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MEMORY OF THE WORLD REGISTER

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					                         MEMORY OF THE WORLD REGISTER
                                                                                      Ref N°2006-03

PART A – ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

1 SUMMARY

                       Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan (www.vedamu.org )

        The Sanskrit word ‘Veda’ is derived from the root vid, meaning to know without end.
Veda literally means knowledge without beginning and end. The Vedic texts are believed to have
been revealed to great ‘seers’. The seers are not their authors. They are only receptors of what has
only existed in the universe in the shape of sounds. Inspired by the Divine will, different seers are
believed to have comprehended the sounds into structured hymns which, together, constitute the
Veda, through their inner sense. All of them have been realized in their own way, in the absence
of which it would not have been possible for them to comprehend the Vedic hymns. It may be for
this reason that the philosophies in India, which are the Brahman-centred, are considered
Darsanas or perceptions of Truth or God. The names of the seers are associated with what has
been comprehended by them.

         The Veda has been split into a large number of branches (sakhas) since prehistoric times
for the convenience of the Vedic scholars for recitation and remembrance. Vyasa, a great saint, is
stated to have clubbed the sakhas into four identifiable Veda groups known as Rigveda,
Yajurveda, Samaveda and Atharvaveda. Yajurveda is a combination of two major groups known
as Sukla Yajurveda and Krishna Yajurveda. Of 1131 Veda sakhas available in India during the
time of Patanjali, about 2 and a half millenniums ago, only a few – ten in number - are available
and known to the scholars today.

        The website Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan at www.vedamu.org, which is sought to be
inscribed on the Me mory of the World Register, is primarily designed to bring together the
Vedic literature in its entirety as available in India. Initially, it presents the text of the ten Veda
sakhas (branches) with some of them carrying the Bhashya by Sayanacharya. Each Veda sakha
contains Samhita, Brahmanam, Aaranyakam and the Upanisads related to it, except some that are
not known to have Brahmanam, Aaranyakam, Upanisads related to them. Besides the Veda
sakhas, the website presents 87 other Upanisads in Devanagari script, which constitute part of the
Veda sakhas though the Samhita component of such Veda sakhas is not extant. Brahma Sutras,
aphorisms of Vedic truths, as old as the components of the Veda sakhas, form part of the content
of the website for inscription.

         The Veda is also called ‘Sruti’, that which is heard. Without being recorded in writing,
the Veda sakhas have been passed from generation to generation, in the ancient method of
learning, by word of mouth, to listening and repeating, in the guru-sishya (master-disciple)
tradition. One main reason for not learning from the written text is that several sounds do not lend
themselves to be accurately reproduced phonetically. They fall in between two syllables and can
be transmitted only orally.

         Without resort to writing, our seers have devised many ways to prevent even a very small
error to creep into any Veda sakha. The fullest benefit from the Veda mantras can result only if
no word is changed; and no unauthorized upward or downward drift in the note occurs in the
recitation. Hence numerous safeguards have been built into the system. How much time it should
take to utter each word is indicated by resort to the notation by ‘ maatra’ - the time it takes to
pronounce a short vowel. How to regulate breathing so that the vibrations can occur at what part
of the body to give birth to the pure word-sound is laid down in the Vedanga ‘Siksha’.

         A foolproof method of Veda recitation is to chant each mantra in various patterns and
combinations known as Samhita (Vaakya), Pada, Krama, Jata, Maala, Sikha, Rekha, Dhwaja,
Danda, Ratha and Ghana. The main object of reciting in so many modes is to make no mistake in
the original meaning and sound pattern of the words.

         Just, as in a laboratory, a life giving elixir is preserved with the utmost care, the Veda
mantras, which are for universal benefit, have been preserved by the ancient seers, without resort
to writing, by very exacting methods of recitation.

         The system of complicated recitation has been devised in very early times in order to
preserve the purity of the word, sound, intonation, pronunciation, accent and sound combination
of the mantras. By repeating the words in manifold ways, the correct tally of the words is always
kept which alone naturally ensures the purity of the texts. To enable the scholars to take up the
difficult methods of recitation, it has been laid down that the more difficult the methods of
recitation are, the more merit the chanter earns.

        The website has a module for presentation of Vedic recitation in audio for about 220
hours in different modes (patterns) of all the ten Veda sakhas, presently known to the scholars, in
a representative way.

          The Veda is thus the integration of word and sound that admits of no error even in a
single syllable or a single note. The purpose of the website is primarily to bring the Vedic texts
in print, manuscript and in recitation to one place with access to all.

2 DETAILS OF THE NOMINATOR

2.1 Name (person or organization):

        Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan (A registered Charitable Trust).

2.2 Relationship to the documentary heritage nominated:

        The Nominator maintains the website titled in its own name at www.vedamu.org.

        The main objectives of the Trust are:

        i)      To develop the website www.vedamu.org as the repository of the Vedic literature
        in Sanskrit in full, and also in Telugu and in English;

        ii)      To seek to convert the site initially into a virtual Vedic University on the web and
        / or a regular Vedic University; and

        iii)    To do all acts that are necessary for, or contingent to, achieving the objectives
        said above.

2.3 Contact person (s):

        K.R.Paramahamsa, Managing Trustee, Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan
2.4 Contact details (include address, phone, fax, email):

        S3-B4, Prasanthi Nilayam – 515134,       Andhra Pradesh, India
        E-mail: krphamsa1@sancharnet.in
        Tel: 91-98490-41874
        Fax: 91-8555-287390

3 IDENTITY AND DESCRIPTION OF THE DOCUMENTARY HERITAGE

3.1 Name and identification details of the items being nominated:

        Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan at www.vedamu.org.

      The ten Veda sakhas and the other related texts proposed for Nomination as
Documentary Heritage, presented on the website in Sanskrit, as of now, are the following.

        RIG VEDA - Saakala sakha
        KRISHNA YAJUR VEDA - Taittiriya & Maitrayani sakhas
        SUKLA YAJUR VEDA - Madhyandina & Kanva sakhas
        SAMA VEDA - Raanaayana, Kouthama & Jaimini sakhas
        ATHARVA VEDA - Sounaka & Pippalada sakhas
        OTHER UPANISADS
        BRAHMA SUTRAS

        Maitrayani sakha of Krishna Yajurveda and Pippalada sakha of Atharvaveda are the latest
finds among the available Veda sakhas.

        Maitrayani sakha has only Samhita and Aaranyakam.

          Pippalada sakha is presently available in print for the first 15 Kandas accounting for a
little less than 50% of the text of the Pippalada Samhita. This is brought on to the website.
Kandas 16-20, accounting for a little more than 50% of the text of the Veda sakha, is available in
Oriya script on palm leaves. This text has just been transliterated into Devanagari script in hand
and is brought on to the website.

        The other related item on the website for Nomination as Documentary Heritage is the
module of Vedic recitation in audio for about 220 hours in different modes (patterns) of all the
ten Veda sakhas, presently known to the scholars, in a representative way. Broadly, the audio
content, as of now, is as follows.

    Sri Rudram from Taittiriya sakha

    Adhyayas 1 & 2 of Saakala sakha in eleven modes of recitation

    Kanda 1 of Taittiriya sakha in five modes of recitation

    The entire text of Maitrayani sakha in Samhita mode of recitation

    Adhyayas 1 to 27 of Madhyandina sakha in Samhita mode of recitation.
    Adhyayas 1, 2 and 3 and some suktas of Kanva sakha in Samhita mode of recitation

    Satapatha Brahmanam in full in Samhita mode of recitation

    Isa Upanisad in Samhita mode of recitation

   Samhita and Aaranyaka of Raanaayana sakha in Samhita mode of recitation including Ooha
Ganam

    Samhita and Aaranyaka of Kouthama sakha in Samhita mode of recitation including Ganam
and Rahasya Ganam

    The entire text of Jaimini sakha in Samhita mode of recitation.

    Adhyaya 1 of Sounaka sakha in Samhita mode of recitation

    Kandas 1 – 15 of Pippalada sakha in Samhita mode of recitation

3.2 Description:

         Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan is a website at www.vedamu.org maintained by Sri
Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan, a Charitable Trust vide No 1512-IV-53/2003 dated June 11, 2003
registered at Malkajgiri, Secunderabad, India.

        We began collecting and collating the content of the website since April 2001. The
website was formally launched on April 28, 2003 at Bangalore, India.

        The Vedic hymns are an integration of word and sound that admits of no error. The
content of the website in word, audio and video is open to easy download.

       The Vedic texts on the website are those printed and published after very careful scrutiny.
The text of a Veda sakha in part in Devanagari script (Sanskrit) is in manuscript as it has just
been got transliterated from Oriya script in palm leaves. The recitation of two Veda sakhas in
Samhita patha on the website has been a recent discovery.

        With a view to popularising the Veda sakhas that have only Samhita patha, Pada and
Krama pathas in sound for those sakhas are being got structured by eminent scholars following
the procedure enunciated in the Vedanga ‘Siksha’. They will be brought on to the website as
soon as they are structured.

        As of now, there are only ten Veda sakhas known to scholars out of 1131 available 2500
years ago. It is possible that some Veda sakhas, presently not in the common knowledge of the
scholars, may be discovered in due course. If and when any other Veda sakhas are discovered, in
any Indian script on palm leaves, we get them transcribed in Devanagari script (Sanskrit) and
upload to the website. Correspondingly, we get the Samhita patha of the concerned Veda sakha
in audio also uploaded after certification by eminent scholars. Construction of Pada and Krama
pathas for such sakhas will also be taken up to secure them firmly in the memory of the scholars.

       Besides what is sought to be inscribed on the Memory of the World Register as stated in
the Summary, the website has several modules such as Learn Sanskrit, Vedic Astrology, Vedic
Mathematics, Ayurveda Applications. It also has considerable literature related to Vedanga,
Upaveda, Darsanas, Tantra, etc in Sanskrit besides Vedic literature in English and in Telugu. The
Home page of the website makes a detailed account of its contents.

Referees:

       i) Dr. B.V.K.Sastry, Resident Faculty, Hindu University of America, Orlando, Florida
32825-3732, USA. Tel: 407-275-0016, E-mail: sastry_bvk@hindu-university.edu

        ii) Mr. A.P.V.N. Sarma, IAS, Executive Officer, Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams,
Tirupati, A.P., Inida. Tel: 91-877- 2230977, E-mail: apvns@nic.in , Web: www.tirumala.org

        iii) Mr. Robben Hixson, 2173 Village Point Way, Sandy, Utah 84093, Ph: 1-801- 943-
0554, E-mail: passage@burgoyne.com

4 JUSTIFICATION FOR INCLUSION/ ASSESSMENT AGAINST CRITERIA

4.1 Authenticity
         The texts of the Veda sakhas brought on to the site are the texts printed and published
after very careful scrutiny by the scholars associated with the said sakhas.

        Similarly the audio rendering of different modes of the Veda sakhas in a representative
manner has been done by the most renowned in the respective sakhas, checked and cross-checked
by equally eminent men.

        Even the manuscript of part of Pippalada sakha in Sanskrit script has been crosschecked
by the scholars of the sakha, and also in Sanskrit, for its authenticity.

4.2 World significance, uniqueness and irreplaceability
         The Vedic texts and the manner of their rendering are certainly unique and irreplaceable.
In fact, of 1131 Veda sakhas stated to have been available 2500 years ago, what exist today are
only 10, that too, at different levels and in different modes of rendering.

        If these ten sakhas disappear or deteriorate, it would certainly constitute a harmful
impoverishment of the heritage of humanity. The Veda sakhas and their subsidiaries constitute
the base of Sanathanadharma, the core Indian ethos and spirituality over millenniums.

        Every effort is to be made to secure memory of these Veda sakhas and also to discover, to
the extent possible, the lost Veda sakhas.

4.3 Criteria of: (a) time (b) place (c) people (d) subject and theme (e) form and style

a) Criterion 1 – Time:
c) Criterion 3 – People:
         The Vedic texts are believed to have been revealed to great ‘seers’ in prehistoric days.
The seers are not their authors. They are only receptors of what has only existed in the universe in
the shape of sounds. Inspired by the Divine will, different seers are believed to have
comprehended the sounds into structured hymns which, together, constitute the Veda, through
their inner sense. All of them have been realized in their own way, in the absence of which it
would not have been possible for them to comprehend the Vedic hymns.
        In fact, the Sanskrit language is stated to have been structured out of the Vedic texts to
convey the meanings comprehended by the seers. The structure of this language is subsequent to
the coming of the Veda into the experience of the seers.
        The Veda is called ‘Sruti’ or that which is heard. Without being recorded in writing, the
Veda-sakhas have been passed from generation to generation, in the ancient method of learning,
by word of mouth, to listening and repeating, in the guru-sishya (master-disciple) tradition. One
main reason for not learning from the written text is that several sounds do not lend themselves to
be accurately reproduced phonetically. They fall in between two syllables and can be transmitted
only orally.
        This establishes that the origin of the Veda sakhas is prehistoric, and any effort at dating
any of them is only a conjecture. The content of the Veda sakhas is interpreted and understood
differently by different scholars depending upon their level of mental and spiritual enrichment.
Sri Aurobindo, in his book ‘The Secret of the Veda’, establishes the uniqueness of the symbolism
in the Rigveda Saakala sakha. According to him, his work is only to show a way to understand
the content of the Veda sakha in its manifold character. This is so for one Veda sakha, though a
very important one. It should be so for other Veda sakhas, too, even to the extent they are
available today.
         The Veda is the most ancient, organized, spiritualised and intellectual literature of the
human race. The Vedic literature is an extraordinary mine of unlimited wealth yet to be tapped, to
realize the spiritual greatness of the era in which the seers and sages associated with the Vedic
texts lived.

e) Criterion 5 – Form and style:
        Each Vedasakha is structured into chapters (adhyayas, Kandas) consisting of hymns.
Each hymn is considered a mantra the notation of recitation of which is fixed. Each mantra is
pregnant with the power of its words if recited in the manner determined by the seers. The fullest
benefit from the Veda mantras can result only if no word is changed; and no unauthorized
upward or downward drift in the note occurs in the recitation.
         Without resort to writing, our seers have devised many ways to prevent even a very small
error to creep into the Veda mantras. Hence numerous safeguards have been built into the system.
How much time it should take to utter each word is indicated by resort to the notation by ‘ maatra’
- the time it takes to pronounce a short vowel. How to regulate breathing so that the vibrations
can occur at what part of the body to give birth to the pure word-sound is laid down in the
Vedanga ‘Siksha’.
        A foolproof method of Veda recitation is to chant each mantra in various patterns and
combinations known as Samhita (Vaakya), Pada, Krama, Jata, Maala, Sikha, Rekha, Dhwaja,
Danda, Ratha and Ghana. The main object of reciting in so many modes or patterns is to make no
mistake in the original meaning and sound pattern of the words.
         The system of complicated recitation has been devised in very early times in order to
preserve the purity of the word, sound, intonation, pronunciation, accent and sound- combination
of the mantras. By repeating the words in manifold ways, the correct tally of the words is always
kept which alone naturally ensures the purity of the texts. To enable the scholars to take up the
difficult methods of recitation, it has been laid down that the more difficult the methods of
recitation are, the more merit the chanter earns.
         Just, as in a laboratory, a life-giving elixir is preserved with the utmost care, the Veda
mantras, which are for universal benefit, have been preserved by the ancient seers, without resort
to writing, by very exacting methods of recitation.

4.4 Issues of rarity, integrity, threat and management

Rarity:
          Each Veda sakha is unique in its own way for its content and structure, and the manner of
its recitation. In respect of some sakhas such as of Atharvaveda, some mantras are taken from
the Saakala sakha. But the manner of recitation is different conveying possibly different
meaning, and carrying different power of the words. The perception of the seers associated with
the mantras in each sakha must have been unique for them. Each Veda sakha is a rarity in its
own way and the epitome of the spiritual perception (darsana) of the seers associated with the
mantras in the said sakha.

Integrity:
        The words, rather the syllables, of each mantra are fixed. The recitation of Veda mantras
does not admit of any change even in a syllable or notation. Possibly, there is no other literature
in human history, which is as fixed as is the Veda. For instance, the number of words in the
Rigveda Saakala sakha is 1,53,826 and the number of letters is 4,32,000. These numbers have
not changed through the millenniums

Threat:
         The Veda sakhas survive only through the Vedic scholars learning them in the teacher-
disciple pattern. Though the text in writing may help a learner to speed up its learning, learning
the notation from guru is still a necessity. The word and sound are equally important for the
Veda. Unless Vedic learners are motivated to learn the Veda sakha(s) both from the points of
view of recitation and understanding, the great Vedic lore gets easily extinct. It is no surprise that
there are only ten Veda sakhas now known to Vedic scholars in India at d ifferent levels and
modes of recitation, as against 1131 Veda sakhas stated to have been known to the Vedic scholars
about 2500 years ago.

Management plan:
        At present, the website www.vedamu.org makes a representative presentation of different
modes of recitation of each Veda sakha now known to the scholars in India. For instance,
Rigveda Saakala sakha is chanted in eleven modes. But there are only one or two scholars that
are aware of these eleven modes. The Madhyandina, Kanva and Taittiriya sakhas have only five
modes of recitation. The Sounaka, Maitrayani and Pippalada sakhas, the recent finds, have only
one mode of recitation, the preliminary one. As for the Samaveda sakhas of Ranayana, Koutama
and Jaimini, the modes of recitation are not uniformly known to the scholars.

         With a view to retaining the Veda sakhas, now known to the scholars, in human memory,
concerted efforts need attention and implementation. For instance, Sri Sathya Sai Veda
Pratishtan is presently engaged in structuring Pada and Krama pathas to Sounaka, Maitrayani and
Pippalada sakhas, recent finds, which have only Samhita patha each. The other eight pathas as in
the case of Saakala sakha, also called vikrtis, are to be developed for these sakhas over a period of
time. In the case of the Yajurveda sakhas that have three prakrti and two vikrti pathas, the other
six vikrti pathas are to be developed. Similarly, for the Samaveda sakhas, uniformity in the
modes of rendering may have to be built up. When the rendering of the Veda sakhas in different
modes is authentically made and brought within the knowledge of the scholars of these sakhas,
the recitation of these sakhas will continue in perpetuity with all the attendant benefits.
        Similarly, the texts of the Veda sakhas including their subsidiaries in Devanagari script
are to be published ensuring that there is no scarcity of the texts in print. When the Vedic
scholars acquire scholarship in Sanskrit, they will have a better understanding of the content of
the Veda sakhas, which they recite. The module Learn Sanskrit on this website is primarily
designed to help Vedic scholars acquire scholarship in Sanskrit for better understanding and
appreciation of the content of the Veda sakhas.

5 LEGAL INFORMATION

5.1. Owner of the documentary heritage (name and contact details)

      Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan, a registered Charitable Trust, is the owner of the
documentary heritage. The Managing Trustee K.R.Paramahamsa is the contact person.

5.2 Custodian of the documentary heritage (name and contact details, if different to owner)

        -------

5.3 Legal status:

(a) Category of ownership                A Public Charitable Trust

(b) Accessibility                        It is accessible universally with facility for easy
download

(c) Copyright status                     Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan intends to retain
                                         copyright only for the audio and the video content on the
                                         website in the context of the huge cost involved in
                                         creating it. It is, however, open to forego copyright
                                         status even for this content should it be a condition
                                         imposed by the IAC.

(d) Responsible administration           The Board of Trustees, headed by the Managing Trustee,
                                         is legally responsible

(e) Other factors                        No other factors to our knowledge


6 MANAGEMENT PLAN

6.1     The documentary heritage herein is in the nature of a website bringing thereto the texts of
the Veda sakhas with representative recitation of each of the sakhas in different modes that are
presently known to the scholars in India.

        In respect of some Veda sakhas such as Pippalada, part of the text of the Samhita is in an
Indian script (Oriya) on palm leaves. It has just been transliterated into Sanskrit script in
manuscript and brought on to the website. In respect of some of the Veda sakhas and their
subsidiaries, though the texts have been printed earlier, they are no longer extant except as
personal copies of some old scholars. They are secured from such scholars to be scanned and
uploaded on to the website.
         It is common knowledge that, in India, huge Vedic literature is still on palm leaves in
Sanskrit, and in the scripts of other Indian languages, though the content is in Sanskrit. It needs
concerted efforts by scholars and administrators to classify and bring the literature to an order.
When such volumes related to other Veda sakhas are available in print or in manuscript, we
intend to upload them on to the website progressively.

          As regards the recitation of each of the Veda sakhas in different modes, unique for each,
it is extremely difficult to get accomplished scholars for recording the recitation for uploading.
For instance, for the Rigveda Saakala sakha, there may at best be a couple of scholars that know
all the eleven modes of recitation. Only one, relatively young and energetic, is available to our
knowledge. Unless all the eleven modes are recorded in his lifetime for the entire sakha, which is
rather quite extensive, it may be that the rendering of the sakha in all the eleven modes may not
remain for the posterity.

         As for Yajurveda sakhas of Madhyandina, Kanva and Taittiriya, the scholars are aware of
only five modes of recitation, three prkrti and two vikrti. There are six more modes of recitation,
all of vikrti, for these sakhas, too, as in the case of Saakala sakha. But we are not aware if any
scholar in India is in a position to render them in the other six vikrti modes at present. It is
possible to structure them following the disciplines in Siksha, a Vedanga. But it requires
considerable effort to bring together scholars in recitation of the existing modes, scholars in
Siksha, etc to construct the other vikrti modes. In the event of their being recorded after such
construction, it becomes easy for the other scholars to learn them and pass on to their disciples.

         Similarly, for the Sounaka and Pippalada sakhas of Atharvaveda and for Maitrayani
sakha of Krishna Yajurveda, the scholars are aware only of the Samhita patha, as these sakhas
happen to be recent finds. For these sakhas to survive, they need Pada and Krama pathas, both
prkrti, to be structured, to start with. It needs effort and resource to bring scholars in different
disciplines together to structure the Pada and Krama pathas for these sakhas.

          Incidentally, we are arranging to structure Pada and Krama pathas for Sounaka sakha
with financial support from the Maharshi Sandipani Rashtriya Veda Vidya Pratishthan, Ujjain, an
institution of the Government of India. When these pathas are structured, we get them recorded
and bring them on to the website. Similarly, we have to work, subject to availability of resources,
to structure Pada and Krama pathas to Pippalada and Maitrayani sakhas, too. In the next stage, all
the vikrti pathas, eight in number, may have to be structured. Our objective is to upload all these
pathas, as and when structured, on to the website. Similar effort is needed in respect of the
Samaveda sakhas to bring about a kind of uniformity in fullness in the rendering of the sakhas.
Incidentally, the rendering of the Samaveda sakhas is totally different from the rendering of the
other sakhas.

        All that is stated above is in respect of only ten Veda sakhas presently in the knowledge
of scholars in India. It may be that some more Veda sakhas may be discovered with incessant
efforts of Vedic scholars and administrators of archives. The same exercise detailed above in
respect of the recent finds such as Pippalada and Maitrayani has to be followed for any such new
finds.

         The Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams (TTD), Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India are the
largest religious endowment in India. They have a Veda recording project. Their objective is to
record the recitation of the Veda sakhas in different modes to the extent practicable. They are in
the process of uploading the recitation of the Veda sakhas so far recorded to their website
www.tirumala.org. Our idea is to supplement the recording of the recitation of the Veda sakhas
in different modes not done by the TTD, and also to get all the other modes of recitation
structured and recorded for the Veda sakhas, other than Saakala sakha, than what are available at
present. We upload to the website the recitation thus recorded. It is, indeed, a stupendous job. It
requires enormous effort and resources, involves enormous logistics and takes considerable time,
too.

       As the documentary heritage is a website, preservation and conservation of the content in
word and audio pose no problems in view of the present day technology.

7 CONSULTATION

7.1 Provide details of consultation about this nomination with

(a) The Owner of the Heritage

       The nominator of the documentary heritage, the website www.vedamu.org, is Sri Sathya
Sai Veda Pratishtan, a Charitable Trust. The nominator is the owner.

(b) The Custodian

        The Board of Trustees of Sri Sathya Sai Veda Pratishtan is the custodian of the website.
The contact person on behalf of the Nominator is the Managing Trustee, the Chief Executive of
the Trust. The Board of Trustees is wholly agreeable for submission of the nomination.

(c) Indian National Memory of the World committee

         I made a reference to the Director General of Archives, Government of India, New Delhi,
in his capacity as the Chairman of the Indian National Memory of the World Committee to fill
this column with the appropriate recommendation of the National Committee and forward the
Nomination to the Memory of the World Program, UNESCO, Paris. In his letter No. F.24-3(2) /
2004CC of the National Archives of India, Government of India, New Delhi, the Director
General of Archives has advised that the Nomination to the Memory of the World Programme be
forwarded to the UNESCO direct. As such this Nomination is being forwarded to UNESCO

PART B – SUBSIDIARY INFORMATION

8 ASSESSMENT OF RISK

8.1 We do not foresee any threats to this documentary heritage.

9 ASSESSMENT OF PRESERVATION

9.1    The documentary heritage is wholly digitized and on the website. We do not foresee any
problem whatsoever in the context of its preservation.

       The Boston Group Inc., Boston initially constructed the website, and hosts it. Virinchi
Technologies Ltd., Secunderabad, India maintains the website in coordination with the Boston
Group local office at Hyderabad.

PART C - LODGEMENT
This nomination is lodged by:
(Please print Name)

(Signature)
(Date) 27 May 2005




                                     No.F.24-3(2)\2004CC
                                     Government of India,
                                  National Archives of India,
                                 Janpath, New Delhi – 110 001


                                                                                                .

To

The Managing Trustee,
Sri Sthya Sai Veda Pratishtan,
S3-B4, Prasanthi Nilayam – 515134,
Andhra Pradesh

        Sub:    Nomination for the International Register of the Memory of the World
                Programme

Sir,

         I am to refer to your letter dated the 19th May 2005 on the above subject and to request
you to kindly forward the nominations to the Memory of the World Programme, UNESCO
directly for further necessary action.


                                                                                Yours faithfully,

                                                                                  Sd/…
                                                                for Director General of Archives,
                                                                            Government of India.

				
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