Cleaning an automatic Ice Maker Food code Factsheet by bnummer

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									Retail Food Safety Consortium

2009 No. 4-602.11

Food Code Fact Sheet

Cleaning Automatic Ice Makers
[This is a template document. Feel free to use it and modify it. Change the header to include your jurisdiction or company name. We request you leave the footer that cites the Retail-Foodservice Food Safety Consortium as the source of this template.] There are several instances where cleaning your automatic ice maker is required. The first is routine sanitation. Over time mold can build up on the parts of the ice maker. Mold is not a dangerous microorganism, but it can lead to allergies and visually contaminated ice. Regular cleaning at least every six months is recommended. Another instance would be a “boil water” or “contaminated water” notice. Other sources of contamination, e.g. flood water, equipment malfunction, broken pipes, etc would also necessitate cleaning and sanitizing before returning the ice machine to use. If the ice machine has been contaminated by any means you must: (a) turn the power off or disconnect the machine from electrical power, (b) remove and discard any stored ice, (c) turn the water supply off, and (d) drain water from the machine. Only after confirming that the water contamination event (or boil water notice) is over then you must: (a) confirm the water supply is safe and (b) clean and sanitize your machine before returning it to use (directions below).

Cleaning and sanitizing procedure for a commercial ice-making machine with removable ice contact surfaces. 1. If available, follow the manufacturer’s recommended cleaning and sanitizing procedure, or 2. General cleaning instructions: a. Turn the water supply off and disconnect the unit from electrical power. b. Drain water and discard any ice inside the machine. c. Remove all ice-contact parts of the machine then, for both parts and the ice contact surfaces: · Wash in hot, soapy water, · Rinse in clean water, · Sanitize with a solution of one ounce of unscented household chlorine bleach per three gallons of water. Leave parts soak for 2 or more minutes. Spray sanitizer solution on remaining ice contact surfaces (e.g. bin) and allow to air dry.

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Retail Food Safety Consortium

2009 No. 4-602.11

· Alternatively, clean and sanitize removable parts using an automatic dish machine. Use caution with any delicate plastic parts that might melt in a hot water dish machine. d. Reassemble the unit and re-start machine. You may wish to discard the first few cycles of ice.

Cleaning and sanitizing procedure for a commercial ice-making machine with nonremovable ice contact surfaces In ice making machines from which ice contact surfaces are not readily removable, the tubing, pipe, fittings and valves are required to be arranged so cleaning and sanitizing solutions can be circulated throughout the fixed system. (NSF/ANSI Standard 12, Automatic ice making equipment, Section 5). The procedure for cleaning these machines is similar to that above, except replace section “c” to the following: a. Circulate a cleaning solution of warm soapy water for two minutes, then drain. b. Circulate clean water for two minutes, then drain. c. Circulate a bleach sanitizing solution (see above for instructions) for at least 2 minutes, then drain. d. Wash, rinse, and sanitize the ice contact surfaces (e.g. bin) using the same procedure as for ice machines with removable parts.

De-liming or removing water mineral build-up for a commercial ice-making machine Ice maker manufacturers usually supply de-liming solutions and instructions to follow to remove water mineral build-up. This procedure only needs to be applied if there is any build-up visible or based on manufacturer’s maintenance schedule. It is usually recommended to clean the unit, de-lime the unit, and then sanitize the unit before return to service. --end--

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