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Pringles Wind Turbine (Pleech) - Version One

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Pringles Wind Turbine (Pleech) - Version One
by mikejedw on May 3, 2007 Table of Contents intro: Pringles Wind Turbine (Pleech) - Version One . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 1: Collect Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 2: Cut the Pringles Can . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 3: Mark out the CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . File Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 4: Cut, Sand, and Fit the Cork Into the CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 5: Attach the Magnets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 6: Glue Can to CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 7: Tap in Dimples into the Paper-Towel Holder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 8: Wind the Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 9: Label the Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . step 10: Solder the Coils Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 3 4 4 5 6 6 6 7 9 9

step 11: Make a Base for the Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 step 12: Layout coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 step 13: A Brief Explanation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 step 14: Circuitry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 step 15: Test! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 step 16: Conclusion and a Plea For Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Related Instructables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Advertisements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Comments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

intro: Pringles Wind Turbine (Pleech) - Version One
The Pringles Wind Turbine (a.k.a. Power Leech or Pleech) is an attempt to turn simple items found at the hardware store and elsewhere into a working low-voltage power supply. The Pleech is designed to take wind or other air currents (such as from A/C ducts, dryer vents, etc.) and convert that energy into electrical energy using magnets and copper coils. It was created as part of my final project for the Design and Technology Major Studio class at Parsons The New School for Design.

step 1: Collect Materials
You will need: Pringles Can Two CDs Paper towel holder (preferably metal) 12 Aluminum bobbins (NOT steel) Magnet Wire (lots of it, the thinner the gauge the better -- try for 36 gauge) 8 strong magnets (rare earth preferred) a wine cork hot glue and these electronics: 6 schottky diodes (1N5822) Large capacitor, pref, super cap wire solder

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 2: Cut the Pringles Can
You'll need to cut the can into two halves lengthwise. Be sure to mark it carefully. Uneven halves will create an unbalanced turbine. Metal snips help -- easier than scissors, less ragged than a saw.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 3: Mark out the CDs
In order to make sure all the different parts of the turbine get put into the right place, it helps to write guides onto the CDs with a sharpie. Lucky for you, though, that you can also use the templates I made after my build was done. Just check out those PDF files. They have all you need to know for placing the can halves, magnets, coils, electronics, and they include a helpful wiring guide. If you choose to mark you own guides, I found the transparent "CD" that comes with some CD-R spindles was helpful to use as a template.

File Downloads
http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

page1.pdf (79 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'page1.pdf']

page2.pdf (211 KB) [NOTE: When saving, if you see .tmp as the file ext, rename it to 'page2.pdf']

step 4: Cut, Sand, and Fit the Cork Into the CDs
The wine cork forms the very simple axle of the turbine. I prefer this over the dowel from my first version because: a) you can make them as snug as you need to b) you don't hurt the turbine's efficiency by running a dowel through the middle of it (which, according to some of my research, knocks it down by something like eight percent) You can take an ordinary wine cork and cut it in half, then work the pieces over with a saw and some sandpaper until they fit just right into the CDs' holes. Be sure not to over cut. Cutting away the outside of the cork is a great way to save time from sanding, but don't over do it. Better too snug than too loose. When you get close to the right diameter for the cork pieces to fit into the holes of the CDs, test and sand and test again. Once the corks are the right size, pierce them with small nails. These will form a "needle bearing" on which the entire contraption will spin. Try as hard as you can to get the nails to be perpendicular to the CD and as close as possible to the dead center or it. Otherwise, you'll get wobble.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 5: Attach the Magnets
The best thing you can do here is to look at the diagram in the PDF from a few steps back. Basically, you need to attach the magnets (glue, tape, epoxy, whatever works) to the CDs in such a way that the poles alternate. A magnet that faces north follows one facing south follow one facing north, etc. If you're confused, do check the diagram. Marking the poles with a Sharpie also really helps.

step 6: Glue Can to CDs
Now you can glue the can halves to the top and base CDs. Make sure each half stays vertical--use a square if you need to. You want the turbine to be as upright as possible. It's not hard to do, but it takes a little patience and a fair amount of hot glue. Also, try to follow those templates. The Savonius turbine requires that the two halves sort of over lap. This lets the air push on both "buckets" at once. Clever, huh?

step 7: Tap in Dimples into the Paper-Towel Holder
This is the other half of the "needle bearing" I wrote about. You'd need to make this deep enough so that the turbine stays in place but not so deep or so narrow that friction becomes a real problem. Some suggestions: - with a hammer, tap each end with a small blunt nail followed by a phillips head screwdriver - don't make a hole, just a deep dent - test the mechanical action with your turbine frequently - add WD40 - adjust the height of the nails if there's not enough or too much pressure on the turbine (i.e. it keeps falling out or it's stuck and really slow) Once satisfied, glue down the corks to the CD

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 8: Wind the Coils
This part is crucial. The amount of power you generate pretty much depends on two things: the speed of the wind, and number of coils. Other factors play in, but these are the big ones. You have not control over the wind, though, so make this step count. I highly recommend using thinner gauge wire than I did. I used 28, and got decent results, but I think 36 gauge will blow the doors off of my current set up. It's all about the number of wraps. The 36 gauge stuff is harder to find, so you can make do with thicker stuff--just be aware of the cost of doing so. Here's how to go about it. - use a dowel for the big spool of wire - put bobbin on an awl, then insert the awl into variable speed drill - leave 10 - 15 cm hanging when you start. You'll need these to make connections later. - wind the first wrap slowly or by hand. If you're using thin stuff, do it by hand. - you can increase speed thereafter. Again, be gentle if you have the thin wire. - go back and forth, try not to cross, be neat. - if using thin wire, be careful: in case of breakage, use a lighter to burn off the enamel that insulates the wire tie the pieces back together tightly it doesn't hurt to check the repaired connection with multimeter - once finished, tape down the coil. - leave 10 - 15 cm on the outside, too - burn off about 1 - 2 cm worth of the enamel and the end of each coil with a lighter (just be careful with thin stuff, since it will burn up really quickly--a quick pass with the flame should suffice). Use fine sandpaper to take off anything that stays on.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 9: Label the Coils
I know, this seems kind of dumb to get its own step, but it's reaaaaalllllly important. The next few steps devolve into tangles and chaos pretty quickly, so it pays to be organized here. You're going to make three groups of four: A (red), B (blue), and C (green). Using Avery circle labels can help a lot. I found the combo of letters and color made life easier. Follow the template if you're confused about this step. P.S. (ignore the odd ordering of the "B" group in the photo. Just number them B1 through B4. I had the order the way you see it there because of a different--and less efficient--wiring method I had tried earlier. More on that later).

step 10: Solder the Coils Together
Follow the wiring diagram. Seriously. Don't even read another word of this, because it will only be confusing. Well, actually, here are some useful tips: - solder flux helps a lot. You can use a lot less solder and with a lot less hassle. - follow the diagram (bears repeating) - do one group at a time. Start with A1 to A2, A2 to A3, A3 to A4, then go to the B group - test the layout using the pattern provided. - solder a thicker wire lead to the "1" end of each group. This will lead to the rectifier. More on that soon.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 11: Make a Base for the Coils
I made my prototype out of foam core, but this will depend a lot on the size of your coils, the size of your magnets and the shape of the frame. Plus, if you're planning on keeping this outside instead of hooked up to an AC vent of whatever, keep weather proofing in mind (and while you're at it, give the Pringles can a good going over with Scotch Gard--I haven't tried it, but let me know what works for outdoor versions you make). The most important thing is to try to get the coils to be as close to the magnets without collisions. If you can position the coils on the base so they sit just 1 mm below the spinning magnets (watch out for wobble) then you're in good shape. Also, try to make the base as stable as possible. At higher RPMs, the turbine can really start to rattle a bit, so keeping things together in those conditions is crucial.

step 12: Layout coils
Once again, follow the template. This is by far the most confusing part, and I think the template should really help. Lay down one group (e.g. "A"), then another, then another. Check that the current all flows one way. That is, if you imagine an electron running through the coils, it always enters the coil from one particular side and exits from another. Just don't cross the wires over, and you should be fine. The arrows on template should help you think about how the electrons should be running through the coil wraps. Now glue those coils down. Glue 'em down good. Once that's set, solder the remaining three ends together (the ones not soldered to thick wire that should be sticking out of the "4" coils). This is the neutral point. In our circuit, you won't need to access this junction again, so you can tape it down or otherwise hide it under the coils' base, along with excess lengths of the other connections. In fact, the more you can do to tidy up stray wires, the better. A malfunctioning turbine that comes out of its divots has a nasty tendency to grab exposed wire and tear it up. Fun to watch, but hell to repair. What you should have left are the three thicker wires connected to the "1" coils on each of the groups. This will lead into the AC to DC conversion circuit.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 13: A Brief Explanation
Okay, so I haven't really gone over much in the way of what has been wired up here. What you have now is a Y circuit for a 3-phase alternating current generator. Instead of how we usually think of AC, like one big sine wave, this contraption has three waves working at three different phases at the same time. The benefit of doing it this way is that we can jam in some more coils than we would if we just did a simpler version that produced a simple AC wave. Also, this method allows us to get about 1.7 times more voltage out of the generator than the coil groups would produce on their own. That's the magic of this "Y" configuration: it gets us more voltage for low RPM generators, which is definitely what we have here. There is another configuration worth mentioning (and it's the reason my "B" looked out of order in the photos). The "Delta" configuration gives us the same voltage as the individual coil groups but about 1.7 times the current. So, if you really needed more current, and you could get the turbine spinning fast enough to take care of your voltage needs, that might be the way to go. It wasn't for me, but feel free to research it for your own stuff and let me know how it works for you.

step 14: Circuitry
The rectifier circuit template in the PDF should be able to fit right over a standard project board (the ones that require soldering.) This should make a nice, neat converter for AC to DC that you can tuck away wherever you need to. That being said, start with a solderless bread board. Either way, the big schottky diodes will need headers or wire soldered to them to fit in. They have leads that are too wide to go in. Regular diodes will fit fine, but they have a higher voltage drop. If you use the diodes I mentioned in the parts list, you lose less voltage with these big guys. Since every volt counts here, I'd highly recommend you deal with the added trouble of the oversize diodes. When you put the circuit together, follow the rectifier diagram, watching the diode bands and capacitor polarity. Switching things the wrong way will make the circuit not work (or worse.) Attach a multimeter to leads off both ends of the cap and be ready to watch the voltage (start in millivolts for a reading, then work up as you spin it faster). Attach coil leads by color per the diagram--they go between two diodes. The template should make this pretty clear.

step 15: Test!
No time like the present. Blow on it, put it in the wind, attach magnets to the vertical piece of the frame and tack it up on a AC vent, hit with a Shop Vac blower (I've done this--it holds up just fine). Some tips: *apply more WD-40 if needed (note: a helpful commenter let me know that WD-40 is not a lubricant, but a solvent that has similiar properties--until it dries up. Use light weight oil instead, 5 to 10 weight) *blowing on it will get you about .5 V DC with my set up. Hopefully you will get a lot more (it's those thin wire wraps that will do it for you) *I had 1.12 volts with it sitting on a fairly gentle AC vent *with the Shop Vac, it gets up to 6 V at least before it starts to rattle like crazy and pop out of the dimples. You will probably get even better results.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

step 16: Conclusion and a Plea For Help
That's it! You have a crazy renewable energy source of perhaps dubious usefulness. BUT there is a lot more that can be done. I'd like to throw out a few suggestions to the crowd for thing to try: double up the magnets and coils. Put one set on the bottom and one on the top. Wire the DC output of each in serial and double the voltage. Hopefully. bigger, badder coils. Really see if you can up those wraps to a crazy degree. I think that's the key. take a look at the mintyboost USB charger (http://www.instructables.com/id/EGBQJPLCB2EP287KTZ/). I've spoken with the inventor herself, and she says that the circuit that drives it can work with input voltages between 1.5 and 4.5 volts, with the most efficiency in the middle of that range. It produces steady 5V power off of two AA batteries (which are only 2.4 to 3.0 volts). If you have this project with that one, do you get a wind-powered iPod charger? Try it and let me know. try a different bearing. My big thing is to use as simple and readily available parts as I possibly could, so I swore off fancier parts. You have no such limitation. I have it on good authority that skateboard bearings would be great for this. Or some other kind of bushing. Let me know what you come up with (especially if it's hacky, cheap, and better than what I've done.) Small lazy susans are available at art and sculpture supply stores that might also make good bearings. Made a bunch of these turbines? What happens when you wire them together in series? Can you make a "Pleech" farm? There's another more efficient Vertical Axis Wind Turbine design called the Darrieus Turbine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darrieus_wind_turbine). It uses lift instead of drag. If you have an easy way to modify this turbine into one of those, drop a comment down here. What I'd really love is for this to be the first (well, second) version in a long series of continually improving small turbines, the goal of which would be to power small devices (phones, sensors, art projects installed on public buildings, etc.) So, what did I do wrong? And what could be done a whole lot better? If you have answers, let us know. Hopefully, we can "crowd source" a way to make a pretty decent, and fairly cheap, wind powered generator.

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Horizontal Double Helix Wind Turbine by Ultra Computers

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Comments
50 comments Add Comment view all 232 comments
Jun 16, 2009. 8:52 AM REPLY

kmahalanabis says:
PL NOTE IT HAS TO BE "CLEAR CD"

clint114 says:
Could you put a clear CD between them to keep the magnets from bumping onto the coils?

Mar 29, 2009. 8:31 PM REPLY

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

kmahalanabis says:

Jun 16, 2009. 8:51 AM REPLY U CAN,WITH A LITTLE CHANGE IN PERMEABILITY......CANT SAY HOW MUCH IT WILL AFFECT CURRENT GENERATION.

mhelo75 says:

Jun 12, 2009. 9:40 PM REPLY Sir may i ask whats the rating in terms of microfarad and voltage is your capacitor? thanks for the instructibles. im going to build this design of yours so i would have an idea of the basic and build a bigger one.

jshowell says:

May 30, 2009. 6:13 PM REPLY how about instead of a pringles can you use a squirrel cage like this one: http://www.sciplus.com/recommend.cfm/recommendid/9940 and glue the magnets to the bottom and top of the cage. Gain electricity from both ends. Also there might be no need for a towel dispenser so airflow might be increased.

strmrnnr says:
Couple of suggestions you have likely seen by now.

May 16, 2009. 11:09 PM REPLY

Levitation bearing magnets could likely be used and thinner coils with more wraps. I was throwing figures in an inductance calculator this Winter and found that the length of the coil really didn't make a difference most of the time except to use more wire, and make the coil more stable. If the coil is glued on a flat surface then stability is not a factor to worry about. Also, other experiments I have seen use 4 magnets / 3 coils, but the wiring was a little different. That is what makes it tough for me as you guys all have new ideas and do this=ngs a little different. I guess when I finally get around to throwing one together mine while be different again. Nice job!

SoulReaper18 says:
ok i know you must have done ALOT of Turns on these bobbins... ALOT! haha can you round a number in telling me?

May 14, 2009. 4:44 PM REPLY

et334 says:

Apr 27, 2009. 8:22 AM REPLY wouldn't it double the efficiency is you add coils and magnets on the other end as well? maybe just reverse them bcuz of reversed direction? this could probably be powered by falling water as well like a drain pipe or the down pipe of some building's gutters when it rains.

markomiz says:
10 magnets######

Apr 25, 2009. 6:56 AM REPLY

markomiz says:

Apr 25, 2009. 6:55 AM REPLY i made a similar design using 15 coils on steel bobbins with 36 awg wire and 15 magnets, unfotunately i made my propellery spinny bit too heavy (mainly made from MDF ((the magnets snapped the cd's in half because they needed to be too close together)), i realise now how stupid that was) so the wind didnt want to turn it but using my hands to spin it i got 22 volts, however i believe if i had used plastic bobbins i could have got an even higher voltage, steel bobbins created a resistance and made it harder to turn, also because of the strong attraction to the magnets i couldnt set it up for the magnets to spin less than about 4cm above the coils, with plastic bobbins you could probably get the gap to few mm. any questions: markomizdrak@hotmail.co.uk

stevenhowk says:
dude your instructions are so complicated man i can't understand every steps what you want us to do

Apr 21, 2009. 9:57 PM REPLY

Xedrius says:

Apr 12, 2009. 9:02 PM REPLY How many Gausses should they have? and how many amp produce it? i want to make one of 5 watt aprox i dont know if this is possible with your design

DrJekyl says:

Mar 7, 2009. 8:20 PM REPLY Actually, just try this out: Does this thing generate more power when the AC is venting out hot air? The higher temperature the air is at, the more energy its particles possess. This would mean that when these air particles collide with the surface of the turbine blades, they would be getting more work done while losing some heat, and hopefully you'd get a higher RPM.

capjbadger says:
Actually NO. Hot air is less dense and thus pushes the turbine with less force.

Apr 2, 2009. 1:04 PM REPLY

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

DrJekyl says:

Apr 3, 2009. 9:19 PM REPLY Right. Air temperature is also an important factor in wind power generation. Cold air is more dense than hot air. Thus, wind turbines are able to generate about 5% more power at any given wind speed in the winter than they are during the hot days of summer.

qballcat says:
love the ible, but one thing the rectifying thing can someone post it as a schematic where its a bunch of lines like http://faculty.frostburg.edu/phys/latta/ee/6cl6xmtr/6cl6schematic655.gif

Mar 30, 2009. 7:41 AM REPLY

qballcat says:
nevermind, i figured it out. but can i use a plastic bobbin?

Mar 30, 2009. 8:05 PM REPLY

childofartandmusic says:

Mar 8, 2009. 6:55 PM REPLY are the grouped simply for organization during the wiring? or is there a difference between the groups in material or manufacturing methods

qballcat says:
just for simplicity's sake, there is no point to the groups but its easier to wire

Mar 30, 2009. 7:38 AM REPLY

DrJekyl says:

Mar 7, 2009. 7:52 PM REPLY Looks neat. Didn't those magnets attract/repel each other, while being fitted so close? Did you have to hold them in place till they stuck to the CD?

wheatstone says:

Mar 7, 2009. 12:18 AM REPLY To join the wires together I used a quick method...telecom connectors from all tronics 10 for $2.00 . Just insert the wires and snap the button with a pair of plyers. DONE! Or see your local telephone man butter him or her up and maybe they would have extras to lend. These connectors even have a sealing silicone to wheather proof the wires! Hey they work on your land lines so why not here.

markomiz says:
im currently building a similar design for a school project instead of using 12 coils and 8 magnets would 15 coils and 10 magnets be better? also what is the best way to maximise voltage? ( not too interested in current) thanks :)

Mar 6, 2009. 6:01 AM REPLY

create360 says:

Mar 4, 2009. 5:46 AM REPLY ok. i love the concept, but i have a thought... doesn't placing the turbine near the opening of a dryer vent, etc. add drag/resistance to the dryer vent itself; making the dryer have to work somewhat more to ventilate? meaning the power you capture is actually adding more work to another device. thus, negating the overall effect. maybe i'm building a poor visual model in my head and PLEASE correct me if i'm wrong here. i could very well be wrong! :) in fact, it kinda reminds me of putting your hand in front of a garden hose spray...and in my mind, that DOES NOT add resistance to the flow of water IN the hose. now i'm confusing myself.. systems that capture lost energy from drain pipes (gravity powered) seem to make more sense to me. capturing this source of power is capturing something that is lost anyway. j

mahmood13 says:
Could any one tell me how much uF and volts that the capacitor should be ?? Thanks

Feb 27, 2009. 4:10 AM REPLY

emdarcher says:
could you make a video of this working

Feb 25, 2009. 6:26 PM REPLY

emdarcher says:
are those rare earth magnets you used? where did you get those magnets and the bobbins?

Feb 25, 2009. 4:13 PM REPLY

HerrBuckliger says:

Dec 15, 2008. 2:04 PM REPLY Do pardon all the dumb questions from me, but I was wondering: do you have any advice on how to securely fasten 8 rare earth magnets to a CD in a circle? The pull they exert on each other is so strong that it wrecks every glue and tape job that I've tried, including gorilla tape and epoxy. How did you do it?

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

kuauhtemok says:

Feb 25, 2009. 4:19 AM REPLY From my experience the ONLY way to use rare earth magnets is with some type of steel/iron backing. Like you I found this out the hard way. Without steel to grip the magnets they will fly everywhere, no matter what you do. Plastic is therefore useless in this situation. Hope this helps.

HerrBuckliger says:
Your comment helped immensely. Thank you very much =). Now I just gotta find me some of those...

Feb 25, 2009. 10:05 AM REPLY

emdarcher says:
thanks I finally know how to make a generator for a wind turbine.

Feb 22, 2009. 5:06 PM REPLY

TOCO says:
please post a video!

Feb 22, 2009. 4:35 PM REPLY

Majafero says:
probably a really obvious question, but where do i get a super-capacitator???

Feb 4, 2009. 4:21 AM REPLY

aqua_scummm says:

Feb 18, 2009. 2:31 PM REPLY I'd actually recommend a "super capacitor"... Super capacitor typically refers to super high capacity but low voltage capacitors... goldmine-elec.com has some polyacene .6farad super capacitors cheap, but they're only 3V rated. You can make a big capacitor bank out of them for a higher voltage, but really I'd use the big capacitors from disposable camera flash mechanisms (BE CAREFUL!!!!). After you limit the voltage down in some way, it'd be good to use some super capacitors to store a bit more charge to make up for the inconsistencies of wind

istifen says:

Feb 7, 2009. 11:59 PM REPLY this is cool ive done mine following this instructable but my only problem is this circuitry set up. please do make an instructable on this. And please make it as simple as possible.

DeanC993 says:
Hi i am begining to make a horizontal wind turbine, are those ceramic or rare earth magnets? Great Wind Turbine(:

Feb 3, 2009. 5:19 PM REPLY

sldhd7 says:
what if you added more magnets than bobbins? it would help stop the "cogging".

Jan 31, 2009. 9:14 AM REPLY

comodore says:
I found this site that sells all kinds of magnet wires... http://www.bulkwire.com/product.asp?ProdID=7589 Would a 36 gauge Weight: 1/4 lb. Length: 3092.5 ft do fine??? I want to buy this one, so I want to consult you will this do for your project???? Thanks a lot!

Jan 14, 2009. 4:34 AM REPLY

comodore says:
What is the material on whitch the wire is vinded, metal or plastic??? From the picture I would say metal...

Jan 10, 2009. 5:24 AM REPLY

dsandds2003 says:

Jan 5, 2009. 7:47 AM REPLY The only thing I must of missed is the size of the rare earth magnets you used. Are they the same size or smaller than the bobbins and will plastic bobbins work as well? Also will bigger magnets make any difference on the voltage or current??? Thanks, Dave

ncblu says:

Jan 3, 2009. 10:52 PM REPLY cogging will definitely be a problem if you include any iron into the coil design. each magnet will have a "home" over each coil and the only wind that will break 12 cogged magnets free will likely trash the unit. your best bet is to offset the coils to the magnets. try using 9 coils instead, that way you likely wont ever end up with more than 2 magnets in a cogging location. if you use open air coils then your design will work fine because there is no iron to cog the magnets. coils can be wound easily this way. take 4 16d nails and put a 'z' bend in each one, hammer them in about 1/2 into a piece of wood on a circle drawn to the diameter of the coil. spin each nail so the head is facing outwards and start winding the coils, when done rotate the nails so the heads are now in the middle and you can slide the coil off in one piece and roughly the diameter you wanted. it's the simplest way to wind a good coil and this method is as old as the hills

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/

Griffin21 says:
Im using 24 gauge will this hurt the voltage and everything else? I couldnt find anything higher than 24.

Dec 13, 2008. 12:03 PM REPLY

Trickus says:

Dec 1, 2008. 1:45 PM REPLY I am using just the generator part for a number of project ideas, but I do not know a lot about circuitry. I know the principals of wiring and have soldered a few projects. but when it comes to capacitors and diodes I don't know heads from tails. It there a place I could go to learn more about what is the best capacitor to use and diodes. Why did you choose the ones that you did? Thanks

Wesley666 says:

Nov 9, 2008. 4:25 PM REPLY I have a bunch of hard drive magnets and I was wondering if they would work for the magnets. Also This project is alot like something I've built. I built a big fan and welded it to an alternator and that works wonders for generating power because alternators are so easy to turn. Another question is did you ever test the current and voltage of AC this produced before adding the DC converter/Bridge rectifier?

sew1 says:

Nov 9, 2008. 2:40 PM REPLY Hi Mike, you seem to be the brains behind this outfit!! I have collected most of the bits needed but am having problems finding a SUPER CAP. What is the British name for this. I'm assuming its an American term as most electrical people keep telling me to get the ratings and power etc. Could you help, cheers fella.

madcow11 says:

Oct 13, 2008. 2:10 PM REPLY What is the easiest way to measure the current generated from one of these? When i use an ammeter in series it seems like the current is too small, it is something like 4 microamps (at ~5 volts). Would i be able to measure the voltage and resistance of the coils and then use I=V/R to determine the current, or place a known resistor in series and measure the voltage accross that then use current = voltage accross resistor/resistance of resistor? Would either of these work? I'm trying to see how the current varies with the turns in the coils (I assume more turns means less current because of higher resistance) but I am having trouble actually measuring the current...

mikejedw says:

Oct 13, 2008. 4:47 PM REPLY Although the wire does provide some resistance, it's not enough to offset the gains you make when you have more wraps on the coils. More wraps is definitely better. If anything, overdo it with the wrapping. Just make sure you have the same number of wraps for all the coils--otherwise, the coils will start to work against each other. As for measuring the current, I'd take the voltage across a known resistor and use that to calculate the current using I=V/R like you wrote. That's always a lot easier to hook up. Let us know what you get (and how many wraps you're using).

netbuddy says:

Sep 23, 2008. 1:45 PM REPLY I just bought some magnets, they are listed as N42 Neodymium and are 12mm x 3mmA which I thought would be enough. They have a 2.3 Kg pull force, is this ok for a project like this?

netbuddy says:
What other configurations have you tried for the coils wiring?

Sep 19, 2008. 1:24 PM REPLY

mikejedw says:

Sep 21, 2008. 12:39 PM REPLY Take a peek at step 13--I go over the issue with the configuration there. In brief, the configuration I'm using is called "Y" (or "wye"). It favors voltage generation over current generation. Another configuration, "delta", favors current over voltage. Your choice of configuration depends on your needs--I needed more voltage, so I used "Y".

HerrBuckliger says:

Sep 12, 2008. 10:47 AM REPLY Do you recall what brand of paper towel holder you used, where you bought it, etc.? I've been having a hard time finding the right kind for this project.

view all 232 comments

http://www.instructables.com/id/Pringles-Wind-Turbine-Pleech---Version-One/


				
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Description: The Pringles Wind Turbine (a.k.a. Power Leech or Pleech) is an attempt to turn simple items found at the hardware store and elsewhere into a working low-voltage power supply. The Pleech is designed to take wind or other air currents (such as from A/C ducts, dryer vents, etc.) and convert that energy into electrical energy using magnets and copper coils.