Docstoc

Breathing

Document Sample
Breathing Powered By Docstoc
					BREATHING	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Tara	
  Jacobson	
  
THE	
  ROLE	
  OF	
  BREATH	
  IN	
  YOGA	
  

        •        How	
  important	
  is	
  the	
  breath	
  to	
  health?	
  We	
  can	
  go	
  three	
  weeks	
  without	
  food,	
  three	
  days	
  without	
  water	
  but	
  we	
  cannot	
  go	
  
                 three	
  minutes	
  without	
  breathing.	
  The	
  aim	
  is	
  to	
  learn	
  to	
  breathe	
  optimally	
  for	
  good	
  health.	
  
        •        We	
  all	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  breathe—we've	
  been	
  doing	
  it	
  since	
  birth.	
  But	
  do	
  you	
  breathe	
  correctly?	
  Many	
  of	
  us	
  breathe	
  in	
  a	
  
                 shallow	
  manner,	
  only	
  filling	
  the	
  top	
  two	
  thirds	
  of	
  our	
  lungs.	
  This	
  is	
  called	
  a	
  “chest	
  breath.”	
  The	
  shoulders	
  rise	
  and	
  the	
  chest	
  
                 expands	
  with	
  each	
  inhalation.	
  In	
  yoga	
  there	
  is	
  great	
  emphasis	
  on	
  breathing	
  and	
  breathing	
  correctly.	
  
        •        Pranayama	
  is	
  yogic	
  breath	
  control.	
  Yogis	
  and	
  Yoginis	
  (female	
  Yogis)	
  use	
  breath	
  training	
  to	
  manipulate	
  their	
  prana	
  or	
  life	
  
                 force.	
  To	
  break	
  down	
  the	
  word,	
  prana	
  is	
  “that	
  which	
  is	
  infinitely	
  everywhere”	
  and	
  ayama	
  is	
  “stretch	
  or	
  extend”	
  and	
  is	
  the	
  
                 action	
  of	
  pranayama.	
  The	
  best	
  way	
  to	
  describe	
  prana	
  is	
  a	
  life	
  force	
  or	
  energy	
  that	
  is	
  everywhere	
  and	
  can	
  be	
  manifested	
  
                 through	
  the	
  breath.	
  Prana	
  is	
  not	
  oxygen	
  or	
  the	
  breath	
  itself,	
  but	
  the	
  life	
  energy	
  that	
  fills	
  all	
  living	
  things—a	
  universal	
  energy.	
  
        •        How	
  does	
  prana	
  work?	
  According	
  to	
  yoga	
  scripture	
  prana	
  flows	
  through	
  the	
  body	
  along	
  specific	
  pathways	
  on	
  either	
  side	
  of	
  
                 the	
  spine;	
  ida	
  on	
  the	
  left	
  and	
  pingala	
  on	
  the	
  right.	
  The	
  left	
  side	
  represents	
  the	
  moon	
  and	
  the	
  right	
  side	
  represents	
  the	
  sun.	
  
                 Energy	
  also	
  runs	
  down	
  the	
  spinal	
  cord.	
  This	
  pathway	
  is	
  called	
  sushumna.	
  



THE	
  USE	
  OF	
  BREATH	
  IN	
  YOGA	
  

Breath	
  should	
  lead	
  the	
  asana.	
  When	
  a	
  yogi	
  begins	
  a	
  pose	
  it	
  should	
  be	
  in	
  union	
  with	
  the	
  breath	
  and	
  the	
  inhalation	
  or	
  exhalation	
  
should	
  be	
  the	
  catalyst	
  for	
  that	
  movement.	
  In	
  static	
  (held	
  still)	
  poses,	
  the	
  yogi	
  should	
  breathe	
  fully	
  throughout	
  the	
  pose.	
  During	
  
especially	
  challenging	
  asanas,	
  some	
  students	
  will	
  hold	
  their	
  breath.	
  A	
  yoga	
  teacher	
  may	
  give	
  cues	
  during	
  these	
  challenging	
  asanas	
  as	
  
a	
  reminder	
  to	
  breath.	
  	
  

There	
  are	
  many	
  styles	
  of	
  breathing,	
  each	
  with	
  a	
  purpose	
  and	
  result.	
  For	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  class,	
  Ujjayi	
  breathing	
  is	
  used	
  most	
  often.	
  
The	
  use	
  of	
  a	
  single	
  breath	
  will	
  help	
  new	
  students	
  become	
  familiar	
  with	
  this	
  breathing	
  style	
  and	
  become	
  proficient	
  at	
  it.	
  	
  

COMMON	
  YOGA	
  BREATHS:	
  

Ujjayi:	
  Victorious	
  Breath	
  

Ujjai	
  breath	
  or	
  victorious	
  breath	
  is	
  soothing	
  to	
  the	
  nerves,	
  cools	
  the	
  head,	
  helps	
  digestion	
  and	
  brings	
  mental	
  clarity.	
  Inhale	
  through	
  
the	
  nose	
  keeping	
  the	
  lips	
  closed.	
  Soften	
  the	
  tongue	
  and	
  jaw	
  and	
  fill	
  the	
  lungs	
  from	
  the	
  bottom	
  up.	
  Slowly	
  exhale	
  allowing	
  the	
  air	
  to	
  
flow	
  over	
  the	
  vocal	
  cords	
  creating	
  a	
  vibration	
  in	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  the	
  throat.	
  This	
  will	
  create	
  a	
  humming/whisper	
  noise.	
  Allow	
  yourself	
  to	
  
become	
  aware	
  of	
  the	
  rhythm	
  of	
  your	
  breath.	
  The	
  audible	
  sound	
  should	
  only	
  be	
  heard	
  by	
  you	
  or	
  possibly	
  those	
  close	
  by	
  but	
  not	
  so	
  
loud	
  that	
  the	
  class	
  can	
  hear.	
  	
  

Full	
  Complete	
  Breath	
  

Inhale	
  through	
  the	
  nose,	
  filling	
  the	
  entire	
  abdominal	
  cavity	
  with	
  air.	
  The	
  feeling	
  should	
  be	
  that	
  you	
  are	
  filling	
  your	
  lungs	
  in	
  three-­‐
dimensional	
  space:	
  bottom	
  to	
  top,	
  forward	
  and	
  back,	
  side	
  to	
  side.	
  The	
  shoulders	
  and	
  chest	
  should	
  not	
  rise	
  or	
  move.	
  Retain	
  the	
  
breath	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  beats,	
  and	
  then	
  slowly	
  exhale	
  through	
  the	
  nose,	
  emptying	
  lungs	
  completely.	
  

Sitali:	
  Cooling	
  Breath	
  

Sitali	
  or	
  cooling	
  breath	
  is	
  healing	
  to	
  the	
  body,	
  rids	
  the	
  body	
  of	
  excessive	
  heat	
  and	
  activates	
  the	
  liver.	
  Soften	
  the	
  face	
  and	
  mouth,	
  roll	
  
the	
  tongue	
  into	
  a	
  tube	
  then	
  poke	
  the	
  tongue	
  between	
  the	
  lips.	
  Suck	
  the	
  air	
  in	
  through	
  the	
  tongue	
  like	
  sipping	
  water	
  through	
  a	
  straw.	
  
When	
  you	
  have	
  completely	
  filled	
  your	
  lungs,	
  draw	
  the	
  tongue	
  back	
  into	
  your	
  mouth	
  and	
  close	
  the	
  lips.	
  Hold	
  the	
  air	
  in	
  the	
  lungs	
  for	
  a	
  
few	
  seconds	
  then	
  slowly	
  exhale	
  through	
  the	
  nose.	
  

	
  

	
  
Cleansing	
  Breath:	
  

The	
  Cleansing	
  Breath,	
  cleans	
  and	
  ventilates	
  the	
  lungs	
  along	
  with	
  toning	
  up	
  the	
  entire	
  system.	
  Cleansing	
  breath	
  is	
  typically	
  done	
  at	
  
the	
  end	
  of	
  other	
  yoga	
  exercises	
  or	
  just	
  before	
  the	
  final	
  relaxation.	
  	
  

Stand	
  straight	
  with	
  feet	
  close	
  together	
  and	
  arms	
  hanging	
  loosely	
  at	
  the	
  sides.	
  Take	
  a	
  deep	
  breath,	
  hold	
  it	
  for	
  a	
  little	
  while,	
  then	
  purse	
  
your	
  lips	
  as	
  if	
  you	
  were	
  going	
  to	
  whistle.	
  Now	
  start	
  exhaling	
  forcefully,	
  little	
  by	
  little,	
  but	
  do	
  not	
  blow	
  the	
  air	
  out	
  as	
  if	
  you	
  were	
  
blowing	
  out	
  a	
  candle,	
  and	
  do	
  not	
  puff	
  out	
  the	
  cheeks.	
  They	
  should	
  be	
  hollowed.	
  

These	
  successive	
  and	
  forceful	
  exhalations	
  will	
  feel	
  almost	
  like	
  slight	
  coughs	
  which	
  expel	
  the	
  air	
  until	
  the	
  lungs	
  are	
  completely	
  empty.	
  
The	
  effort	
  of	
  the	
  exhalation	
  should	
  be	
  felt	
  in	
  the	
  chest	
  and	
  in	
  the	
  back.	
  

Alternate	
  Nostril	
  Breath:	
  	
  
	
  
In	
  this	
  Breathing	
  Technique,	
  you	
  inhale	
  through	
  one	
  nostril,	
  retain	
  the	
  breath,	
  and	
  exhale	
  through	
  the	
  other	
  nostril	
  in	
  various	
  ratios.	
  
The	
  left	
  nostril	
  is	
  the	
  path	
  of	
  the	
  Nadi	
  called	
  Ida	
  and	
  the	
  right	
  nostril	
  is	
  the	
  path	
  of	
  the	
  Nadi	
  called	
  Pingala.	
  Alternate	
  Nostril	
  Breath	
  
restores,	
  equalizes	
  and	
  balances	
  the	
  flow	
  of	
  Prana	
  in	
  the	
  body.	
  	
  

                                                                                                              	
  




                                                                                                                                                                     	
  
                                                                                                              	
  
                                                                                                              	
  

In	
  Anuloma	
  Viloma	
  (Alternate	
  Nostril	
  Breath),	
  you	
  adopt	
  the	
  Vishnu	
  Mudra	
  with	
  your	
  right	
  hand	
  to	
  close	
  your	
  nostrils.	
  Tuck	
  your	
  
index	
  and	
  middle	
  finger	
  into	
  your	
  nose.	
  Place	
  the	
  thumb	
  by	
  your	
  right	
  nostril	
  and	
  your	
  ring	
  and	
  little	
  fingers	
  by	
  your	
  left.	
  	
  

       1.     Close	
  the	
  right	
  nostril	
  with	
  your	
  right	
  thumb	
  and	
  inhale	
  through	
  the	
  left	
  nostril.	
  Do	
  this	
  to	
  the	
  count	
  of	
  four	
  seconds.	
  
       2.     Immediately	
  close	
  the	
  left	
  nostril	
  with	
  your	
  right	
  ring	
  finger	
  and	
  little	
  finger,	
  and	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  time	
  remove	
  your	
  thumb	
  from	
  
              the	
  right	
  nostril,	
  and	
  exhale	
  through	
  this	
  nostril.	
  Do	
  this	
  to	
  the	
  count	
  of	
  eight	
  seconds.	
  This	
  completes	
  a	
  half	
  round.	
  
       3.     Inhale	
  through	
  the	
  right	
  nostril	
  to	
  the	
  count	
  of	
  four	
  seconds.	
  Close	
  the	
  right	
  nostril	
  with	
  your	
  right	
  thumb	
  and	
  exhale	
  
              through	
  the	
  left	
  nostril	
  to	
  the	
  count	
  of	
  eight	
  seconds.	
  This	
  completes	
  one	
  full	
  round.	
  

Typical	
  ration	
  is	
  1:2.	
  Inhale	
  4,	
  exhale	
  8	
  (4-­‐8-­‐4-­‐8).	
  Working	
  up	
  to	
  Inhale	
  8,	
  Exhale	
  16	
  (8-­‐16-­‐8-­‐16).	
  Start	
  by	
  doing	
  three	
  rounds,	
  adding	
  
one	
  per	
  week	
  until	
  you	
  are	
  doing	
  seven	
  rounds.	
  

*Alternate	
  nostril	
  breathing	
  should	
  not	
  be	
  practiced	
  if	
  you	
  have	
  a	
  cold	
  or	
  if	
  your	
  nasal	
  passages	
  are	
  blocked	
  in	
  any	
  way.	
  Forced	
  
breathing	
  through	
  the	
  nose	
  may	
  lead	
  to	
  complications.	
  In	
  pranayama,	
  it	
  is	
  important	
  not	
  to	
  force	
  anything.	
  If	
  you	
  use	
  the	
  nostrils	
  for	
  
breath	
  control,	
  they	
  should	
  be	
  unobstructed.	
  If	
  they	
  are	
  not,	
  practice	
  throat	
  breathing.	
  

Three	
  part	
  breath:	
  	
  

Three	
  part	
  breath	
  involves	
  breathing	
  sequentially	
  into	
  the	
  three	
  parts	
  of	
  the	
  lungs.	
  The	
  abdomen	
  (lower	
  section	
  of	
  the	
  lungs),	
  
ribcage,	
  and	
  chest	
  (up	
  to	
  the	
  clavicle).