
                                             Eloise Jillings            Paul Chambers                                   Eloise Jillings
             2:30   PAR/OTC          2:30    Charging out and   2:30    Antibiotics     2:00    Anaesthesia     2:00    Surgery: case-
                    dispensing               Pricing                                            Vicki Walsh             based
                    Jenny Weston                                                                                        Andrew Worth
Veterinary Diagnostic Pathology


Roster Leader: John Munday

Other Contributing Staff:
Mark Collett
Wendi Roe
Keith Thompson
Keren Dittmer
Eloise Jillings
Kelly Buckle
Bernie Vaatstra
Mike Hardcastle


Learning Outcomes
At the end of the two necropsy rotations, you should be able to:

1.   Demonstrate understanding of the relationships between pathology, clinical
     pathology and the presentation, treatment and prognosis of clinical disease.

2.   Show that you can make practical application of knowledge gained previously in
     anatomic pathology, clinical pathology, microbiology and parasitology.

3.   Perform a necropsy to a satisfactory standard. Show that you can interpret and
     describe gross lesions and relate them to clinical problems.

4.   Show that you are able to make use of scientific literature in the interpretation of
     gross pathology.

5.   Demonstrate your understanding of the cost effective use of laboratory tests, and
     show that you can interpret laboratory results.

6.   Maintain records of anatomic and clinical pathology findings to a satisfactory
     standard.


General Information
Attendance at all roster sessions is compulsory. Any lost time must be made up before
the end of the year. In the event of absence, make sure you contact either the course
coordinator or, in the case of the necropsy roster, the duty pathologist.

Students should report to the post-mortem room at 9.00am each morning. Necropsy
examinations will be performed during the morning. Tutorials are scheduled during
some of the afternoon sessions (see schedule), but in others the time is reserved for
preparation of necropsy reports, literature review of cases from the morning, or
preparation of case reports. In addition, tutorials illustrating the gross pathology of
various animal species will be made available on the CALVE site as self-study modules
for review during down-time in this or other rosters. These will be examinable at the
end of the year in either this course or the relevant clinical course.

Students involved in this roster will be required to present cases of interest at the
Friday afternoon pathology review sessions.


62                                                                              26/02/2010
There will also be tutorials and case-based material discussed in the Composite roster.
These are also part of the Veterinary Diagnostic Pathology component of the paper.
The material in these tutorials is also examinable at the end of the year.


Assessment
During necropsy rosters, students will be assessed on the basis of their performance
in:

1)     Gross post mortem technique.

2)      Professional behaviour in the necropsy roster, including attendance and
        participation in rounds and afternoon tutorials.

3)     Written reports of necropsy cases.

4)     A literature search and a presentation to the Friday pathology review session.

Grades will be: ‘excellent’, ‘good’, ‘pass’, ‘marginal’ or ‘fail’. Both assessment for
Rotation 1 (NEC1) and Rotation 2 (NEC2) will contribute to your final grade.
Additionally, a ‘fail’ assessment in the second rotation through the necropsy roster will
require the student to repeat the roster.

There will be a final practical exam at the end of the year, based on interpretation of
gross lesions, cytological preparations, blood smears and clinical pathology data.
Students are required to achieve 50% in this final examination to pass this component.




26/02/2010                                                                              63
                                                           Necropsy Roster: First Rotation (NEC1)
68




                               Monday                  Tuesday                Wednesday                  Thursday               Friday

             Morning       Necropsy cases           Necropsy cases          Necropsy cases            Necropsy cases        Necropsy cases
                         + roster introduction
             9.00-1.00



             Afternoon     Practical Clinical     Skin biopsies (Path      Diagnostic Lab visit       Necropsy report      Weekly case review
                         Pathology (PM room)           museum)                  (NZVP)              preparation and case
             1.30-4.30    K Dittmer/E Jillings         J Munday                A French                   research



                                                                   Second Rotation (NEC2)

                               Monday                  Tuesday                Wednesday                  Thursday               Friday

             Morning       Necropsy cases           Necropsy cases          Necropsy cases            Necropsy cases        Necropsy cases

             9.00-1.00



             Afternoon     Cytology/haem-        Histology and Cytology       Cytology case           Necropsy report      Weekly case review
                            atology tutorial     of skin tumours (Path           studies            preparation and case
             1.30-4.30    E Jillings/K Dittmer          museum)           K Thompson/K Dittmer           research.
                           (Path museum)                A French             (Path museum)
26/02/2010
Portfolio


At the end of the year, you will be required to submit a portfolio of case material.

This will include:
1)     An exemplary SOAP, Surgical case report, Anaesthetic record and Discharge
       letter (SA rosters).

2)     Four short farm animal case reports (see FSC roster).

3)     Three short equine case reports (see Equine).

4)     Your Grand Rounds presentation (see below).

5)     Evidence of using the ESS skills database.

6)     Your completed ‘red book’.

7)     An exemplary case report for your track (see below).

8)     Your poisonous plants collection (see below).


Exemplary Case Reports
Case reporting is a recurring theme throughout Paper 227.503, as the ability to record
clinical cases accurately and in detail is regarded as one of the key skills that you will
need to acquire during your Clinical Science studies. Full case reports are required
from all students as part of the core Production Animals curriculum, and from Equine
trackers.

Each student must write a case report, in a style suitable for publication, describing an
individual production animal or equine clinical case or herd health investigation that you
were exposed to during your 5th year. Production Animal cases may be drawn from
Massey clinics (Farm Service/Animal Health, Sheep & Beef), Rural Practice
Externship(s) or from seeing practice. Similarly, Equine cases can be sourced from
internal rosters, externships or seeing practice.

The aim of this report is for you to gain experience in critically evaluating a case you
have been exposed to, NOT to simply describe what happened and provide a literature
review on the subject. The latter approach does not provide evidence that you have
actually thought about the case! Choose the case you decide to use for your report
carefully - it does not have to be unusual but must be amenable to fitting the required
report format. This means that it will need to be a case for which you have a
reasonably complete set of information. A well written report describing a common
disease is much better than a poorly written report describing a rare or previously
unreported disease!


How to write your report
Firstly, select your topic. It should be one for which you have a reasonably complete
set of information. It should also be one that is interesting:- i.e. which has sparked your
interest and enthusiasm. If in doubt about the suitability of a case, seek advice.




26/02/2010                                                                              65
Mentoring
Production Animal Case Reports require a mentor. Equine Case Reports do not, but
you are however strongly encouraged to you seek advice of an appropriate equine
clinician (e.g. surgeon for lameness/surgery cases, internist for medicine cases etc.),
especially if you are uncertain regarding case selection or your critical evaluation of the
case. Remember that staff are busy people so if your first choice of staff member is
unable to help you ask another. Also remember that the earlier you seek help the more
likely that you will get it - i.e. don’t wait until the last moment to seek advice!

All of the Farm Animal clinicians will be acting as mentors for Production Animal Case
Reports, although each will only take on a maximum of 8 students. As a guide, ask
staff for supervision in the following areas:

Richard Laven         Cattle                  Norm Williamson        Reproduction, Dairy
Alan Thatcher         Cattle, Deer            Keith Thompson         Goats
Kevin Lawrence        Cattle,                 Kevin Stafford         Welfare, Behaviour
Jenny Weston          Cattle                  Paul Chambers          Pharmacology
Dave West             Sheep, Beef, Young      Mark Collett           Exotic diseases
                      stock,
                      Micronutrients
Stefan Smith          Sheep, Beef             Tim Parkinson          Dairy,
                                                                     Reproduction, ‘Call
                                                                     of Last Resort’
Peter Wilson          Deer                    Bill Pomory            Parasitology
Pania Flint           Deer                    Ian Scott              Parasitology


Deadlines
Register with your mentor as soon as you are able, to reduce the chances of rejection
for case overload. All production animal students must be registered with a mentor by
the end August, but most should be registered much earlier than this.

By 14th September, you must have submitted a first draft of your case report. Your
mentor will help by starting you off in the right direction and assisting you in improving
the presentation of the case. Again, it would be helpful if the majority of case reports
were to be submitted before this deadline and, preferably, during the first semester.
Please understand that writing a case report takes time and we will frequently rewrite
scientific papers many times before they are accepted for publication. Depending upon
how well you have prepared, you should anticipate that at least 2-3 rewrites will be
necessary. The final day for submission of your final report is 12th October.


Format of Report
Cases need to be written formally and in depth. They must be typewritten and must
be at least 1,500 words and never more than 2,500 words. Use the Case Reports
in the New Zealand Veterinary Journal as a general guide to style and format.
Handwritten reports will not be accepted.

Always write in the ‘scientific’ third person and in the past tense. Thus,
sentences should read ‘the cow was examined per rectum’, or ‘the cow appeared to be
dehydrated’, or ‘an incision, 15 cm long, was made in the left flank just behind, and
parallel to, the last rib’ rather than ‘I did a rectal examination on the cow’ or ‘the cow
now looked to us as if she was dehydrated’ or ‘we made an incision in the left flank of
the cow. It was about 15 cm long and we tried to get it in line with the last rib’.


66                                                                               26/02/2010
Never write in the present tense ‘the cow is now getting worse’. The only time it is valid
to write in the present tense is when you review knowledge: ‘Campylobacter fetus is a
Gram negative bacterium that inhabits the preputial cavity of the bull which, when it is
introduced to the genital tract of a cow, causes a moderate degree of metritis that
usually results in embryonic failure’.

Never write in a ‘chatty’ style: ‘we were getting really fed up that we couldn’t get the calf
out, but we thought that we’d try a bit harder for a few minutes’ and don’t try to be
funny!!!!! Academic staff are basically very boring people who don’t appreciate humour
in written work, so don’t try their patience!


Contents of the Report

The report must contain:
A title: The title page of your report must contain all of the following information:
a)     The title itself, which must reflect the content of the report.
b)     Your name and ID number.
c)     The full name and address of the veterinarian(s) with whom you saw the case.
d)     The date(s) on which you saw the case.
e)     The following signed statement - ‘I certify that I have prepared and written this
case report independently and that it is my own original work’.

An Introduction, in which the clinical problem is discussed in general terms. This may
often take the form of a brief overview of the literature on a specific disease or problem.
However, a number of other formats have been used, so look at a NZVJ for the ways in
which other people have written this section. Make it interesting and ‘punchy’, so that it
grabs your readers’ attention.


A section containing the Clinical Findings. This will detail the:

i)     History / owner’s complaint
       Provide all relevant information regarding the signalment, nature and duration of
       the presenting signs, previous therapies etc.

ii)    Initial clinical examination
       A complete record of physical findings should be included.

iii)   Additional diagnostic methods
       Describe the details of lameness examinations, laboratory tests, radiographs,
       ultrasonography, scintigraphy or other diagnostic procedures performed.

iv)    Diagnosis / confirmation of diagnosis
       List the differential diagnoses that were considered. Make a brief comment
       regarding the evidence for or against the most likely diagnoses.

v)     Treatment and response to treatment
       Treatments. Give drug name, dose, frequency and duration of treatment, and (if
       you can remember it!) the trade name and manufacturer of the drug.
       e.g. The cow/horse was given ampicillin by intramuscular injection (Ampitras
       20%, Phoenix Pharmaceutical Distributors Ltd.; 4,000 mg) daily for three days. It
       also received intramammary infusions of ampicillin (100 mg) plus dicloxacillin
       (300 mg) twice daily for three days (Diclomam MC; Ethical Agents Ltd.).


26/02/2010                                                                                67
       For surgical procedures, give as much detail as possible: method of anaesthesia
       (induction, maintenance, gasses, pre-meds, post-op’s etc.), materials and
       instruments that were used, and so forth.

vi)    Outcome
       You must show evidence of ‘follow-up’ information, obtained from the veterinarian
       or (having obtained the veterinarian’s permission) from the owner.

vii)   If appropriate, post mortem findings
       If the patient was euthanased describe the gross and histopathologic findings.

In general, you should confine this section to observations, actions and outcomes.
There is normally no scope for you to express your opinion about anything much in this
section, except for such phrases as ‘it was concluded that the animal was suffering
from BVD. Symptomatic treatment was therefore instigated, as follows…..’

Do not append actual lab test reports: instead, make proper tables out of them.
However, illustrations (colour or B+W prints, U/S prints, radiographs) are very useful.
Even so, think as if you were the editor of a journal receiving your report for publication
and ask whether your illustrations are (i) necessary and (ii) show what you want the
reader to see.

The most difficult section is usually the Discussion. Several things might go in here.
Firstly, you will probably want to discuss the progress of the case, its response to
treatment etc., in relation to previously-published reports. Secondly, you might want to
undertake a critique of the way in which the case was handled (it is OK to say that,
even for a Massey case, things might have been done differently or better. Hindsight is
an exact science!!). Thirdly, you might want to draw attention to the differential
diagnoses and/ or problems that occurred in diagnosis. Or you could talk about control
measures that you did / could have been implemented. Another possibility is to
consider wider significances of the disease:- perhaps in terms of the farm’s economics,
its importance as a zoonosis, its national significance. It is basically your opportunity to
show that you are able to think in depth about a clinical problem and that you can put
your thoughts into the context of the published literature.

This section of the report should be a real ‘discussion’ of the case, rather than
just a review of the literature! Remember the aim of this report is for you to gain
experience in critically evaluating a case, NOT to simply describe what happened
and provide a literature review on the subject. The latter approach does not
provide evidence that you have actually thought about the case.

We know that you did not control the case you observed, but the whole point of the
discussion is to compare what was done with peer reviewed, reasonably recent
references, AND to comment on what was done and why. It is not necessary to be
critical, merely to show you realise why accepted practice was not/could not be
followed. It is one of your first chances to show you recognise that a dilemma exists,
state what it is, and explain it in temperate language.

Finally, References. These reports must be referenced, so that your wild assertions
are backed up by either observational data or some-one else’s published thoughts on
the subject. References may be standard texts, like Radostis, Blood & Gay (Veterinary
Medicine) Jubb & Kennedy (Pathology of DA’s) etc., but there must be a least 6
citations of original papers (i.e. citations from journals), together with evidence that you



68                                                                                26/02/2010
have read those articles!! Do not cite lecture notes as ‘references’:- these will not be
accepted.

References must be given in the form used in NZVJ. In the text, papers by a single
author should be cited as: Williamson (1995). By two authors, as Williamson &
Vermunt (1998), or by more than two authors, as West et al. (1994).

In the reference list at the end, these must be given in full, in alphabetical order of first
author Thus, for each reference, all authors, names and initials; full title, full (i.e. not
abbreviated) journal title, volume, first and last pages must be given.

For example, a multi-author reference would look like:

West DM, Wilson PR, Williamson NB. Selenium deficiency in yearling red deer stags.
New Zealand Veterinary Journal 21, 43-50, 1994.

For a book, give the title, edition, pages, publisher, place of publication:
Noakes DE. Fertility and obstetrics in cattle. 2nd ed. pp. 1-14. Oxford, Blackwell
Science. 1997.

For a chapter in an edited book, a bit more information is needed (author, title of
chapter, editor/s of book, title of book + edition number, pages, publisher, place of
publication):
BonDurant RH. Examination of the reproductive tract of the cow and heifer. In:
Morrow DA Current therapy in theriogenology, 2nd ed. pp. 95-101. Philadelphia, W.B.
Saunders Co. 1986.




26/02/2010                                                                                69
Grand Rounds


Co-ordinator: Nick Cave

Assistant: Stuart Gordon

All students are required to give one 15 minute Grand Rounds presentation (12 minute
talk and 3 minutes for questions) that will be graded. These are held on Fridays in
ICLT from 12.30-1.30. The topic can be of your own choice. Ideally it should be on a
case/herd problem you have seen here at Massey and worked up. If you have enough
information it can be on an appropriately worked up case/herd you have been involved
in while seeing practice. If the latter, you should discuss it with a member of staff at
Massey.

The purpose of doing these presentations is for you to show your peers your level of
knowledge and in-depth understanding of a particular clinical syndrome/disease and
that you can explain it to a group of peers in an organised fashion. As part of this the
amount of content about the particular case should only consist of half the
presentation. The other half should be expanding on the aetiology, epidemiology,
pathophysiology, treatment outcomes etc of the particular disease process/syndrome
you are talking about. You should make an effort to undertake a literature search and
not just rely on text books for your content and your references should be listed on one
of the slides. You should also consult with the relevant Faculty member about the
content of your presentation before it is finalised. They should be acknowledged at the
end of your presentation.

The other benefit of these presentations is that it gives you the opportunity to develop
your public speaking skills. As a professional, you are expected to have practised your
presentation before you give it, and be prepared for questions.

In order to help you develop the skill of being concise and being able to expand on key
points, the total number of slides and overheads allowed is limited to 15. Radiographs
should be scanned or digitally photographed and then incorporated into your
presentation. For all digital photos and radiographs, the areas of interest should have
arrows or highlights to allow the audience to see what you are talking about.

The date for your presentation will be allocated at the start of the year and require prior
approval by the Undergraduate Office if you wish to change. You are required to
provide the title of your talk to the Undergrad Office by the Friday one week before it
will be presented. Title should include species, and a major problem or the disease
syndrome to be discussed. This allows other people to be informed of the Grand
Rounds topics so they can attend if they wish. It is not the Undergraduate Office’s job
to have to chase you up for this information.

You will need to provide the Undergraduate Office with your complete talk in digital
format by the Thursday morning (9am) the day before you are due to talk.

This is a great opportunity to put together all the knowledge you have gathered over
the past 4+ years of the course. See it as an opportunity to show your skills rather then
a chore to be completed.




70                                                                               26/02/2010
Poisonous Plant Collection


Each student will prepare a collection of at least 20 poisonous plants to be handed in
during the second semester (8 September). Various parts of the plants should be
collected, dried and mounted on a size A4 or larger page, so as to be able to identify
the plant. Text should be limited to: headings and a brief description of the plant which
will aid identification, a brief statement of plant distribution and where it was collected,
the animal species usually affected, a very brief statement describing the mechanism
of action of the plant toxin and expected clinical signs, post-mortem findings and
treatment. Photographs are encouraged but are not to substitute for a dried specimen.

At least 10 of the plant species must be of those that commonly cause poisoning in
grazing animals. At least 5 of the plant species should be poisonous to small animals.
At least 5 poisonous plants should be New Zealand native plants. Common garden
vegetables and fruits that have toxic parts (e.g. rhubarb, potatoes, plums) must not be
included in the collection unless there is evidence of significant poisoning of domestic
animals. Poisonous plants that are indirectly poisonous, e.g. fungal endophyte toxins,
may be included.

Organise the collection by genus and species but include common name(s).

The aim of this assignment is to help you learn to identify clinically important toxic
plants. If done well, the collection will provide a resource of great value in your
practice. To preserve the collection, it is recommended to enclose or cover each plant
with plastic to protect it from handling.

A good reference text is:

    •   Conner HE, (1977 or later edition) The Poisonous Plants in New Zealand. E.C.
        Keating, Government Printer, Wellington, New Zealand.

Or see: http://calve.massey.ac.nz/pharm/toxSite/poisonplants/index.html




26/02/2010                                                                               71
Appendix 1


                      2009 Assignment/Assessment Timetable

                                Assessment                       Submitted by
Equine – CORE                3 short equine case reports.     They should be handed in to
                                                              the Undergraduate Office
                                                              immediately after your last
                                                              week of equine rosters
                                                              (whether Massey, Matamata,
                                                              Christchurch        or     seeing
                                                              practice).
Equine – CORE               Equine Roster Quiz on             Completed prior to the start of
                            CALVE.                            your first rotation on Equine.
                                                                th
Equine – TRACKERS           You will also be required to      30      September       to    the
                            produce an exemplary case         Undergrad Office.
                            report, to a publishable
                            standard for the NZEVP.
Small Animal – CORE         An exemplary                      Submit by end of last Small
                             • SOAP,                          Animal rotation.
                             • Surgical case report,
                             • Anaesthetic record
                             • Discharge letter.
Farms Services – CORE       4 short farm animal case          Submit by end of last FSC or
                            reports.                          RPE rotation to the Undergrad
                                                              Office.
Farm       Services    –    4 Journals.                       Submit by end of last FSC or
PRODUCTION AND MIXED        1 exemplary case report.          RPE rotation to the Undergrad
TRACKERS                                                      Office.
ESS Skills database Small   Evidence of using the ESS         On-line ESS at the end of
Animal CORE & SMALL         skills database on your           each small animal rotation.
ANIMAL TRACKERS             assessment form.
Composite Roster 2          Epidemiology       Presentation   To be handed in at the end of
                            and prepare a brief written       your presentation.
                            critique of the paper.
Small Animal Roster         Purple book online quiz on        Completed before start of
                            CALVE.                            rotation.
Imagining Roster             • On-line radiation safety        • Completed before start of
                                  quiz on CALVE.                    rotation.

                             • Imagining Quiz.                 • Last day on rotation.
AHES MX & PA TRACKERS       Deer        Herd      Profile     Tuesday and Thursday of
                            presentation.                     your rotation.
                                                                             st
227.501                     Code of Professional Conduct      Submitted by 1 August 2008
                            Assignment.                       to the Undergrad Office.
                                                                              th
227.501                     Careers Assessment Task.          Submitted by 25 July 2008 to
                                                              the Undergrad Office.
                                                                 th
227.501                     Completion     of    Practice     26 September 2008 to the
                            Management Essay.                 Undergrad Office.
227.502                     Public Health Roster 3 Case       Submitted throughout the year
                                                                                 st
                            Reports.                          but by Friday 31 October
                                                              2008 to the Undergrad Office.
227.502                     Public Health WebCT Quiz.         Completed      during    your
                                                              composite roster week.
                                                                         rd
227.502                     Meat Works Project.               Tuesday 3 June 2008.




72                                                                                  26/02/2010
                                                                    st
Portfolio         Submit in folder:              Submit by Friday 31 October
                   • Equine 3 marked case        2008 to the Undergrad Office.
                     reports (CORE).
                   • Equine 1 exemplary case
                     report (TRACKERS).
                   • Small Animal exemplary
                     SOAP (CORE).
                   • Small Animal Surgical
                     case report (CORE).
                   • Anaesthetic record and
                     Discharge letter (CORE).
                   • FSC 4 short farm animal
                     case reports (CORE).
                   • FSC 1 exemplary case
                     report      (PA   &   MX
                     TRACKERS).
                   • Red Skills Book.
                   • Grand              Rounds
                     Prestentation
                                                                    st
Red Skills Book                                  Submit by Friday 31 October
                                                 2008 to the Undergrad Office.
Grand Rounds      Presentation.                  Signed off after presenting.




26/02/2010                                                                 73

				
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