Hawai Community College by sanmelody

VIEWS: 105 PAGES: 338

									                 Hawai`i Community College
                                                                      University of Hawai`i
                                                                            Institutional
                                                                Self-Study in Support of
                                                                        Reaffirmation of
                                                                           Accreditation
                                                                               July 2006


Hawai`i Community College   200 West Kawili Street    Hilo, HI 96720-4091 http://hawaii.hawaii.edu

      Hawai`i Community College   200 West Kawili Street   Hilo, HI 96720-4091 http://hawaii.hawaii.edu
Hawai`i Community College
                             University of Hawai`i

      Institutional Self-Study in Support of
             Reaffirmation of Accreditation
                                   July 2006


                                     Submitted by:
                        Hawai`i Community College
                           200 West Kawaili Street
                              Hilo, HI 96749-4091
                                http://hawaii.hawaii.edu



                                      Submitted to:
                    The Accrediting Commission for
                 Community Colleges of the Western
                  Association of Schools and College




             “




    “Hilo Hanakahi ‘āina pōpōlehua o kulukulu’ ā”
                                 Hilo of one focus
                      Land of the full bloom lehua
                                         Fed by fire
                             Sustained by rainfall
                                    Hilo Hanakahi
                Evidence, Citations and References
As suggested by The Guide to Evaluating Institutions (ACCJC,
2004), primary sources were the predominant type of evidence
used by the writers of Hawai'i Community College’s self-study. In-
text citations for sources are found throughout the narrative and
correspond to a full citation in a list of References, located at the
end of each standard. The American Psychological Association
(APA) format was used for in-text citations and a modified version
of APA for the References. To make it easier for online readers of
the Self-study to access sources, whenever an internet URL was
available, in-text citations were hyperlinked and the full URL’s were
included in the lists of References.
                 CERTIFICATION OF THE INSTITUTIONAL SELF-STUDY REPORT



Date:             August 24, 2006


To:               Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges


From:             Hawai`i Community College
                  200 West Kawili Street
                  Hilo, HI 96720-4091



The Institutional Self-Study Report is submitted for the purpose of assisting in the determination of the
institution’s accreditation status.

We certify that there was broad participation by the campus community, and we believe the Self-Study
Report accurately reflects the nature and substance of this institution.


Signed:

          ______________________________________________________________
          Board of Regents

          ______________________________________________________________
          David McClain, President, University of Hawai`i

          ______________________________________________________________
          John Morton, Vice-President for Community Colleges

          ______________________________________________________________
          Rockne Freitas, Chancellor, Hawai`i Community College

          ______________________________________________________________
          Trina Nahm-Mijo, Accreditation Liaison Officer

          ______________________________________________________________
          Beth Sanders, Co-Chairperson, Accreditation Steering Committee

          ______________________________________________________________
          Jennie Padilla, Co-Chairperson, Accreditation Steering Committee

          ______________________________________________________________
          Lou Zitnik, Chairperson, Academic Faculty Senate

          ______________________________________________________________
          Rebecca Kenney, Chairperson, College Council

          ______________________________________________________________
          Kathy Rodriguez, President, Associated Students UH-HawCC
Table of Contents

                                                     Table of Contents

Introduction................................................................................................................1

Abstract of the Report..............................................................................................17

Organization for the Self Study ...............................................................................25

Organization of the Institution .................................................................................29

Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements ..................47

Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Evaluation .......................64

Institutional Self-Evaluation Using Commission Standards

           Standard I:           Institutional Mission and Effectiveness
                                     I.A Mission.................................................................79
                                     I.B Improving Institutional Effectiveness..................87

           Standard II:          Student Learning Programs and Services
                                    II.A Instructional Programs .......................................105
                                    II.B Student Support Services ...................................137
                                    II.C Library and Learning Support Services .............167

           Standard III: Resources
                            III.A Human Resources ..............................................209
                            III.B Physical Resources.............................................224
                            III.C Technology Resources .......................................236
                            III.D Financial Resources ...........................................253

           Standard IV: Leadership and Governance
                           IV.A Decision-Making Roles and Processes ..............273
                           IV.B Board and Administrative Organization ............288

Evidence Available in Team Room .......................................................................327
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study


                                     INTRODUCTION


          Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study: Hawai‘i Community College

E Komo Mai. Hawai‘i Community College is located on the island of Hawai‘i in the
state of Hawai‘i. It is one of seven community colleges in the University of Hawai‘i
system which also includes the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, the University of
Hawai‘i at West Oahu, the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo and dozens of other educational,
training and research centers across the Hawaiian Islands. The college’s main campus is
located in the port town of Hilo on
the island of Hawai‘i, the
southernmost and largest island in
the Hawaiian archipelago. The
college’s UH Center at West Hawai‘i
is     located    in     Kealakekua,
approximately 110 miles west of
Hilo. The college offers more than
thirty associate degree, certificate
and non-credit programs ranging
from liberal arts and Hawaiian
lifestyles to health services and
technical trades.

History
The college’s origin dates to 1941 when the Territorial legislature established Hawai‘i
Vocational School. A name change occurred in 1956 to Hawai‘i Technical School and
again in May 1970 to Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) at which time school
governance transferred from the Department of Education to the University of Hawai‘i
(UH system). From 1970 through 1990, HawCC was a unit of the University of Hawai‘i
at Hilo (UH at Hilo). In Fall 1990 the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents voted to
separate the two, starting a process spanning more than two decades whereby HawCC
and UH at Hilo sought to disentangle themselves. In July 1997 HawCC’s administrative
responsibilities expanded further when governance of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i
transferred from UH at Hilo to HawCC.

Since 1997 the college has continued to expand its offerings and locations on the island,
developing an identity conducive to its unique mission as an open door institution serving
all segments of the Hawai‘i Island population. Community relationships have made
possible the offering of courses at satellite sites in northeast Hawaii in Kohala at both the
Waimea Middle School and the Kohala Center, on the Hamakua Coast at Honokaa, and
on the south side of the island at Ka‘u High School, Ka‘u Rural Health facility and the
Na‘alehu Youth Center. Growth of the college has averaged about 1% annually for the
past ten years even with tuition rate increases, fluctuations in the economy and a
decreasing unemployment rate.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                1
        Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

        Fall 2004 was the start of a new era for the college with changes in administration at both
        the college and system level. A focus on program reviews interwoven with student
        learning necessitated new policies and procedures. The college developed and is
        implementing an approach to planning and assessment that is integrated and systematic.
        The state legislature approved a permanent increase of over $4 million in general funds
        effective July 1, 2006. Construction-in-progress funds are awaiting release by the
        governor; private public partnerships have been formed for development of new
        campuses, in east Hawai‘i as well as in west Hawai‘i. The open doors of Hawai‘i
        Community College are opening wider; it is a good time to be part of the college ohana.

                           Hawai‘i Community College at a Glance Fall 2005
Enrollment
                                                                                    Student Diversity
Total Enrollment                         2,377
Full Time Equivalent                     1,480
                                                                             All Other(2)
Attendance Status
                                                                                  11%
Full-Time                                 46%                     Pacific
Part-Time                                 54%                  Islander(1)              Chinese    Filipino
Average Credit Hours Taken                                          3%                    1%         13%
Full-Time                                 13.5
                                                        Mixed Ethnic
Part-Time                                   5.9
                                                            13%
Registration Status
Continuing                              52.8%                                                                 Haw aiian/Part
Returning                               10.1%                                                                   Haw aiian
First-Time                              24.9%                   Caucasian                                          29%
                                                                                            Japanese
Transfer                                12.2%                      20%
                                                                                               10%
Gender
Men                                       36%
Women                                     64%
Residency                                         1 Includes Guamanian/Chamorro, Micronesian, Samoan, Tongan, Other
                                                      Pacific islander, Mixed Pacific Islander
Island of Hawai‘i                         87%     2 Includes Korean, Laotian, Thai, Vietnamese, Other Asian, Indian, Hispanic,
Other Hawaiian Islands                      8%        African American, American Indian, Alaska Native

U.S. Mainland                               3%
Foreign                                     2%
Age                                                                               Faculty Diversity
Average                                   26.4
Under 18                                    8%                               All Other(2)     Filipino
18-24                                     54%                                     3%
                                                                                       Chinese 5%
25 and older                              38%                        Portugese            3%         Haw aiian/Part
Programs Offered                                                         2%                            Haw aiian
Associates of Arts                            1                                                          10%
Associates of Science                         5
Associates of Applied Science                15       Caucasian
Academic Subject Certificate                  2          41%
Certificate of Achievement                   16                                                                Japanese
Certificate of Completion                     9                                                                   36%
Bachelor’s *                                  5
Master’s *                                    5
Graduate Certificate *                        3
* Degrees are offered by the UH Center at West Hawai‘i in support of distance delivered programs offered by the UH System
baccalaureate-degree-granting institutions




                                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                                 2
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study


Demographics
Hawai‘i Community College with its UH Center at West Hawai‘i is the only
comprehensive, open-door, community based college on the island. Hawai‘i County,
which covers the entire island, has been designated by the U.S. Census Bureau as the
most ethnically-diverse county in the United States, with more than 28 percent of the
island’s 162,971 estimated                            Cultural Diversity 2004
citizens claiming two or more
races. More than a quarter of             State of Hawai‘i Students Faculty   County of Hawai‘i
the island’s population claim
                                  50%
Asian ancestry, most of them
                                  40%
Japanese. Just under a third of
                                  30%
the population listed itself as
Caucasian.     The    college’s 20%
students and faculty mirror the 10%
                                   0%
county’s diversity.




                                                                                  Filipino
                                               Caucasian




                                                                                                     Hawaiian/Part




                                                                                                                                   All Others
                                                                 Chinese




                                                                                                                      Japanese
                                                                                                       Hawaiian
About 10% of Hawaiians and
other Pacific Islanders in the
county classified themselves as
purely Hawaiian or Pacific Islander in
                                                            Hawaiian/Part Hawaiian Enrollment UH System
ancestry, while 31% of Hawaiian and
Pacific Islanders listed themselves as       35.0%
part-Hawaiian or part-Pacific Islander
                                             30.0%
in combination with one or more other                                                                                              UHCC
races. HawCC consistently enrolls the        25.0%
                                                                                                                                   Haw ai‘i CC
highest percentage of Hawaiians and          20.0%
                                                                                                                                   UHM
part Hawaiians in the UH System.             15.0%
                                                                                                                                   UHH
                                             10.0%
                                                                                                                                   UHWO
The age group of 35-54 year olds              5.0%
accounts for the largest percentage           0.0%
(31.8%) in the county followed by                              2001        2002              2003             2004   2005
those under 15 years of age (21.3%).
The 20-34 year olds make up
16.3% of the total population;                              Haw CC Enrollm e nt by Stude nt Age

the 65 or older crowd (13.5%).
The thinking-about-retiring 55-                            2002-03                2003-04                            2004-05
64 age group comes in next-to-    600
last (9.5%) with the smallest     500
percentage (7.5%) being our       400
forthcoming college students,     300
ages 15-19. Enrollment ages       200
for HawCC vary with the           100
                                     0
majority of students either                    <18             18-19       20-21             22-24        25-29      30-34       35+
recently out of high school, or
non-traditional or older.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                   3
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

                                                                        Annual Undergraduate Tuition $
As of 2000, the median household income in                                  for Full-Time Students

Hawai‘i County was $39,805, with the largest                          (*HawC C tuition is based on 24 credits)

percentage of households (18.4%) making                      $4,000
$50,000-74,999. Of the island’s 52,945
households, nearly 12% had incomes of less than              $3,500
                                                                                                    UH at
$10,000. Median earnings for male full-time                  $3,000                                 Manoa
workers were $31,955 a year, while median
                                                                                     UH at Hilo
earnings for female full-time workers were                   $2,500

$26,164 a year. Lower tuition rates make HawCC               $2,000
                                                                                                  UH at West
an option for many residents seeking a quality                                                      Oahu
education.                                                   $1,500
                                                                            HawCC
                                                             $1,000
Enrollment growth posted from fall 2002 through
fall 2004 has been large in historical terms and      $500

fairly consistent across the UH system. Fall 2005       $0
numbers dropped 2.6% (63 students) and pre-                  2001-02 2002-03 2003-04                 2004-05     2005-06

registrations for fall 2006 remain behind those of
the previous year. These
                                                Student Headcount and FTE
declines can be linked to low
                                                     Fall 1998 - Fall 2005
rates of unemployment. As a
community college, HawCC’s
student base is primarily island
residents. Of the college’s                        2,090
                                                                                                        2,377
student population 87% claim                2,279                           2,346                   2,440
                                       2,308               2,075 2,182
the island of Hawai‘i as their
permanent      residence     and
another 8% are permanent                           1,432                                                1,480
                                           1,564
                                      1,593                1,378 1,431 1,496                        1,522
residents of the state.

The rate of unemployment for 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Hawai‘i County has dropped          Full Time Equivalent (FTE) Headcount Enrollment
significantly over the last
several years; from 9.1% in 1998 to 3.5% in 2005. A comparison of changes in
enrollment compared to changes in the
                                                      Comparison of Changes in Enrollment
unemployment rate reveals a direct                         Compared to Unemployed
relationship between the two; when the 30.0%
county unemployment rate increases,
                                            20.0%
enrollments increase; when they decrease,
                                            10.0%
enrollments tend to follow.
                                                      0.0%
                                                             1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
The UH system reports that active recruiting        -10.0%

by the four-year campuses has contributed to        -20.0%

large increases in first-time freshmen from         -30.0%
                                                                                         % Change - Unemployed
                                                                                         % Change - FTE
the U.S. mainland over the last several             -40.0%                               % Change - Headcount
years. HawCC recruitment efforts have               -50.0%
focused more on its Intensive English
                                                    -60.0%

                                                    -70.0%



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                4
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

Program (IEP) which gives international
students a chance to learn English in a                      Enrollment as Percent of Unemployed
beautiful and culturally diverse environment
as they experience a less commercialized            90%
side of Hawai‘i and the United States. IEP          80%
                                                    70%
students are not counted in the college’s
                                                    60%
credit enrollment; however, many elect to
                                                    50%
enroll in credit classes when they finish the
                                                    40%
program. Another group that HawCC has
                                                    30%
been successful in recruiting would appear          20%
to be those not working. An analysis of             10%
enrollments as a percentage of the number            0%
of persons unemployed shows a substantial               1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
increase; in fall 2005, headcount enrollment
(2,377) was 83% of the number unemployed                              Headcount Enrollm ent
(2,850) compared to 36% in 1998. Full time                            Full Tim e Equivalent (FTE)
equivalent percentages (FTE) have also
increased over time, 52% in 2005 compared
to 25% in 1998.
                                                                     Degrees & Certificates
Enrollment projections for HawCC indicate                              Awarded 2005-06
a stable upward trend. The UH system
                                                                                ASC
projects annual growth of about 1.4%                                  AA                      CC & CA
                                                                                 3%
through fall 2008; for HawCC this would                               27%                       29%
result in an increase of approximately 100
students. The college is actively recruiting
high school students, is working with                                          AAS & AS
Oregon State University and the UH system                                        41%
on articulation, and has requested funds in
the biennium budget for development of a
comprehensive marketing plan. These                                 Degrees & Certificates Awarded
actions coupled with the development of                             By Major Program Area 2005-06
new campuses on both sides of the island
secure enrollment.                                        Applied
                                                        Technology                                  Liberal Arts
HawCC awards a variety of certificates and
degrees including nine Certificates of                     25%                                          31%
Completion (CC), sixteen Certificates of
Achievement (CA), fifteen Associates in                    HLS/
Applied Science degrees (AAS), five                       TEAM
Associates in Science degrees (AS), two                                                         Business Ed
                                                            5%
Academic Subject Certificates (ASC), an                         Public              Food Services 12%
Applied Technical Studies degree (ATS),                        Services     Health       8%
and an Associate of Arts degree (AA). Total                      13%
degrees and certificates awarded for                                       Services
2005-06 were 400; in 2004-05 the total was                                    6%



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               5
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

372 and 395 in 2003-04.
                                               Headcount Enrollment Compared to
The college actively responds to needs      Degrees and Certificates Awarded 2005-06
of the community by developing new                  (excludes unclassified students)
areas of study and altering existing
ones. Since 2000, additions to HawCC
Degrees and Certificates include a                                  1,261
Digital Media Arts Certificate of          1400                                 Headcount
Completion and a Substance Abuse           1200 780                             Enrollment
Counseling Certificate of Completion;      1000
                                            800                                 Degrees &
an Environmental Studies Academic           600                                 Certificates
Subject Certificate; an Associate in        400                                 Awarded
Science degree and Certificate of           200      106           294
Achievement in Tropical Forest                0
Ecosystem       and       Agroforestry     Liberal Arts    Career & Technical
Management (TEAM); and an
Associate in Applied Science degree in
Hawaiian Life Styles (HLS), which includes three distinctive tracks: Hula (dancing),
Lawai‘a (fishing), and Mahi‘ai (taro farming). A variety of existing programs have
undergone major revision to update their curriculum, incorporating student learning
outcomes developed with input from industry-based program advisory councils.

The college also serves the island                              OCET Registration
community by offering a variety of
programs and courses through its 6000                               4975         4589           4426
                                        5000         3804
Office of Continuing Education 4000
and Training (OCET). This area of 3000
the college offers non-credit pre- 2000
collegiate courses and programs, 1000
                                            0
short-term education and training
                                                     2003           2004         2005           2006
courses    and      programs,       an
accredited Intensive English
Program      for      international                     OCET Registrations by Program 2005-06
students, apprenticeship trades-
specific (non-credit) academic
courses, workforce development                   English / ESL        Other
and employment preparation                                        Programs (16)      Culinary Arts
                                       Office &       4%
                                                                                      Food Prep
courses, and extensive online          Clerical                        12%
                                                                                         17%
accredited     and       certificate     4%
courses. Registration             in    Job Skills Prep                                      Health Care
continuing      education       and           5%                                                 11%
community service non-credit               Business                                          Agriculture
classes has more than tripled                 5%                                            Landscaping
since 1993. (Non-credit numbers
                                                 Family / Child           Apprenticeship     Gardening
are registration counts, not
                                                      Care Computers Journeyworker              11%
unduplicated headcounts.)                             10%         10%           11%




                             Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                   6
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

A challenge facing the college for both credit and non-credit offerings is the vast size of
the island. Covering 4,028 square miles, the island is the youngest and largest of the
Hawaiian Islands — twice the size of all the other major Islands combined. And with two
of the five volcanoes that created the island still active, it continues to grow. Yet
population wise, the 2000 census reports the island’s population per square mile as the
lowest in the state.

                                          Geography Quick Facts
                                 State             Hawaii                    Honolulu                   Kauai                  Maui
                                Average            County                     County                   County                 County
       Land area,
       square miles               6,423                 4,028                           600                  622                1,159
       Population, 2005
       estimate             1,275,194             167,293                      905,266                 62,640                 139,884
       Persons per
       square mile                   199                    42                    1,509                      101                   121



                                                                                      Enrollment by Maj or Areas 2005

The majority of the college’s
students come from the areas                       1600


closest to the college, Hilo/Puna                  1400
                                                   1200
on the east side of the island and                 1000

Kailua-Kona on the west side.                       800

The college is increasingly using                   600
                                                    400
distance learning sites and                         200

internet-based courses to make                          0

college accessible to all segments
                                                                Hilo           Puna           Kona         Kohala        Hamakua     Kau


of the island’s population.
                                                                            Immediate Transition to 2-Year College
The college is the postsecondary
                                                                                                Hawai‘i       Nation
choice for an increasing number of
local high school graduates. The                  25%
                                                                       21.4%                                            21.7%              21.5%
“going rate” (percentage of high                  20%
                                                                                               19.7%

school June graduates who enroll                                                                                                    14.2%
in college the following semester)                15%       12.8%
                                                                                        10.4%
                                                                                                               11.6%
for the county is on the rise.                    10%
Students’ goals for enrolling vary;               5%
the majority seeking career and
technical training.                               0%
                                                                  2000                      2001                    2002                 2003



                                      Educational Objective

 900       780
 800
 700                                        638
 600                      493
 500
 400
 300                                                                                                                    208
 200                                                                                                                                        128
                                                                       57                       73
 100
   0
        A.A. - 33%   A.S. - 21%         A.A.S. - 27%             C.A. - 2%                 C.C. - 3%           Based at Other       Unclassified/No
                                                                                                                Campus - 9%           Data - 5%




                                Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                            7
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

Graduation rate as defined by the UH system is the cumulative percentage of full-time,
first-time, degree seeking freshmen in a given fall semester who graduated within a
designated period of time. The designated period of time is 150% of the normal time to
completion. For example, students in a 2-year program would graduate within 150% time
if they graduate within 3 years. The
                                               Average Graduation & Persistance Rates
University of Hawai‘i Community
                                                          Fall Cohorts 2005
Colleges (UHCC) have an average 150%
graduation rate of 14% for the 2004                   Graduated    Still Enrolled
cohort and 15% for the 2005 cohort.
HawCC had the highest graduation rate
                                              40%
of the seven campuses both in 2004                                        14%
(19%) and in 2005 (21%). HawCC was                       20%
                                              20%
the only college in the UHCC system                      15%              21%
where men had a higher graduation rate
than women; 22% compared to 17%.               0%
                                                              UHCC               HawCC

The average continuation rate for the UHCC system was 21% in 2004, dropping to 20%
in 2005. HawCC and Maui had the lowest rate at 15% in 2004 and in 2005 HawCC was
lowest with 14%. HawCC’s continuation rate of women (19%) was higher than those of
men (10%).

The success rate, the sum of                        Number of HawCC Students Transferring
graduation and continuation rates,
for the UHCC system averaged 35%         160

in both 2004 and 2005. HawCC’s
                                         140
success rate of 34% in 2004 was
                                                                                    Transfers to Out of
second highest in the system behind      120                                        State Institutions
Kapi`olani and Leeward, who both
reported 38%. HawCC’s success            100                                        Transfers to Haw aii
rates for women (35%) were slightly                                                 Private Institutions
                                                                                    (excludes HPU and
higher than those of men (32%). In         80
                                                                                    Cham inade)
2005 the college’s success rate                                                     Transfers to a UH
                                           60
equaled the UHCC system average                                                     Com m unity College

of 35%.                                    40
                                                                                    Transfers to UH 4-
                                                                                    Year Institutions
HawCC students who transfer seem           20
to stay in the UH System with the
largest number moving on to one of          0
                                                    Fall   Fall   Fall    Fall
the system’s baccalaureate-granting                 2001   2002   2003    2004
institutions.




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                8
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

Another challenge facing the                               Basic Skills Completion Comparison - Fall 2004
college,    along   with    colleges                                             Began in Basic Skills               No Basic Skills
nationwide, is the number of
                                           100%
students entering who appear to be                             86.4%                                 86.7%
                                                                         79.21%
below college level in basic skill          80%                                                                 75.50%


areas. Basic skills are defined as          60%
                                                                                                                                 60.7%
                                                                                                                                         53.45%
math and English courses not
applicable to a degree or certificate.      40%

An analysis of students not taking          20%
basic skill courses with those who            0%
did shows a higher success rate for                                Eng 22                                   Eng 21                 Math 24X
students taking the basic skills
courses.

Recommendations from Last Comprehensive Visit
The final evaluation report from the last comprehensive visit to the college (October 24-
26, 2000) by representatives from the Accrediting Commission for Community and
Junior colleges (ACCJC) listed seven recommendations:

   -   making the vision of the Four Cornerstones a reality

There has been monumental dialogue at campus gatherings about the four cornerstones.
At a March 3, 2006 All-College Learning Day, which was one of the best attended
college activities in recent history, the Four Cornerstones morphed into seven
imperatives: Community Development, Workforce Development, Cultural Competency,
Environment, Hawaiian Culture and Values, Healthy Communities, and Technology.

   -   communicating of the college mission island-wide

A map of the island showing where the                                                  Hawi 4

college’s credit students come from                                                     Kapaau 22
                                                                                                             Honokaa 74
indicates that the college is reaching                                     Kamuela 103
                                                                                                                Paauilo 12
                                                                                                                    Ookala 3
students island-wide. A few projects                                            Waikoloa 34                           Laupahoehoe 6
                                                                                                                         Papaaloa 3
that show the college’s dedication to                                                                        Hakalau 4
                                                                                                            Pepeekeo 35
                                                                                                                           Honomu 8
serve all segments of the Hawai‘i                                                                                         Papaikou 57

Island community include                                                 Kailua-Kona 268                                   Hilo 1339

  * the Kama‘aina application, which                                       Holualoa 18
                                                                                                                            Keaau 325
                                                                                                                          Kurtistown 96
    gives juniors and seniors an                                           Keauhou 12                                          Pahoa 213
                                                                               Kealakekua 76
    opportunity to complete a HawCC                                           Captain Cook 61
                                                                                                                      Mountain View 63
                                                                                                               Volcano 24
    application and have a conditional                                          Honaunau 19                      HNP 5

    acceptance letter printed on site at                                                                        Enrollment by Location
    their local high schools
  * development         of    community                                                                     Pahala 24
                                                                                                                           Hawaii Community College
    relationships, making possible the                                                          Naalehu 23
                                                                                        Ocean View 14
                                                                                                                           Fall 04 & Spring 05
                                                                                                                           Enrollment for Big Island
    offering of courses at seven             Source: ODS enrollment data for HawCC Fall 04 and Spring 05.

    satellite sites around the island



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                    9
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

 * presentations by the Chancellor at community-based groups concerned with the future
   of the island’s youth; such as a Saturday, July 8, 2006 community meeting at
   Laupahoehoe High and Elementary School which resulted in the college offering two
   sections of its Construction Academy curriculum for the high school for the 2006-07
   academic year
 * a multitude of Rural Development Projects, offered through the college’s Office of
   Continuing Education & Training, to identify and meet economic, employment, and
   training needs island-wide
 * development of the A.S. degree in Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agroforestry
   Management and its expansion to students in West Hawai‘i starting fall 2006.

   -   developing resources to support a cohesive research function

In addition to continuation of the efforts described in the Midterm Report, the college
hired a full-time institutional analyst in January 2005, who has been instrumental in
developing assessment data for program reviews. Through his efforts an assessment
website has been created, giving faculty access to a variety of assessment ideas and data.
The data provided in the program review process was used in development of the
college’s budget request for the 2007-09 biennium.

Plans are to hire additional support in the research area during the 2006-07 academic
year. Funds have also been requested as a result of unit reviews in the student services
area for a strategic enrollment management system to improve student communication,
recruitment and retention and also provide historical data for assessment and planning.

   -   strengthening of the relationship with the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

A co-location agreement between the UH at Hilo and HawCC has been reached; HawCC
will assume facilities management of the Manono campus starting October 2006.
HawCC received approximately $400,000 from the legislature for academic year 2006-07
to reimburse the UH at Hilo for those services the two colleges will continue to share.
The college received another $1.6 million for facilities support on the Manono campus.

   -   supporting the distance learning delivery system

Developments in support of distance learning at HawCC include
   * formation by the college’s Academic Senate of a Distance Education (DE) ad hoc
      committee with representation from instruction, student and academic support to
      review issues and make recommendations regarding Distance Education using
      the Guidelines for Implementation presented in the ACCJC Distance Learning
      Manual, pp. 8-14 and relevant UH system policies
   * sponsorship of staff development activities such as a web conference to introduce
      the use of pods, blogs, wikis and writely to improve and assess student learning
   * provide workshops and individualized instruction to help faculty utilize and
      manage web pages




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                10
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

    *   utilization of the college’s Title III, I Ola Haloa grant to aggressively engage in
        distance education endeavors particularly in the Hawai‘i Island’s rural districts of
        Kohala, Kona, Ka‘u, Hamakua and Puna.

    -   developing and applying uniform standards for curriculum

In addition to the college’s response included in the Midterm Report, recent
developments include completion of an extensive review of the curriculum process by the
Education Policy Committee of the Academic Senate, resulting in updated procedures
and forms. The new online fillable forms incorporate student learning outcomes and will
help establish uniform standards. Following adoption Spring 2006, a Curriculum Portal
(http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/curricula/) was developed online to improve faculty
access to current procedures, forms, and resources, taking effect August 1, 2006.

    -   planning for facilities that will promote the goal of autonomy

Chancellor Rockne Freitas arrived at HawCC August 3, 2004 with a mission of “getting
shovels in the ground.” Quickly realizing that appropriation of sufficient funds from the
legislature to develop campuses on both sides of the island was doubtful in the near
future, he set out to find alternative ways for campus development. The result was the
formation of private public partnerships.

April 20, 2006 President McClain representing the UH system, Chancellor Freitas and
representatives of Hawai‘i Campus Developers LLC signed a Real Estate Development
Service Agreement for a HawCC campus in Hilo to be constructed on the state’s
Komohana property. June 15, 2006 President McClain, Chancellor Freitas and
representatives from Hiluhilu Development LLC signed a memorandum of understanding
for the first extension phase of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i.

With these agreements signed the college is awaiting release of approved CIP funds.
Once funds are released by Governor Lingle, the planning and design for both campuses
will begin. Meanwhile the college continues to renovate buildings on the Manono
campus, and plans to keep the facility in conjunction with the future Komohana Street
location.

Significant Events in HawCC’s accreditation history since the last comprehensive visit,
October 24-26, 2000

January 19, 2001      Accreditation reaffirmed by ACCJC, with a requirement that the college
                      complete an Interim Report to be submitted by November 1, 2002 to address
                      seven recommendations made by the evaluation team
July 1, 2002          Shirley Metcalf, Director of Office of Continuing Education & Training
                      takes leave without pay
August 1, 2002        John Carroll, Dean of Student Services reassigned as Acting Director of
                      Office of Continuing Education & Training; Peiper Toyama named Acting
                      Dean of Student Services
October 2002          HawCC submits Interim (Midterm) Report to ACCJC




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                11
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

January 16, 2003       Peiper Toyama, Acting Dean of Student Services resigns; John Carroll has
                       dual role as Dean of Student Services and Acting Director of the Office of
                       Continuing Education & Training
January 17, 2003       ACCJC accepts interim report; the college is commended for its careful
                       attention to the development of the report and urged to continue the
                       development of its research capabilities; Also recommended a review of the
                       relationship between HawCC and UHH, “particularly in facility utilization”
January 27, 2003       UH System submits Substantive Change Request related to the
                       reorganization of the UH system eliminating the Office of the Senior Vice
                       President and Chancellor for Community Colleges, realigning the reporting
                       structure for college provosts to the President of the UH System, and
                       changing the provosts’ titles to “chancellor”
April 3-4, 2003        ACCJC team visits University of Hawaii system to gather additional
                       information about the substantive change request related to the
                       reorganization
April 21, 2003         ACCJC grants approval of the system reorganization requiring additional
                       reports and reviews: August 1, 2003, November 1, 2003 (report to be
                       followed by a visit), and April 1, 2004 (report to be followed by a visit)
June 2003              AS Nursing program’s accreditation is reaffirmed by the Nursing
                       Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) for eight years, with no interim report or
                       revisit required
June 30, 2003          Sandra Sakaguchi steps down from chancellorship; Dr. Shirley Daniel, a
                       faculty member in the UH at Manoa College of Business Administration and
                       a holder of an endowed chairship, is appointed to work in a dual capacity as
                       the interim Chancellor of HawCC
August 1, 2003         UH System submits report to ACCJC on implementation of the
                       reorganization
August 31, 2003        Harry Kawamura, Dean of Instruction retires; Noreen Yamane appointed
                       Interim Dean of Instruction
October 2003           HawCC submits Midterm Report to ACCJC
November 1, 2003       UH System submits report to ACCJC on implementation of the
                       reorganization
November 17-18, 2003   ACCJC visits UH System
December 30, 2003      Alan Subica, Director of Administrative Services retires
January 2004           ACCJC accepts August and November reports from UH System and requests
                       that the community colleges respond to three additional recommendations
January 23, 2004       HawCC Midterm Report accepted by ACCJC; the college commended for
                       the progress made in addressing the Commission’s recommendations. This
                       letter includes findings from a Fall 2003 team visit to the University of
                       Hawaii Community Colleges, which sited lack of an active program review
                       process as a system-wide issue. The college was directed to address this issue
                       and become active with the rest of the University of Hawaii Community
                       Colleges in developing appropriate policies and procedures
March 1, 2004          Sara Narimatsu and Wilt Watanabe appointed as Acting Co-Directors of the
                       Office of Continuing Education & Training; John Carroll returns full time as
                       Dean of Student Services
March 5, 2004          All campus learning day focuses on assessment
March 22, 2004         Mike Leialoha appointed Interim Director of Administrative Services
                       (subsequently appointed Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs)
March 30, 2004         UH System submits report to ACCJC on the substantive change request
                       related to the system reorganization and other commission recommendations
April 13-16, 2004      ACCJC visits UH System
June 2004              Dr. David McClain named Acting President (subsequently appointed
                       President) of the University of Hawaii System upon Dr. Evan Dobelle’s
                       departure



                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 12
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

August 2004            The Community College Survey of Student Engagement results released.
                       HawCC recognized for high performance in two critical benchmark areas for
                       student involvement: Academic Challenge and Active and Collaborative
                       Learning
August 3, 2004         Dr. Rockne Freitas appointed Chancellor; Dr. Shirley Daniel, Interim
                       Chancellor returns to UH at Manoa
August 25-27, 2004     Dr. Ruth Stiehl holds the first of several workshops at HawCC focused on
                       outcomes and assessment, evidence of the college’s commitment to improve
                       student learning and allocate its resources to support student learning
October 18, 2004       Douglas Dykstra appointed Dean of Instruction (title later changed to Vice
                       Chancellor for Academic Affairs); Rebecca Kenney appointed Director of
                       Office of Continuing Education & Training; Noreen Yamane appointed as
                       Interim Assistant Dean
November 15-18, 2004   Dr. Barbara Beno chairs ACCJC team that visits UH System
January 31, 2005       ACCJC accepts March 30, 2004 UH System report and requests a Progress
                       Report by April 1, 2005 that details further progress made on the November
                       2004 Visit Team recommendations 2,4,5,6,and 7
January, 2005          ACCJC in separate actions places six of the seven UHCC Community
                       Colleges on Warning, directing them to resolve recommendations 2,4,5,6,
                       and 7 and address recommendations contained in the reports of the campus
                       visiting teams; Progress Report is required by April 1, 2005
January 31, 2005       ACCJC requires HawCC to submit a report by April 1, 2005 on its own
                       progress in developing a practice of program review that is used to inform
                       institutional decision making and resource distribution, and that leads to
                       institutional improvement, as well as participate in the resolution of
                       community college system-wide issues
March 4, 2005          All campus learning day focuses on creating and mapping program student
                       learning outcomes
April 1, 2005          HawCC submits report to ACCJC
April 4-8, 2005        ACCJC evaluation team meets with HawCC Administrators on Oahu; does
                       not visit HawCC
June 28, 2005          ACCJC reviews April 2005 Progress Report and ACCJC April 2005 Visit
                       Team report; acts to issue a Warning over concern that the college fully
                       implement a program review policy that revolves around a “conscious effort
                       to improve student learning…and that the college organizes its key processes
                       and allocates its resources to support student learning,”; the college is to
                       submit a Progress Report by October 15, 2005 and to prepare for an ACCJC
                       visit team evaluation in November 2005
July 1, 2005           HawCC Food Service programs in Hilo and West Hawaii are accredited by
                       the Accrediting Commission of the American Culinary Federation until June
                       30, 2008
October 2005           UHCC establishes program review policy, UHCCP #5.202
October 15, 2005       HawCC submits Progress Report to ACCJC
October 21, 2005       BOR grants permanent status for the Tropical Forest Ecosystem and
                       Agroforestry Management (TEAM) Program conferring an Associate in
                       Science degree and a Certificate of Achievement
November 14, 2005      First set of HawCC program/unit reviews (12) is submitted to the HawCC
                       College Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC)
November 14-16, 2005   ACCJC Team visits HawCC; ACCJC Team visits UHCC system
November 17, 2005      "Developing Standards-Based Assessments for the Classroom" presented by
                       Dennis A. Johnston, Ph.D. San Diego County Office of Education, evidence
                       of the college’s commitment to improve student learning and allocate its
                       resources to support student learning
December 2005          Intensive English Program accredited by the Commission on English
                       Language Program Accreditation (CEA)



                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 13
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

January 31, 2006      ACCJC accepts HawCC’s October 2005 Progress Report and removes
                      Warning; instructs college and the UHCC System to demonstrate further
                      progress on the issues of assessment, institutional effectiveness and
                      improvement, as provided for in the spring 2005 accreditation team reports
                      to the college and the System; next comprehensive evaluation of HawCC to
                      occur Fall 2006
January 31, 2006      ACCJC accepts Progress Report submitted by the UHCC system and
                      commends UH and its President for their work to bring the community
                      colleges into alignment with accreditation standards
February 2006         College Effectiveness Review Committee, College Council, and Academic
                      Senate complete standardized review of initial set of twelve program/unit
                      reviews. The Chancellor makes $25,000 available for distribution based on
                      program review priorities
February 2006         HawCC’s Children’s Center is accredited by the National Association for the
                      Education of Young Children through 2011
March 3, 2006         The collaborative, interactive dialogue, “After Ten Years . . . What is the
                      Vision/Mission of HawCC?” that occurred at the college’s All Campus
                      Learning Day produces a draft of a vision and mission statement complete
                      with elucidating statements for college "cornerstones"; Input on 2006 self
                      study is solicited from all attendees using an all-encompassing, yet
                      anonymous evaluation, planning, and improvement “post-it-note” activity
April 2006            HawCC administration uses program/unit reviews and strategic plan to
                      complete supplemental and biennium budget requests, linking educational
                      planning, student learning, and resource allocation
April 20, 2006        UH, HawCC, and Hawaii Campus Developers LLC sign Real Development
                      Service Agreement for HawCC campus in Hilo at Komohana property,
                      autonomous from the UH at Hilo
May 2006              UHCC establishes Council of Community College Chancellors, UHCCP
                      #1.101 and Strategic Planning Council, UHCCP #4.101
May 18, 2006          BOR grants permanent status for the Hawaiian Lifestyles (Hula, Mahi`ai and
                      Lawai`a Tracks) Program conferring an Associate in Applied Science degree
June 15, 2006         UH, HawCC and Hiluhilu Development LLC sign memorandum of
                      understanding, first phase of UH Center at West Hawaii
July 2006             HawCC Academic Development Plan with amended vision, mission and
                      imperative statements approved by the BOR

Student Learning Outcomes
The college has made significant progress in the area of student learning outcomes. Its
program review and new curriculum review processes reflect an institutional commitment
to improvement. For the most part, faculty assess student achievement through the
traditional avenues of examinations, presentations, group activities, and projects. With
greater emphasis being placed on assessing student learning, a number of individual
faculty members and departments have began experimenting with other avenues of
assessment. Other departments are refining existing assessments tools to provide
evidence of student learning, modifying teaching methodologies when data shows a need
for alternate or further emphasis.

In the nursing program, students’ pass rates for the 2004 NCLEX-RN national exam were
lower than faculty expected. Consequently the nursing program instituted a review
course to better prepare students. In spring 2005, twenty-one of the twenty-two students
passed on the first try with the remaining student passing on the second try for a pass rate
of 100%. Other programs, such as marketing and accounting, have revised their


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                14
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

curriculum to include capstone projects. Another group is developing an electronic
portfolio, which will be introduced to students in their freshman year and completed as
part of a capstone course taken the semester they graduate.

Faculty are developing rubrics to use in grading and involving industry experts in the
evaluation process. Others utilize national contests, public performances, and service
learning activities to assess student learning. The college’s Early Childhood Education
program is utilizing a survey as an assessment tool.

The English Department at HawCC uses departmental examinations for its finals in all
developmental writing courses; exams are graded collaboratively by a team of English
faculty to ensure uniform grading occurs. Students in remedial and developmental
reading courses are required to complete a competency-based, computer-based program
of reading, being required to pass each competency before they progress to the next level.
In the college’s non-credit employment preparation classes, students work at their own
pace learning business skills using competency based materials.

Programs receiving federal funds under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical
Education Act have a history of tracking student success through core indicator data that
measures program outcomes using number of credits earned by program majors, graduate
placement rate, degrees awarded, and retention. Many technical programs have
culminating activities, such as the college’s model home project, which require students
to exhibit the skills they have learned in previous courses.

The college also participates in the              Student Learning Benchmarks
Community College Survey of
Student Engagement (CCSSE).                             HawCC        National Benchmark
CCSSE’s survey instrument, The                    65.9
Community College Student Report, 70.0                      58.1      56.1      55.7
provides information on student 60.0                   50.8      49.9      51.8      50.6
                                                                                          52.3
                                                                                               51.0
                                           50.0
engagement, a key indicator of
learning. The survey asks questions 40.0
that assess institutional practices and 30.0
                                           20.0
student behaviors that are correlated
highly with student learning and 10.0
                                            -
student retention. Results of the
                                                                                                 Student
                                                                                   Support for
                                                       Collaborative



                                                                       Academic
                                                                       Challenge




                                                                                                           Interaction
                                                                                                  Effort




2004 survey recognized HawCC as
                                                                                                            Student-
                                                        Active and




                                                                                                             Faculty
                                                                                    Learners
                                                         Learning




one of the highest performing
institutions in its size category on
two of five national benchmarks –
active and collaborative learning and academic challenge. On the other three – student
effort, student-faculty interaction, and support for learners – the college also scored above
the benchmark.

The college recognizes the importance of institutionalizing the outcomes effort.
Evidence of the college’s commitment to developing and assessing student learning



                            Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                  15
Introduction of the 2006 Self-Study

outcomes includes its underwriting of faculty hands-on training activities supervised by
experts in the field, Dr. Ruth Stiehl and Dr. Dennis Johnson, and the college’s focus since
2004 on assessment and student learning at its annual All-College Learning Day. The
November 14, 2005 ACCJC Visit Team Report stated:
   “Hawaii Community College has been active in establishing Student Learning
   Outcomes at the program and course level. The team saw examples of student
   learning outcomes that were being used in the program review process to assess
   effectiveness. The faculty is enthusiastic about their development of student
   learning outcomes.”

The college plans continued expansion of its efforts to develop and assess student
learning outcomes at the course, program, and degree level utilizing the program review
and curriculum processes to do so, since both require faculty to report intended student
learning outcomes. Program reviews are conducted on a four-year cycle; it is planned
that all programs will have developed student learning outcomes and be in varying stages
of assessing them in the first cycle of program reviews. Assessment efforts should be
well-defined by each program as they enter the second cycle.

Off-Campus Sites and Centers
HawCC’s Hilo campuses (Manono and UH at Hilo) and its Kealakekua campus at the
UH Center at West Hawai‘i are the only two official college sites. The college offers
distance learning classes through partnerships with various schools and organizations.
By the end of Spring 2006, the Hawaiian Lifestyles Program will have invested time and
energy and funds provided by the Title III, I Ola Haloa grant program to secure
community relationships to offer a total of eight videoconference units island wide: two
located at the HawCC Manono campus in Hilo; two in Köhala at both the Waimea
Middle School and the Köhala Center; two units at Kealakekua, the West Hawai‘i
campus; and three units located at the Ka‘ü High School, the Ka‘ü Rural Health facility
and the latest at the Nä‘älehu Youth Center in partnership with Hawaii Economic
Opportunity Council and the County of Hawai‘i. The college also offers numerous
online courses. All distance education classes are listed on the UHCC’s distance learning
website: http://www.hawaii.edu/uhcc.e-learn/

Financial Integrity
The UH System and HawCC have control mechanisms in place to assure financial
integrity and responsible use of resources. External auditors audit the University of
Hawai‘i annually. All grant monies are handled by the UH System Office of Research
Services (ORS). A separate financial aid independent audit is also conducted annually.
These audit reports may be found at the website of the UH System’s Office of the Chief
Financial Officer. (UH System, 2006: http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/).




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                16
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study


      Thematic Abstract of the 2006 Self -Study: Hawai‘i Community College

The self-study has engaged the efforts of a broad cross section of the college’s faculty
and staff guided by the accreditation standards as the organizing principle for the report.
The six major themes are interspersed in the narrative of the document wherever and
whenever relevant. Although not always directly identified, the thematic spirit infuses
the document as a subtext, sometimes subtle but undeniably present, inspiring the report
without burdening it. In this light, the brief overview provided by the abstract
appropriately draws upon the themes as the organizing principle for a summation of the
college’s standards driven self-study.

INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENTS:

Hawai‘i Community College’s commitment to promoting student learning in the unique
environs of the Hawai‘i Island community is pervasive throughout the self-study, but it is
particularly evident in Standard I. The lodestar for the college commitment to student
learning is the recently revised vision/mission statement. Reviewing and renewing the
basic guiding principles of the statement attracted significant attention and effort as the
focal point of collegial efforts during the recently completed spring semester. This
governing board approved statement will guide the college as it serves the learning needs
of the entire Hawai‘i Island community with distributed sites and distance learning
opportunities in addition to its (campus) sites on two sides of the island.

Standard II reviews the extensive efforts made by the college to fulfill its mission by
offering 27 instructional programs covering transfer education opportunities, as well as
the gamut of workforce development needs in business/technology, culinary and
hospitality education, public services, health services and a trades and industry program
especially notable for three decades of Model Home construction for the community.
Reflecting its community the college is home to the most extensive and unique Hawaiian
cultural studies program in the state. Despite the unique challenges of sharing facilities
and services with the baccalaureate granting UH at Hilo campus, academic support
reviews its efforts to support the community college mission through such programs as
the READ Collection for remedial and developmental students, information literacy
programs, and a substantive emphasis upon service to distance education students.
Housed separately, The Learning Center (TLC) and the Hale Kea Advancement and
Testing Center (HKATC) are able to pursue their shared commitment to the appropriate
placement of students, provision of tutoring and learning opportunities via access to
technology, and ultimately the production of independent learners.

With students always as the focal point of the college’s daily operations the Student
Services commitment to the community and its students is especially significant. This
facet of the college’s operations has been especially proactive as a unit seeking to
coordinate its own mission with the broader mission of the college. The watchwords of
Access, Progress, Learning and Success guide the Student Services personnel. Access
provides expedited entrance to the college with such features as the Kama‘aina
Application, the Running Start dual credit program, and financial aid so crucial given the


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                17
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study

demographics of our island’s communities. Progress is expedited by the commitment to
case manager approaches and a proactive disabilities counseling program. Learning is
clearly identified by unit wide student learning outcomes (SLO’s) and strategizing to
provide assessment data reflecting student achievements of the expected outcomes.
Success is documented by the system-wide leading graduation rates and Career Center
coordination with the many workforce development instructional programs at the college.

The self-study reflects the efforts of all parts of the college to collaborate in the
commitment to the learning needs of our expansive (4,000 sq. miles) community. The
non-credit arm of the college provides an integral contribution to the learning needs of
the community with apprenticeship classes in the construction trades and basic skills
classes in remedial education for math and English students to help launch them
successfully into credit programs. It administers the Rural Development Program funds
in a wide variety of projects including the renovation of the credit Welding and Sheet
Metal program with state-of-the-art equipment and a revamped curriculum providing
students with a broader array of opportunities in the new Machine, Welding and
Industrial Mechanics Technologies program. The Intensive English Program recruits
students primarily from East Asia who often matriculate into the credit programs at the
college to provide a more international ambiance to student life on campus. Additionally,
the Academic Senate has stepped to the fore to review the distance education curricular
offerings, student services and academic support for distance students, as well as the
needs for faculty skills development training for distance education. This effort bespeaks
our commitment to island-wide learning opportunities providing the highest possible
quality to our students. Finally, all staff members throughout the campus are proud to be
committed in service to the learning needs of the fastest growing island community in the
archipelago.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Hawai‘i Community College has consciously provided significant support for the
development and implementation of SLO’s at the course, program, and college level.
The college has made a major effort to disseminate student learning outcomes by means
of several extended workshops provided by Dr. Ruth Stiehl whose most recent visit was
dedicated to strategizing techniques for SLO assessment. Dr. Stiehl has trained a cadre of
facilitators (many of whom are Division Chairs) who have been deployed among the 27
instructional programs offered by the college to establish program maps, program and
course level SLO’s. Faculty meetings in some of the Divisions have taken on a task force
approach to deploying collegially determined SLO’s for commonly taught courses. The
next level is for collegial agreement upon assessment strategies and reporting methods to
be integrated as a key element in the program review reports.

The college has good reason to feel confident about its record of transforming students’
intellectual development in light of the reports from its participation in the Community
College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) surveys over a six year span. Standard
II features summations of these results emphasizing the higher than average student
perceptions of the impact that their college experience at HawCC has had upon their


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               18
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study

cognitive growth and skills development in challenging classroom experiences. The
Student Services Division has taken the CCSSE results as reaffirmation of the
significance of the college’s mission to this community and its substantial demographic
challenges. Accordingly, Student Services has devised core categories for the
identification of SLO’s that should be evinced by students during 1) the admission
process; 2) as signals of retention prospects; 3) during their transition to completion of
their programs; 4) after their exit from the college. This systematic consideration of the
intended learning outcomes to be engendered by student interaction with student service
personnel bespeaks an in-depth analysis of the normative college experience desired for
our students by a very committed group of educators.

At the system level efforts are underway to win acceptance of a faculty classification plan
that specifies the faculty responsibility for SLO’s. This good faith effort to tie tenure and
promotion to outcomes among our students should be able to find some common ground
recognizing the multiple responsibilities of students, faculty and the colleges to generate
the synergy for successfully improving student learning. Finally, the hiring process at the
college is rigorous and it incorporates inquiries into candidates’ knowledge of SLO’s
concepts.

Faculty members are already taking the lead in identifying and validating the
performance of intended SLO’s. The English Department at the college has for years
employed a departmental final examination requiring the setting of grading norms by the
departmental colleagues who proceed to grade exams taken from colleagues’ classes and
assigned both randomly and anonymously to readers. The Nursing Program’s national
accreditation has been renewed by the National League for Nursing Accreditation
Commission based in part upon validated outcomes for its graduates who also maintain
very high pass rates on their board exams. The Food Service Program, likewise
accredited by the American Culinary Federation, has attained this recognition based upon
its ability to validate its learning outcomes.

DIALOGUE:

The emphasis upon reviewing all programs and units of the college to promote a culture
of continuous improvement in service to student learning has generated vigorous
dialogue in the development of each stage in the process. The ad hoc Assessment
Committee appointed to report directly to the Chancellor has drawn on its broad based
membership to lead the effort to deploy SLO’s, devise a template for program/unit
reviews and identify the data elements essential to the review process. Each of these
aspects of the committee’s work engendered spirited dialogue guided by a focus on the
goals of the committee to avoid becoming pointless tautological argumentation.

Each of the governance bodies, including the Academic Senate and the College Council,
considered their respective roles in the process and entered the discussion with an eye
upon economy of effort in the interests of managing a sustainable process of program
review linked to planning and budgeting. The creation of a new body, known as the
College Effectiveness Review Committee, opened new avenues of inquiry and dialogue.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                19
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study

The addition of another formal committee raised the specter of process careening to
spawn more responsibilities and duties at the expense of an economy of efforts that could
be conducted by existing bodies with expanded duties. After much discussion the
determination to try the process with the new structure in place subject to ongoing
evaluation won the day. Dialogue in tandem with the theme of evaluation, planning and
improvement helped the body politic to move forward for the time being, secure in the
knowledge that a change in direction is possible if indicated by subsequent evaluations of
the process.

The campus dialogue can be extensive and interlocked with colleagues from other
divisions/departments within the college, and throughout the community college and
university system, in both formal and informal conferencing to support the furtherance of
student learning needs. Student Services has developed a well-conceived packet of
sequentially ordered SLO’s all of which require collaboration and buy-in with colleagues
in other divisions and departments opening a rich avenue for continuing discussions.
Librarians have benefited from a formal venue for ongoing collaborative dialogue in the
UH Libraries’ Information Literacy Committee working on system projects such as
Learning Information Literacy Online (LILO) now implemented and functioning. The
Learning Center incorporates faculty coordinators who are integral to the staff and
provide a first line for ongoing dialogue on the needs of the instructional divisions to
better serve student learning. Finally, the campus recognizes its opportunity for rich
dialogue in service to student learning as it takes up the challenge of considering a
philosophy of general education that will match the diverse needs of its 27 instructional
programs.

As Standard III in particular reveals, the budget and its formation prior to the arrival of
the new Chancellor had been a sub-rosa process. Consequently the campus as a whole is
somewhat insecure about its preparedness to take on the responsibilities of budget
analysis and preparation, although faculty and staff have no timidity about identifying
their needs with budgetary implications. Much dialogue has already centered on the role
to be played by campus governance in the budget formation process and this will
continue to be a topic of concern as the campus leaders grow in confidence that budget
discussions are amenable to broad-based participatory input.

Recognizing the crucial significance of the hiring process, the college follows particularly
formal processes of recruitment, screening and selection of new faculty and staff. The
screening committees are the site of carefully considered dialogue committed to
preserving the standards of a college that sets its top priority upon satisfying the learning
needs of its service area. Much discussion and consideration is warranted during such a
decision making process.

Finally, for a college that technically has not had responsibility for its own facilities the
prospect of new campus development, now upon the horizon, is a source of inspiration
for reconsideration of the products of past dialogues in the form of the Long Range
Development Plans for Hilo and West Hawai‘i, as well as the inspiration for new



                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 20
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study

discussions about the pace, the prospects, the phasing and the planning of the new
campuses.

EVALUATION, PLANNING & IMPROVEMENT (EPI):

The college’s acceptance of EPI as the foundation for its culture of continuous
improvement is illustrated by the following:
       the formal deliberations of the ad hoc Assessment Committee since April 2004 to
       the present;
       the two progress reports to ACCJC chronicling the development of a program/unit
       review process;
       the successful implementation, on schedule, of a first cohort of program/unit
       reviews;
       a constructive debriefing and improvement of the template, the data elements and
       the process for program/unit reviews.

With program/unit review in place the college has the vehicle for making data driven
decisions about staffing needs based on full-time equivalent (FTE) workload in
instructional programs and demand and efficiency data for non-instructional units. Once
the full cycle of program/unit reviews is complete the college will have the capacity to
project its needs for equipment/supplies replacement and facilities renovations based
upon depreciation reports from the programs and units.

The college is supportive of the use of program/unit review in tandem with planning
documents as a road map for future budget requests. Based upon both the Strategic Plan
and the unit reviews with Student Services, along with analysis of CCSSE data, the
college was able to make a case for a strategic enrollment management initiative, which
is now a key element in its biennium budget request. The Library, in preparation for its
unit review, has developed both a mission statement and strategic plan while working
through the auspices of the system-wide Library Council to prepare for implementation
of the LibQual+ Survey to provide key data. The anomaly of a strategic plan for the
college emphasizing technology as a college cornerstone when the computer support unit
was understaffed and underfunded provided the first opportunity for a “snap” unit review.
The review of the Academic Computing Unit and the Media Support services was
implemented in the summer of 2005 before the first cohort of program/reviews was due
in November of that year. Although stopgap measures have been taken in the meantime
to provide palliatives to the challenging situation, the college is preparing to make a
major biennium proposal for a Computing and Media Support Department.

Program/unit review is a major EPI undertaking and the process is such a key part of
planning and budgeting for the future learning needs of the college community that
serious future consideration needs to be given to integrating external validation to the
process. This issue has been broached by the Academic Senate as a possible
improvement to the process by which program/unit review is integrated to the planning
and budgeting process. EPI is fundamental to a culture of continuous improvement and



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               21
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study

the college is finding that a process this basic to its efficient operation may require
exceptional measures to support the process.

INSTITUTIONAL INTEGRITY:

Whether in print, on the internet, or in its practices the college places integrity at the
forefront of its operations. Character counts at HawCC as evinced by the concerted
efforts of the Academic Senate to produce a college Code of Professional Conduct
reflecting our standards during the most recently completed academic year.

Hiring procedures that rigorously follow EEO guidelines and assure that candidates are
thoroughly screened for both their qualifications and their character reinforces the
college’s commitment to the highest standards of integrity. The Chancellor’s
implementation of a series of Cultural Transformation Initiative workshops has updated
the campus constituency on its obligations relative to workplace non-violence, sexual
harassment and diversity appreciation policies within this university system.
Additionally, the Chancellor utilizes his weekly Administrative Staff Meetings to
implement a rapid response methodology to issues, opportunities and responsibilities that
reflect upon the integrity and the public image of the college.

The college has had frequent opportunities to interact with the ACCJC in the past two
years in particular. Two progress reports, one of which included a visit, have enabled the
college to focus its energies on the development of a program/unit review process
incorporating SLO’s as a key feature. Progress has been sufficient to enable the college
to be removed from warning status within approximately six months of its
implementation. As a collateral benefit of the foregoing efforts, the college has
transitioned to a far more transparent representation to faculty and staff of the status of its
budget and its preparation process than previously. This transformation has led to
faculty/staff who are requesting budget analysis and preparation primers in the realization
that they will now have both the opportunity and the responsibility of monitoring,
analyzing and helping to develop budgets at all levels of college operations.

The college is taking steps to assure that its catalog will be error free, and its internet
pages updated regularly. Student access to both the Student Conduct Code and the
Academic Grievance Code in their entirety has been made available on the internet. An
Academic Freedom statement is in the new catalog. The purchase of new Web page
authoring software will make management of this medium more user friendly, but the
college recognizes that a responsible party must be in place to assure compliance with the
currency and accuracy requirements constituent to the principles of institutional integrity.
The biennium budget request includes a request for such an individual to work out of the
Computer and Media Support Department.

ORGANIZATION:

A leading challenge to this community college is to operate a campus under an
organizational structure requiring shared facilities and services with the baccalaureate


                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 22
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study

granting institution of UH at Hilo. The impact is to make the college feel as if it is
“renting” its campus from the baccalaureate granting institution. Conversely, the close
relationship with UH at Hilo has great potential benefits for the students, faculty and staff
insofar as articulation of courses and programs are concerned, as well as the stimulation
of collegial relations across the institutions. Additionally, the two institutions are also
able to consolidate and economize certain of their operations. However, the sharing of
facilities and services may also create some tension in the relationship if the difference in
mission of the two institutions comes into play.

Perhaps the Library exemplifies the challenges of shared services across the chasm of
differing missions most explicitly. Although the facility is shared, the college’s share in
staffing the library’s operation has dropped appreciably over the past several years.
Restoring staffing levels is in the offing as part of the college’s biennium budget request.
Fulfilling this request would be timely given the prospect on the horizon for a new
campus development for the college that would be independent of UHH.

With the approval of a unique private public partnership to develop college campuses in
both Hilo and Kona presently anticipated, the college will be able to express its
independent physical identity for the first time in its organizational history. Not only the
physical facilities but also the financial resources to support these facilities for all facets
of the college’s operation will at last be within its autonomous control. Creation of an
identity and a physical/organizational presence fully consonant with the community
college mission is now on the horizon.

Recent funding in the Supplemental Budget for auxiliary services will be employed by
the college to begin the process of separating its operations from the UH at Hilo campus
while still sharing the Upper and the Lower campuses with them. This expansion of
staffing whether in the Library or in the creation de novo of an auxiliary services staff is
needed to produce the core of staff and faculty positions that will be planning, opening
and caring for the newly developed campus.

Finally, the proposed addition of a Computer and Media Services Department under a
director reporting directly to the Chancellor will support the needs of both academic as
well as administrative technology requirements. Likewise, the addition of two interim
assistant deans helps the instructional services operation to provide the needed attention
to the diversified needs of 27 instructional programs covering the gamut of transfer
education, public services, health services, culinary and hospitality education,
business/technology and the trades and industry programs. In an anticipated
reorganization proposal the two assistant deans would be described as line officials for
their respective positions as Dean of Liberal Arts & Public Services along with a Dean of
Career and Technical Education.




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 23
Abstract of the 2006 Self-Study


CONCLUSION:

Hawai‘i Community College has provided stellar transfer education, Hawaiian cultural
studies and career/workforce development programs for many years. The campus
submits its 2006 Self-Study in an atmosphere of rising expectations and hope that it will
soon be developing its own campuses on both sides of Hawai‘i Island in facilities
designed specifically to its specifications suiting its mission. Morale is improving as
resources flow to the campus in unprecedented amounts. Support has been absent for so
long that there is an inevitable desire to see problems solved immediately. The campus
leadership can only hope that all campus constituencies have the patience to realize that
an upward curve of support for the future may still require time and improvised solutions
for the present before all challenges can be addressed. In the meantime this is an active,
busy campus as it absorbs the new resources, fills the new positions, and implements the
new programs to serve the needs of its Hawai‘i Island community. This is a good time to
be part of the Hawai‘i Community College ohana.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               24
Organization for the 2006 Self-Study


         Organization for the 2006 Self Study: Hawai‘i Community College

In the Fall semester 2004, the Accreditation Liaison Officer began to recruit Co-Chairs
for the Self-Study, Chairs for the four new Accreditation standards, Co-Editors, and an
archivist in consultation with administration and the Chair of the 2000 Self-Study. Along
with faculty governance Chairs from the Academic Senate, the College Council and
Student Government as well as a representative from the staff, an Accreditation Steering
Committee was convened on December 17, 2004 to start planning for the writing of the
Self-Study. At this orientation meeting, the Guide to Evaluation Institutions was
distributed to all steering committee members and the difference between the old
standards and the new standards as well as the necessity of embedding the six themes
throughout the Self-Study was discussed.

A timeline and draft deadlines were discussed and set-up as well as the set-up and
management of an Accreditation website by one of the Self-Study Co-Chairs. Standard
Chairs committed to finalizing the membership of their committees to make sure there
was broad representation from both the East and West sides, all categories of college
personnel, and a student representative. They also were asked to convene their individual
Standard committees and set-up meeting dates and times with their members at the
beginning of the Spring 2005 semester. A schedule of monthly meeting dates and times
for the Spring 2005 semester was decided on by the Steering Committee.

On March 4, 2005, an official kick-off for the 2006 Self-Study titled: “Paddling our Own
Canoe” was inaugurated by Chancellor Rockne Freitas. At this all-college meeting, the
members of the Steering Committee were introduced and each Standard Chair or Co-
Chairs gave a PowerPoint presentation showing committee members and the criteria for
their particular standard that would be studied. An open invitation to the college
community was also extended to join one of the Standard committees.

The majority of the learning day was spent on describing the continuous cycle of
assessment built on a systematic program review process and understanding the
importance of student learning outcomes in creating a learning-centered college. A
detailed PowerPoint presentation and handouts put together by the Vice-Chancellor of
Academic Affairs, the Institutional Researcher, the Accreditation Liaison Officer, and the
Co-Chairs of the Accreditation Self-Study concerning these two integral concepts in
transforming the college culture from one that is teacher-focused vs. learner-focused and
where institutional planning and budgeting is based on sound assessment practices.

Standard Chairs began meeting with their committee members and strategizing their
division of work, gathering evidence, and dialoguing about the self-analysis portions of
their standard during the Spring 2005 semester. On August 15, 2005, at the All-College
meeting a Faculty Staff Administrator Survey was administered to all those present. The
results for this survey were made available to Steering Committee members on
September 2, 2005.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               25
Organization for the 2006 Self-Study

On October 14, 2005, the first draft of the Self-Study was due and circulated for review
and feedback by Steering Committee members. Minutes of the October 27, 2005
Steering Committee reflects concerns for the interjection of themes in the first draft.
The Self-Study Co-Chairs and editors agreed to meet with their designated Standard
Chair(s) on November 10, 2005 to discuss the drafts and provide feedback from the
Steering Committee.

Everyone on the committee agreed that the gathering of evidence, dialoguing, and group
writing was challenging, so that this would definitely be a focus on the second draft
which was due on January 30, 2006. The second draft was posted on the College
Accreditation website and was widely available to administrators, faculty, staff, and
students to provide feedback to Standard Chairs and/or the Steering Committee.

On March 3, 2006, the all-college learning day: “Kau ka hoku, hele i ke ala loa” (Upon
the star we travel on the long path), was divided into two sessions. The morning session
was devoted to revisiting Hawai‘i Community College’s vision/mission and
accompanying statements. In the afternoon session, the main points of each Standard’s
planning agendas were summarized by the Standard Chair(s) and all the planning agendas
from the second draft were blown-up into giant posters and posted around the room. The
college community was invited to post feedback, corrections and or recommendations to
each standard committee either verbally or on “post-it notes”postettes. All feedback was
collected by Standard Chairs and incorporated into the third draft of the Self-Study that
was due on April 3, 2006. The third draft was also posted on the Accreditation website
and the College community invited to offer corrections and feedback.

The Standard Chairs submitted their final reports on May 2, 2006 and the editors finished
their reviews on June 8, 2006. The finalization committee made-up of the archivist,
ALO, VCAA, and one of the Self-Study Co-Chairs cleaned up the document checking for
final formatting, veracity of detail, evidence, and ability of the college to deliver on
planning agendas.

The Self-Study process proved to be a tremendously challenging, but invigorating
process for the College. With the institution undergoing a complete change over in
organization and administrative leadership both at the system and college level in the last
two years, it has been a time that can be signified by the Chinese character “danger is
opportunity.” Not only has the college had to undergo intense scrutiny with the self-
study process, but it had to build a viable program review process at the same time. To
its credit, the collaborative efforts of administrators, faculty, staff, and students enabled it
to get off ACCJC warning in six months.

In the past two years, the College has come away with a clearer self-identity, stronger
sense of purpose and a hopeful future with increased resources, plans for new campuses,
and a better blueprint to address its weaknesses.




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 26
Organization for the 2006 Self-Study

                                               Self-Study Timetable

                              Data and Survey needs determined; Steering Committee constituted;
Fall 2004
                              Leadership and Committee members selected
Spring 2005                   Standards and Subcommittees organized and start meeting
October 14, 2005              First Draft Due (copies available to Steering Committee)
January 30, 2006              Second Draft Due (copies available to all faculty, staff, and students on website)
April 3, 2006                 Third Draft Due (copies available to all faculty, staff, and students on website)
May 2, 2006                   Final Draft Due to Editors
June 30, 2006                 Obtain Signatures
July 24, 2006                 Final Document sent to Printers
July 28, 2006                 Copies sent to the BOR and Vice-President for CC
September 11, 2006            Final Document sent to the Commission
October 23–26, 2006           Team Visit Dates


                                        Steering Committee Members

Chancellor ..................................................................... Rockne Freitas

Accreditation Liaison Officer ....................................... Trina Nahm-Mijo

Accreditation Self-Study Co-Chairs ............................. Jennie Padilla, Beth Sanders

Administration .............................................................. Kathy Damon, Douglas Dykstra

Academic Senate Chair................................................. Lou Zitnik

College Council Chair................................................... Sara Narimatsu (2004–05)
       ........................................................................... Rebecca Kenney (2005–06)

Standard Chairs
       Standard I ..........................................................   Mike Saito, Jim Yoshida
       Standard II.........................................................    Joni Onishi, Mai Wong
       Standard III .......................................................    Sara Narimatsu
       Standard IV .......................................................     Lou Zitnik

APT Representative: ..................................................... Marsha Okajima

Clerical Representative: ................................................ Chris Iha

ASUH-HawCC Senate Chair........................................ Keala Pihana (2004–05)
     ........................................................................... Kathy Rodriguez (2005–06)

Editors ........................................................................... Marilyn Bader, Pam Hudson

Institutional Analyst...................................................... Shawn Flood

Archivist........................................................................ Michael Larish, Ellen Okuma



                                   Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                             27
Organization for the 2006 Self-Study

                             Accreditation Committee Members

              Standard                   Standard Co-Chairs               Committee Members
I.   Institutional Mission and           Mike Saito,                Laurel Gregory
     Effectiveness                       Jim Yoshida                Karen Leialoha
                                                                    Dorinna Manuel-Cortez
                                                                    Kate Sims
                                                                    Tammy Tanaka
                                                                    Rebecca Gabriel (student)
II. Student Learning Programs and        Joni Onishi,               Barbara Arthurs
    Services                             Mai Wong                   Kenoa Dela Cruz
                                                                    Mike Hopson
                                                                    Donnalyn Kalei
                                                                    Pua Kanahele
                                                                    Marsha Kayano
                                                                    Guy Kimura
                                                                    Gwen Kimura
                                                                    Milton Leslie
                                                                    Sheryl Lundberg-Sprague
                                                                    Gordon Nekoba
                                                                    Lea Nordloh
                                                                    Ellen Okuma
                                                                    Debbie Shigehara
                                                                    Francis-Dean Uchima
                                                                    Lynn Wolforth
                                                                    Robert Yamane
                                                                    Shellie Mizuno (Student)
III. Resources                           Sara Narimatsu             Gayle Cho
                                                                    Robert Duley
                                                                    Kathy Edmund
                                                                    Luane Ishii
                                                                    Kent Killam
                                                                    Mike Leialoha
                                                                    Violet Murakami
                                                                    Marsha Okajima
                                                                    Steve Schulte
                                                                    Claire Shigeoka
                                                                    Jacqueline Stradtmann-Carvalho
                                                                    Wilton Watanabe
                                                                    Antoinette Wilson (Student)
IV. Leadership and Governance            Lou Zitnik                 John Carroll
                                                                    Raynette Haleamau-Kam
                                                                    Krysty Kaneda
                                                                    Lei Kapono
                                                                    Mike Leialoha
                                                                    Joel Peralto
                                                                    James Schumaker
                                                                    Janice Watanabe




                            Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                  28
Organization of the Institution
                                                                            STATE OF HAWAI‘I
                                   David McClain                             UNIVERSITY OF
                                      President                                 HAWAI‘I
                             University of Hawaii System
                                                                                 HAWAI‘I
                                                                               COMMUNITY
                                     John Morton                                COLLEGE
                                   Vice President for
                                  Community Colleges                         Organization Chart
                                                                                  Chart I
                               Office of the Chancellor
                                       Chart II
                              Rockne Freitas, Chancellor




       Instruction          Student                Administrative         Continuing Ed     University of
                            Services                 Services              & Training      Hawai‘i Center
        Douglas             Barbara                                         Rebecca          West Hawai‘i
        Dykstra             Arthurs                Mike Leialoha             Kenney           Kathleen
        Chart III           Chart IV                 Chart V                Chart VI           Damon
                                                                                              Chart VII




                                                                      Permanent Temporary
                                        General Fund                     155.00      5.00
                                        (B) Special Funds                   1.0




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              29
Organization of the Institution


                                                      HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY COLLEGE

                                                             Position Organization Chart
                                                                       Chart II




                               Office of the President
                             University of Hawaii System
                             David McClain, President*

                              Office of the Vice President
                               for Community Colleges
                             John Morton, Vice President*

                               Office of the Chancellor
                                  Chancellor, 89092
                              Rockne Freitas, Chancellor


                                                         Secretarial Services
                                                         Private Secretary II,
                                                            SR22, 900115
                                                             Gail Inouye




                                                                            Permanent
                                                General Fund                      2.0

                                                * Excluded from position count this chart




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              30
Organization of the Institution


                                                      HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY COLLEGE

                                                             Position Organization Chart
                                                                      Chart III

                                  Office of the Chancellor

                             Rockne Freitas, Chancellor*

                                        Instruction
                                    Vice Chancellor of
                                    Instruction, 89108
                                     Douglas Dykstra                      Secretarial Services
                                                                          Secretary II, SR14,
                                                                                22235
                                                                            Sandra Kama


                   Instruction                          Academic Support
                   Chart IIIA                              Chart IIIB




                                                                                     Permanent
                                                         General Fund                      2.0

                                                         * Excluded from position count this chart




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              31
Organization of the Institution
 Reorganization required to
 include four(4) new                                                                         HAWAI‘I
 positions provided by the
 2005 State Legislature;
                                                                                           COMMUNITY
                                             Instruction                                    COLLEGE
 postitions include two
 secretary I SR12 96225F,
                                     Vice Chancellor of Instruction
 96226F and two Assistant                 Douglas Dykstra*                             Position Organization
 Deans 96727F, 96728F                                                                          Chart
 Beth Sanders, CTE
 Noreen Yamane, Lib Arts
                                                                                            Chart III-A
                                                 Instruction



  Liberal Arts          Nursing &              Business Ed             Hospitality                 Applied
 Unit Head &           Allied Health          & Technology           Faculty-WH                   Technical
 Clerical Staff***    Faculty (Dir of         Chairperson**          Coordinator                  Education
 Sec II SR14          Nursing) 84774            Joni Onishi          83156@                    Transporttion &
 22234                Elizabeth Ojala         Sec II SR14            James Lightner            Applied Techn
 Paula Medeiros       Sec II SR14             25059                  Educational &             Chairperson**
 Clerk Steno II       26806                   Rufina Fritz           Academic                  Clyde Kojiro
 SR09 42458           Luane Ishii             Faculty (13.00)        Support Spec              Faculty (9.00)
 Clerk Steno II       Faculty (9.0)           82108 82362            PPA 80013T^               82527 83030
 SR09 42647           83348 83535             82451 82703            Faculty (4.00)            83550 83638
                      83664 83741             82785 83076            83209@ 83973              83701 83704
                      84001 86476@            83312 83531            86363@ 84140              84296 84328
                      86567 86568             83899 84126                                      84366
                      86571                   84647 84664                                      Construction
                                              84969                                            Technology
                                                                                               Chairperson**
                                                                                               Clyde Kojiro
                                Social Science                                                 Faculty (8.00)
         Chairperson** Mary Goya
                                                                                               83047 83143
         Early Childhood Specialist PBB 81135; Faculty (9.00)
         82236 82521 83059 83202 83257 83420 86691 86696 87107                                 83774 83871
                                                                                               84151 84331
                                                                                               84620 84624
                        Math & Natural Sciences                                                Clerical Staff***
                                                                                               Sec II SR14
         Chairperson** Marilyn Bader
                                                                                               22236
         Faculty (12.00) 82851 82972 83045 83717 84374 86378
                                                                                               April Nakagawa
         86562 86566 86693 86694 86985 86368 (.50)@
                                                                                               Clerk Typist II
         88058(.50)@
                                                                                               SR08 44169

                                    English
         Chairperson** Pam Hudson
         Faculty (14.00) 82435 82609 82812 83622 83623 86377
                                                                                * Excluded from position count this
         86380 86563 86564 86692 86733 87109 96725F$ 86577
                                                                                chart
         (.50)@ 86934(.50)@
                                                                                ^ Temporary Position
                                                                                ** Chairperson appointed from faculty
                                 Humanities                                     positions within department
                                                                                @ Position located at West Hawai‘i
         Chairperson** John Cole
                                                                                ***Clerical staff serve all units; report
         Faculty (7.00) 82780 82889 84967 84968 86695 86986@
                                                                                to only one immediate supervisor
         86988
                                                                                $ To be established


                              Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                    32
Organization of the Institution


                                                       HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY COLLEGE

                                                             Position Organization Chart
                                                                     Chart III-B

                                    Instruction
                            Vice Chancellor of Instruction
                                 Douglas Dykstra*



                                    Academic Support




     Learning Center        Library                  Academic              Institutional
      Guy Kimura          Lari-Anne Au               Computing               Research
     Faculty 84380        Faculty, 87075            Steve Schulte          Shawn Flood
     Ed Spec PBA6726F                              IT Spec PBB 81948      Ed Spec PBA 81066
     Ed Spec PBB80021                              IT Spec PBA
     Cleark Steno II                               81295T^
     SR09 47357
                                                   IT Spec PBA
                                                   80735T^
                                                   IT Spec PBA
                                                   81784 (.50)




                                                                 Permanent Temporary
                                        General Fund                  7.50      2.00

                                        * Excluded from position count this chart
                                        ^ Temporary Position




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              33
Organization of the Institution


                                                             HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY COLLEGE

                                                                   Position Organization Chart
                                                                            Chart IV


                                   Office of the Chancellor

                                 Rockne Freitas, Chancellor*

                                        Student Services
                                Dean of Student Services 89323
                                   Barbara Arthurs, Interim
                                                                              Secretarial Services
                                                                              Secretary II, SR14,
                                                                                    46216
                                                                                Tammy Tanaka


            Counseling & Student Life                       Enrollment Services
          Faculty 82442 84770 87008 87044             Student Services Spec PBB 81687
          Clerk Typist II, SR08, 46931 ~              Clerk Typist II, SR08, 46930
                                                      Student Services Spec PBB 80967
                                                      Information Tech Spec PBA 79932
                                                      Student Services Spec PBB 81714
                                                      Clerk Typist II, SR08, 43841
                                                      Student Services Spec PBA 81643
                                                      Student Services Spec PBB 80659 (.50)
                                                      Clerk Typist II, SR08, 43857




                                                                           Permanent
                                            General Fund                       15.50

                                            * Excluded from position count this chart
                                            ~ Clerk Typist reports to the senior faculty of Counseling
                                            & Student Life




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 34
Organization of the Institution


                                                            HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY COLLEGE

                                                                Position Organization Chart
                                                                          Chart V

                                      Office of the Chancellor

                                    Rockne Freitas, Chancellor*

                                      Administrative Services
                                     Vice Chancellor of Admin
                                          Services, 89324                    Secretarial Services
                                           Mike Leialoha                     Secretary II, SR14,
                                                                                   46217
                                                                              Janice Watanabe



            Business Office              Computer Center             Human Resources
              Jodi Mine                  Marvin Kitchen               Claire Shigeoka
          Administrative Officer        IT Spec PBB 80621           Personnel officer PBB
          PBB 80162                                                 80253
          Admin & Fiscal Support                                    Personnel Clerk V SR13
          Specialist PBA 81867                                      50047
          Purchasing Tech II SR13
          51271
          Account Clerk IV SR13
          25661
          Account Clerk III SR11
          51273
          Account Clerk II SR08
          46280
          Auxiliary & Facilities
          Services Officer PBB
          81502T^

                                                                         Permanent Temporary
                                            General Fund                     11.00      1.00

                                            * Excluded from position count this chart
                                            ~ Temporary Position




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 35
Organization of the Institution


                                                                                 HAWAI‘I
                                                                               COMMUNITY
                                                                                COLLEGE
                                    Office of the Chancellor
                                                                                 Position
                                                                             Organization Chart
                              Rockne Freitas, Chancellor*
                                                                                 Chart VI

                                   Continuing Education &
                                          Training
                                   Director of Continuing Ed &
                                         Training, 89382                    Secretarial Services
                                        Rebecca Kenney                      Secretary II, SR14,
                                                                                  25060
                                                                                 Chris Iha
                                                                           Clerk III, SR08, 111587^

             Apprenticeship Program                      Non-Credit Programs
                   Faculty 83051                    Educational Spec PBA 80256 (B)
                 Wilt Watanabe                      Educational Specialist PBB 81638




                                                                         Permanent Temporary
                                          General Fund                        4.00      1.00
                                          (B) Special Funds                   1.00

                                          * Excluded from position count this chart
                                          ^ Temporary Position




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               36
Organization of the Institution


                                                                                HAWAI‘I
                                                                              COMMUNITY
                                  Office of the Chancellor
                                                                               COLLEGE
                             Rockne Freitas, Chancellor*
                                                                                 Postion
                                                                            Organization Chart
                                                                                Chart VII
                             University of Hawai‘i Center,
                                    West Hawai‘i
                                  Director of University of
                                  Hawai‘i Center, 89398
                                                                          Secretarial Services
                                     Kathleen Damon                        Secretary II, SR14,
                                                                                 54816
                                                                          Clerk Typist II, SR08,
                                                                                 45122


         Student         Adminstrative             Operations and            Academic
         Services          Services                 Maintenance               Support
     Faculty 86475      Admin Officer              Janitor II BC02        Faculty 86436
     Student Services   PBB 81400                  45116                    (Librarian)
     Specialist PBB     Account Clerk II                                  Laurel Gregory
     80371              SR08 46785                                        Library Asst IV
        Raynette            Mary Kay                                      SR09 54814
     Haleamau-Kam            Havens                                       Educational Spec
                                                                          PBB 80906
                                                                          Educational
                                                                          Specialist PBB
                                                                          80573
                                                                          Media Specialist
                                                                          PBA 81395




                                                                      Permanent
                                        General Fund                      13.00

                                        * Excluded from position count this chart




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              37
Organization of the Institution

                             STATE OF HAWAI‘I
                           UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I
                         HAWAI‘I COMMUNITY COLLEGE

                            FUNCTIONAL STATEMENTS

Provides a comprehensive post-secondary instructional program including outreach
education, career education, and general education courses. Career education programs
lead to certificates and Associate of Science degrees, and are designed to prepare the
graduate for entry-level employment. General education courses may lead to the
Associate of Arts degree and may also transfer to Baccalaureate degree programs offered
on the four-year campuses. At present, this College provides the following programs:

       Accounting, Administration of Justice, Agriculture, Auto Body Repair and
       Painting, Automotive Mechanics Technology, Carpentry, Diesel Mechanics,
       Drafting and Engineering Aide, Early Childhood Education, Electrical Installation
       and Maintenance Technology, Electronics Technology, Food Service, Hotel
       Operations, Human Services, Information Technology, Liberal Arts, Nursing,
       Office Administration and Technology, Marketing, Welding and Sheet Metal

The College provides a wide range of student support services to meet the needs of a
diverse student body.

The College also provides a summer session and an extensive array of non-traditional and
non-credit programs.

Through its University of Hawai‘i, West Hawai‘i Center, the College provides West
Hawai‘i communities with outreach services and access to programs offered elsewhere in
the University of Hawai‘i (UH) system. Qualified students who are unable to travel to a
UH campus enroll in courses or credential programs that are offered by one or more of
the University’s accredited institutions.


Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR

The Office of the Chancellor is responsible for the orderly and proper functioning of
Hawai‘i Community College, and is responsible for carrying out the objectives of the
College.

Within the rules and regulations of the University of Hawai‘i System, the Office of the
Chancellor:

* Issues rules and regulations governing the activities of the College


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               38
Organization of the Institution



*   Develops long-range plans for the growth and improvement of the College.

*   Recommends appointments, tenure, leaves, terminations and promotions for all
    College personnel.

*   Maintains accreditation standards as promulgated by the Accrediting Commission for
    Community and Junior Colleges, the State Legislature, and other governing bodies.

*   Approves and submits a College budget to the University System.

* Serves as the College’s liaison and representative to the general community
  including the Hawai‘i County Government, State Legislators, and other
  appropriate State and community agencies, and organizations.

*   Assures community involvement and program quality through the establishment
    of lay advisory bodies to critically review instructional programs, the continuance
    of a fund raising committee, and the establishment of other committees as needed.


Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

OFFICE OF DEAN OF INSTRUCTION

The Office of the Dean of Instruction is responsible for directing all instructional and
academic programs. The main functions of the office are to plan, organize, and conduct
formal post-secondary education classes; maintain and improve on-going certificate and
degree programs, develop new programs; conduct on-going evaluation of academic
programs; and maintain standards of accreditation. For all credit instruction, the office:

*   Supervises and participates in delivering programs and curriculum development, off
    campus credit programs; reviews instructional programs; and coordinates programs
    and course revisions as needed.

*   Supervises and coordinates the activities of unit/division chairpersons and program
    coordinators including personnel recruitment, selection, training, and evaluation;
    academic advising; planning, budgeting, requisitioning, and record-keeping;
    scheduling of classes; and coordinating facility usage for instruction.

*   Assesses resource and staffing needs and prepares biennium and supplemental
    budgets for the instructional and academic support programs.

*   Recommends to the Chancellor personnel transactions which relate to hiring, tenure,
    leaves, promotions, and terminations.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                39
Organization of the Institution

*   Plans, budgets, organizes, implements, and evaluates a staff in-service training
    program.

*   Prepares grant applications; operationalizes plans to carry out various federally-
    funded programs.

*   Maintains and updates articulation programs with the Department of Education, four-
    year campuses, and other agencies.

*   Coordinates the development of the College's vocational education state plan, and all
    accreditation reports.

*   Coordinates externally-funded instructional programs.


Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

INSTRUCTION

The purpose of instruction is to offer courses to meet the specific degree major
requirements of academic programs in each unit/division and the needs of general
education and lower division students. The instructional divisions are:

*   Liberal Arts (transfer) programs in Social Sciences, Math & Natural Sciences,
    English, and Humanities.

*   Hospitality includes Food Service and the Hotel Operation programs

*   Applied Technical Education consists of Construction Technology and Transportation
    & Applied Technology

*   Nursing & Allied Health

*   Business Education & Technology

Under the general supervision of the Dean of Instruction, the five divisions develop
coherent programs among the disciplines within their respective divisions. The divisions:

*   Oversee the recruitment, improvement, and evaluation of faculty;

*   Schedule classes, assigns faculty, assigns classroom space

*   Develop plans for the Division, including the division level activities in the College
    Academic Development Plan and plans to meet student and employee needs, and
    adjusts plans to reflect changing conditions and policies.

*   Coordinate curricular offerings among the disciplines.

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                40
Organization of the Institution


*   Offer courses to meet the specific degree requirements of major programs and the
    needs of general education and lower division students.

*   Consult and cooperate with other divisions on curriculum matters.

*   Recommend personnel transactions and administer annual operating and equipment
    budgets necessary to deliver the instructional programs.

Cooperative Vocational Education

The cooperative vocational education program enriches the quality and scope of post-
secondary education through educationally-related work experiences which afford
students an opportunity to earn funds needed for their education while enabling them to
become better prepared to achieve their educational or career objectives. Instructors
collaborate with local training station sponsors to assure that the educational objectives of
the work laboratory are attained.

West Hawai‘i Center

The purpose of the University of Hawai‘i Center, West Hawai‘i is to coordinate
curricular offerings among disciplines; offer courses to meet the specific degree
requirements of major academic programs and the needs of general education and lower
division students; and consult with other divisions on curricular matters.


Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Academic support services provide assistance to students outside the formal classroom
environment. These services complement instruction, assist students who need additional
help, and educate students on resources available to them to support their classroom
learning.

The Learning Center

The Learning Center coordinates four primary services:

    *   Academic tutoring in basic skills and content area subjects.

    *   Computer-assisted instructional programs.

    *   Instruction utilizing self-paced audio visual kits and print media.

    *   Non-credit basic skills and literacy training.

                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 41
Organization of the Institution



Library

The Library coordinates library services for community college students with the
University of Hawai‘i at Hilo's Library. In conjunction with academic units, the library
conducts instruction for students and faculty in the use of the libraries within the
University System and the State of Hawai‘i System and assists community college
faculty with library needs.

Academic Computing

The Academic Computing Unit is responsible for the technical support of all computers
used by students, instructional staff, and academic support activities and services. This
responsibility includes the maintenance and repair of computers and their system on the
upper Main campus, the lower Manono campus, and the University of Hawai‘i Center,
West Hawai‘i.


Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

STUDENT SERVICES

The Office of Student Services provides all the necessary and complementary services
related to the needs of students which are not directly instructional. The services are to
better enable students to succeed in their learning experiences, adjust to the College and
seek future goals in a more orderly fashion.

Counseling and Student Life

*   Provides qualified, professional counseling services including assistance with
    career/life planning, establishing educational goals, adjusting to college life,
    developing job search skills, and job placement.

*   Disseminates information about services available on campus, college transfer
    information, occupational exploration, and labor market trends, and provides
    referral services to community resources for specific services and information not
    available on campus.

*   Coordinates assistance for students with disabilities and other groups in need of
    special assistance.

*   Conducts orientation and provides workshops and classes on student development
    topics such as, career/life planning, decision making, goal setting, time
    management, and self-knowledge.

*   Implements student center programs and other co-curricular activities and
    advises student government and other major student organizations.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                42
Organization of the Institution

Enrollment Services

*   Provides information about the college to the general public and selected special
    target populations, and implements recruitment strategies for the college.

*   Provides pre-admissions counseling services including clarification of
    career/educational goals and workshops on preparing for college, and assistance in
    applying for financial aid.

*   Delivers timely financial aid services to meet the needs of entering and enrolled
    students, including coordination of all Federal and State student financial aid
    programs.

*   Delivers an efficient and flexible registration system for credit and non-credit
    programs, and assures that student academic records are properly maintained and
    made available to students.
*   Provides enrollment certification for students receiving veterans’ benefits,
    financial aid, and other such benefits.

Joint Services

In cooperation with the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, coordinates student housing for
Hawai‘i Community College students in residence halls; coordinates health services;
coordinates sharing of campus center facilities; and coordinates services for international
students.


Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

The Office of the Administrative Services provides for the various administrative support
services and activities of the College which generally include personnel, administrative
management, budget and fiscal services, and operations and maintenance. This
operation:

*   Insures the College operates within Federal and State statutes, established policies
    and procedures of the University of Hawai‘i, and educates the campus community of
    applicable policies, guidelines, procedures, forms, and alternatives available in
    accomplishing tasks.

*   Reviews and assists in the preparation of the College's long and short term
    educational plans, accreditation self-studies, program reviews, special studies, etc.;
    makes corrections and recommendations for improvement; prepares and implements
    the short and long range plans for the Business Office and the Operations and
    Maintenance Programs, in coordination with the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                43
Organization of the Institution

*   Performs and/or participates in special studies of interest or concern; making
    recommendations, offering alternatives, correcting problems, discussing the facts,
    etc., as appropriate.

*   Monitors all aspects of the activities of extramurally-funded projects including
    critically reviewing the proposal, ensuring the activities can be performed with
    available resources and time frame, monitoring progress, and following-up on
    reporting requirements.

*   Responds to requests for information, especially from UH system wide offices, State
    agencies, and legislators.

*   Coordinates the budgeting for the College, including the biennium budget requests,
    six-year operating budget plan, the Capital Improvements Program (CIP), and the
    Special Repairs and Maintenance Programs in coordination with the University of
    Hawai‘i at Hilo.

*   Works with University of Hawai‘i at Hilo to see that proper maintenance and care of
    all physical facilities and properties of the College are performed, including adequate
    security of the premises; prepares short and long range plans and implements them
    within the resources available; monitors CIP, energy conservation, Special R&M and
    other campus projects.

Business Office

Responsible for the College's fiscal operations including accounting, disbursing,
cashiering, contracts and grants management, procurement, inventory management,
payroll, etc.

Works with University of Hawai‘i at Hilo to insure that the fiscal and business services
clerical functions relating to the above operations are maintained.

Computer Center

Responsible for all aspects of administrative and non-instructional computing
requirements of the College. Responsible for providing technical support in managing,
maintaining and modifying commercially obtained software, and the maintenance of
computer hardware and peripherals.

Human Resources

Responsible for the College's human resources operations including classification and
pay administration; recruitment and employment; contract interpretation; EEO/AA;
training and staff development; and workers' compensation.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                44
Organization of the Institution

Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

CONTINUING EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Under the Director of Continuing Education and Training (CET), the function of this
organizational unit is to administer all non-traditional programs, including apprenticeship
programs and non-credit instructional programs and activities. The latter includes:
seminars, lectures, and workshops for the general public and special interest groups of the
community; cultural programs; international programs; Intensive English Program; and
the regular credit summer session.

Apprenticeship Program

The Apprenticeship Program provides evening and weekend courses for apprenticeship
training in such fields as carpentry, electricity, heavy equipment mechanics, masonry,
painting, plumbing and sheet metal. Training may be offered in other fields if there is a
demand. The program meets the requirements of the State of Hawai‘i Apprenticeship
Law and enables an apprentice to complete the minimum hours of related instruction
paralleling on-the-job training.

Non-Credit Programs

The Non-Credit Program offers to the community programs related to on-campus
curricular programs, employment preparation programs, basic skills programs, the
Intensive English Program, and workforce development programs. Partnerships with
businesses and secondary education institutions will enhance outreach to all population
groups and geographic areas of the Island.



Hawai‘i Community College
Functional Statements

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I CENTER, WEST HAWAI‘I

The University of Hawai‘i Center, West Hawai‘i establishes a permanent University of
Hawai‘i (UH) presence in a community that otherwise lacks access to programs offered
elsewhere in the UH system. The Center is a site at which qualified students who are
unable to travel to a specific UH campus can enroll in courses or credential programs that
are offered by one or more of the University’s accredited programs.

While the primary purpose of the University of Hawai‘i Center, West Hawai‘i is
instructional, it may also provide for various research and/or public service programs.
The Center:

*   Ascertains community needs in West Hawai‘i; identifies the UH campus that is
    responsible for and capable of responding to those needs; and facilitates the delivery
    of all levels of outreach credit and non-credit instruction to meet those needs. The
    methods of delivering instruction include the use of the Hawai‘i Interactive
    Television System (HITS), compressed video, satellite TV, and the World Wide Web.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                45
Organization of the Institution

*   Reviews and analyzes community needs and coordinates the creation and updating of
    a multi-year plan to reflect community needs and available resources.

*   Determines the appropriate courses and programs to be offered at the University of
    Hawai‘i Center, West Hawai‘i; with the various UH campuses and other UH
    education centers, develops a schedule of future offerings; and determines the specific
    facilities and academic support requirements for each program to be offered.

*   Provides access to a library with a basic collection suitable for the programs being
    offered; operates and maintains computing resources consistent with program
    requirements; establishes and maintains suitable telecommunications resources that
    include the use of the telephone, FAX, connectivity to HITS, compressed video,
    satellite TV, electronic mail, and the World Wide Web.

*   Distributes and collects student applications for program admission and financial aid;
    develops and operates an on-site registration process for all admitted students; and
    provides general academic information, financial aid information, counseling and
    guidance services to students and prospective students.

*   Provides for the collection, accounting, and appropriate disbursement of tuition and
    fees, State general funds, and other monies according to established University
    policies; secures and maintains suitable instructional and administrative facilities that
    include office space, classrooms, and other work areas; and provides for appropriate
    security of the Center’s facilities.


*   Collects student, class, and enrollment data; prepares and publishes a summary report
    of the Center’s activities; and prepares assessment reports to meet University of
    Hawai‘i and Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) requirements as
    needed.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                46
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements


          Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements

Hawai’ i Community College has reviewed the eligibility requirements for accreditation
and affirms its continued compliance with them. No changes have occurred which might
affect HawCC’s standing. Further information is provided throughout the self-study and
in the twenty-one eligibility statements included in the document.



Signed:


______________________________________________                             __________________
Board of Regents                                                           Date



______________________________________________                             __________________
David McClain, President, University of Hawai‘i                            Date



______________________________________________                             __________________
John Morton, Vice-President for Community Colleges                         Date



______________________________________________                             __________________
Rockne Freitas, Chancellor, Hawai‘i Community College                      Date




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               47
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements




                         This page intentionally left blank.




                       Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             48
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements



     Eligibility Requirements for Accreditation: Hawai‘i Community College, 2006

1.     Authority

       The Hawai‘i State Authority for Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC), as part of
       the University of Hawai‘i System, comes from the State Legislature in the Hawai‘i
       Revised Statutes (HRS) (HRS, §304-1). The University is a public corporation,
       under the direction of the University of Hawai‘i (UH) Board of Regents (BOR)
       (HRS, §304-2). The BOR manages and controls the affairs of the university system
       and is responsible for the successful operation and achievement of its purposes
       (HRS, §304-3). The Board approves the establishment or termination of all
       instructional and research programs. This includes grouping of courses or academic
       units towards a credentialed objective (UH BOR, 2002b).

2.     Mission

       The mission statement of HawCC was most recently revised spring 2006 based on
       campus-wide input that occurred at an all-college learning day, March 3, 2006. The
       mission statement clearly defines the college’s commitment to achieving student
       learning and is appropriate for a community college seeking to serve all segments of
       the Hawai‘i Island community. Following the March 3, 2006 learning day input
       was received from the college’s Academic Senate and College Council.

       The HawCC mission statement along with its vision statement and imperatives was
       approved by the BOR as an amendment to the HawCC Academic Development
       Plan July 20, 2006. Previous to adopting the current procedure, the BOR approved
       the UHCC mission statement and plans, not individual community college plans.
       The college’s mission statement is included on its website, general catalog, and
       other publications deemed appropriate such as the college’s monthly newsletter.

3.     Governing Board

       The BOR manages and controls the affairs of the university, has exclusive
       jurisdiction over the internal organization and management of the university, and is
       responsible for the successful operation and achievement of its purposes as
       prescribed in the HRS, Chapters 304-3 (HRS, §304-3) and 304-4 (HRS, §304-4).
       BOR Policy (UH BOR, 2002a, section 4-7) identifies community colleges as a
       critical component of the UH system and establishes policies for their development.

       The BOR is composed of twelve members appointed by the governor to staggered
       four-year terms (UH, 2006b). Regents serve as volunteers. Five of the twelve also
       serve on the BOR’s Committee on Community Colleges (CCC) (UH BOR CCC,
       2005). This committee is charged with making recommendations to the BOR on
       issues related to UHCC and vocational education.



                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 49
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements


     The BOR adheres to a conflict of interest policy requiring disclosure of potential
     conflicts of interests, an emphasis on impartial decision making, and the upholding
     of professional standards as outlined in Article X of the BOR Bylaws (UH BOR,
     2003). Regents are also subject to the standards of conduct and financial interest
     disclosure requirements as found in HRS, Chapter 84, Standards of Conduct (HRS,
     §84).

4.   Chief Executive Officer

     Dr. Rockne Freitas serves as the chief executive of HawCC’s main campus in Hilo
     and its University of Hawai‘i Center in West Hawai‘i. His three year appointment
     as Chancellor, effective August 3, 2004 was approved at the July 2004 BOR
     meeting (UH BOR, 2004). He is a full-time administrator who serves as the
     college’s liaison officer to the President of the University and the President’s staff,
     the BOR, and the State Legislature.

     Dr. Freitas, as Chancellor, is responsible for the overall administration and
     management of the College’s instructional, student services, institutional support,
     academic support, continuing education and training programs and career and
     technical training programs. He works with the campus to set institutional goals
     and mission, plan and forecast courses of action, develop strategies to achieve
     goals, allocate resources and is responsible for the financial soundness of the
     budget, development of policies, and setting of procedures.

5.   Administrative Capacity

     The administrative staff of the college includes the Chancellor and seven
     administrative officers (listed below). Only one of these positions is currently filled
     by the same individual who was part of the administrative team at the time of the
     2000 self study. The two Interim Assistant Deans are additions since the 2000 self
     study and the two Vice-Chancellors are re-titled positions, previously the Dean of
     Instruction and Director of Administrative Services.
           • Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs
           • Vice-Chancellor for Administration Affairs
           • Dean of Student Services
           • Director of Continuing Education and Training
           • Director of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i
           • Interim Assistant Dean of Liberal Arts
           • Interim Assistant Dean of Career and Technical Education

     The college has sufficient administrative officers, with appropriate preparation and
     experience, to support its mission and purposes. However, funds provided by the
     2006-2007 supplemental budget and funds requested in the 2007-2009 biennium
     budget will provide the college with needed infrastructure support. Most new
     positions are in the area of administrative affairs, necessitated by the college


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               50
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements


     assuming responsibility for overseeing the Manono Campus, historically handled by
     the University of Hawai‘i Hilo until October 2006.

6.   Operational Status

     HawCC enrollment statistics demonstrate students are actively pursuing its degree
     and certificate programs. Headcount enrollment of credit students at HawCC
     increased almost 17% from fallFall 2000 (2,090 students) to fallFall 2005 (2,377
     students) (UH Institutional Research Office [IRO], 2005b, Table 2, Fall 1995-Fall
     2005). Spring enrollments for the corresponding period increased 10% (1,897
     students to 2,098) (UH IRO, 2005a, Table 2, Spring Semesters 1995-2005). The
     combined number of degrees and certificates awarded in 2004-05 was 315, which is
     slightly higher than the average of 311 awarded during the most recent five year
     period. The going rate of Hawai‘i high school graduates attending HawCC has also
     increased; 293 Hawai‘i high school graduates enrolled at HawCC in 2005, an
     increase of almost 18% over the five year average of 257 (UH IRO, 2005c, Table 4
     “Going Rates” Of Hawai‘i High School Graduates Into The University Of Hawai‘i
     System).

     The current schedule of classes offered by HawCC is available on the internet
     (HawCC, 2006e). A complete listing of all classes is included in the college’s
     annual printed catalog. A copy of the catalog is given to all new students, is
     available in the college bookstore, and can be downloaded from the college’s
     website (HawCC, 2006a). UH Community Colleges’ (UHCC) distance learning
     classes available to HawCC students are listed on the internet at the UH Community
     Colleges’ e-learn site (UH CC, n.d.).

7.   Degrees

     The HawCC college catalog (HawCC, 2006a) contains a listing of the HawCC
     degrees and certificates (HawCC, 2006a, p.39-43), as well as course credit
     requirements (HawCC, 2006a, p.67-111), and the unit length of study for each
     degree program (HawCC, 2006a, p.44-64). Students may select from twenty-seven
     different programs of study, culminating in nine certificates of completions, sixteen
     certificates of achievement, fifteen Associate of Applied Science degrees, five
     Associates of Science degrees, an Associates of Arts degree, and two Associate of
     Arts degrees with an academic subject certificate.

     Requirements for each certificate and degree are provided in the catalog. The
     unduplicated number of degrees and certificates awarded in 2004-05 was 315, an
     upward trend from the most recent five year average of 311 (UH IRO, 2005d). Of
     the 315 unduplicated, 110 were AA degrees and 205 were from a career or technical
     education program. The college’s fallFall 2005 enrollment count of 2,377 students
     represents the number of students enrolled in certificate and degree programs.



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               51
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements


8.   Educational Programs

     HawCC offers a range of academic and technical training programs that culminate
     in degrees and certificates. The college’s degree programs are congruent with its
     mission. They emphasize student learning and seek to provide the Hawai‘i island
     community with general education, transfer, and vocational programs that will help
     students become productive and engaged citizens, ready to meet the complex
     challenges of a global community. Since 2000, in response to community interest
     and demand, the college has added a digital media arts certificate, substance abuse
     counseling certificate and two new degrees, the Hawaiian Life Styles A.A.S. degree
     and the Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agroforestry Management A.S. degree.

     Courses are conducted at levels of quality and rigor appropriate to the degree
     offered. The faculty is in the process of revising all courses/programs to include
     student learning outcomes (SLOs) as the basis for evaluating students and awarding
     credit, degrees, and certificates. Numerous courses have been articulated with the
     UHCC system using student learning outcomes and several courses are articulated
     with UH at Hilo and UH at Manoa.

     All degree programs are detailed in the college catalog which includes course
     descriptions and curricular sequences of educational programs. All A.A.S. and
     A.A. degrees generally require a minimum of two years to complete. By policy,
     these degrees require at least 60 semester credits, with the A.A. degree requiring the
     credits to be earned at the 100 and 200 baccalaureate level.

     The college also offers courses when coupled with those offered by other UHCC
     campuses, leading to an Associate in Arts degree through distance learning.
     Courses are offered via cable TV, polycom, and the Internet. Information about the
     UHCC’s online A.A. degree is on the internet at the e-learn web site (UH CC, n.d.),
     which also includes a wide-array of courses offered for both general education and
     technical programs of study.

9.   Academic Credit

     HawCC awards academic credit based on the Carnegie formula; one semester unit
     of credit is defined as one hour of lecture per week for fifteen weeks with a
     recommended two hours of preparation outside of class for each one hour in class.
     Other equivalences also follow the standard formula: two hours of lecture/lab per
     week for fifteen weeks are equivalent to one credit and three hours of lab per week
     for fifteen weeks are equivalent to one credit. Cooperative vocational educational
     classes require one hour per week lecture plus three hours per week work
     experience for the semester. The college has policies related to academic credits
     earned published in its catalog.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               52
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements


10.   Student Learning Achievement

      All programs and courses are moving forward in a planned, systematic manner to
      identify and assess student learning outcomes via the college’s program/unit review
      process. (HawCC, 2006b). The Program Review Template (HawCC, 2006d)
      requires programs and units to assess program learning outcomes over a 4-year
      cycle (HawCC, 2006c). Under this plan, by fallFall 2009, all programs will have
      identified their respective student learning outcomes and assessment processes.
      Institutional commitment to student learning achievement is further evidenced by
      the Senate Educational Policy Committee’s incorporation of SLOs into the
      curriculum process.

      Administrators, faculty, and staff are working on an on-going basis to facilitate the
      development of outcomes and improvement of student achievement. Institutional
      commitment to this process is guided by the Assessment Committee. The
      committee has planned numerous workshops to assist faculty in their endeavors to
      promote and assess student learning, while emphasizing the knowledge and
      experience necessary for students to pursue academic achievement.

      HawCC’s success rate, defined as the percentage of students who have either
      graduated or are still enrolled, is 34% as of Fall 2004, which is only slightly below
      the 35% average UHCC 150% success rate. HawCC is second highest in the
      UHCC system behind Kapi`olani and Leeward, who both reported 38%. For the
      same period, according to peer and benchmark group comparison data, HawCC had
      the highest graduation rate, 19% compared to the community colleges average
      150% graduation rate of 14% (UH IRO, 2005e).

      Program outcomes may also be assessed by evaluating student performance on
      licensure examinations. The college’s Associate in Nursing program graduated 22
      students in spring 2005. Of the twenty-two graduates all but one passed the
      NCLEX-RN national exam on the first try for a pass rate of 95.5%. The remaining
      student passed on the second try.

         “Hawai‘i Community College has been active in establishing Student
         Learning Outcomes at the program and course level. The team saw
         examples of student learning outcomes that were being used in the program
         review process to assess effectiveness. The faculty is enthusiastic about
         their development of student learning outcomes” (ACCJC 2005, p.4).

11.   General Education

      HawCC requires all academic and vocational degree programs to have a component
      of general education. All degree programs require students to earn credits in
      prescribed mathematics, communications, and thinking/reasoning courses.
      Associate of Applied Science and Associate of Science degree programs require
      students to earn a minimum of nine (9) general education credits by selecting one

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                53
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements



      3-credit course from each of three areas: Humanities/Cultural Environment, Natural
      Sciences/Natural Environment, and Social Sciences/Social Environment. The
      Associates of Arts degree requires forty-nine credits to be earned from liberal arts
      courses at the 100-200 baccalaureate level and eleven credits to be earned from any
      course offered at the 100-200 level. The AA degree also requires completion of one
      writing intensive course with a grade of “C” or getter.

      The Liberal Arts program, from which the general education courses originate, has
      developed program learning outcomes (HawCC Assessment Committee, 2006).
      General education course descriptions and requirements are included in the college
      catalog. The courses are consistent with a level of quality and rigor appropriate to
      higher education; many of the courses are articulated with UH at Manoa (UH Office
      of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, 2006). Effective Fall 1994, students
      who have earned an AA degree from HawCC or any UHCC shall be accepted as
      having fulfilled the general education core requirements at all other University of
      Hawai‘i campuses. Quality of general education courses is also evidenced by
      program entry requirements and course prerequisites.

12.   Academic Freedom

      Hawai‘i Community College maintains an atmosphere in which intellectual
      freedom and independence exist. Faculty and students are free to examine and test
      all knowledge appropriate to their discipline as judged by the general academic
      community. A discussion of the college’s academic freedom policy is included in
      the college’s most recent catalog (HawCC, 2006a, p.30). BOR policy section 9-
      15(b) establishes the UH system policy on safeguarding academic freedom (UH
      BOR, 2002c, p.102). Article IX. Section A of the 2003-2009 University of Hawai‘i
      Professional Assembly (UHPA) and BOR Agreement also addresses the faculty’s
      rights to academic freedom (UHPA, 2003, p.16).

13.   Faculty

      HawCC has a substantial core of qualified faculty with full-time responsibility to
      the institution. The core when coupled with qualified adjunct faculty is sufficient to
      support the institution’s educational programs. The college catalog includes a
      listing of faculty coupled with their relevant degrees and areas of expertise
      (HawCC, 2006a, p.113-117). The schedule of classes identifies the instructor for
      each class (HawCC, 2006e).

      For the past several years a hiring freeze has been in place for the UH system; this
      was recently lifted resulting in a flurry of recruitment and hiring during the
      spring/summer 2006. Additional positions have been funded in the supplemental
      budget and are being requested in the next biennium budget. The hiring of qualified
      permanent faculty will reduce the college’s dependence on adjunct faculty.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                54
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements



      Article IV. Section B of the 2003-2009 University of Hawai‘i Professional
      Assembly (UHPA) and BOR Agreement includes curriculum and course
      development, participation in campus committees, implementation of instructional
      systems and strategies, and student evaluation and assessment as integral pieces in
      the professional responsibilities of faculty (UHPA, 2003, p.4).

14.   Student Services

      Under the direction of the Dean of Student Services, the student services unit
      provides a full range of services consistent with the college’s mission to promote
      student learning and academic success. Inasmuch as the college’s students are
      ethnically diverse and have a wide range of educational needs, services have been
      developed to serve these students. These services are identified in the college
      catalog under the counseling and support services section (HawCC, 2006a, p.27-
      28).

      In addition to responding to student requests for assistance, the counseling and
      support services staff reach students through a cooperative arrangement whereby
      faculty refer students for counseling who are observed to be having difficulty
      academically or personally.

      The college has also instituted a case management program for career and technical
      students, providing services to a group of students who are traditionally
      economically disadvantaged, at risk, and/or limited English proficient. (Hawai‘i
      Community College Carl D. Perkins Achieving Standards Plan 2006-2007) This
      program introduced in 2003 was expanded in 2005 because of its success.

      Specialized services are also available for students who are academically under
      prepared, displaced homemakers, returning older nontraditional students, any
      student with a documented physical l. Learning and/or psychological disability and
      students on academic warning, probation, or readmission after academic dismissal.

      To enhance services, the college has budgeted for an enrollment management
      system and has requested additional personnel for financial aid and counseling
      support. All units within the student services have or will be completing unit
      reviews as part of the college’s program review process.

15. Admissions

      Access to Hawai‘i Community College in accordance with BOR Policy, section 4-7
      is open-admission, providing access to high school graduates and other adults age
      18 or older who can benefit from its programs (UH BOR, 2002a, section 4-7).
      Other eligibility requirements apply to high schools students participating in the
      Running Start or Early Admit Programs, and international students (HawCC, 2001).



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                55
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements


      The college utilizes the “University of Hawai‘i System Application Form” (UH,
      2006a), which is available on the internet and also the Kama‘aina Application for
      Hawai‘i Island high school students applying during high school recruitment visits.
      Admission criteria is included in the college catalog and also on the college’s
      website. The admission process is well defined on the college’s website (HawCC,
      2001). To assist persons with questions about admissions, the college has
      established an Information Center located in the administration building or by
      calling 974-7611. The college has also instituted online orientation and intermittent
      campus orientations during the summer.

16.   Information and Learning Resources

      HawCC provides information learning resources and services at a variety of
      locations in an effort to support its mission and instructional programs.
            ♦ Edwin H. Mookini Library located on the UH at Hilo campus
            ♦ Library located at the University of Hawai‘i Center at West Hawai‘i
            ♦ The Learning Center on the UH at Hilo campus
            ♦ Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center on the HawCC Manono
                campus
            ♦ The Learning Center located in Kealakekua at the UH Center at West
                Hawai‘i, currently administered by UHCWH and funded by HawCC
                budget allocations.
            ♦ Web-based catalog of UH System library holdings
            ♦ The Learning Information Literacy Online (LILO) Web site for college-
                level research writing courses.

      Library and learning centers located in Hilo service both UH at Hilo and HawCC
      students. HawCC administers all of the units listed above except for the Mookini
      Library which is under the direction of the UH at Hilo. HawCC has one librarian
      located at the Mookini Library and a biennium budget request for another position.
      Both the library and learning center units of HawCC are scheduled to complete unit
      reviews to more fully evaluate their services and needs as part of the college’s
      program review four-year cycle.

17.   Financial Resources

      The UH System and Hawai‘i Community College utilizes a program-based, full-
      cost incremental budget system. The budget is prepared and authorized on a
      biennial basis by the state legislature. HawCC’s program review process was
      intentionally designed to support shared governance and to emphasize the
      importance of student learning outcomes; nevertheless, determination of resource
      allocation is, for the most part, a UH system-based decision that is determined by
      Hawai‘i State Government actions.

      There are major advantages of belonging to a Hawai‘i state-based system such as
      knowing that long term liabilities and obligations such as employee-related health

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                56
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements


      benefits will be paid by the state. In addition, the state is self-insured, allowing the
      college assurance of liability coverage without direct cost. Additionally, repairs and
      maintenance of buildings are system-based.

      A recent UH System agreement with the Accrediting Commission for Community
      and Junior Colleges requires each individual campus to establish and maintain 3%
      of their total budget in reserve to be used for emergencies; HawCC met this 3%
      reserve for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2006, the first year of the agreement
      (UHCC System, Community Colleges, 2005).

18.   Financial Accountability

      Annually, the UH System conducts mandatory independently contracted audits of
      general funds and tuition and fees. A separate financial aid independent audit is
      also conducted annually. These audit reports are available online (UH Vice
      President for Budget and Finance/CFO, 2006).
      In addition to these annually mandated audits, Price Waterhouse is scheduled to
      perform an independent audit of all UH System special and revolving accounts for
      fiscal year July, 2005-June, 2006. The Hawai‘i State Legislative Auditor will also
      conduct a separate audit of general funds and tuition and fees for the same period.

      The fiscal management of all grants, externally funded programs, and contractual
      agreements is reviewed and approved through the UH System Office of Research
      Services (ORS). The UH System and the college follow audit guidelines for all
      such externally funded programs.

19.   Institutional Planning and Evaluation

      One element of financial planning for Hawai‘i CC is organized through the College
      Council and documented in the college’s academic development plan, the most
      recent of which is the HawCC Academic Development Plan 2002-2010 (HawCC,
      n.d.). Mission alignment and goals selection, strategies and resource needs for
      meeting selected goals and the college’s commitment to fiscal planning based on
      long-term priorities are part of this document.

      A second element of the college’s financial planning process is the HawCC
      Program/Unit Review Process, which was designed to support shared governance,
      to emphasize the importance of student learning outcomes, and to provide a
      mechanism for an ongoing systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning,
      resource allocation, implementation, and re-evaluation. As part of this process the
      college’s administrative team utilizes program/unit review assessments from the
      College Effectiveness Review Committee, College Council and Academic Senate to
      determine if a modification of the strategic development plan is warranted,
      formulate biennium and/or supplemental budget requests to the State Legislature,
      and/or consider internal reallocation of budget and position allocations to fulfill the
      needs documented in the program/unit reviews.

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                57
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements




         “The college has developed an approach to planning and assessment that is
         integrated and systematic. The team saw evidence that the program review
         process has been embraced by the college and will be used in the manner
         intended. The college is well positioned to use systematic evaluation and
         planning to improve Hawai‘i Community College.”

         “To add reality to the first round of reviews, the Chancellor has made the
         sum of $25,000 available for distribution based on program review
         priorities. This commitment by leadership has been well received by the
         college” (ACCJC 2005, p.4).

20.   Public Information

      HawCC publishes an annual catalog that contains accurate and current general
      information about its mission, website, courses, programs and degrees, as well as
      student services offered. The catalog also includes a calendar for the current
      academic year, admission and registration information, transfer information,
      academic policies, other policies affecting students, names and degrees of
      administrators and faculty, and names of the BOR. The college’s history, official
      addresses and locations, and official voice, TTY, and fax phone numbers are
      available in the annual catalog and on the college’s website.

      The annual catalog is available for download on the college website. Print copies
      are available in the college bookstore, at the college’s help desk, and at other
      locations around campus (HawCC, 2006a).

21.   Relations with the Accrediting Commission

      HawCC adheres to the eligibility requirements and accreditation standards and
      polices of ACCJC, describes itself in identical terms to all its accrediting agencies,
      communicates any changes in its accredited status, and agrees to disclose
      information required by ACCJC to carry out its accrediting responsibilities. The
      college complies with all ACCJC requests, directives, decisions and policies, and
      makes complete, accurate, and honest disclosure.

      UHCCP #4.101 dated May 2006 requires strategic planning documents to include
      major highlights of the colleges’ most recent accreditation report (UH CC, 2006).

      BOR Policy, section 4-5 requires that the board be informed of University
      assessment activities by means of special reports and as part of ongoing program
      review, accreditation, planning, budgeting, and tuition-setting processes (UH BOR,
      2002a, section 4-5).



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                58
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements -- References


              Eligibility Requirements for Accreditation: References

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. (2005, November 14).
Progress visit ream report for Hawai‘i Community College, M. Smith, Chair. Novato,
California: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/memo/Hawaii_CC_Progress_Team_Rpt_Nov_05_fin
al.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date a). Academic development plan 2002-2010. Hilo:
author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/hawccadp.htm

Hawai‘i Community College. (2001). How to apply. Hilo: author. Retrieved July 25,
2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/howtostart/howtoapply.html

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006a). General catalog, 2006-2007. Hilo: author. Also
available from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/learningresources/Catalog_2006-2007.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006b, February 2). Program/Unit Review Process.
Hilo: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program%20Reviews/AC%20PR%20Review
%20Process.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006c, May 1). Instructional program and unit review
schedules. Hilo: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program%20Reviews/2006%20Program%20Review
/Instructional%20Review%20Schedule%205.4.06.xls

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006d, June 30). Program review report [template].
Hilo: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program
Reviews/2006 Program Review/PROGRAM REVIEW TEMPLATE.5.10.06.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006e, July 25). Active and upcoming terms at Hawai‘i
Community College. Hilo: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://myuh.hawaii.edu/pls/uhdad/avail.classes?i=HAW

Hawai‘i Community College Assessment Committee. (2006). Course and program
SLO’s and maps. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes. Chapter 84 Standards of conduct. Honolulu: Hawai‘i
Legislature. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol02_Ch0046-0115/HRS0084/HRS_0084-
.HTM




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              59
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements -- References

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes. Chapter 304, section 1. Honolulu: Hawai‘i Legislature.
Retrieved July 24, 2006 from http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-
0319/HRS0304/HRS_0304-0001.HTM

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes. Chapter 304, section 2. Honolulu: Hawai‘i Legislature.
Retrieved July 24, 2006 from http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-
0319/HRS0304/HRS_0304-0002.HTM

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes. Chapter 304, section 3. Honolulu: Hawai‘i Legislature.
Retrieved July 24, 2006 from http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-
0319/HRS0304/HRS_0304-0003.HTM

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes. Chapter 304, section 4. Honolulu: Hawai‘i Legislature.
Retrieved July 25, 2006 from http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-
0319/HRS0304/HRS_0304-0004.HTM

University of Hawai‘i. (2006a). System application form academic year 2006-2007.
Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i. (2006b, July 21). Meet the UH Board of Regents. Honolulu:
author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/admin/regents/index.php

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2002a, October 18). Chapter 4 Planning.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch4.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2002b, October 18). Chapter 5 Academic
affairs. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 24, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch5.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2002c, October 18). Chapter 9 Personnel.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch9.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2003, January 17). By-laws of Board of
Regents. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/bylaws.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2004, July 16). Minutes. Honolulu: author.
Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20040716.regular.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents Committee on Community Colleges. (2005,
October 25). Mandates. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006, from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/cc/



                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              60
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements -- References

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (n.d.). UHCC.e-learn: Distance learning at
the University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25,
2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/uhcc.e-learn/

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2006, May). UHCCP #4.101 Strategic
academic planning. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/UHCCP_4.101_CC_Strategic_Academic
_Planning.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2005a, Spring). IRO reports
online: MAPS by report category, Table 2, Headcount enrollment of credit students, by
campus Spring semesters 1995 to 2005. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seuhs05w.xls

University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2005b, Fall). IRO reports online:
MAPS by report category, Table 2, Headcount enrollment of credit students, by campus,
Fall 1995 to Fall 2005. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?seuhf05w.xls

University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2005c, Fall). IRO reports online:
MAPS by report category, Table 4, “Going rates” of Hawai‘i high school graduates into
the University of Hawai‘i system by UH campus and by public and private high schools,
Fall 1995 to Fall 2005. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?hbuhf05w.xls

University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2005d, June 30). IRO reports
online: MAPS by report category, Table 1, Degrees and certificates earned University of
Hawai‘i Community Colleges fiscal years (July 1 to June 30) 1994-95 to 2005-05.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?dgccy05v.xls

University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2005e, October). Graduation and
retention rates, peer and benchmark group comparisons, University of Hawai‘i,
Community Colleges. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?gccc04.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. (2006, July
25). Hawai‘i Community College – Courses articulated to UHM general education
requirements. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/academics/html/articulation_hawaiicc.htm#sr

University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly. (2003, April 24). 2003-2009 Agreement
between the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly and the Board of Regents of
the University of Hawai‘i. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/2003-2009-uhpa-uh-bor-agreement.pdf/view



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               61
Certification of Continued Compliance with Eligibility Requirements -- References

University of Hawai‘i Vice President for Budget and Finance/CFO. (2006, May 23).
Directory [of CFO reports]. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 25, 2006 from
http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              62
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation


 Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) last comprehensive visit by the Accrediting
Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) was October 24-26, 2000. On
April 7, 2006 HawCC Administrators met on Oahu with the ACCJC Substantive Change
Progress Visit Team; the team did not visit HawCC. On November 14, 2005 HawCC
was visited as a follow-up to the October 2005 progress report the college was required to
submit.

      Hawai‘i Community College Official Communications with ACCJC
                         January 2001 – 2006
January 19, 2001         Accreditation reaffirmed by ACCJC, with a requirement that the
                         college complete an Interim Report to be submitted by
                         November 1, 2002 to address seven recommendations made by
                         the evaluation team.
October 2002             HawCC submits Interim (Midterm) Report to ACCJC
January 17, 2003         ACCJC accepts interim report; the college is commended for its
                         careful attention to the development of the report and urged to
                         continue the development of its research capabilities.
January 31, 2005         ACCJC requires HawCC to submit a report by April 1, 2005 on its
                         own progress in developing a practice of program review that is
                         used to inform institutional decision making and resource
                         distribution, and that leads to institutional improvement, as well
                         as participate in the resolution of community college system-
                         wide issues
October 2003             HawCC submits Midterm Report to ACCJC
January 23, 2004         HawCC Midterm Report accepted by ACCJC; the college
                         commended for the progress made in addressing the
                         Commission’s recommendations. This letter includes findings
                         from a fall 2003 team visit to the University of Hawaii
                         Community Colleges, which sited lack of an active program
                         review process as a system-wide issue. The college was directed
                         to address this issue and become active with the rest of the
                         University of Hawaii Community Colleges in developing
                         appropriate policies and procedures.
January 31, 2005         ACCJC requires HawCC to submit a report by April 1, 2005 on its
                         own progress in developing a practice of program review that is
                         used to inform institutional decision making and resource
                         distribution, and that leads to institutional improvement, as well
                         as participate in the resolution of community college system-
                         wide issues
April 4-8, 2005          ACCJC evaluation team meets with HawCC Administrators on
                         Oahu; does not visit HawCC
June 28, 2005            ACCJC reviews April 2005 Progress Report and ACCJC April 2005
                         Visit Team report; acts to issue a Warning over concern that the
                         college fully implement a program review policy that revolves
                         about a “conscious effort to improve student learning…and that
                         the college organizes its key processes and allocates its
                         resources to support student learning,”; the college is to submit
                         a Progress Report by October 15, 2005 and to prepare for an
                         ACCJC visit team evaluation in November 2005
October 15, 2005         HawCC submits Progress Report to ACCJC
November 14-16, 2005     ACCJC Team visits HawCC; ACCJC Team visits UHCC system
January 31, 2006         ACCJC accepts HawCC’s October 2005 Progress Report and
                         removes Warning; instructs college and the UHCC System to
                         demonstrate further progress on the issues of assessment,
                         institutional effectiveness and improvement, as provided for in
                         the spring 2005 accreditation team reports to the college and the
                         System; next comprehensive evaluation of HawCC to occur Fall
                         2006




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               63
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

The final evaluation report from the last comprehensive visit to the college (October 24-
26, 2000) by representatives from the Accrediting Commission for Community and
Junior colleges (ACCJC) listed seven recommendations:

   -       making the vision of the Four Cornerstones a reality
   -       communicating of the college mission island-wide
   -       developing resources to support a cohesive research function
   -       strengthening of the relationship with the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo
   -       supporting the distance learning delivery system
   -       developing and applying uniform standards for curriculum
   -       planning for facilities that will promote the goal of autonomy

These recommendations were addressed in detail in the college’s November 1, 2002
Interim Report and again in the college’s October 2003 Midterm Report. Both reports
were accepted. A January 23, 2004 letter from ACCJC accepting the midterm report
advised the college to become active with the rest of the UHCC system in complying
with a system-wide recommendation resulting from a fall 2003 team visit to the UHCC
system. This recommendation required the UHCC system to develop policies and
procedures to ensure:

       -    that the community college engage in regular assessment of institutional
            effectiveness, including program review;
       -    that the community college system as well as each college sets priorities for
            implementing plans for improvement that are based in analysis of research data;
       -    that the colleges and the UHCC system incorporate these priorities into resource
            distribution processes and decisions;
       -    that the colleges and the UHCC system develop and employ a methodology for
            assessing overall institutional effectiveness and progress toward meeting goals
            expressed through plans for improvements; and
       -    that the colleges and the UHCC system report regularly to internal
            constituencies and the Board on this progress.

This following reflects the replies to the October 2000 visit team recommendations as
they were addressed in the midterm report as well as brief updates on the progress since
that report.

Recommendation 1: The leadership of the college, having consulted with the system
Chancellor regarding the parameters within which it can realize its vision as
expressed in the Four Cornerstones, should communicate this to the college
community. The college should then work collaboratively to make the visions a
reality by prioritizing college plans and related resources.

August 2001 a task force was formed to continue discussion on the Four Cornerstones. A
general agreement was reached: the Four Cornerstones would be integrated into the
curriculum, imbedded into the institution, and the college would become a role model for
the community in the areas of community work-based learning, environment, Hawaiian


                             Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                   64
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

culture, and technology. As a result, the Four Cornerstones were paramount in the
development of the college’s strategic plan for 2002-2010. Additionally, efforts were
made to publicize the college’s Four Cornerstone, including publication in the Hawai‘i
Community College Newsletter, the Kukui News, and the college’s general catalog.

Examples of how curriculum and community partnerships demonstrate commitment to
the Four Cornerstones follow:

   *   Community Work-Based Learning

The college has a rich history of work-based learning, from its award-winning Model
Home Project to a wide range of internships and service learning and volunteer
programs. These include co-op and practicum courses such as the clinical practicum in
Nursing and the American Reads student employees’ work experience.

HawCC’s apprenticeship program provides evening and/or Saturday classes in the areas
of carpentry, electricity, masonry, plumbing, refrigeration and air conditioning, and
painting.

The Office of Continuing Education (OCET) has increased both enrollment and the
number of work-based classes offered every year since 1998. Part of this increase is due
to work-training agreements with the Hawai‘i Department of Labor’s Workforce
Development Division.

   *   Environment

The AS degree in Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agroforestry Management was added
to the college’s curriculum in 2001. This action, combined with an Environmental
Studies Academic Subject Certificate and faculty sponsorship and planning of events
such as the annual Earth Day Fair, illustrate the college’s commitment to the
environment.

   *   Hawaiian Culture

The college has established a center for the study of Hawaiian Culture, with emphasis on
the practice, perpetuation, and evolution of the culture. The Board of Regents approved
the AAS degree in Hawaiian Life Styles with three options: Hula (dancing), Lawai‘a
(fishing), and Mahi‘ai (kalo farming). Many Liberal Arts and Career and Technical
Education students select individual classes from the Hawaiian Life Styles Program to
meet requirements in their majors.

   *   Technology

The college offers an AS degree in Information Technology and provides extensive
training in CISCO networking including classes in Basic Networking, Routers/Routing,
Switching/Inter Routing, and WAN Technologies. The Informational Technology


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                65
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

Program and Electronics program are unique in the fact that they offer training directly
related to the technology needed by observatories.

Since 2000, the college converted from analog to digital networking. This change and
other efforts by the college have significantly expanded distance education course
offerings and degree possibilities for both the East and West Hawai‘i campuses. For
example, the AS in Nursing degree is offered to students in West Hawaii via the Hawaii
Interactive Television System (HITS) and WebCT. A complete listing of faculty’s
involvement in HITS, WebCT, and internet courses can be seen at
http://www.hawaii.edu/uhcc.e-learn/.

Other examples of the college’s commitment to technology include partnerships such as
the UH College of Education LEI Aloha Project (designed to update classroom
technology) and Workforce Development Division computer training agreements with
OCET.

Update:
At a March 3, 2006 All-College Learning Day, which was one of the best attended
college activities in recent history, the Four Cornerstones morphed into seven
imperatives: Community Development, Workforce Development, Cultural Competency,
Environment, Hawaiian Culture and Values, Healthy Communities, and Technology.

HawCC in partnership with the Department of Education launched the Construction
Academy at Kealakehe and Laupahoehoe high schools July 2006. Plans are to expand it
to all interested high schools fall 2007. The academy is designed to promote awareness
among high school students that becoming a plumber, carpenter, or an electrician can
provide a successful, satisfying, and lucrative career and to give high school students a
head start on a two-year post-secondary degree, or allow them to enter a post-secondary
apprenticeship program at a higher, more qualified skill level, or enter the workforce at a
higher, more qualified skill level. The academy was created in response to workforce
needs particularly in the construction area.

HawCC’s electronics program is currently revising their curriculum to offer an
Associates in Science degree in response to workforce needs for the observatories and
other local entities.

The implementation of online registration provides a means for students from any of the
UH system colleges to register for a HawCC online course assuming they meet the
prerequisites. It also makes registration easier for students in the outlying areas of the
island.

Recommendation 2: The mission statement of the college should reflect its
distinctive educational service on the island of Hawaii. Specifically, the college
should make a concerted effort to market to the community its unique island
mission and the relevance of its Four Cornerstones to providing a responsive
educational environment.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                66
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

The college considers its community to be the entire island of Hawai‘i, and our vision is
to serve this large geographic area through distributed sites. These specialized sites will
provide area access to training and educational opportunities and support local economic
development initiatives.

In addition to the Four Cornerstones that frame the educational experience at HawCC,
five long-term goals provide an overall, eight-year focus for both the University of
Hawai‘i Community College system (UNCC) and the college.

These five goals are: promoting learning and teaching for student success; functioning as
a seamless state system; promoting workforce and economic development; developing
human resources through recruitment, retention, and renewal; and developing an
effective, efficient, and sustainable infrastructure to support student learning. In the
future, we will strive to meet all of these endeavors; it is our mission (Academic
Development Plan 2002-2010, p. 6).

The college developed a marketing plan and used several methods for advertising and
promotion. One traditional method utilized faculty and staff participation in community
groups and activities. Such participation is encouraged and is used as a means to evaluate
faculty performance.

During Spring 2002, Contributing to the Community was published and distributed to
community members. This publication detailed the many contributions of time, energy,
and expertise that the college offers to the community island wide.

Another marketing effort centered on college web site development. Programs, such as
Nursing, have web pages that provide information for students world wide. Further
information is given to these students via e-mail response and program brochures.

Other methods used to call attention to the college included: mailing two different
newsletters to major stakeholders, creating and conducting a town hall meeting on the
future of the island of Hawai‘i, aggressive use of free press releases to local media, and
utilizing other opportunities to inform and promote. This promotion was done through
public programs such as the Visiting Professor Series, lectures, open houses, career fairs
such as the Women in Transition Seminar, and faculty visits to local high schools.

The Information Center illustrates the college’s financial commitment to marketing. This
position has resulted in new business contacts, better community representation, and a
more efficient one-stop source for a wide variety of information about the college.
Activities from this new position combined with improvements of the college’s main web
site and an e-mail targeting of relevant information to specific groups have improved
marketing efforts.

The Job Placement Coordinator is another illustration of the financial commitment to
marketing. A job placement system is a powerful selling point when recruiting students
and promoting the college.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                67
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

The college expanded partnerships with businesses and other educational institutions
through grants, degree offerings, site development, contracts, and both formal and
informal agreements with others.

Update:
The college participated in the CC Benefits Project. This project provided data to
illustrating the socioeconomic benefits generated by the college.

College personnel created the Kama‘aina application, which gives juniors and seniors an
opportunity to complete a HawCC application and have a conditional acceptance letter
printed on site at their local high schools

Community relationships formed by the Hawaiian Lifestyles program have made possible
the offering of courses at seven satellite sites around the island.

The AS degree in Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agroforestry Management is being
expanded to include students in West Hawai‘i starting fall 2006.

Chancellor Freitas seeks out opportunities to share the vision and mission of the college.
He actively participates in community-based groups concerned with the future of the
island’s youth; such as a Saturday, July 8, 2006 community meeting at Laupahoehoe
High and Elementary School which resulted in the college offering two sections of its
Construction Academy curriculum for the high school for the 2006-07 academic year.

Rural Development funds, administered through the college’s Office of Continuing
Education & Training, have funded a multitude of projects to identify and meet
economic, employment, and training needs island-wide.

Recommendation 3: The college needs to develop the resources that will support a
cohesive research function so that: (1) student learning outcomes in educational
programs and student services can be assessed and improved, and (2) needs
assessment data is gathered as a basis for an enrollment management plan. From
this research data, the college can develop a planning agenda with specific
objectives, timelines, and assigned responsibilities.

One step towards research development was the deployment of the Community College
Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) for the 2001-02 academic year and again in
2004-05. Administered by the Community College Leadership Program from the
University of Texas at Austin and co-sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching, the CCSSE Report is considered a reliable, research-based,
and appropriate tool for assessing institutional quality.

In addition to conducting CCSSE research, the college reviewed relevant external
research data and surveyed faculty to identify internal research projects. A composite of
these projects and their findings was distributed to the College Council members who, in



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                68
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

turn, distributed this information to their constituents. Additionally, relevant external
research data was published in the college’s ADP.

Another major step towards developing cohesive research is SCT Banner. The UHS
conversion to the SCT Banner information and record management system will provide
the college with a wide range of opportunities for improving and expanding data
collection and reporting capabilities, measuring institutional effectiveness, enhancing
academic planning activities, and strengthening institutional research and grant
development functions.

HawCC’s Liberal Arts Program completed its first Program Health Indicator Review in
Spring 2002. Program demand, efficiency, and outcome standards were used to
determine program “health.” Existing data, some of which was published in the ADP,
was gathered into a data pool and then analyzed. Results indicated a relatively efficient
and effective program in sufficient demand.

The AS Nursing Program underwent National League for Nursing Accreditation
Commission (NCNAC) in February 2003. The program was awarded eight years of
continuing accreditation with no revisit or interim report. This re-accreditation was in
part based on systematic program evaluation plans.

Through federal funding, HawCC hired a Job Placement Coordinator to research and
describe existing job placement actions across the campus. This position lead to a report
completed on June 27, 2003, entitled the Job Placement Report.

The college has reorganized the Admissions and Records Office, separating the two
operations and revising the job description of the records officer to include institutional
research responsibilities. The aforementioned mentioned Job Placement Report
identifies alternative job placement structures and processes for presentation to the Dean
of Instruction and faculty. Additionally, an Educational Specialist in the Dean of
Instruction’s office manages some surveys and program assessment activities. These new
and changed positions should aid the planning process.

HawCC is an active member of the system wide AA Degree Task Force Committee that
is determining learning outcomes for general education courses in a wide variety of
subject areas. During fall 2002 and spring 2003, the liberal arts faculty reviewed the
system wide outcomes draft and began the process of “matching” college learning
outcomes and individual course learning outcomes with those from the University of
Hawai‘i system.

Additionally, the liberal arts chair has and is coordinating staff development opportunities
to help faculty identify measurable learning outcomes. This ongoing process will help
provide the data necessary to judge program demand, efficiency, and outcomes.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                69
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation


Update:
The college hired a full-time institutional analyst in January 2005, who has been
instrumental in developing assessment data for program reviews. Through his efforts an
assessment website has been created, giving faculty access to a variety of assessment
ideas and data. The data provided in the program review process was used in
development of the college’s budget request for the 2007-09 biennium.

Plans are to hire additional support in the research area during the 2006-07 academic
year. Funds have also been requested as a result of unit reviews in the student services
area for a strategic enrollment management system to improve student communication,
recruitment and retention and also provide historical data for assessment and planning.

Program specific accreditations have been awarded to the college’s Food Service
Programs, Intensive English Program, and Early Childhood Education’s Children’s
Center.

Comments from the November 14, 2006 ACCJC Visit Team recognized the college’s
commitment to research and planning.

   “The college has developed an approach to planning and assessment that is
   integrated and systematic. The team saw evidence that the program review
   process has been embraced by the college and will be used in the manner
   intended. The college is well positioned to use systematic evaluation and
   planning to improve Hawaii Community College.”

The college is actively developing student learning outcomes at the program, course and
degree level.

HawCC’s biennium budget requests were directly tied to program reviews and the
college’s strategic plan.

Recommendation 4: The relationship, communication and cooperation between the
leadership of the University of Hawaii at Hilo (UH at Hilo) and Hawaii Community
College must be strengthened. Previous agreements and areas of cooperation need
to be reviewed and renewed, particularly with regard to facility utilization.

During Spring 2001, the HawCC College Council undertook a comprehensive and
objective review of the services shared between HawCC and UH at Hilo. The review
identified shared services, levels of effectiveness, challenges, and problems. The strategy
was to gather information as a means to develop a solid basis for discussions.

In June 2001, administrators agreed on several key facilities issues. Building 393 on the
Manono campus was successfully transferred from UH at Hilo to HawCC. Similar
transfer agreements have been reached regarding specific rooms such as Room 1, a
multiple purpose room, in Building 379.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                70
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

In October 2001, the new President of the University of Hawai‘i introduced the idea of
reviewing shared services between HawCC and UH at Hilo. He challenged the faculty of
both institutions to propose a structure that would best benefit the island of Hawai‘i.

A subcommittee was formed in November 2001 to help organize a HawCC College
Council retreat entitled “New Models for Shared Services with UH at Hilo.” The retreat
was followed by an open meeting in January for faculty and staff entitled “Exploring
New Models for Shared Services with UH at Hilo”.

Faculty discussions, both structured and informal, continued at both institutions, but the
primary focus for HawCC planners was the development and writing of HawCC’s
Academic Development Plan 2002-2010; The University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges
Strategic Plan 2002-2010; and The University of Hawai‘i System Strategic Plan:
Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002-2010. UH at Hilo also focused on
system and individual development planning.

In addition to these planning demands, efforts were made by both the College Council
and Faculty Senate to determine the appropriate relationship between HawCC and UH at
Hilo. Discussions ranged from reintegrating HawCC with UH at Hilo to HawCC
developing its own capability for telephone, mail and facilities maintenance services to a
third party entity handling selected services for everyone.

In July of 2002, HawCC Faculty Senate and UH at Hilo Faculty Congress issued a joint
memo to President Dobelle indicating their intention to work together. Additionally, they
presented an outline of the initial principles that would guide their work.

Criteria established for choosing the new HawCC Chancellor, included the perceived
ability to interact and favorably negotiate with UH at Hilo.

Update:
A co-location agreement between the UH at Hilo and HawCC has been reached; HawCC
will assume facilities management of the Manono campus starting October 2006.
HawCC received approximately $400,000 from the legislature for academic year 2006-07
to reimburse the UH at Hilo for those services the two colleges will continue to share.
The college received another $1.6 million for facilities support on the Manono campus.

Recommendation 5: Support services and new financial resources need to be
directed to the distance learning delivery system, as the distributed learning model
has been identified as an important access strategy for the Hawaii Community
College.

The University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges (UHCC) Distance Education
Committee, a committee with members from all colleges in the System including
HawCC, developed and published the University of Hawai‘i Distance and Distributed
Learning Action Plan. This plan lays out specific actions that the UH system needs to
take to advance distance learning. As a result, the UH system has committed to


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                71
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

increasing the number of students who register for distance education courses and
programs to 7,500 by fall 2010 and has set a resource requirement level of $1,000,000 for
distance learning infrastructure development.

HawCC continues to request funding through the formal budgeting process. However,
the request for additional personnel and funding to support distance education initiatives
was not approved during the 2003-2005 Legislative appropriations.

The college gained financial support for distance education by securing two large federal
grants. These grants provided monies for curriculum development, equipment purchases,
and both site and professional development.

A Rural Development Project grant helped potential rural area teachers have distance
education access to a BA in Elementary Education. Grant monies also provided for extra
distance education classes in math and English preparation and provided other West
Hawai‘i students with access to additional bachelor’s, post-baccalaureate, and master’s
degree programs.

HawCC encouraged existing faculty and lecturers to develop online versions of the
classes they teach. A one-week training on how to use WEBCT to create and administer
an online class was offered in both Hilo and West Hawai‘i. This training, Talent 101,
was offered in both fall 2002 and spring 2003.

The development of a system wide, computerized student information system through
SCT Banner enables students who qualify to register online for any course offered by any
college in the system, including distance education courses. This new computerized
registration system is much more streamlined and distance learning accessible than
previous registration methods.

Update:
The college’s Academic Senate formed a Distance Education (DE) ad hoc committee to
review issues and make recommendations regarding Distance Education using the
Guidelines for Implementation presented in the ACCJC Distance Learning Manual,
pp. 8-14 and relevant UH system policies.

The college underwrites staff development activities such as a web conference to
introduce the use of pods, blogs, wikis and writely to improve and assess student
learning.

The college provides workshops and individualized instruction to help faculty utilize and
manage web pages.

Funds provided by the college’s Title III, I Ola Haloa grant were used to aggressively
engage in distance education endeavors particularly in the Hawai‘i Island’s rural districts
of Kohala, Kona, Ka‘ü, Hämäkua and Puna.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                72
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

The college’s Hawaiian Lifestyles program is the first program in the UH system to offer
online Hawaiian culture/studies courses in addition to the online Hawaiian Language
courses for learners beyond Hawai‘i Island. The program currently offers online courses
in: Hawaiian Myths and Legends (3 credits), Hawaiian Plants and Their Uses (3 credits),
Hawaiian Culture I (3 credits), Beginning Hawaiian Language 101 & 102 (4 credits each)
and Intermediate Hawaiian Language 201 & 202 (4 credits each).

A unit review of the Academic Computing Unit and the Media Support services was part
of the college’s first cadre of program/unit reviews submitted November 14, 2005. As a
result of this review the college has submitted a major biennium proposal for a
Computing and Media Support Department.

Recommendation 6: The college needs to develop and apply uniform standards for
curricula, including: (1) the identification of measurable learning outcomes for
general education courses and the Liberal Arts degree program, and (2) a program
review process for the Liberal Arts degree program. In support of these standards,
written materials need to be developed and staff development opportunities
provided.

One of the Action Strategies in the The University of Hawai‘i System Strategic Plan:
Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002-2010 is to “emphasize liberal arts
education as the foundation for an educated community and competent workforce”. This
commitment to liberal arts education at the community college level is also illustrated
through the newly established, system wide, AA Degree Task Force Committee. The
Task Force Committee recently engaged in a System review process for liberal arts. At
the end of Spring 2002, the committee completed a written draft of learning outcomes for
general education courses in a wide variety of subject areas.

HawCC’s Liberal Arts Program Unit Chair participated in these system wide discussions.
During fall 2002 and spring 2003, the Liberal Arts faculty from HawCC reviewed the
system-wide draft and began the process of “matching” the college’s learning outcomes
and individual course learning outcomes with those of the UH system.

HawCC also changed the internal structure of the college by merging several disciplines
into one Liberal Arts Division. Hopefully, this new union combined with “matching”
strategies will enable the development of uniform standards.

The first Liberal Arts Program Health Indicator Review was conducted in Spring 2002.
Program demands, efficiency, and outcome standards were used to determine program
“health.” Results indicated a relatively efficient and effective program in sufficient
demand.

Update:
Spring 2006 the Education Policy Committee of the Academic Senate completed an
extensive review of the curriculum process, resulting in updated procedures and forms.
The new online fillable forms incorporate student learning outcomes and will help


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               73
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

establish uniform standards. Following adoption Spring 2006, a Curriculum Portal
(http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/curricula/) was developed online to improve faculty
access to current procedures, forms, and resources, taking effect August 1, 2006.

The college has consciously provided significant support for the development and
implementation of SLO’s at the course, program, and college level. The efforts to
disseminate student learning outcomes by means of several extended workshops has
resulted in the development of program outcomes for liberal arts as well as many of the
other programs at the college.

The college’s program review process is designed to promote a culture of continuous
improvement in service to student learning. The first twelve program/unit reviews were
completed November 2006. The liberal arts program review is scheduled for year three
of the college’s four year program review cycle, making it due November 12, 2007.

The ACCJC November 14, 2005 visit team reported positive results from their review of
the college’s progress regarding student learning outcomes and assessment stating

   “Hawaii Community College has been active in establishing Student Learning
   Outcomes at the program and course level. The team saw examples of student
   learning outcomes that were being used in the program review process to assess
   effectiveness. The faculty is enthusiastic about their development of student
   learning outcomes.”

Recommendation 7: The college should focus its facility planning on the goal of
becoming autonomous at a site, which when built out, will house all functions of a
comprehensive community college.

Site autonomy has been and still is a primary goal of HawCC, but considering the state of
Hawai‘i’s current fiscal condition and other Capitol Improvement Project priorities, an
autonomous college with campuses in Hilo and West Hawai‘i is a reality that is probably
10 to 15 years away. Nevertheless, long-range development plans have been developed
and approved in concept by the Board of Regents for both Hilo and West Hawai‘i.

In Hilo, the proposed location for a new campus for Hawai‘i Community College is on a
parcel of about 100 acres above Komohana Street. The planning process for this site
occurred during the period 1994-1996 with consultation with administrators, division
chairs, faculty and staff, and students. The Board of Regents approved the LRDP on
March 22, 1996. The 100-acre site was planned to accommodate a student enrollment of
5,000 full-time equivalent (FTE), which would be approximately a 7,500 person
headcount. In 2000, the plan was modified slightly to accommodate the designation of
30 acres for the development of the USDA Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center
facility.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               74
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation


East Hawai‘i Transitional Facility Plan
With a new campus several years away a transitional facility plan for East Hawai‘i is
necessary. It includes major building renovations and site improvement at the Manono
campus combined with several renovation projects on the upper campus to ensure
functionality and greater independence for HawCC. Current and future projects in this
10-year transitional plan have and will continue to be influenced by co-location and
shared service agreements with UH at Hilo.

One component of facility planning is the upgrading of infrastructure on the Manono
campus. The campus’s electrical system was upgraded in 1996. Sewer connection, fire
hydrants installation, handicap accessibility and parking lot and road repavement will be
completed by fall 2003.

A second component of the Transitional Plan is the transforming of older unused or
underutilized buildings into modern classrooms and offices. Building 388, a warehouse
structure housing trade and apprenticeship training programs, was completely renovated
in spring 2000 and converted into two large classrooms with a multi-paneled movable
room divider, a video conferencing classroom, a student learning center lab, faculty
offices, storage rooms, a maintenance closet, and ADA compliant restroom facilities.

Other examples of transformation include Building 389A (a former material storage
facility changed into a Hawaiian Studies Hula classroom), Building 387 (a former
Machine Shop Warehouse to be changed into a Learning and Media Center) and Building
393 (a former UH Hilo Astronomy Warehouse to be changed into facilities for the
Agriculture, Agroforestry, and Early Childhood Education Programs, including a new
Children’s Center). A Hula classroom was completed and dedicated in February 2003,
and the other two renovation projects will be completed by the end of fall 2003.

Other renovations include the reroofing of Building 382 (Food Service Program cafeteria
and dining facility), Building 392 (Applied Technical Education Division Office),
Building 386 (Agriculture Program shop facilities), and Building 380 (Architectural,
Engineering and CAD Technologies Program and Office of Continuing Education and
Training computer labs). Reroofing for all these projects was completed by April 2003.

In addition to reroofing, Building 382 (Food Service Program) received a new air-
conditioning and interior ceiling system, new fire suppression and exhaust ventilation
systems, and ADA compliant restroom and locker room facilities. This project was
completed during Spring 2003. Building 381, Room 107 is scheduled for Science Lab
facility upgrade during 2003.

Renovation of utilized space on the upper campus includes the reroofing of the Auto
Body Repair and Painting Shop (Building 321), the Automotive Mechanics Shop
(Building 322) and the Diesel Mechanics Shop (Building 323). In addition to reroofing, a
new oil separator system and security gate will be installed during fall 2003.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               75
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

In addition to upgrading infrastructure and renovating underutilized and utilized space,
seven portable buildings are planned for the near future. They will be located in the rear
of the Manono campus and will house future classrooms, labs, and offices for faculty and
staff.

Long-Range Development and Transitional Plan for West Hawai‘i
In West Hawai‘i, the proposed location for a University campus was determined through
a community process conducted in 1990. In 1991, the Board of Regents (BOR) selected
a 500-acre site at Kalaoa, which is above Queen Kaahumanu Highway and approximately
two miles from the Kona airport. The planning process for this site was to establish a
30-acre campus that would accommodate a headcount of 1,500 students. It was
considered the number one UHCC system construction-in-process priority and was
included as a high priority in the BOR legislative requests for 2001-2003 and 2003-2005,
but did not receive an appropriation.

Options for private partnerships in the development of both permanent and transitional
facilities for the University are being actively pursued. Plans for the establishment of an
innovative educational village type vision with a private partner are under discussion.
Additionally, the college is exploring a partnership with one of the resort hotels and with
other educational partners to integrate the hospitality and culinary programs into a “resort
for learning” concept.

Update:
The first stages of unique private public partnerships to develop college campuses in both
Hilo and Kona have been approved and agreements signed. The ultimate culmination of
these agreements will result in the college having an independent physical identity for the
first time in its organizational history. Creation of an identity and a physical as well as
organizational presence fully consonant with HawCC’s mission is now more a reality
than a vision. Meanwhile renovation and maintenance of facilities on the Manono and
UH at Hilo campus continue.

Recommendation January 23, 2004 from ACCJC that the college become active with
the rest of the UHCC system in complying with a system-wide recommendation
involving program review, student learning outcomes, assessment and a
methodology for resource distribution processes and decisions.

The college’s April 1, 2005 and October 15, 2005 Progress Reports responded to this
recommendation. The November 14, 2005 ACCJC Visit Team reported

       “The college adopted the UHCC System template for program review but
       then modified it to include only the 13 elements for which data was
       immediately available. In so doing, the college provided a common base
       set of data from which to build over the next three years of assessment
       activity.”




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                76
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation

       “Hawaii Community College has been active in establishing Student
       Learning Outcomes at the program and course level. The team saw
       examples of student learning outcomes that were being used in the
       program review process to assess effectiveness.

       “The college has developed an approach to planning and assessment that
       is integrated and systematic. The team saw evidence that the program
       review process has been embraced by the college and will be used in the
       manner intended. To add reality to the first round of reviews, the
       Chancellor has made the sum of $25,000 available for distribution based
       on program review priorities. The college is well positioned to use
       systematic evaluation and planning to improve Hawai‘i Community
       College.”

The college has made a major effort to disseminate student learning outcomes. This has
included several extended workshops, one of which involved training a cadre of
facilitators who have been deployed among the 27 instructional programs offered by the
college to establish program maps, program and course level SLO’s. Faculty meetings in
some of the Divisions have taken on a task force approach to deploying collegially
determined SLO’s for commonly taught courses. The next level is for collegial
agreement upon assessment strategies and reporting methods to be integrated as a key
element in the program review reports; this is scheduled for the 2006-07 academic year.

As evidenced by a presentation made by
Chancellor Freitas to the University of
Hawai‘i Board of Regents’ Committee on
Community Colleges on July 21, 2006, the
college is committed to program reviews as a
mechanism for continual improvement. The
college’s first cadre of program/unit reviews
submitted November 14, 2005 in tandem with
the college’s strategic plan serve as primary
documentation for the college’s 2007-09
biennium budget requests.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               77
Responses to Recommendations from the Most Recent Comprehensive Evaluation




                       This page intentionally left blank.




                     Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                           78
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness


                   Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

The institution demonstrates strong commitment to a mission that emphasizes
achievement of student learning and to communicating the mission internally and
externally. The institution uses analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and
analysis in an ongoing and systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning,
implementation, and re-evaluation to verify and improve the effectiveness by which the
mission is accomplished.

A. Mission
   The institution has a statement of mission that defines the institution’s broad
   educational purposes, its intended student population, and its commitment to
   achieving student learning.



A.1. The institution establishes student learning programs and services aligned with its
purposes, its character, and its student population.

Descriptive Summary:

The identity of Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) is founded on the principles of
teaching, fostering life-long learning, providing comprehensive education programs,
having a commitment to excellence, and serving community needs (HawCC, n.d.a, p.6).
The mission of Hawai‘i Community College is “to provide the community with a
responsive educational environment that empowers learners to develop skills and
knowledge to be responsible and productive in a complex world” (HawCC, 2005a, p.6).
The college promotes Four Cornerstones that provide the basis for the students’ learning
experience: Hawaiian Culture, Environment, Technology, and Community Work-Based
Learning.

Access to affordable post-secondary education with open-door opportunities in students’
own communities is a special mission identified by the University of Hawai‘i Community
Colleges (UHCC) system. The entire island of Hawai‘i (4,060 square miles) is the
primary community which HawCC serves through distributed sites and the use of
technology.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. However, a major college-wide effort is underway to
develop a new mission statement, vision statement, and imperatives that may better
reflect the institutional commitment to the college’s educational purposes, student
learning programs, intended student population, and commitment to student learning.

The college’s main campus is located in Hilo (East Hawai‘i), so many from outlying
areas are not able to attend classes on the main campus due to geographical and


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                79
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

transportation constraints. To serve this large island area, the college provides off-
campus sites at strategic locations on the island where students may attend in-person
classes and/or use the facilities for classes delivered through various technological
methods.

In addition to the Hilo campus, Hawai‘i Community College has other sites between an
hour and a two-and-a-half hour drive from Hilo: the University of Hawai‘i Center at West
Hawai‘i and sites located in Waimea and Kohala (North Hawai‘i) and Ka`u (South
Hawai‘i). In addition to in-person classes, the college delivers classes online via the
internet, through the Hawai‘i Interactive Television System (HITS), and through video-
conferencing to better reach and serve the entire island community.

Hawai‘i Community College is committed to an organizational structure serving all
segments of the island community through an open-door policy that offers equitable
treatment and learning opportunities to everyone. Academic admission to the college is
open to any high school graduate or person 18 years of age or older who can benefit from
the instruction offered. To fulfill the diverse educational, training, and community needs
of island residents, the college offers a wide range and level of technical and academic
courses including remedial, developmental, and baccalaureate-level courses; certificate
and degree programs; and various non-credit courses and workshops for occupational
training and personal/professional development.

Currently the college is undergoing an incremental program/unit review process that will
drive budget and strategic planning to help maintain and improve opportunities for
student learning. Every program/unit will be required to complete a review every four
years. The program/unit review process includes developing program/institution maps
and student learning outcomes for each course, program, and the college. Twelve
program and unit reviews were completed in November 2005, with additional reviews to
be completed in November 2006, November 2007, and November 2008.

Completed program/unit review reports are reviewed by the College Effectiveness
Review Committee (CERC), the Chancellor, the Academic Senate, and the College
Council. The college administrative team then takes under advisement comments from
prior reviewing bodies as it “proceeds to review the possible need for revision of the
strategic development plan, formulate biennium and or supplemental budget requests to
the State Legislature, or consider internal reallocation of budget and position allocations”
(HawCC, 2006a).

The college encourages dialogue concerning the college’s mission and direction through
discussions with key constituents. In November 2001 the college facilitated a Town
Meeting on the Future of the Big Island where students, college personnel, and
government officials came together to brainstorm solutions to the island’s most pressing
social, economic, health, and safety issues. Contact with community partners is also
maintained through program advisory council meetings and the Chancellor’s Community
Advisory Council.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                80
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

Hawai‘i Community College also conducts surveys to gauge student satisfaction in order
to help determine whether the college is addressing student needs. Students expressed
positive feelings and opinions about the college, faculty, and staff in the Community
College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) surveys conducted in 2002 (HawCC,
n.d.b) and 2004 (HawCC, n.d.c). The Graduate/Leaver 2002-04 survey results also
confirm a high degree of student satisfaction with their educational experience at the
college (HawCC, n.d.d).

This continual cycle of dialogue and discussion among key constituents, data collection,
evaluation, planning, and improvement fosters college-wide commitment to achieve
student learning throughout the very diverse community served by the college.

As a result of the accreditation self-study process, the college’s administrative team
developed a draft vision statement at a November 24, 2005, administrative meeting and a
draft of a revised mission statement at a January 2006 administrative retreat. Both draft
statements were presented to the college community at a March 3, 2006, Learning Day at
which faculty, staff, students, and administrators participated in breakout groups to work
on the drafts developed by the administration team. A new set of draft institutional
statements (Vision, Mission, and Imperatives) resulted and will be further worked on by
an ad hoc committee consisting of faculty, staff and students.

The Academic Senate approved a resolution (HawCC, Academic Senate [AS], 2006)
creating the ad hoc committee with membership divided between Editorial and Advisory
with the following charge and timetable:

•   Advisory members will accept input and submit their drafts to Editorial members by
    April 7, 2006.
•   Editorial members will focus on maintaining the intent of the draft statements while
    at the same time revising for effective style and presentation. The resulting
    statements will be submitted to the Academic Senate Executive Committee, College
    Council Chair, and the Student Government President, by April 20, 2006.
•   Faculty will vote on the Academic Senate final draft statements on April 28, 2006,
    which if passed, will be then forwarded to the Chancellor.
•   The College Council and student government will determine their own method for
    processing the draft statements.

Once the Chancellor has reviewed recommendations from all of the interested parties and
upon adoption, the institutional statements will be reviewed every four years as part of
the program/unit review cycle.

Planning Agenda:

The college shall make an institutional commitment to:

    1. Completing its current review of its Vision/Mission and accompanying statements
       according to the timetable outlined above.

                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               81
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

   2. Reviewing its institutional statements every four years as part of its regular
      Program/Unit Review cycle.

A.2. The mission statement is approved by the governing board and published.

Descriptive Summary:

The college’s mission statement was first published in the 1996-1997 Hawai‘i
Community College General Catalog: “The Mission of Hawai‘i Community College is
to provide the community with a responsive educational environment, which empowers
learners to develop skills and knowledge to be responsible and productive in a complex
world” (HawCC, 1996, p.3).

Since first adopted, the mission statement has not changed other than for a relatively
minor change of one word (from “which empowers learners” to “that empowers
learners”) in the 2001-2002 Hawai‘i Community College General Catalog (HawCC,
2001a, p.5). Since then, the mission statement reads and has been published as: “The
Mission of Hawai‘i Community College is to provide the community with a responsive
educational environment that empowers learners to develop skills and knowledge to be
responsible and productive in a complex world” (HawCC, 2005a, p.6).

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. No specific documentation has been found stating that
mission statements require the approval of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents
(UH BOR) or the approval of any other governing body within the UH system. In an
interview with a former HawCC administrator, it was stated that when the college’s
mission statement was originally approved and adopted by respective college governing
bodies, a copy was sent to the then UH Community Colleges Chancellor’s office more as
a courtesy than for approval.

However, it is expected that new institutional statements being developed as addressed in
the next section will be shared with the various governing bodies within the UH system
once officially adopted by Hawai‘i Community College.

Planning Agenda:

1. The new Vision/Mission and accompanying statements being developed as addressed
   in the previous section is projected to be presented for approval to the Board of
   Regents during the summer of 2006.

2. Officially adopted statements will continue to be published in the college’s general
   catalogue as well as in other appropriate publications.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               82
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness



A.3. Using the institution’s governance and decision-making processes, the institution
reviews its mission statement on a regular basis and revises it as necessary.

Descriptive Summary:

The college’s mission statement was first published in the 1996-1997 HawCC General
Catalog and since then has had only a relatively minor change of one word in 2001-2002.

In the January 2001 ACCJC/WASC final accreditation Evaluation Report, one
recommendation was that “The college should change the wording of its mission
statement to reflect its distinctive educational service on the island of Hawai‘i.
Specifically, the college should make a concerted effort to market to the community its
unique island mission and the relevance of its Four Cornerstones to providing a
responsive educational environment” (ACCJC, 2001, p.34).

In the September 2003 Midterm Report to the ACCJC/WASC, the college responded,
“The mission of Hawai‘i Community College is to provide the community with an open-
access and responsive educational environment that empowers learners to develop skills
and knowledge to be responsible and productive in a complex world” and addressed
various marketing and other island-wide efforts to “call attention to our mission, our
product, and our operations” (HawCC, 2003, p.12-13).

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. There has been periodic dialogue in the
College Council and Academic Senate about the need to review or change the mission
statement, and while no specific evidence could be found, it is assumed that discussion of
the mission statement for the 2002-2010 Academic Development Plan (ADP) did take
place.

Prior to the adoption of the program/unit review process in Fall 2005 and the current
review and development of institutional statements addressed in the previous sections,
there was no formally established schedule for reviewing or discussing the mission
statement on a regular basis in any of the college’s governing bodies. However, the
institutional commitment made to a fixed program review schedule entails review and
possible revision of the mission statement as may be necessary on a regular basis as part
of the program/unit review process every four years as stated in the Academic Senate
resolution: Process to Determine Mission-Vision Statement, adopted on March 24, 2006
(HawCC AS, 2006).

Students and every unit of the college have at least one representative on one or more of
the college’s governing bodies, so the interests of college stakeholders should be
adequately represented in any review or action related to the college’s mission statement.



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               83
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

In so doing, the college seeks to maintain its institutional integrity as it seeks to fulfill its
mission to its service base.

Because the college is in the process of adopting and employing a new process for
reviewing and revising its mission and related statements, it is not yet possible to
determine the effectiveness of the process or to identify specific circumstances that may
prompt changes to these statements. Therefore, to better evaluate these items in the
future, the various bodies of the college responsible for and involved in the review and
revision of the mission must maintain records of related actions and decisions and
communicate the results to the college community in a timely manner.

Planning Agenda:

A formal college policy specifically identifying potential circumstances that will prompt
a review and a schedule for regular review of the college’s mission and related statements
by all stakeholders/governing bodies of the college should be developed and published.



A.4. The institution’s mission is central to institutional planning and decision-making.

Descriptive Summary:

The college meets the standard as evidenced in the development of the 2002-2010
Academic Development Plan which incorporates the Four Cornerstones: Hawaiian
Culture, the Environment, Technology and Community Work-Based Learning into
guiding the development of new programs, course offerings, technological infrastructure,
the distribution of internal resources and the seeking of extramural funding at the college.

For example, in 2001, the college received the Board of Regents provisional approval to
add an A.A.S. degree in Hawaiian Lifestyles supporting the Hawaiian Culture initiative
and an A.S. degree in Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agroforestry Management (Forest
TEAM), showcasing the college’s focus on the environment. Key faculty in these
programs were able to acquire significant Federal funding which added to the college’s
technological capabilities and ability to hire new faculty and staff. These two programs
were granted permanent status by the Board of Regents this year, in 2006, and were
important pioneers in the program review process, constituting two of the six
instructional programs that were assessed in November 2005.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. The college’s mission and the vision of the Four
Cornerstones—Hawaiian Culture, Environment, Technology, and Community Work-
Based Learning—frame the educational experience at HawCC.

In addition, the HawCC 2002-2010 Academic Development Plan contains five long-term
goals that provide an overall, eight-year focus for both the UHCC system and HawCC:

                            Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                  84
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

“promoting learning and teaching for student success; functioning as a seamless state
system; promoting workforce and economic development; developing human resources
through recruitment, retention, and renewal; and developing an effective, efficient, and
sustainable infrastructure to support student learning” (HawCC, n.d.a, p.6).

These broad statements integrate the college’s mission with the mission and philosophy
of the UH system‚ as referenced in the UH System Strategic Plan 2002-2010 (UH Board
of Regents [BOR] and Office of the President, 2002, p.4-7) and the UHCC Strategic Plan
2002-2010 (UHCC, 2002, p.4-5), and are fundamental to the institution’s planning and
decision-making process. Throughout the entire process of developing the ADP,
elements of the college’s mission were used to formulate the vision and direction for the
college. Collaborative dialogue during the HawCC planning process in 2001-2002
identified workforce education/training, enrollment management, international
opportunities, and the Four Cornerstones as focal points of the plan (HawCC, n.d.a, p.3-
4).

Planning for the ADP was broad-based, with dialogue and contributions from faculty,
staff, students, administration, and the community. The process examined factors that
affect the college’s mission, including various demographic statistics of our large island-
wide community, evolving trends in education, challenges to, and opportunities for
fulfilling our mission. Work groups were formed to focus on workforce education,
enrollment management, international opportunities, and the Four Cornerstones.
Students provided input through student government forums, March/April 2002, and an
email survey, Spring 2002. Community members’ concerns were received through a
survey, dialogue in program and advisory councils, and community forums such as The
Town Meeting on the Future of the Big Island (HawCC, 2001b).

The ADP also noted recommendations made by the Accrediting Commission for
Community and Junior Colleges in the 2000 accreditation final evaluation report, two of
which concern the mission: first, making the vision of the Four Cornerstones a reality,
and second, communicating the college’s mission island-wide. The college responded in
its 2003 Midterm Accreditation Report (HawCC, 2003, p.8): “the Four Cornerstones will
be integrated into the curriculum, imbedded into the institution, and the college will
become a role model for the community in the areas of community work-based learning,
environment, Hawaiian culture, and technology.” These elements were communicated
to the college and community through publication in the college newsletters, general
catalog, and Provost’s community reports.

Evidence of the college’s work-based learning cornerstone is demonstrated by student
participation in service learning projects and volunteer activities. The Service Learning
Program (HawCC, n.d.f) places interested students with various community partners in
human services agencies, educational providers, and environmental projects. In
November 2003, HawCC faculty and students founded the Ola`a Community Center
(HawCC, n.d.e), which employs former and current students on the staff, and where
students can participate in service learning projects. The After School Program with a
drug prevention component called Project Kupukupu, family strengthening activities, and


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                85
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

community development activities are some of the opportunities available. Many Career
and Technical Education (CTE) programs place students with community businesses in
the Cooperative Vocational Education (CVE) or intern positions that allow them to apply
their knowledge and skills and acquire firsthand workplace experiences. The college also
is a partner with the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Big Island Workplace
Connections One Stop Center (Hawai‘i Department of Labor and Industrial Relations
[DLIR], 2006) that provides services to employers and job seekers.

Focus on caring for our environment is fundamental to the Environmental Studies
Academic Subject Certificate (HawCC, 2005b) and Tropical Forest Ecosystems and
Agroforestry Management (HawCC, n.d.g) Certificate and AS degree. The annual Earth
Day Fair (HawCC, 2006b) in its 18th year brings the community onto the campus for a
daylong celebration focusing on our environment through educational displays and
programs. System administrators, realizing the impact on our environment of hazardous
materials used in instructional activities, formulated a Hazardous Materials Management
Plan (HawCC, 2002) that includes annual training of responsible faculty and procurement
and inventory oversight.

HawCC has established a center for the study of Hawaiian culture, where practice,
perpetuation, and preservation of the culture are emphasized. Students may earn an
Academic Subject Certificate (ASC) or an Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree in
Hawaiian Lifestyle (HawCC, 2006d), with emphasis on Hula (Dance), Lawai‘a Fishing),
or Mahi‘ai (Kalo Farming). The I Ola Haloā Title III grant to better serve the native
Hawaiian community in rural areas has enabled the college to provide videoconferencing
to support distance delivery of Hawaiian Lifestyles program courses to various island-
wide sites. The unit’s support staff and distance education training workshops have
expanded the benefits to many departments and faculty.

The technology cornerstone is evidenced in course offerings leading to certificates and
degrees in IT, CISCO Networking, and OCET computer classes. Technology also
enables distance education beyond the physical campuses (Spring 2006: 26 online, 20
video-conferencing, and 6 HITS courses). Many CTE programs and courses are
technology-intensive (with electronics and computerized control and diagnostic systems,
state of the art industrial equipment, and internet resource support). The college has
upgraded infrastructure (fiber optic and digital upgrades), increased technology training,
and funded major change and upgrading of computer and electronic equipment
throughout the college.

Recent developments include a new Certificate in Digital Arts officially started in Fall
2005; an $800,000 U.S. Housing and Urban Development grant for Alaskan
Native/Native-Hawaiian Institutions Assisting Communities used to create a Kea’au
Youth Business Center with a state-of-the-art digital arts and music/sound recording
studio; renovations in the Spring of 2004 that added seven new technology classrooms in
EKH; and transformation of a building that formerly housed the Carpentry Program into
Hale Kea Learning Center with student accessible computers, a fully equipped computer
classroom, and a separate room for computerized testing. The building also provides


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                86
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

office and lab space for the Academic Computing Unit. These examples substantiate that
the Four Cornerstones are central to the decisions the college makes in planning
programs, courses, and offerings to the community, as well as providing the manpower,
facilities, and funding required to support them.

The current program review process requires programs to evaluate performance and
initiate planning, action, and review agendas. The process encourages dialogue and
planning consistent with the college’s mission (Dykstra, 2005). The tech support unit
review has identified significant future needs of staff, equipment, and support that call for
major biennium requests (HawCC, 2005c).

Planning Agenda:

The UH Board of Regents has approved funding for the development of new campuses in
both East and West Hawai‘i. At this significant juncture it is essential that the college
finalize its reconsidered vision/mission statements through the appropriate campus
review process.

B. Improving Institutional Effectiveness
The institution demonstrates a conscious effort to produce and support student
learning, measures that learning, assesses how well learning is occurring, and makes
changes to improve student learning. The institution also organizes its key processes
and allocates its resources to effectively support student learning. The institution
demonstrates its effectiveness by providing 1) evidence of the achievement of student
learning outcomes and 2) evidence of institution and program performance. The
institution uses ongoing and systematic evaluation and planning to refine its key
processes and improve student learning.



B.1. The institution maintains an ongoing, collegial, self-reflective dialogue about the
continuous improvement of student learning and institutional processes.

Descriptive Summary:

The Hawai‘i Community College organizational structure consists of administration,
academic instruction, student services, non-credit programs, and administrative
services—all of which work together in the interest of evaluating, maintaining, and
improving opportunities for student learning and institutional processes. Within these
major units of the college are sub-units, departments, or divisions that also maintain an
ongoing dialogue to address student learning and institutional processes. Further, every
unit is represented on various college-wide committees that are responsible for insuring
that dialogue is ongoing with appropriate discussions and actions taken to evaluate and
improve student learning and institutional processes.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                87
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

One method by which the college maintains an ongoing, collegial, self-reflective
dialogue about improving student learning and institutional processes is through the
development and subsequent revision of its Academic Development Plan. The most
recent review and revision took place in August 2001, resulting in the institution’s
Academic Development Plan for 2002-2010. This was a college-wide, 15-month process
that involved representatives from faculty, staff, students and administration, as well as
community input.

As addressed in other sections, the college is currently in the process of conducting
program and unit reviews that will drive budget and strategic planning to help improve
student learning. Part of the program/unit review process includes the development of
program/unit and institutional maps and identification of student learning outcomes for
each course, program, and the college as a whole.

Also as addressed in other sections, the primary college-wide groups are the College
Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC), Assessment Committee, College Council, and
Academic Senate. While there may not be individuals from every constituency
represented in each group (students, for example, are not members of the Academic
Senate), everyone is represented to an extent. In the case of the Academic Senate, a
Student Services representative is a member of the Senate and can address the possible
impact of decisions on students or student views on applicable issues. Dialogue related
to student learning and institutional processes is also undertaken during contact and
meetings between the Chancellor and his Community Advisory Council and during
faculty contact and meetings with respective Program Advisory Councils.

Hawai‘i Community College has a structure in which dialogue related to student learning
and institutional processes is inclusive and encompasses a broad constituent base that
includes administrators, faculty, staff, students, and community members.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. Dialogue between units of the college has resulted in a
number of initiatives to address the improvement of student learning and institutional
processes. As an example of institutional commitment to this continuous improvement, a
team of campus facilitators received training from noted consultant Ruth Stiehl:

“Ruth Stiehl writes, teaches and seeks to bring clarity to the whole notion of outcomes-
based curriculum and learning assessment in community colleges. Using principles from
organic science and systemic thinking, she helps the community college faculty build
their own capacity to initiate and sustain the renewal process across all programs and
disciplines. She helps college faculty think outside the classroom box to create learning
experiences for students that make a difference in the rest of their life. With three
decades of experience as Professor of Community College Leadership and Instructional
Systems at Oregon State University, she is one of the nation's most experienced experts
and practitioners in college curriculum reconstruction. She works out of Corvallis,
Oregon as a full-time writer and consultant” (The Learning Organization, 2005).


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               88
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

Ruth Stiehl was also contracted to conduct several development workshops on campus to
help faculty develop student learning outcomes (SLOs). Currently, all instructional units
of the college are in the process of developing SLOs for each course, program, and
division.

The college has also developed and initiated a Program/Unit Review Process that
facilitates regular program/unit assessment, revision, and evaluation. Each program/unit
will complete a review every four years. Programs/units have been placed on rotating
schedules so that each year approximately 12 programs/units have reviews due, as
indicated on the Program Review Schedule (HawCC, 2006c). The first set of twelve
program reviews was submitted on November 14, 2005.

Program/Unit Reviews are examined and evaluated by the College Effectiveness Review
Committee (CERC), College Council, Academic Senate, and Chancellor for alignment
with college mission and strategic plan and for recommending improvements as
applicable to student learning and institutional processes, as indicated on the CERC Flow
Chart (HawCC, 2006c).

Hawai‘i Community College maintains many on-going processes and opportunities for
collegial, self-reflective dialogue between administration, faculty, staff and students.

Planning Agenda:

None.


B.2. The institution sets goals to improve its effectiveness consistent with its stated
purposes. The institution articulates its goals and states the objectives derived from
them in measurable terms so that the degree to which they are achieved can be
determined and widely discussed. The institutional members understand these goals
and work collaboratively toward their achievement.

Descriptive Summary:

The college uses a number of documents and resources to determine its goals and
priorities: the mission statement, including the Four Cornerstones; institutional outcome
statements from the HawCC 2002-2010 Academic Development Plan; the UH Strategic
Plan 2002-2010 (Nov 2002); statistics from the Fact Book of the UHCC’s (UH CC, 2004,
p.2-9 and UH CC, 2003, p.10-17); UH Management and Assessment Information (UH
Institutional Research Office [IRO], 2006); and the UH benchmarks and performance
indicators updates (UH, 2006a).

The Academic Development Plan (ADP) is developed by the College Council and lists
college goals. The ADP also lists resource requirements: the processes, funds, and
personnel needed to attain goals.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                89
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness


Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Although planning activities have occurred in
the past, changes in leadership, interim leaders, part-time leaders, and ineffective
communication have presented challenges and made the level of institutional
commitment seem unclear at times (Narimatsu, 2005). Since the adoption and
implementation of a program review policy, the cross-referencing of program mission,
goals and action plans with the existing ADP 2002-2010 has taken on a new emphasis.
In this context the evaluation, planning and improvement commitment is on the path to
institutionalization at the college.

On March 24-26, 2004, an American Association of Higher Education workshop entitled,
“Building Learner-Centered Institutions: Developing Institutional Strategies for
Assessing and Improving Student Learning” was held in Honolulu, and 14 team members
from various programs and units at HawCC attended. As a result of the meeting, an
Assessment Committee was formed at HawCC and held its first meeting on April 5,
2004.

On April 5, 2004, Liberal Arts faculty met with the HawCC Assessment Coordinator,
Trina Nahm-Mijo, to learn more about student learning outcomes and the basics of
assessment. Each faculty member was asked to discuss five student learning outcomes
(SLOs) with members of their department/division. A timeline for program reviews was
started.

In 2005, the college established the College Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC).
CERC membership consists of four senior administrators, a faculty member-at-large, and
the chairs of the Academic Senate, College Council, and Assessment Committee. The
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs chairs the CERC to evaluate program review
documents against four criteria: 1) clearly stated mission and goals; 2) consistency
between the analysis and the data; 3) presence of an action plan consistent with the
foregoing data analysis; 4) summative judgment of the document as an effective
planning tool.

The CERC evaluation enables program review initiators to finalize their work before
submitting it to the Chancellor for campus-wide distribution and to the College Council
and Academic Senate for evaluation. Recommended changes identified by the CERC
evaluators are communicated to the program review initiators by the CERC chairperson
for editing before the document is sent to the Chancellor. The documents are evaluated at
the College Council for consistency with the Academic Development Plan and at the
Academic Senate for consistency with the vision/mission statements. At both levels they
are evaluated, at the discretion of the Council and the Senate, for purposes of prioritizing
any budget requests forthcoming from the plans.

Implementation of the program review process has provided for a much more grassroots
review of the relationship of the college’s 45 programs/units to the college’s ADP. Since
the ADP was finalized several years before the program review was instituted, it is only


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                90
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

natural that the college is now finding a lack of coordination between the ADP and the
college mission, plans and budgeting needs determined by the program review process.
When one full cycle of program reviews is completed as planned in four years, the
college will be in an excellent position to comprehensively edit its top-down written
ADP. This ongoing review process will assure that the ADP is brought into coordination
with the needs of the 45 programs/units that directly serve the grassroots learning needs
of our students.

Ongoing Assessment Committee meetings over the last two years, demonstrate the
institution’s commitment to high quality education and open dialogue across all college
areas to solidify an effective cycle of evaluation, planning, and improvement. However,
the roles, function, purpose, objectives/outcomes of the work of the CERC and the
Assessment Committee are just becoming more widely known, and information about
their assigned tasks and subsequent results need to be more widely circulated. Still, such
information is easily accessible on the Assessment web page, which contains complete
and detailed minutes of the Assessment Committee meetings, as well as the results of
CERC reviews posted as memos attached to those program reviews from evaluators.

Planning Agenda:

1. Hawai‘i Community College will follow the plan of action set up by the Assessment
   Committee for program reviews. The college will follow the schedule of
   program/unit reviews generated by the committee and use the flow map, which
   describes the steps involved to solidify an effective cycle of evaluation, planning, and
   improvement. The college will continue to engage in a continuous four-year program
   review cycle.

2. A more formal or systematic method for communicating with the college community
   in relation to the Assessment Committee and College Effectiveness Review
   Committee needs to be established. Perhaps summaries of the outcomes of
   Assessment Committee and CERC functions could be published in the monthly
   campus newsletter.


B.3. The institution assesses progress toward achieving its stated goals and makes
decisions regarding the improvement of institutional effectiveness in an ongoing and
systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation,
implementation, and re-evaluation. Evaluation is based on analyses of both
quantitative and qualitative data.

Descriptive Summary:

The primary long-term planning document for Hawai‘i Community College is the
Academic Development Plan, which includes a description of the planning process and
its context, the elements governing assessment, and the priorities of the college. The



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                91
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

College Council has the responsibility for measuring and assessing progress toward
achieving goals and priorities (HawCC, 2000, p.64-65).

In March 2000, the College Council prepared an “Institutional Outcomes Statements
Derived from HawCC Academic Development Plan 1997-2003” document (HawCC,
2000, p.58) that identified what would be needed to address each of the purposes and
goals. The College Council further decided that future ADP accomplishments would be
reported using the format outlined in the institutional outcomes document.

Additionally and as addressed in the previous section, an Assessment Committee and
College Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC) have been established during the past
two years.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Since the last institutional outcomes document
was prepared and distributed, it does not appear that the College Council has continued to
review and report accomplishments and progress toward ADP goals and priorities.
However, during the past several years, major changes at the college have been a
distraction and resulted in attention being focused on day-to-day operational matters
rather than on assessing progress towards stated goals.

With a new permanent administrative team in place from approximately October 2004,
efforts to assess and evaluate college performance and improve support for student
learning in relation to institutional goals have resumed an important focus for the college.
As addressed in previous sections, program/unit reviews have been implemented, with
the new College Effectiveness Review Committee, Academic Senate, and College
Council all involved in evaluating program/unit reviews and developing plans for
assessing and improving institutional effectiveness on a regular and systematic basis.

Planning Agenda:

The college will complete the program/unit review cycle, examine the results and
relationship with the current Academic Development Plan (ADP), and then take the
necessary steps to ensure that the college is on track toward achieving its goals.



B.4. The institution provides evidence that the planning process is broad-based, offers
opportunities for input by appropriate constituencies, allocates necessary resources,
and leads to improvement of institutional effectiveness.

Descriptive Summary:

Two primary groups offer broad-based participation in college planning: the College
Council and the Academic Senate.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                92
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

College Council: The existence and activities of the College Council, including college-
wide planning workshops in the past 5 years, have provided a broad base of opportunity
to participate in planning. Much of this is detailed in the current Academic Development
Plan. The College Council, while not a voting body, has representation from every part
of the college and provides a mechanism to discuss broad issues of policy and planning.
The only caveat is that in the administrative transition of the past few years, the Council
and its role have been put into a hiatus. During the term of the previous Provost, the
Council was used as a search committee for the new Chancellor and as a means for
disseminating information. The newly hired Chancellor in his first year did not utilize
the Council. However, this year the situation appears to be changing, as the Council
charter, its membership, and its role in the assessment process are under review and
development.

Academic Senate: The Academic Senate is a senate of the whole, which means that all
faculty members are senators. The Senate provides evidence of active faculty
participation in reviewing curricular changes and improvements, academic policies, and
policies relating to faculty. Several course changes and additions have been passed in the
past year that reflect back to the mission and the cornerstones (for example, Hawaiian
Studies has both added classes and changed some classes to the 100 level).

Currently, both bodies play an integral role in the campus evaluation of program reviews,
as well as determining planning and budgeting outcomes derived from the program
reviews.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. The Academic Development Plan details the identified
needs and priorities of the college. Although the overall budget and allocations
discussions do not appear to take place outside of administrative and division chair
circles, both the College Council and Academic Senate have been invited to contribute to
the prioritization of budget requests derived from the program reviews. To date the
Senate has provided some input on the general priorities to be followed in the
development of the biennium and supplemental budgets. Additionally, the Senate has
made some requests for biennium budget items based upon its own deliberations.

The college has made an institutional commitment to support its transition to an
institution driven by student learning outcomes and purposeful assessment by the hiring
of an Institutional Researcher and the reassignment of a senior faculty member to head
the college’s Assessment Committee. It is a very important organizational change for the
college to actually dedicate funds and individuals to data gathering and analysis, the
establishment of student learning outcomes for all classes and programs, and the design
and implementation of a continuous assessment cycle. Considerable resources of time
and money have been spent in the past two years for faculty and staff development to
bring the college community up to date in developing student learning outcomes and
assessment strategies.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                93
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

Some of the human resource needs identified in the ADP have been filled while others
have not. Some of the identified needs include an APT position for English tutoring;
more tutors for the Learning Center; a counselor for students with disabilities; Student
Information Center clerical support; and faculty positions for Hawaiian Studies. The
current biennium budget will be the first one to have ever been developed responsive to
program reviews. However, the disconnection between the ADP and the program
reviews is undeniable since the plan was developed years before program reviews began.
The college is in a period of transition as it gauges the consistency of program review
plans and budget requests with the ADP. It is very likely that there will occasionally be
parallelism; conversely there may sometimes be discordant results. As an example of
parallelism, the Hawaiian Lifestyles Program Review provided data supportive of the
employment of two new tenure-track Hawaiian Studies faculty members who are
currently included in the second year of the next biennium budget request.

Positions not addressed in the ADP such as for two assistant deans have also been
established based upon reorganization planning and biennium budget requests made by a
past administration to help with achieving institutional goals.

Evidence of resources allocated to improving the learning environment for students over
the past five years include the remodeling of the Manono campus Cafeteria (Food Service
teaching classrooms) and other improvements on the Manono campus: classrooms, Hale
Kea Testing Center, Informational Technology area, Early Childhood Education and
Tropical Forest Management facilities.

The new Hilo campus and UH West Hawai‘i Center initiatives are also evidence of an
effort to improve and enlarge the physical facilities of the college.

Various grants have also provided the means for filling positions and for conducting
various activities to assist the college with achieving its goals and priorities.

Planning Agenda:

None.


B.5. The institution uses documented assessment results to communicate matters of
quality assurance to appropriate constituencies.

Descriptive Summary:

The college collects a wide range of data, including student and faculty demographics,
program efficiency, and budget expenditures. Accumulated data is used to help campus
planning and produce reports for the campus and system. Many of the reports produced
from the data are distributed to internal and external constituencies via email or published
in printed articles and reports. Increasingly, the campus and the UH system have also
made the information accessible online.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                94
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness


Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The college collects assessment data that is
used to evaluate performance, improve the educational environment, and aid planning.
The Records and Data Management Specialist compiles statistics on student enrollment
(headcount, major, degree objectives, registration status, location, ethnicity, age, gender,
education level, attendance status), retention, certificates & degrees awarded, and
graduation rates. Data on student satisfaction is derived from Graduate/Leaver surveys
and two CCSSE surveys conducted in 2002 and 2004 that measured student perceptions
of their academic experience. Reports are also made on low enrolled classes, faculty
workload, program budgets, and expenditures. The information is collected island-wide,
with some statistics reported by campus or delivery site (Carroll, J. and D. Loeding,
2005).

Departments track relevant statistics, as in the Learning Center where student placement
test results are used to determine course level placement and needed section offerings.
Non-credit OCET courses must be self-sustaining and are regularly evaluated for
demand, relevance, and efficiency. Programs annually prepare Program Health Indicator
Reports, and some conduct surveys of industry perceptions/needs in their vocational area.
Surveys of students and faculty are also conducted as an evaluation instrument during the
accreditation process. Regular evaluations of all administrators and department/division
chairs are conducted. Instructional personnel are also subject to review for
reappointment, tenure, promotion, and periodic assessment.

As the college implements the program review cycle, additional data relating to student
learning outcomes, program demand and efficiency, and resources will be generated and
evaluated to ascertain program effectiveness. This perpetual cycle of evaluation,
planning, and improvement will promote graduated levels of program and institutional
quality. Several accredited programs exemplify and validate the quality of instruction
available on our campus: the Intensive English Program (accredited through December
31, 2006 by the Commission on English Language Program Accreditation, 2006), Food
Service (American Culinary Federation, 2006), and Nursing (National League for
Nursing Accrediting Commission, 2006).

Reports produced with the data are disseminated to internal and external constituencies
through various means, including postal mailing, email, and publication in the college
newsletters and other publications. Many UH reports are public information and made
available online at several HawCC and UH websites (UH IRO, 2006 and UH, 2006b).
Examples of online reports include demographic information in the Community College
Fact Book, results of CCSSE surveys, the HawCC ADP, UH and UHCC System
Strategic Plans, the Measuring Our Progress Update, and information out of the UH
Institutional Research Office, Management and Planning Support (MAPS) reports. Many
of the reports are fairly current, within one year, and may also contain a great deal of
historical data. With the exception of protected student information, most of this copious
information is available for public inspection. The HawCC Assessment website
(HawCC, 2006c) is readily available and provides access to a great deal of data from a


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                95
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

variety of sources. The oversight of the recently hired institutional researcher(s) should
improve the availability of information and efficiency of obtaining relevant materials.

The institution measures public perceptions of a quality educational environment through
surveys of students (CCSSE, Graduate/Leavers, Student Survey for Accreditation) and
through program and community advisory councils. Many faculty, especially in CTE
programs, are primary contacts between the college and the industry/community.
Programs promote industry partnerships and recruit community representatives for
service on their advisory councils. This network of industry and community
organizations helps to ensure the integrity and quality of HawCC programs and enables
program faculty to communicate this assurance to their constituents.

The Chancellor engages supporters island-wide on a community advisory council to
ascertain public perceptions and communicate the quality of the institution’s academic
efficacy. The college has distributed several community newsletters and given
informative media releases to the public. Reports such as “Contributing To Our
Community” and “The Socioeconomic Benefits Generated by Hawai‘i Community
College” have publicized the contributions and economic impact of the college in our
community. Personnel such as the Information Center Specialist and recently hired Jobs
Placement Coordinator create networking opportunities in the community that also
promote information on institutional effectiveness and quality.

Planning Agenda:

1. The institution’s website is dated, and some information must be made current. A
   webmaster should be hired and charged with coordinating with the administration,
   Institutional Researcher(s), and college personnel to update and upgrade the website.

2. The current media releases are irregular and may not be the most effective methods of
   communicating institutional quality assurance to the greater public. Efforts should be
   integrated into a college marketing plan.



B.6. The institution assures the effectiveness of its ongoing planning and resource
allocation processes by systematically reviewing and modifying, as appropriate, all
parts of the cycle, including institutional and other research efforts.

Descriptive Summary:

Originally, all parts of the cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, resource allocation
implementation, and re-evaluation were to be the responsibility of the HawCC College
Council. However, many changes have occurred during the past year in relation to
college planning, resource allocation, and new processes to systematically review, assess,
and evaluate institutional effectiveness and to implement changes.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                96
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

The overall institutional evaluation, planning, and resource allocation tasks will involve
the College Council, Academic Senate, Assessment Committee, and the newly formed
College Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC).

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The 2000 Accreditation Self-Study Report
stated that the College Council had initiated a process “to assess effectiveness by
outlining instruments and documents needed to help collect important information in the
‘Institutional Outcomes Statement’” (HawCC, 2000, p.64-65). The Self-Study also stated
that the college recognized the need for improvement, was making noticeable progress,
and would continue to set up instruments and processes to provide useful feedback to
administrators and faculty for measuring institutional effectiveness.

The college still recognizes the importance of assessing effectiveness and progress, the
need for improvement, and the need to provide useful feedback to the college
community. However, instead of the College Council being primarily responsible, the
college has involved additional bodies in the process: the College Effectiveness Review
Committee, Assessment Committee, and Academic Senate as indicated by the CERC
Flow Chart (HawCC, 2006c).

The effectiveness of this planning process for fostering improvement cannot be
determined fully yet since the process has just started. However the college’s adaptations
of process and organizational structure to the evaluation, planning and improvement
standards reflects an institutional commitment to place learner needs in the forefront.

Planning Agenda:

The college will continue to develop and refine the process and procedures for reviewing
and modifying as appropriate all parts of the evaluation cycle. The college will continue
to evaluate the effectiveness of these processes and procedures.



B.7. The institution assesses its evaluation mechanisms through a systematic review of
their effectiveness in improving instructional programs, student support services, and
library and other learning support services.

Descriptive Summary:

Several forms of systematic review are now available. Program reviews provide one
form of gauging program efficiency and effectiveness. This process is continuously
evaluated, and the entire process will be re-evaluated once the first cycle of program
reviews is completed in four years. Another review mechanism is the repeated
implementation of the nationally normed Community College Survey of Student
Engagement (CCSSE). The college routinely collects data on student enrollment,
retention, certificates and degrees awarded, and graduation rates. In addition, student

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                97
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

learning outcomes are being developed for all college programs and courses. Some
departments have developed standards-based assessment mechanisms and collected
relevant data. The library has developed a strategic plan with eight goals. The Learning
Center conducts annual surveys. On all fronts, individuals and departments have taken
stock of how their programs serve students. As the college implements new evaluation
mechanisms, it will also assess these mechanisms and review their effectiveness.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. Evidence that the college is addressing the needs of its
student population and assessing its evaluation mechanisms is documented in many ways,
including the HawCC 2002-2010 Academic Development Plan (ADP), the CCSSE, and
other documents.

Instructional Programs
Discussion of the CCSSE as a measure of the effectiveness of our instructional programs
and learning support services is documented in the current HawCC ADP. According to
the ADP, CCSSE results are “reliable, research-based and an appropriate tool for
assessing institutional quality and justifying accreditation” (HawCC, n.d.a, p.14).

The CCSSE asked students questions about their college experience: how they spent
their time; what they feel they gained from their classes; how they assessed the quality of
their interactions with faculty, counselors and peers; what kind of work they were
challenged to do; and how the college supported their learning. According to the 2004
CCSSE Report, the vast majority of students (96%) stated that they would recommend
this college to a friend or family member, and that they considered their entire
educational experience here as being excellent (35%) or good (46%). Only one percent
considered their experience to be poor.

According to UH Center at West Hawai‘i Director Kathy Damon, the recent CCSSE
studies (HawCC, n.d.c), which have been conducted twice, also included very specific
quantitative questions related to the academic experience. Student input came from both
east and west sides and was very positive. Specific areas of academics were highlighted
and compared with institutions across national norms.

Quantitative data is also generated by monitoring the number of students who enter
programs, persist, and then graduate. According to Kathy Damon, data is collected for
the college as a whole and shows that HawCC performs positively compared to other
community colleges statewide. Graduation rates for students in the AA program also
indicate effectiveness. Average graduation and persistence rates for the UH campuses
are listed in the 2005-06 HawCC General Catalog (HawCC, 2005a, p.11).

As detailed in section A.1, the implementation of a program/unit review process now
provides a more inductive approach to measuring institutional effectiveness program by
program. This evaluation mechanism will be continuously assessed throughout the four-
year cycle of reviews and re-evaluated once the first cycle is complete.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                98
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

In addition, a process for developing, reviewing, and revising student learning outcomes
at both the program and the course levels has begun in all instructional divisions and
departments. Division/department chairs have been tasked to lead the efforts to identify
and implement strategies for SLO assessment projects at the program level.

Some departments have developed and systematically monitored standards-based
assessment and kept statistical evidence of effectiveness in specific courses. For
example, the English Department has collected data each semester for over 10 years
showing pass rates of students in developmental writing classes (English 20W and 22)
and the results of departmental team-graded exams. The English faculty participates in
the grading of these departmental final exams, resulting in more consistent course
expectations and outcomes. Writing faculty and lecturers use these statistics to review
and improve their delivery of these courses.

The Library and Learning Center
According to Ellen Okuma, Coordinator of Supplemental Instruction, the Edwin H.
Mookini Library has conducted a two-phase planning process to develop a mission
statement and a strategic plan with goals and objectives. The process included several of
the themes of this self-study. In Phase I, beginning in Fall 2002, the theme of dialogue
was used to develop the library's mission statement. Library staff input via meetings, e-
mail correspondence, and voting was sought. All library units were involved: access
services, technical services, public services, administrative services and graphics
services. A committee was appointed to develop each bullet of the mission statement
based on dialogue between each unit and its committee representative.

Once the mission statement was drafted, reviewed, and approved by the library staff,
Phase II of the strategic planning process began, using the themes of dialogue,
institutional integrity, and evaluation/planning/improvement (EPI). The original
committee that facilitated the development of the mission statement met at least twice a
month and sometimes weekly for one academic year to identify goals and objectives for
the strategic plan. The representative of each unit consulted with the unit on strengths,
weaknesses and action planning activities, and brought these back to the committee. The
committee used EPI strategies and did an honest assessment of shortcomings and
achievements to come up with an action plan.

The strategic planning committee worked with the library administration to schedule a
planning retreat for all library staff members to review the strategic plan with its seven
goals approved during the early part of May 2003 (goal 8 was developed by graphics
services during the retreat). After the retreat, further dialogue and planning helped the
committee and library staff to make decisions about implementing parts of the strategic
plan (Okuma, 2005).

Learning Center Coordinator Guy Kimura has conducted extensive and systematic
evaluations of the effectiveness of the Learning Center (TLC). Student evaluations
reveal that the majority of students “agree” or “strongly agree” that the TLC provides
services to meet their needs. TLC also conducts faculty evaluations, which are extremely


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                99
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness

positive but relatively small in number. TLC aims to increase faculty input and the
number of evaluations. For more information, Guy Kimura has written extensively about
this in section II.C.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will continue to evaluate its effectiveness in fulfilling its mission
   statement by monitoring through the CCSSE the value of being a student at HawCC
   from the student’s point of view.

2. Persistence and graduation rates will continue to be collected and reviewed to guide
   program success.

3. The Library and Learning Centers will continue to conduct internal evaluations of
   their respective facilities. The campuses will continue to make these reviews more
   systematic and assess their effectiveness.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              100
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness -- References


                                Standard I: References

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. (2001, January 19).
Evaluation report, Hawai‘i Community College; K. Ramirez, Chair. Novato, California:
author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/Final_accreditation_eval_report.pdf

American Culinary Federation. (2006). Accredited culinary programs. St. Augustine,
Florida: author. Retrieved May 12, 2006 from http://www.acfchefs.org/drctaccr.html

Carroll, J. and D. Loeding. (Fall 2005). E-mail correspondence with Mike Saito (various
dates). Hilo: HawCC.

Commission on English Language Program Accreditation. (2006, May 6). CEA
accredited programs and institutions. Alexandria, VA: author. Retrieved May 12, 2006
from http://www.cea-accredit.org/accredited.php

Dykstra, D. (2005, December 5). CERC review procedures and functions [memo].
Hilo: HawCC.

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date a). Academic development plan 2002-2010. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date b). CCSSE 2002 documentation. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 14, 2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/CCSSE
2002 Documentation.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date c). CCSSE 2004 documentation. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 14, 2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/CCSSE
2004 Documentation.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date d). Graduate leaver survey academic year end
2002-2004. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/Grad Leaver Survey Results
AYE02_03_04.xls

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date e). Ola`a Community Center. Hilo: author.
Retrieved May 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/laurab/servicelearning/index.htm

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date f). Service-learning program. Hilo: author.
Retrieved May 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/laurab/servicelearning/default.htm




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             101
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness -- References

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date g). Forest TEAM program. Hilo: author.
Retrieved May 12, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/forestteam/ Hawai‘i
Community College. (1996). General catalog 1996-1997. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2000, September). Accreditation self-study report. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2001a). General catalog 2001-2002. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2001b). The Town meeting on the future of the Big
Island: Proceedings. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2002, December). Hazardous materials/hazardous waste
management program. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/employeeservices/hazardous_management1.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2003, September 23). Midterm accreditation report.
Hilo: author. Retrieved May 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/midterm.htm

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005a). General catalog 2005-2006. Hilo: author. Also
available from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/learningresources/2006catalog.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005b, January 7). Environmental Studies Academic
Certificate. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 12, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/esc/

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005c, November 14). Program review Academic
Computing Unit. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program Reviews/Computing Technology
Program Review.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006a, February 2). Program/Unit Review Process. Hilo:
author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program%20Reviews/AC%20PR%20Review
%20Process.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006b, April 24). Annual Earth Day Fair. Hilo: author.
Retrieved May 12, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/eday/

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006c, May 18). Hawai‘i Community College assessment
website. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006d, June 14). Hawaiian Life Styles. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 14, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/humd/humhls.htm


                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             102
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness -- References

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate. (2006, March 24). Agenda. Hilo:
author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.ag.sup.mar06.htm

Hawai‘i Community College College Council. (2000). Minutes. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Department of Labor and Industrial Relations. (2006). Workforce Development
Division one stop center links. Honolulu: author. Retrieved May 12, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.gov/labor/wdd/oslinks.shtml

The Learning Organization. (2005). About us: Ruth Stiehl. Blaine, Washington:
Strategic Planning Concepts. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from
http://www.outcomesnet.com/

Narimatsu, S. (2005, October 27). Interview. Hilo: HawCC.

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. (2006, April 29). NLNAC
accredited nursing programs. NY: author. Retrieved May 16, 2006 from
http://www.nlnac.org/Forms/directory_search.htm

Okuma, E. (2005, December). E-mail correspondence with Kate Sims. Hilo: HawCC.

University of Hawai'i. (2006a, January 12). Measuring our progress. Honolulu: author.
Retrieved May 12, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/mop/

University of Hawai'i. (2006b, February 16). The University of Hawai‘i System.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved May 16, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/about/

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents and Office of the President. (2002, June).
University of Hawai‘i system strategic plan 2002-2010. Honolulu: author. Retrieved
June 14, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/stratplan/UHstratplan.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2002). Strategic Plan, 2002-2010.
Honolulu: author. Also found at
http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CC_Strategicpl/strategic%20plan.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2003, November). Factbook 2002-2003.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 26, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/FactBook2002-2003.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2004, November). Factbook 2003-2004.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 26, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/FactBook2003-2004.pdf
University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2006, April 25). Reports online.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved May 16, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/iro/maps.htm


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              103
Standard I: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness -- References




                          This page intentionally left blank.




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             104
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs


                Standard II: Student Learning Programs and Services

The institution offers high-quality instructional programs, student support services,
and library and learning support services that facilitate and demonstrate the
achievement of stated student learning outcomes. The institution provides an
environment that supports learning, enhances student understanding and appreciation
of diversity, and encourages personal and civic responsibility as well as intellectual,
aesthetic, and personal development for all of its students.

A. Instructional Programs
   The institution offers high-quality instructional programs in recognized and
   emerging fields of study that culminate in identified student outcomes leading to
   degrees, certificates, employment, or transfer to other higher education institutions
   or programs consistent with its mission.

   Instructional programs are systematically assessed in order to assure currency,
   improve teaching and learning strategies, and achieve stated student learning
   outcomes. The provisions of this standard are broadly applicable to all
   instructional activities offered in the name of the institution.


 A.1. The institution demonstrates that all instructional programs, regardless of
location or means of delivery, address and meet the mission of the institution and
uphold its integrity.

   A.1.a. The institution identifies and seeks to meet the varied educational needs
   of its students through programs consistent with their educational preparation
   and the diversity, demographics, and economy of its communities. The
   institution relies upon research and analysis to identify student learning needs
   and to assess progress toward achieving stated learning outcomes.

   A.1.b. The institution utilizes delivery systems and modes of instruction
   compatible with the objectives of the curriculum and appropriate to the current
   and future needs of its students.

   A.1.c. The institution identifies student learning outcomes for courses,
   programs, certificates, and degrees; assesses student achievement of those
   outcomes; and uses assessment results to make improvements.

Descriptive Summary:

Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) is the only publicly supported, open-door
community college on the island of Hawai‘i. It is open to any high school graduate or
person 18 years of age or older who can benefit from the instruction offered. The college
seeks to serve the entire island through distributed sites and the use of technology.



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              105
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

HawCC offers a range of academic and technical training programs that include degrees,
certificates, and short-term training options in Hilo, West Hawai‘i, and other sites on the
island. All degree programs must be approved by the University of Hawai‘i Board of
Regents (BOR), according to policy, Sections 5-1 and 5-8 (UH BOR, 2002b). All credit
courses and certificate programs must be approved by the HawCC Chancellor. The Chief
Academic Officer (CAO) of the college, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
(VCAA), is responsible for ensuring that all credit programs and courses are consistent
with the mission of the college and uphold its integrity. The faculty is responsible for
maintaining program and course content and integrity and for utilizing appropriate
pedagogy in course delivery.

A range of delivery systems and modes of instruction is utilized. While the primary
mode of instructional delivery for most on-campus credit courses is lecture, instructors
also incorporate simulations, discussions, modeling and demonstration, collaborative
learning, laboratory instruction, field trips, practicums, cooperative vocational education,
multi-media presentations, service learning, and technology as components of the
learning process.

Distance learning courses are offered via the Hawai‘i Interactive Television System
(HITS), video-conferencing, and the internet. The UH Board of Regents explains
distance learning (DL) plans, policies, and procedures for the UH system in its Executive
Policy E5.204 (University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice President for Planning and
Policy [OVPPP], 1998a) and Section 5-10 of its Academic Affairs policy (UH BOR,
2002b). The UH system provides “Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about DL at
UH” (UH, 2006a). The BOR gives the CAO of each campus the responsibility to certify
that appropriate levels of oversight and quality assurance are achieved. The Academic
Senate has recently established an ad hoc committee of faculty and staff to advise the
CAO on distance learning issues.

HawCC is moving towards a student learning outcomes base for all programs and
courses. This includes an understanding of the outcomes expected of students in the real
world by employers and the community. Staff development in this area has been a
priority since August 2004 with a series of training workshops focusing on student
learning outcomes (SLOs) and assessment. SLOs for college programs are being
developed through joint efforts of faculty, staff, and advisory committees led by a cadre
of facilitators trained by nationally recognized consultant Ruth Stiehl during several
campus workshops. Discipline faculty members are developing course SLOs. Programs
are in the early stages of devising assessment strategies and gathering assessment data.

In November 2005, eight academic programs and four units were reviewed in accordance
with the recently developed program/unit review process (UH Community Colleges
[CC], 2005b). All others will be reviewed on a systematic, ongoing four-year cycle as
scheduled by the college Assessment Committee.

The College Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC) is responsible for evaluating
program/unit reviews. Procedures for the committee’s operation were determined by


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               106
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

means of spirited dialogue among committee members that produced agreement on
committee functions as well as a template to employ in its work. These outcomes are
reported in a memo dated December 5, 2005, from Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Douglas Dykstra, CERC Chairperson (Dykstra, 2005). Through this process the
programs will respond to recommendations for improvement.
As illustrated on the College Effectiveness Review Committee Flow Map (HawCC,
2006b), CERC is just one assessment body in the review process. To uphold the integrity
of the reviews, the Academic Senate and College Council have also developed their own
assessment tools (HawCC Academic Senate [AS], 2005a) (HawCC College Council
[CC], [2006?]).

Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs are required to evaluate their programs
annually by completing a “Program Health Indicators” (PHI) report (Yamane, 2005).
This evaluation serves as a means to assess the programs for future planning and
improvement. CTE programs dialogue at least once a year with their Advisory Councils
to maintain currency and receive feedback about graduates or students on the job.

The Graduate Leavers Survey (HawCC, n.d.d) provides information of value to identify
and assess student learning. The survey was last administered in 2003/04.

Finally, the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) has been
administered in 2002 (HawCC, n.d.b) and 2004 (HawCC, n.d.c) as well as currently in
spring 2006. The survey provides national comparisons for student perceptions about
their learning experience at the college as well as their needs and preferences.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. HawCC programs constantly strive to update
themselves in order to meet student learning needs and uphold the integrity of the
college. For example, the Welding program’s focus for many years was primarily
servicing the large sugar plantations that have since closed. In response to this economic
change, the Welding faculty conducted surveys and dialogued with the community,
employers, and alumni to identify interests and needs. As a result of their evaluation and
planning, the Welding program transformed its narrow scope into one that provides
training for industrial maintenance and mechanics positions found in almost every
industry.

The A.S. Nursing program is held accountable by the National League for Nursing
Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) for ensuring that all institutional offerings fit the
stated mission of HawCC. The first NLNAC standard is, “The program has clear and
publicly stated purposes and mission appropriate to either post-secondary, baccalaureate,
or higher education in nursing.” Criterion 1 under the standard reads, “The
mission/philosophy and goals/objectives of the nursing unit are consistent with those of
the governing organization, or differences are justified by the nursing unit
goals/objectives” (NLNAC, 2005, p.129). The A.S. Nursing program was reviewed and



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              107
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

reaccredited for eight years in June 2003 by the NLNAC, validating that the program’s
offerings fit the stated college mission.

The newly created Certificate of Completion in Substance Abuse Counseling embraces
the college mission, providing students and in-service personnel with much needed
education and training not only to meet their educational and professional goals, but also
to provide the Big Island community with additional qualified human resources to help
address the crystal meth “ice” crisis.

The Business Education and Technology Division hired consultant Ruth Stiehl in August
2004 to dialogue with the division in helping to reform its program curriculum into an
outcomes-based framework. Faculty used Dr. Stiehl’s books, The Outcomes Primer and
The Mapping Primer, to create a program map, a visual diagram showing strategic
relationships between intended SLOs, assessment, and course content. Programs met
with employers to evaluate the existing curriculum, get answers to the question, “What
do students need to be able to do ‘out there’ that we’re responsible for ‘in here,’” and
plan for curriculum improvement to address employers’ needs.

To provide educational opportunities in remote areas of the Big Island, HawCC
developed distance education learning sites in Waimea and Ka`u through a Title III
grant. The funds were used for curriculum development, equipment purchases, and site
and professional development. With the establishment of the distance learning sites,
more courses have been offered via video-conferencing, and more faculty are using the
internet.

HawCC has no formal method of evaluating effectiveness in delivery systems and modes
of instruction and has no means of assessing instructors’ technical knowledge. As a
result, the Academic Senate established an ad hoc Distance Learning Committee in
spring 2006 ([HawCC] AS, 2006) to address these concerns and advise the Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs on distance delivery issues. The college has thus made
an institutional commitment to ensure that the quality and standards of distance learning
instruction are comparable to those of other HawCC instructional programs.

The program/unit review process that began its four-year cycle in Fall 2005 will provide
the means for evaluation, planning, and improvement by departments, units, programs,
and HawCC as a whole. The process provides consistency in the reporting of student
learning outcomes as well as in assessing student achievement of those outcomes. The
CERC, Assessment Committee, and institutional researcher are an important part of
HawCC’s organization structure and demonstrate the college’s commitment to
integrating program review and student learning outcomes into its mission.

The response to the Graduate Leaver’s Survey was very low, thus an invalid sample. On
the other hand, the college has shown impressive results in the nationally-normed
feedback returned from its two complete CCSSE surveys. The results for 2004 (HawCC,
n.d.c) are particularly impressive, showing the college scoring significantly higher (.33 or



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               108
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

higher per item on a 4 point scale) than small colleges nationally in the following
categories:

   •    Made a class presentation
   •    Prepared two or more drafts of a paper or assignment
   •    Worked on a paper or project requiring integration of ideas
   •    Worked with other students on projects during class
   •    Worked with classmates outside class to prepare class assignments
   •    Participated in a community based project as part of a regular course
   •    Had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your
        own
   •    Encouraging contact among students of different economic, social, racial and/or
        ethnic backgrounds.

Areas of Personal Improvement Due to Attendance at this College:

    •   Writing clearly and effectively
    •   Speaking clearly and effectively
    •   Working effectively with others
    •   Understanding myself
    •   Understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds
    •   Developing a personal code of values and ethics
    •   Contributing to the welfare of my community.

This bespeaks a significant level of student satisfaction with the quality of the educational
experience they are building for themselves in conjunction with faculty and staff at the
college.

The 2004 CCSSE results surveyed 105 items, and the college scored higher than the
national norm for small colleges on 80 of the items surveyed, including the 15 items
listed above in which the scores were significantly higher. The college scored slightly
lower than the national average for small colleges on the following 25 items:

   •    Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor
   •    Talked about career plans with an instructor or advisor
   •    Provides the financial support needed to afford my education
   •    Student works for pay
   •    Quality of relationship with administrative personnel and offices
   •    Solving numerical problems
   •    Frequency of academic advising and planning
   •    Frequency of peer or other tutoring
   •    Frequency of use of child care facilities
   •    Frequency of financial aid advising
   •    Frequency of computer lab use
   •    Frequency of involvement with student organizations

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               109
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs


   •   Frequency of transfer credit assistance
   •   Frequency of use of services to students with disabilities
   •   Satisfaction with academic advising
   •   Satisfaction with job placement assistance
   •   Satisfaction with peer or other tutoring
   •   Satisfaction with skills labs
   •   Satisfaction with child care services availability
   •   Satisfaction with financial aid advising
   •   Satisfaction with computer lab facilities
   •   Satisfaction with student organizations
   •   Satisfaction with transfer credit assistance
   •   Satisfaction with services to students with disabilities
   •   Total credits earned at the college.

CCSSE results provide a significant source of data to bolster the upcoming biennium
budget requests from the college in which a strategic enrollment management initiative
will address many of the items above that relate to student services. The biennium
request also addresses a major technical support need, a Computing and Media Support
Department adequately staffed and equipped to meet student, faculty, and staff needs.

Planning Agenda:

The college shall make an institutional commitment to:

   1. Support continuing dialogue with advisory councils.

   2. Continue to provide on-going training in the development and assessment of
      SLOs.

   3. Implement and continuously evaluate its program review process.

   4. Use assessment results from the program reviews to evaluate and improve student
      learning.

   5. Use results from the program reviews to ensure that the college mission and
      integrity are upheld in all instructional and support programs.

   6. Determine a more effective way to assess graduates and leavers.

   7. Develop an instrument to assess effectiveness of various delivery systems.

   8. Provide faculty with proper training and support to teach effectively via distance
      education.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              110
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs



A.2. The institution assures the quality and improvement of all instructional courses
and programs offered in the name of the institution, including collegiate,
developmental, and pre-collegiate courses and programs, continuing and community
education, study abroad, short-term training courses and programs, programs for
international students, and contract or other special programs, regardless of type of
credit awarded, delivery mode, or location.

    A.2.a. The institution uses established procedures to design, identify learning
   outcomes for, approve, administer, deliver, and evaluate courses and programs.
   The institution recognizes the central role of its faculty for establishing quality
   and improving instructional courses and programs.

   A.2.b. The institution relies on faculty expertise and the assistance of advisory
   committees when appropriate to identify competency levels and measurable
   student learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general
   and vocational education, and degrees. The institution regularly assesses
   student progress towards achieving those outcomes.

   A.2.c. High-quality instruction and appropriate breadth, depth, rigor,
   sequencing, time to completion, and synthesis of learning characterize all
   programs.

   A.2.d. The institution uses delivery modes and teaching methodologies that
   reflect the diverse needs and learning styles of its students.

Descriptive Summary:

Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) offers a large number of credit programs: an
Associates in Arts degree in Liberal Arts, four Associate in Science degrees, 20 Associate
in Applied Science degrees, and 27 certificate programs. Certificate programs include
Certificates of Completion, Certificates of Achievement, and two Academic Subject
Certificates in Environmental Studies and Hawaiian Life Styles. The Office of
Continuing Education and Training (OCET) offers non-credit pre-collegiate courses and
programs, short-term education and training courses and programs, an accredited
Intensive English Program for international students, apprenticeship trades-specific (non-
credit) academic courses, workforce development and employment preparation courses,
and extensive online accredited and certificate courses.

The faculty has the primary responsibility for the curriculum. The curricular process
includes discourse among the faculty, discipline members, members of the Academic
Senate, and the Senate Educational Policy Committee and Curriculum Review
Committee. The faculty within each discipline or program determines the breadth, depth,
and rigor of programs. Competency levels in vocational programs are determined by
faculty with the assistance of advisory councils to ensure that industry standards are met.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               111
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

HawCC has several means of ensuring high quality instruction in all college programs:
selecting instructors with a high degree of expertise within their discipline through an
intensive hiring process, a rigorous contract renewal process, a rigorous tenure and
promotion process, and student course/instructor evaluations at the close of each course.

The diverse students at HawCC bring many challenges with them that interplay with their
desire for education. Geography, work schedule, readiness for college or work, childcare
needs, financial needs, and special learning/instructional needs are a few.
HawCC faculty and instructors self-select their teaching methodologies based on their
course objectives. The college encourages the use of effective methodologies through
staff development as evidenced by a variety of workshops offered ([HawCC] [Staff
Development Committee] [SDC], n.d.).
.
Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard.

Established Procedures and Faculty Role
HawCC has established procedures whereby the faculty plays a primary role in
establishing the quality of instructional courses and programs.

All programs at HawCC are approved through a rigorous college curriculum review
process. The primary responsibility is in the hands of the faculty as outlined in the
Charter of the HawCC Academic Senate (HawCC AS, 2005b). The Senate Charter states
that the Senate Educational Policy Committee (EPC) “will review, advise, and make
recommendations on academic policies, including . . . [the] curriculum process” (HawCC
AS, 2005b, Article VII.2.a). The curriculum process is developed by the EPC and
approved by the Senate (HawCC AS Educational Policy Committee [EPC], 2006).

The Senate Charter also states that the Curriculum Review Committee (CRC) “will make
recommendations regarding the review and modification of degree requirements,
program proposals, course proposals, and catalog descriptions as appropriate for all credit
courses, including distance education and summer session” (HawCC AS, 2005b, Article
VII.2.b). Curriculum forms, guidelines, and procedures as well as CRC deadlines and
actions can be found on the HawCC web site (HawCC, 2006d). To ensure
comprehensive dialogue throughout the campus, the CRC is made up of a faculty
member from each instructional department or division.

Course and program modifications, additions, or deletions are initiated by a faculty
member after collaborative discussion with the department/division chair. Recently
revised curriculum forms specify that each course outline include teaching methods,
evaluation criteria, and concepts, skills, and knowledge to be learned (HawCC, 2006c).
The mode of delivery of a course is not addressed. Any proposed course numbered 100
or above to be considered for articulation must complete an additional set of questions.
Courses seeking a writing intensive designation must submit an additional proposal to the
Senate Writing Intensive Curriculum Committee.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               112
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

Proposals to be considered for approval at the next Senate meeting are made available via
email or in administrative offices for faculty review and discussion. At the Senate’s
monthly meeting, the faculty reviews CRC recommendations, holds further deliberations,
and then votes whether to forward the proposal to the VCAA or return it to the CRC.
The Senate Chair forwards all proposals approved by the Senate to the VCAA. The
VCAA reviews all course proposals and makes recommendations to the Chancellor, who
has the final determination.
Once a course is approved, the stewardship of the course is assigned to the appropriate
division/department. The division/department chair (DC) is responsible for supervising
all instructors to ensure that approved course outlines are followed. Currently, there is no
systematic policy in which semester course outlines are provided to the DC, although
many DCs collect outlines regularly.

In 2004 the Academic Senate charged the Educational Policy Committee (EPC) and
Curriculum Review Committee (CRC) to address faculty concerns about the curriculum
review process. Dialogue reflected in the minutes of the Education Policy Committee
(HawCC AS EPC, 2005) demonstrates that the EPC and CRC collaborated to evaluate
curriculum guidelines and procedures to reflect student learning outcomes and address
faculty concerns. EPC representatives widely circulated their proposals to their units for
feedback. The final proposal was brought to the Academic Senate for a vote at the April
28, 2006, meeting and passed with slight modifications.

The forms provided by the CRC in preparing course outlines follow the guidelines set
forth in the Chancellor for Community Colleges Memo (CCCM) #6100 (UH CC, 1991).
However, there has been some question whether the CCCM documents are still in place
after the dismantling of the UHCC Chancellor’s office in 2002. Current information
from the UHCC Policy Conversion Analysis chart developed by the UH Associate Vice
President for Academic Affairs indicates that curriculum policies outlined in CCCM
6100 are now left to the discretion of individual campuses (Rota, 2004). The HawCC
VCAA has been authorized to raise the issue with the chief academic officers system-
wide. The point of broaching such a dialogue is to determine if the system would benefit
from a common set of criteria to distinguish baccalaureate-level courses from pre-
baccalaureate and developmental/remedial courses.

OCET staff and faculty respond to community demands and coordinate their non-credit
course offerings outside of the curriculum review process.

Sequencing
OCET determines its course offerings based on multifaceted criteria. It considers
requests from employers (computer classes for KTA), response to community trends
(police examination preparation in response to a shortage of qualified applicants to fill
openings in the police force), and geographic considerations (PACE workshops offered in
Waikoloa). OCET also responds to college and UH system directives; its non-credit
FIRMW (Foundations in Reading, Math, and Writing) was established as the result of a
mandate from the UHCC system not to offer remedial courses. OCET also uses



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               113
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

statistical data collected from previous courses/programs and participant and community
surveys.

Completion of a degree or certificate program requires a clearly defined sequence of
courses, with emphasis on the discipline as well as general education requirements.
These requirements are clearly stated in the college general catalog.

Scheduling of classes and review of program course sequencing are done by DCs in
consultation with faculty and the VCAA. Scheduling is also done in consultation with
other departments/divisions so that courses in a major are not offered at conflicting times.
Credit courses are scheduled based on student demand as determined by enrollment
history, program requirements, and room and staff availability. Any section of a class for
which there is insufficient student demand as evidenced by low enrollment may be
cancelled. Courses in sequence deemed essential for graduation are exempt, and other
considerations may also apply.

Not every course is offered every semester. However, courses are offered cyclically so
students entering a program may expect to complete the requirements within the time
frame delineated in the catalog. Students can complete programs within the specified
time period providing that the following criteria are met:

   •   Students have met all academic and program prerequisites by the time they enter
       HawCC and are accepted into the specific program.
   •   Students entering programs are full-time and carry the recommended course load
       as outlined in the catalog for their respective programs. For example, liberal arts
       students must take a 15-credit semester load to complete the 60 credit hours
       needed for an AA degree within a two-year period.

The fall semester is the only time students are accepted into many of the vocational
programs because of the programs’ set two-year cycle.

Quality
The quality of instruction is maintained in several ways: a rigorous hiring process, a
faculty and lecturer review process, course and instructor evaluations, staff development
activities, and various college curricular review processes.

In credit programs, the quality of instruction is ensured through a rigorous hiring process,
including national searches when necessary, minimum qualifications as set forth by the
University system, and a screening and interview process involving faculty, the
department/division chair, VCAA, and Chancellor, with final approval by the Board of
Regents (BOR). Faculty members serve under the jurisdiction of the BOR and are
assigned a rank, title, and salary appropriate to their duties and responsibilities as defined
in the classification system adopted by the BOR.

A May 1, 2001, memorandum, “Revised Faculty Minimum Qualifications and Salary
Placement Guidelines” (Tsunoda, 2001) from the UH Chancellor for Community


                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                114
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

Colleges to all UH community colleges summarizes the minimum qualifications for
faculty positions in all disciplines. The implementation guidelines are in consonance
with WASC requirements for academic integrity and with Affirmative Action
requirements for an open and broadly representative pool of qualified personnel. HawCC
strictly adheres to these guidelines and is monitored by the campus personnel officer.

The performance of faculty and lecturers is regularly reviewed according to defined
guidelines. The original wording from the July 17, 1992, “Guidelines for Tenure and
Promotion” handbook states, “Community college faculty members should strive for
excellence in the performance of their primary responsibilities. To carry out their
responsibilities, faculty must maintain currency and understanding in their fields, must
continually search for the most effective means of teaching, and must contribute to the
development of the curriculum.” All subsequent Guidelines and the most recent set have
retained the same focus (UH CC, 2005a, p.A2-A3).

Tenure-track faculty participate in a contract renewal and tenure/promotion process
designed to assess discipline expertise, instructional design and delivery skills, college
and university service, community service, professional and self development, and
leadership abilities. Contract renewal and tenure/promotion documents are reviewed by
the Department/Division Personnel Committee (DPC), Department/Division Chair (DC),
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and Chancellor. Tenure/promotion documents are
also reviewed by a UH system Tenure and Promotion Review Committee (TPRC).

Non-tenure-track faculty members (half-time faculty, for example) are required to
complete annual contract renewal documents, which are applications for reappointment.
They are also assessed in the areas above and may apply for promotion when eligible
even though they are not eligible for tenure. These documents are also reviewed by the
DPC, DC, VCAA, and Chancellor.

Lecturers are hired on a temporary, part-time basis to teach needed courses when
permanent faculty is not available. Lecturers must meet the same minimum
qualifications as faculty in their discipline. Lecturers are hired by the DC with advice
from discipline/department faculty members and are regularly reviewed by department
chairs or assigned faculty to assess teaching effectiveness.

In order to maintain the quality of the learning environment, instructors are provided with
course/instructor evaluations for students to complete at the conclusion of all courses.
Faculty members applying for contract renewal, tenure and/or promotion, or completing a
post-tenure review utilize these student evaluations as evidence of their teaching abilities.
Faculty members are expected to present and analyze this information as part of their
personnel documents in a usable form that highlights both strengths and weaknesses and
serves as a means of improving instruction. Lecturers and non-tenured instructors must
obtain student evaluations for each course taught. Tenured faculty members are not
required to administer evaluations, but most do. Appropriate personnel (department
chair, program coordinator or supervisor), whose responsibility is to oversee the quality



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               115
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

of instruction, review lecturer course evaluations. Informal mentoring is provided to
faculty and lecturers who receive poor student evaluations.

In noncredit courses and programs, the high quality of the learning experience is ensured
by an intensive hiring process that reviews the qualifications of potential instructors and
engages in reference checks. OCET courses are evaluated at the conclusion of each
course and reviewed by the program coordinator.
Professional development activities further support faculty to ensure curricular quality. A
Staff Development Committee headed by a faculty Staff Development Coordinator each
semester plans professional development for the faculty/staff ([HawCC] [SDC], n.d.).
Funding for travel has been severely restricted, making it a challenge for faculty to attend
off-island conferences. Grants to help faculty with their professional development are
sought to help faculty improve as instructors.

Collaboration and coordination among the UHCC Staff Development Coordinators have
provided a cost-effective way to bring trainers from the mainland to service several
colleges. The Carl Perkins Grant for upgrading vocational programming has been used
recently in this cooperative way for staff development. In 2003-04, Skip Downing
(Strategies for Creating Student Success) and in 2004-05, Ruth Stiehl (Student Learning
Outcomes & Assessment Training) are examples of this effort. Staff Development
activities typically include ten to fifteen activities per academic year with participation of
between 10-40 people per session ([HawCC] [SDC], n.d.).

Each summer the faculty has the opportunity to attend a high-energy summer retreat,
Hawai‘i National Great Teachers Seminar, where they gather together with educators
throughout the United States to learn from each other and exchange teaching innovations
and solutions to teaching problems (Leeward CC, 2006).

In 2004-05, college funds were used to pilot a project for faculty peer mentoring. The
project was intended to help instructors to learn and share, through mentoring, teaching
strategies to positively influence teaching effectiveness and student success. Instructors
targeted were those whose programs had under-performed in the Program Health
Indicators (PHI) performance indicators. The faculty mentors were also assigned to
assist in the training of newly hired CTE faculty in teaching strategies. Despite numerous
attempts, the project was unsuccessful in recruiting interested faculty. The monies
instead funded three faculty members and a counselor to attend an Innovations 2005
Conference in New York. The attendees produced a summative report of the conference
proceedings that was shared with colleagues and planted the seed for the campus-wide
work with Ruth Stiehl.

The quality of the credit academic programs is partially maintained through the
curriculum process as described earlier. The program/unit review process provides
additional means by which faculty review programs and courses within a four-year span
of time. Further discussion of program review is in section IIA2.f in this document.
Another college policy relating to course review is HAW 5.250 (HawCC Office of the
Provost, 2001). This policy mandates a five-year cycle of review of all college courses.


                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                116
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

However, this policy has not been followed in recent years. The Senate Educational
Policy Committee is committed to evaluating the policy and implementing through the
Senate a plan of action for course reviews.

Since 1987 the UHCC system has managed an organizational structure of Program
Coordinating Councils (PCC) made up of faculty from all the UH colleges to minimize
curricular inconsistencies among the community colleges and to develop common
minimum student competencies for each degree offered. The ensuing dialogue has
resulted in the development of several articulated programs (Early Childhood Education,
Business Technology, Marketing) throughout the UHCC system.

Teaching Methodology
Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) encourages a wide range of delivery modes and
teaching methodologies. Each instructor chooses which mode is most effective based on
course content and the needs of HawCC’s diverse student body. Broadly speaking,
HawCC instructors use a variety of teaching methodologies: lecture, student-led and
teacher-led discussion, videos, class exercises, games, group presentations, hands-on
laboratory activities, service-learning outreach, internships, computer-assisted learning,
power-point presentations, online courses, field experiences in practicums and trips as
evidenced in the collected syllabi and course outlines ([HawCC], n.d.e).

The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) has been administered
three times since 2002. It solicits responses from students on their educational
experience and growth. This tool also encourages faculty to reflect upon their teaching
methodology.

CCSSE has demonstrated that students are exposed to a variety of teaching
methodologies that address different learning styles. CCSSE reports that HawCC has
been effective, according to students, in helping them to think critically, speak clearly and
work effectively. Students also reported that they learned about career opportunities and
developed a personal conviction about helping their community. The report indicated
that HawCC had significantly positive ratings in making class presentations, working on
projects with other students during class and outside of class, and participating in a
community-based project as a part of a regular course.

The college has supported faculty by providing workshops that encourage faculty to
reflect upon and assess student learning styles. Title III grants have played a role in
helping faculty explore classroom assessment techniques and learning styles in the
ethnically Hawaiian population (HawCC, 2000) (HawCC, 2003?). Outside of these
workshop opportunities, faculty hold informal discussions regarding teaching
methodology.

Faculty members provide accommodations to students who self-identify as having a
special need. An assigned counselor is available to assist faculty in making these
accommodations.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               117
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

Student learning styles are not formally assessed by the college, making it difficult for
instructors to effectively adapt their teaching methodology to the various student learning
styles of a given set of students. However, student course/instructor evaluations at the
end of each course offer HawCC instructors direct feedback on how they are meeting
student needs and expectations.

Instructors assess student learning on a regular basis in each course as appropriate given
course type, course content, course objectives, and student learning outcomes.
Methodologies include written tests, individual presentations, group presentations,
practicums, project grading, and service evaluation as evidenced in the collected syllabi
and course outlines. As SLOs are being identified, further assessments strategies will be
developed. The college has begun its development of measurable learning outcomes.
Each discipline is at various stages of completion of this work.

The development of learning outcomes continues and is strongly encouraged by the
institution through its program/unit review process that requires programs to assess their
learning outcomes. Extensive faculty dialogue, with the support of the Institutional
Researcher, has occurred during the review process. Program/unit reviews have
incorporated a review of learning outcomes; however, because of the infancy of learning
outcomes development, the reviews completed in 2005/06 may not yield information
about student progress towards these outcomes.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college shall make an institutional commitment to continue to provide ongoing
   training in defining and assessing SLOs.

2. The Academic Senate through the Educational Policy and Curriculum Review
   Committees will review the current curriculum review process in evaluating for
   SLOs, teaching methodology and delivery mode.

3. The college shall make an institutional commitment to assist faculty in developing
   methods to assess students’ diverse needs and learning styles and in matching
   appropriate teaching methodology and pedagogy to improve student learning.

4. The college shall make an institutional commitment to review, modify as necessary,
   and reinstitute HAW 5.250, Course Review Policy and Procedure, for the purpose of
   maintaining course quality.

5. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will pursue a dialogue with appropriate
   administration colleagues to determine the status of the CCCMs (system policy
   memos) and to establish a consensus about the possible need for a replacement of
   those CCCMs currently slated for discontinuation.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               118
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs



   A.2.e. The institution evaluates all courses and programs through an on-going
   systematic review of their relevance, appropriateness, achievement of learning
   outcomes, currency, and future needs and plans.

   A.2.f. The institution engages in ongoing, systematic, evaluation and integrated
   planning to assure currency and measure achievement of its stated student
   learning outcomes for courses, certificates, programs including general and
   vocational education, and degrees. The institution systematically strives to
   improve those outcomes and makes the results available to appropriate
   constituencies.

   A.2.g. If an institution uses departmental course and/or program examinations,
   it validates their effectiveness in measuring student learning and minimizes test
   biases.

Descriptive Summary:

The college employs several means to evaluate its courses and programs for
appropriateness. The Academic Development Plan, Program Health Indicators,
Program/Unit Reviews and the curriculum review process guide the college in reviewing
its courses and programs.

The effectiveness of instructional courses and programs is determined through,
computation of Program Health Indicators for vocational programs (Yamane, 2005), self-
studies needed for independent Certification/Accreditation (e.g., Nursing [NLNAC,
2005], Culinary Arts [American Culinary Federation, 2006], Intensive English
[Commission on English Language Program Accreditation, 2006]), and the HawCC
Program/Unit Review process.

Effective course and program planning takes into consideration the environment in which
the institution must function. External factors that will influence the future of HawCC
include geography, demographics, trends in lower education, a variety of opportunities
and challenges, and economic outlook. These factors are identified in the HawCC
Academic Development Plan 2002-2010 (HawCC, n.d.a). Internal factors come from
either the University of Hawai‘i enrollment reports from community colleges (UH
Institutional Research Office [IRO], 2006) or from the Community College Survey of
Student Engagement (CCSSE).

The English Department at HawCC uses departmental examinations for its finals in all
developmental writing courses for both native and non-native speakers: English 20W
(College Writing & Grammar), English 22 (Introduction to Expository Writing), ESL 11
(Basic Grammar & Writing), ESL 13 (Grammar & Writing), and ESL 15 (Introduction to
Expository Writing for ESL Students).




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             119
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

In addition, students in all remedial and developmental reading courses for both native
and non-native speakers (English 18: Reading Essentials; English 20R: Reading and
Learning Skills; English 21: Developmental Reading; ESL 007: Reading and Study Skills
I; and ESL 009: Reading and Study Skills II) are required to go to The Learning Center to
work on the Alternative Instructional Management System (AIMS) to improve their
reading skills. AIMS is a competency-based and individualized program with tests and
lessons for levels of reading ability ranging from very easy to very difficult. AIMS is an
extension of the classroom where students cover major skill areas in reading such as
vocabulary, main idea, supporting details, map and graph reading, and critical reading at
their own pace (Robison, 2006).

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The state of Hawai‘i provides for a regular and
systematic assessment of all UH programs through Executive Policy E5.210, Institutional
Accountability and Performance (UH OVPPP, 1999). This is the overall policy
framework for decentralized assessment activities carried out by the different UH
campuses, colleges, departments, and programs, one of which is HawCC. Assessment
information collected by instructional departments and programs is reported as part of the
program review process mandated by Executive Policy E5.202 (UH CC, 2005b). These
reviews are to be done every 5 years and begin with a self-study. Completed documents
include the Academic Development Plan 2002-2010 (HawCC, n.d.a); The University of
Hawai‘i Community Colleges Strategic Plan 2002-2010 (UH CC, 2002); and The
University of Hawai‘i System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century,
2002-2010 (UH BOR and Office of the President, 2002).

The HawCC Academic Development Plan 2002-2010 lists college priorities as a set of
goals, with each set having a list of outcomes, strategies, and resource requirements.

The Chancellor for Community Colleges Memorandum #6002, Review of Provisional
and Established Academic Programs, requires all vocational programs to be reviewed
every five years ([UH CC], 1985). This review is accomplished through yearly
computation of Program Health Indicators for the vocational programs at HawCC
(Yamane, 2005). The PHI model provides a comprehensive review of vocational
programs using year-to-year information and empirical data so that programs can be
compared across campus or even across campuses. The program demand, program
efficiency, and program outcomes are assessed. Based on PHIs, advisory counsel input,
and student feedback, the Accounting, Information Technology, and Business
Technology curriculums were revised effective Fall 2005 (HawCC, 2005a).

The Assessment Committee was convened in 2004-2005 to establish the organizational
structure and processes to institutionalize ongoing, systematic program/unit reviews and
an assessment cycle for the college. The Program/Unit Review consists of a description
of the program or unit, chart of quantitative enrollment trends, assessment of program
and student learning outcomes, student and employer satisfaction surveys, analysis of the
program, action plan and budget implications.


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              120
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

Under the direction of the Assessment Committee, which has been reconvened in 2005-
2006, all HawCC units and programs of HawCC will be reviewed in a four-year cycle.
This review process will be centered on course and program SLOs. The program reviews
will determine program needs in the context of available college resources and will drive
budget and strategic planning.

In November 2005 six programs and six units completed their program/unit reviews. The
College Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC) began evaluating these reports in
December 2005. The reviews were shared with the college staff, faculty and students and
the community through the HawCC website. This process marks the beginning of the
college’s focus on SLOs and will yield valuable information for future planning. This
process is occurring in tandem with development of program and course SLOs (HawCC
Assessment Committee [AC], 2006).

Classes offered by the Office of Continuing Education and Training (OCET) (HawCC
OCET, 2006) are evaluated and critiqued by students. Classes are restructured to meet
the needs of each requesting agency to accommodate the needs of its workers. Extensive
data is kept for each course offered through OCET, including student enrollment and
location, to assist in planning for future offerings.

Two new executive/managerial positions have been funded under the current biennium
budget: an Assistant Dean for Liberal Arts and Public Services and an Assistant Dean for
Career and Technical Education. These positions are currently filled by interim
appointments. Final recruitment and hiring is pending the approval of a formal
reorganization proposal that must be reviewed at the campus and system levels. The
reorganization would convert the assistant deans to senior manager deans with line
responsibilities for all programs at HawCC and provide leadership for the recruitment,
hiring, administration, supervision, assessment, development, and improvement of
faculty and staff of the respective divisions.

The Assistant Deans of Liberal Arts and CTE will also oversee and be responsible for the
overall administration, management, development, delivery, and integrity of transfer
curricula, general education, and developmental and remedial education. The deans will
integrate new and evolving learning technologies into the classroom or distance learning
and direct the establishment of performance objectives and measurable learning outcomes
within the parameters of the college mission and broad academic goals.

To minimize test bias in departmental exams, writing faculty members work as a group to
set procedures and policies for the final exams, develop grading rubrics, and conduct
group grading sessions. Each grading session begins with a grade-norming of at least one
sample paper. Writing faculty members review the departmental exams after every
sitting to help validate their effectiveness in measuring student learning and minimizing
test biases. To validate their effectiveness in measuring student learning and minimizing
test biases, the reading discipline uses the AIMS program to determine students’
competency at the different levels. A student demonstrates competency of a certain skill
by passing a test with 80% accuracy. Students need to progress to specific levels in order


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              121
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

to continue their studies at the next level. At the end of the semester, an evaluation of the
AIMS program is given to the students. Reading Lab evaluations for Spring 2005 show
very positive results. The respondents rated their experience in the “strongly
agree/agree” categories as follows: #4: My experience in the lab is improving my attitude
toward reading in general (82%); #5: My work in the Reading Lab has helped me
become a better reader in my other academic courses (84%); and #6: My overall rating
of the Lab (83%).

Planning Agenda:

The college shall make an institutional commitment to:

   1. Continue the process of program/unit reviews in order to evaluate each area of the
      college in an on-going, systematic review of their achievement of learning
      outcomes, currency, and future needs and plans.

   2. Fill the Assistant Dean positions to provide leadership in the development of new
      courses and academic programs and direct the scheduled evaluation of academic
      programs and activities.

   3. Develop an ongoing, systematic method of collecting all syllabi for the purpose
      of reviewing them for accuracy.

   4. Encourage dialogue within departments to formally evaluate tests to minimize test
      bias.


   A.2.h. The institution awards credit based on student achievement of the
   course’s stated learning outcomes. Units of credit awarded are consistent with
   institutional policies that reflect generally accepted norms or equivalencies in
   higher education.

   A.2.i. The institution awards degrees and certificates based on student
   achievement of a program’s stated learning outcomes.

Descriptive Summary:

The college faculty in consultation with their respective advisory committees controls the
curricula of the college as described in section IIA2.a.

The college’s General Catalog (HawCC, 2005b) provides a description for each program
offered at the college and a list of the courses required to meet the outcomes. Each
course is described in the catalog under “Course Listings.” Official course outlines are
filed in the VCAA’s office and in each of the college’s department/division offices.
Students are expected to complete the prescribed courses within a program with a passing
grade as well as maintain an overall GPA of 2.0. Some programs identify specific


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               122
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

courses in which students must achieve at least a “C” grade to have it credited towards
the degree or certificate. The letter grade is used as an indication of the student’s
achievement of the course requirements.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The pathway to achieving outcomes required
of program degrees and certificates is clearly outlined in the college catalog. Courses are
briefly described in the catalog and often in course syllabi given to students. Learning
achievement is evaluated through various assignments, projects, in-class participation,
exams, and/or demonstration of required skills. Program effectiveness data collected
from the Program/Unit Reviews, Program Health Indicators, and Graduates and Leavers
Survey provide some measures on which planning is based. Some programs have
engaged in “Return to Industry” surveys through a Perkins Grant, where employers are
asked to assess the performance of graduates from the college programs as to their
preparedness for employment (HawCC, 2004). See II.A.5 for more in-depth discussion.

The units of credit are based on accepted norms in higher education. Some of the
programs at HawCC also articulate their courses and curricula with the other system-wide
community colleges and with four-year colleges as evidenced by UH articulation
agreements (UH, 2006b).

Each of the college’s programs is at different stages in the process of developing program
and course SLOs. This process has resulted in many lively and meaningful discussions
among faculty, students and community members. Several programs have had
discussions with faculty from other system community colleges (Maui, Kauai and CC’s
on O’ahu). Currently ten programs have developed specific program learning outcomes:
Nursing, A.S. and P.N.; Forest TEAM; Early Childhood Education, A.S. and C.A.;
Business Technology; Accounting; Marketing; Information Technology; and Liberal Arts
([HawCC], n.d.f). Two programs currently developing learning outcomes are
Administration of Justice and Diesel Mechanics. The remaining programs will also begin
to develop learning outcomes. In addition, many programs have developed program
maps (HawCC AC, 2006).

The faculty is in the process of revising all courses/programs to include student learning
outcomes (SLOs) as the basis for evaluating students and awarding credit, degrees, and
certificates. The college’s institutional commitment is reflected in the Senate Educational
Policy Committee’s current efforts to revise the curriculum process to address faculty
concerns and to incorporate SLOs into the process.

The college is committed to the development of learning outcomes through its
program/unit review process (HawCC, 2006a). In Fall 2005, six programs and six units
completed their program reviews. The Program Review Template developed by the
college includes sections that require programs and units to assess program learning
outcomes over a 4-year cycle (HawCC, 2006b). In December 2005 the College
Effectiveness Review Committee (CERC) was charged with reviewing the submitted


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               123
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

Program/Unit Reviews. With the development of program learning outcomes, the
college will move towards a new basis for assessing student learning.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college shall make an institutional commitment to continue to provide
   professional training in the development of SLOs and the selection of appropriate
   assessment tools to evaluate student achievement of learning outcomes.

2. Divisions and departments shall develop and implement SLOs for all
   programs/courses as the basis for evaluating students and awarding credit, degrees,
   and certificates within four years.

3. The college administration shall make an institutional commitment to hire a
   webmaster so program learning outcomes can be widely distributed.

4. The Academic Senate through the Educational Policy Committee and Curriculum
   Review Committee shall incorporate learning outcomes into the curriculum review
   process.

5. The Academic Senate through the EPC and CRC shall develop systematic processes
   for assessing student progress on achieving SLOs.


A.3. The institution requires of all academic and vocational degree programs a
component of general education based on a carefully considered philosophy that is
clearly stated in its catalog. The institution, relying on the expertise of its faculty,
determines the appropriateness of each course for inclusion in the general education
curriculum by examining the stated learning outcomes for the course.

Descriptive Summary:

The college’s overall mission and complementary Four Cornerstones are stated in the
college General Catalog (HawCC, 2005b, p.7). All associate degree programs have a
general education component. General education courses are designed to further skills
development, promote lifelong learning, and introduce the content and methodology of
the major areas of knowledge: Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences.
Descriptions of the general education (GE) requirements for the AA, AS, AAS, and ATS
degrees are also found in the catalog.

The Four Cornerstones encompass all facets of the college experience. Community
Work-Based Learning has service learning and volunteerism at the forefront of civic and
social responsibility. Technology is interwoven into each program as students learn to
use computers and web-based resources. The college is the center for Hawaiian Culture,
a hub for Hawaiian history, and teaches respect for cultural diversity, cultural practices,
and cultural understanding. Caring for the Environment and a commitment to conserving


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               124
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

natural resources are the foundation for being an effective citizen, locally, nationally, and
globally. The cornerstones also enable students to recognize ethical principles and the
qualities of an ethical human being.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The college catalog is published and reviewed
annually. The GE Requirements for the AA degree are found on page 39 of the 2005-
2006 General Catalog. Pages 40 through 58 describe the AS, AAS, and ATS degrees.
The “General Education Electives” for the AS and AAS degrees are listed throughout this
section. Individual programs vary on how they present the GE requirements to their
students. There is no “carefully considered philosophy” of general education stated in the
2005-2006 catalog. There is no subject heading for General Education in the index in the
back of the catalog (HawCC, 2005b).

The Liberal Arts program, from which the general education courses originate, has
developed program learning outcomes (HawCC AC, 2006). All faculty need to begin
discussion about the value of the components of general education in their programs.

As evidenced by pages 38-40 of the catalog (HawCC, 2005b), all Associate degree
programs require students to earn nine (9) credits total by selecting one 3-credit general
elective course from each of three areas: Humanities/Cultural Environment, Natural
Sciences/Natural Environment, and Social Sciences/Social Environment. There is no
consistency among programs that individual skills development, lifelong learning skills,
and effective citizenry are explicitly included in the description of their programs.

Although the college adopted the four cornerstones, there is no institutional commitment
to ensure that each student receives learning experiences in each of the cornerstones.

Currently, as described in Standard I, the college is reviewing its mission statement. The
college is well along in the process of rewriting its mission statement and developing a
vision statement and imperatives to support the mission. The “imperatives” will include
the revisited Four Cornerstones as well as other elements. The revised mission, vision,
and imperatives will form the basis of a carefully considered philosophy of general
education.

Planning Agenda:

1. All faculty will dialogue to evaluate, plan, and develop a philosophy of general
   education and an institutional rationale for inclusion of courses in general education.

2. The college will communicate to all constituents the philosophy of general education
   and the institutional rationale for inclusion of courses in general education.

3. The college will dialogue to create college learning outcomes to include lifelong
   learning skills and effective citizenry that will be reflected in all curriculum.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               125
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs



4. The college will complete its revised mission, vision, and imperatives statements, and
   faculty will consider how to integrate these elements into the curriculum


A.4. All degree programs include at least one area of focused study or
interdisciplinary core.

Descriptive Summary:

The 2005-2006 HawCC catalog lists all courses required for the following degrees:
Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degree, Associate in Applied Science, and
Associate in Technical Studies. All degree programs include at least one area of focused
study and/or interdisciplinary core courses along with the general education courses.

The Associate in Arts (AA) degree at Hawai‘i Community College provides students
with the skills and competencies needed for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program.

The Associate in Science (AS) degree, the Associate in Applied Science (AAS), and the
Associate in Technical Studies degrees provide the students with skills and competencies
for entry into gainful employment.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard; however, a planning agenda is included to ensure
ongoing institutional commitment to developing program maps and student learning
outcomes.

As evidenced in the catalog, pages 38-40 (HawCC, 2005b), the core requirements for the
AA degree include communication, logical reasoning, world civilization, and a writing
intensive course. In addition, students are provided with an introduction to the broad
areas of knowledge (Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences), their theories,
and methods of inquiry. These requirements embrace the AA degree learning outcomes.

All programs that award the AS and AAS degrees have one area of focused study. In
addition, most programs require students to take at least six credit hours in general skills
courses: Communication, Thinking/Reasoning, Mathematics, and three credits from each
of the following areas: Social, Natural, and Cultural Environment. Each program thus
provides students with knowledge in its focused area as well as an introduction to the
broad areas of knowledge.

Programs in the Business Education and Technology Division (Accounting, Business
Technology, and Marketing), as is evidenced in their curriculum requirements, have both
a focus of study and interdisciplinary core. Their program maps clearly illustrate the
connections of the interdisciplinary courses to its focus of study designed to help students
achieve program outcomes (HawCC AC, 2006).


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               126
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs


Planning Agenda:

The college shall make an institutional commitment to continue its support of developing
program maps and student learning outcomes.


A.5. Students completing vocational and occupational certificates and degrees
demonstrate technical and professional competencies that meet employment and other
applicable standards and are prepared for external licensure and certification.

Descriptive Summary:

Industry-represented Program Advisory Councils and external agencies play an important
role in evaluating the curriculum requirements of vocational and occupational programs
to assure that intended learning outcomes are aligned with employment competencies and
standards.

All Career and Technical Education programs are annually reviewed for program
efficiency and outcomes by using the Program Health Indicators (PHI) and input from the
Advisory Councils as listed in the 2005-2006 HawCC General Catalog, p. 60 (HawCC,
2005b).

The Return to Industry program is another means by which programs can validate student
performance on the job.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard; however a planning agenda is included to make an
institutional commitment to validate the meeting of this standard with systematic
procedures and assessment tools.

Dialogue between the programs and their Advisory Councils plays a pivotal role in
determining and evaluating the employment requirements and success of the college’s
vocational students. Dialogue continues when industry experts within the appropriate
areas review the core competencies of the vocational programs in conjunction with the
faculty and provide feedback regarding the students they have employed locally.

Results from the Return to Industry program indicate that although students have
acquired the necessary technical skills, some have a weakness in related skills such as
English, math, writing, and professionalism (HawCC, 2004).

The Nursing Program, which is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing
Accrediting Commission, prepares students for national licensing exams. The nursing
program documents the pass rates of the national licensure Exam (NCLEX) for registered
nurses and for licensed practical nurses. A questionnaire developed for this self-study
and given to division/department chairs indicates other programs prepare students for


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               127
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

external licensure and certification (Onishi, 2005). However, no data is available on the
pass rates for our students on these exams.

   •   Students who complete the Substance Abuse Counseling program will obtain 720
       hours from the State of Hawai‘i Department of Health Alcohol and Drug Abuse
       Division (ADAD) that can be applied toward State certificate requirements.
       Students who complete the program together with an Associate’s Degree will
       receive 2000 (1year) work service hours from ADAD.

   •   The CISCO Networking Academy offers courses, which prepare students to take
       the Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA) certification exam, Cisco
       Certificate Networking Professional (CCNP) certification exam, and the World
       Organization of Webmaster’s Certified Web Designer Apprentice (CWSDA)
       certification exam.

   •   Students in the Diesel Mechanics Program are prepared to take the State Diesel
       Mechanics Certification (ASE). Students in the Automotive Program receive
       ABRP instruction based on the Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision
       Repair (I-CAR) advanced training curriculum. The curriculum is structured to
       prepare graduates for the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) testing and
       certification.

   •   The Business Education and Technology Division certifies students for the Civil
       Service typing certification. Accounting Program students enrolled in Hospitality
       Accounting I, ACC 130, receiving 69 percent or better on the final examination,
       will be issued a certificate from the Educational Institute of the American Hotel
       and Lodging Association. The exam is issued and graded by the Educational
       Institute of AHLA.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college shall encourage individual programs to identify and collect statistical data
   to document the technical and professional competence of students.

2. The college shall utilize the program/unit review process to report and analyze data
   documenting competence.

3. The college shall make an institutional commitment to conduct and analyze employer
   satisfaction surveys.

4. All CTE programs will develop program maps, student learning outcomes, and
   assessment tools.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               128
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs



A.6. The institution assures that students and prospective students receive clear and
accurate information about educational courses and programs and transfer policies.
The institution describes its degrees and certificates in terms of their purpose, content,
course requirements, and expected student learning outcomes. In every class section
students receive a course syllabus that specifies learning objectives consistent with
those in the institution’s officially approved course outline.

   A.6.a. The institution makes available to its students clearly stated transfer-of-
   credit policies in order to facilitate the mobility of students without penalty. In
   accepting transfer credits to fulfill degree requirements, the institution certifies
   that the expected learning outcomes for transferred courses are comparable to
   the learning outcomes of its own courses. Where patterns of student enrollment
   between institutions are identified, the institution develops articulation
   agreements as appropriate to its mission.

Descriptive Summary:

Executive memorandum No. 98-8, University of Hawai‘i System Student Transfer and
Inter-campus Articulation, affirms the position that a UH community College AA degree
fulfills the general education core requirements at baccalaureate campuses within the
system and that students holding such an AA degree are admissible to UH baccalaureate
institutions. In addition, articulation agreements have been signed between the
University of Hawai‘i and Brigham Young University at Hawai‘i, Chaminade University,
and Hawai‘i Pacific University. This memorandum accompanies Executive Policy E
5.209, which establishes Board of Regents policy guidelines for transfer within the UH
system that include “transfer of students, transfer and applicability of academic credit,
including acceptance of the University of Hawai‘i Associate in Arts degree as fulfilling
UH baccalaureate admissions and general education requirements, articulation of the
curriculum, and related policy issues” (UH OVPPP, 1998b, p.1). The final authority on a
variety of transfer and articulation matters lies with the receiving campuses. A 2004 UH
progress report on student transfer within the system submitted to the BOR notes that E
5.209 needs to be revised due to UH system reorganization and changes in the general
education requirements at UH Manoa and UH Hilo (UH Office of the Vice President for
Academic Affairs [OVPAA], 2004).

In addition to an articulated AA degree, system-wide transfer/course agreements exist in
Art, Mathematics, and Nursing.

HawCC clearly states its transfer of credit policies in its annually published catalog.
Under the section “Admissions and Registration, Transfer Student,” the catalog states:

       Courses will be processed for possible transfer credits only if applicable to
       the student’s current major and if the course was completed with a grade
       of “D” or better. When applicable, transfer credits may be counted
       towards the specific requirements of a program; otherwise, they will be


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              129
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

       counted as general electives. However, neither grade points nor grade
       point averages earned at other institutions are used in the computation of
       HawCC accumulative grade point average. (Policy Haw7.208) (HawCC,
       2005b, p.15)

Students wishing to transfer credits from institutions outside of the UH system
must arrange for their official transcripts to be sent to the Records Office directly
from institutions previously attended. For clarification purposes, students should
keep in their possession a course catalog or course description for all courses
taken. An official evaluation is processed after the student registers. It is the
student’s responsibility to question any courses deemed not transferable. When
the transferability of a course is uncertain, counselors complete an Articulation
Request Form and forward the request to the appropriate division chair for
evaluation. In consultation with discipline faculty, a determination is made.

When a course is identified as transfer-level, the course is assigned a course
equivalency or transfer code. The Articulation Form is returned to the counselor
to be included in the student’s academic records, and the college’s database of
articulated courses is updated for future determinations in accepting credits from
those institutions.

Vocational credentials (CA, AAS, and AS) are established in accordance with
CCCM #6004, Academic Credentials: Degrees and Certificates, dated November
4, 1996. While this CCCM provides the general requirements for vocational
credentials, each program articulates its course content through its own Program
Coordinating Council. These committees, comprised of discipline faculty from
each campus offering a similar program of study, meet regularly to discuss trends
and content and agree on the articulation of vocational courses.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard; however, a planning agenda is included to continue the
process of evaluating new courses for transferability.

While an articulated AA degree satisfies the general education core requirements within
the UH system, there may be campus- and program-specific requirements that may result
in a course being transferred but not applicable to any of the specific requirements.

The transfer/course agreements are easily accessible to students on the UH system’s web
site.

Some career and technical education programs met in summer 2005 through Career
Pathways and have developed a system-wide program to study articulation agreements.

The Educational Policy Committee, a subcommittee of the Academic Senate, has
developed guidelines for evaluating course proposals. Although the intent of this


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               130
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

guideline is not to evaluate transferability of courses, it provides a mechanism to
determine if the content of a course meets “college” level.

Planning Agenda:

The college shall continue to evaluate courses for transferability and update its database.


   A.6.b. When programs are eliminated or program requirements are
   significantly changed, the institution makes appropriate arrangements so that
   enrolled students may complete their education in a timely manner with a
   minimum of disruption.

Descriptive Summary:

The division chairs, faculty adviser, and student services staff work with students in
discontinued or modified programs to assure timely completion of their educational
goals. Students working toward a degree or certificate program who experience a change
in requirements can discuss options with the appropriate department faculty.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard.

The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the division chairs review historical and
student demand for programs. Under-enrolled programs are reviewed with instructors,
and recommendations for change or deletion may be made. When a program is evaluated
for major change or elimination, “The Chancellor can approve a program stop-out, a halt
to new admissions to the program, for no more than two years in conjunction with a
special study. Commitment to students already officially enrolled in such programs shall
be met but no new program admissions shall take place” ([UH BOR], 2002a, section
b.[2], p.5-2).

While the program is being evaluated, advisory councils are consulted as needed. If
changes are required, instructors are allowed a period of time to make the appropriate
curriculum and instructional modifications. If students are not able to complete their
course work in the two-year period, they would be able to complete work through
directed studies and course waiver substitutions or encouraged to change to a closely
related major. The division chair approves course waiver substitutions.

Recently modified programs are:
       Accounting
       Agriculture
       Architectural, Engineering and CAD Technologies (AEC)
       Office Administration and Technology
       Welding


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               131
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs



Planning Agenda:

None.


   A.6.c. The institution represents itself clearly, accurately, and consistently to
   prospective and current students, the public, and its personnel through its
   catalogs, statements, and publications, including those presented in electronic
   formats. It regularly reviews institutional policies, procedures, and publications
   to assure integrity in all representations about its mission, programs, and
   services.

Descriptive Summary;

The college represents itself to all stakeholders, internal and external, with integrity.
Institutional publications are appropriate, clear, and accessible to all stakeholders. The
college publishes a General Catalog annually and posts a copy of the catalog on its web
site. The catalog contains general information about Hawai‘i Community College and its
programs and services. Major college and academic policies and procedures that are
relevant to students and prospective students are contained in full or summarized.

The college also maintains a print Policies Manual containing various internal academic
and non-academic policies, practices, and procedures applicable to the college. Those
deemed to be of interest and importance to the general public, students, and prospective
students are published in the catalog, while policies, practices, procedures related to
college operations and functions are not. For example, the Academic Grievance (Haw
5.101) and Credit/No Credit (Haw 5.503) policies are published in the catalog (HawCC,
2005b, p.29 and p.23) but the college Web Page Guidelines policy (Haw 2.510) is not.
The college’s web site has some administrative policies but it has not been updated since
2003 (HawCC, n.d.e)

A copy of the Hawai‘i Community College Policy Manual is located in administrative
offices of the college as well as in the various departments and divisions.

Although the catalog is the primary means by which college-related information is
communicated to the general public, students, and prospective students, the college’s web
site also contains various information not in the catalog.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The annual college catalog is a major college
publication and the primary means by which college-related information is
communicated to the general public, students, and prospective students. The catalog is
reviewed and revised as necessary annually.



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              132
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

The office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs coordinates the annual review,
revision, and publication of the catalog. Every section of the catalog is sent to the
appropriate academic, support, and administrative unit for review by its respective faculty
and staff for completeness, accuracy, and any additions, changes, or corrections that need
to be made. The annual review helps to insure the accuracy and integrity of the
information contained in both the hard-copy catalog and electronic version posted on the
college’s web site. Nevertheless, small errors sometimes creep into the catalog and are
not immediately located for correction. An example mentioned in an earlier section is the
incorrect reference to HSER majors in the section on Digital Media Arts (HawCC,
2005b, p.46).

College policies, practices, procedures contained in the Hawai‘i Community College
Polices Manual that are published in the catalog are reviewed annually. Those that are
not published in the catalog do not appear to have a schedule of regular review; therefore,
the accuracy, applicability, and integrity of these policies, practices, and procedures may
not be ensured.

While the integrity of the electronic version of the catalog is maintained through an
annual review, the accuracy and integrity of the information related to the college
contained in sub-pages of the college’s web site may be questionable. Different units
and/or individuals are responsible for the content of web pages related to the respective
area or unit; therefore, there is no consistent means by which the content of every web
page is reviewed. Furthermore, there is also no process by which web pages are
examined or reviewed by bodies for accuracy as they are created. The college’s current
biennium budget request includes a Webmaster who could address the foregoing
challenges. The webmaster position is embedded in the broader college funding request
for a Computer and Media Services Department.

There is no formal or systematic means by which the college provides information on
student achievement to the public. Occasionally there will be a submission of an article
to the local newspaper about student achievements, but there is no Public
Relations/Marketing Office or person responsible for publicizing student achievement.
Any dissemination of information about student achievement is essentially left to faculty
or staff directly involved with the student or student organization. However, the college
is presenting a biennium budget request that calls for the establishment and staffing of a
Marketing Office.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will make an institutional commitment to review the policies, practices,
   and procedures contained in the Hawai‘i Community College Policies Manual. Those
   deemed to need attention for updating, revision, or deletion need to be assigned to the
   appropriate unit for follow-up.

2. To ensure institutional integrity, the college will establish a means to check the
   catalog more carefully for accuracy in its annual review.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               133
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

3. The college’s Web Page Guidelines policy needs to be updated or an individual
   assigned to maintain the college’s web site to ensure that all postings represent the
   college clearly, accurately, and consistently.
4. The college will make an organizational commitment to allocate resources to ensure
   that student achievements are communicated to the public in a timely manner.



A.7. In order to assure the academic integrity of the teaching-learning process, the
institution uses and makes public governing board adopted policies on academic
freedom and responsibility, student academic honesty, and specific institutional beliefs
or worldviews. These policies make clear the institution’s commitment to the free
pursuit and dissemination of knowledge.

Descriptive Summary:

Chapter 1, Section 1-10, of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents (BOR) Policies
states that:
It is the policy of the University to maintain and strengthen organized and systematic
involvement by faculty in academic decision making and policy development. Consistent
with this policy, the faculties of . . . the Community Colleges are authorized to develop
faculty organizations by which regular and organized faculty involvement may be
exercised in carrying out their collective responsibilities with their administrative
colleagues in matters of academic policy to make recommendations or provide advice on
academic policy for the particular campus. ([UH BOR], 2002a, p.1-7).

The policy protecting academic freedom is clearly stated in the 2003-2009 Agreement
between the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly and the Board of Regents of the
University of Hawai‘i (UHPA, 2003). According to the UHPA Agreement (Article IX,
A), “Faculty Members are entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing subjects of
expertise, in the conduct of research in their field of special competence, and in the
publication of the results of their research” (p.16). Sections B, C, and D in the agreement
outline procedures for dealing with alleged infringements, the Advisory Committee on
Academic Freedom, and procedures for dealing with alleged breaches of professional
ethics and/or conflicts of interest in research or scholarship.

CCCM #2600, The Statement on Professional Ethics ([UH CC], 1998) addresses the need
for faculty to state the truth as they see it, exercise critical self-discipline and judgment in
transmitting knowledge, and protect their academic freedom.

Hawai‘i Community College requires conformity to specific codes of conduct for its
faculty and instructional staff, but it does not strive to instill specific beliefs or world
views. In Spring 2005, after much dialogue between the Faculty Policy Committee and
college stakeholders, the college’s institutional commitment to integrity was made
evident by the Academic Senate’s adoption of a code of professional conduct (Hawai‘i
Community College Faculty and Instructional Staff Professional Standards and Ethics)

                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                134
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

for the college ([HawCC AS], n.d.). All faculty members and instructional staff are
expected to review this code of professional conduct (included in the Faculty & Staff
Handbook) when first employed at Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC Staff
Development, n.d.). The Chair of the Faculty Policy Committee will disseminate this
document at the beginning of each semester. Division chairs and/or unit heads will
encourage dialogue on an informal basis about the implications of the Code as issues may
arise. The 2003-2009 UHPA contract agreement, Article IX, D provides procedures for
dealing with alleged breach of professional ethics and/or conflicts of interest in research
or scholarship (UHPA, 2003).

The college’s institutional commitment to student academic honesty is evident by its
policy on student academic honesty, found in the Student Conduct Code (HAW 7.101—
Hawai‘i Community College Administrative Policies and Procedures Manual (HawCC,
n.d.e). A brief overview of the Student Conduct Code is published in the catalog in the
“General Policies” section (HawCC, 2005b, p.29-31). The catalog gives a synopsis of
information on academic honesty, cheating and plagiarism.

A Student Academic Grievance Committee is appointed each year under HAW5.101,
Hawai‘i Community College Student Academic Grievance Policy (HawCC, n.d.e).

Executive Policy E7.205, Administrative Policy and Procedures Governing Systemwide
Student Disciplinary Sanctions addresses sanctions for violations of UH campus student
conduct codes (UH Vice President for Student Affairs, 1999).

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. The policy protecting academic freedom is publicly
available in the faculty contract agreement. BOR-approved policies are public, but hard
to find, and they are not readily available through the HawCC web site.

The institutional integrity of the college requires conformity to specific codes of conduct
by faculty, staff, and students.

Students are informed about the Student Conduct Code through the catalog where a brief
overview is included. The subsection on “Student Conduct Regulations” advises students
to familiarize themselves with the Student Conduct Code, and copies are available at the
Office of the Dean of Student Services and Director of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i.
A copy is also available in division offices. Faculty have been encouraged to include a
section in their course syllabus on academic honesty and to make reference to the Student
Conduct Code (division chairs survey, item 10) (Onishi, 2005). Dialogue with Staff
Development Coordinator Joni Onishi confirms that new faculty are informed about the
Student Conduct Code at the new faculty orientation and it is referenced in the Faculty &
Staff Handbook.

What happens in the classroom is difficult to evaluate. If a faculty member presents
information with personal bias, students have the right to disagree and take action (via the


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               135
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs

grievance procedure or student evaluation) if desired. Dialogue with division chairs has
not shown this to be a problem at this college (Division Chairs survey, item #11) (Onishi,
2005). Current student evaluation forms do not specifically address this concern.

The Hawai‘i Community College Faculty and Instructional Staff Professional Standards
and Ethics document does not specifically address the need for faculty to distinguish
between personal conviction and professionally accepted views in a discipline.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college shall strengthen its institutional integrity by promoting dialogue through
   its Academic Senate on including a statement in the Hawai‘i Community College
   Faculty and Instructional Staff Professional Standards and Ethics document that
   addresses the need for faculty to distinguish between personal conviction and
   professionally accepted views in a discipline.

2. The Academic Senate will evaluate, plan, and improve the student evaluation form to
   include a question that evaluates the faculty’s ability to distinguish between personal
   conviction and professionally accepted views in a discipline.

3. The college shall make an institutional commitment to review and communicate
   system-wide policies that affect students, faculty, and/or staff.

4. The college shall make an institutional commitment to hire a webmaster to widely
   communicate on a timely basis pertinent information on the web, such as the Hawai‘i
   Community College Faculty and Instructional Staff Professional Standards and Ethics
   document, the Student Conduct Code, and the Faculty Handbook.



A.8. Institutions offering curricula in foreign locations to students other than U.S.
nationals operate in conformity with standards and applicable Commission policies.

      This section is not applicable to HawCC.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              136
Standard IIB: Student Support Services


B. Student Support Services
   The institution recruits and admits students with diverse backgrounds and goals
   who are able to benefit from its programs, consistent with its mission. Student
   support services address the identified needs of students and enhance a supportive
   learning environment. The entire student pathway through the institutional
   experience is characterized by a concern for student access, progress, learning, and
   success. The institution systematically assesses student support services using
   student learning outcomes, faculty and staff input, and other appropriate measures
   in order to improve the effectiveness of these services.

Descriptive Summary:

Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) complies with the UH community colleges’ open
door policy, the UH system Non-Discrimination, Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Policy (UH Office of the President, 1991), and the UH community colleges’ Civil Rights,
Nondiscrimination Policy (UH CC, 1997). HawCC admits individuals from diverse
backgrounds and with diverse goals that are at least 18 years old and/or have a high
school or general education diploma. The minimum age requirement does not apply to
summer session elementary and secondary school students in non-credit programs nor to
early admit students such as Running Start students taking courses for credit. Health
clearances (TB for all and MMR for those born after 1956 who did not attend a Hawai‘i
high school) are required for enrollment. F-1 Visa international students must have a
minimum TOEFL score of 450 (133 computer based) or successfully complete Level IV
of the non-credit Intensive English Program.

HawCC serves West Hawai‘i at the University Center in Kealakekua. The Center is one
of three centers established by the Board of Regents in June 1996. The Center provides
access for courses from multiple disciplines and serves as a receiving site for courses,
courses sequences, and identified BOR-authorized programs, which originate from
HawCC and/or the UH senior institutions. Students may also register for distance
education courses found at other community colleges in the UH system.

The student population includes residents and non-residents who are diverse ethnically,
culturally, socially, economically, in age, and in academic preparation. As a UH system
community college, HawCC complies with its non-discrimination policy which prohibits
discrimination on the basis of race, sex, age, religion, color, ancestry, marital status,
sexual orientation, national origin, disability, veteran’s status, or arrest and court record.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Differences in academic preparation are
identified through the COMPASS (COMputer-adaptive Placement Assessment and
Support System). Given the wide range of academic preparation among HawCC
students, the COMPASS is an important assessment tool which aids in placing students in
their program courses or initially in remedial/developmental courses to strengthen their
basic skills to better prepare them for the courses in their major. Most courses have


                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                137
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

reading and/or writing and at times math placement prerequisites. Some programs, such
as Nursing and some of the Applied Technical Education programs, have reading and/or
writing and math entry-level requirements. The open door policy is supported by an
institutional commitment to provide remedial and developmental courses to academically
under-prepared students, some of whom are ESL (English as a Second Language)
students, in order to enhance their ability to benefit from the courses and programs
offered by HawCC. The COMPASS also serves as an important tool to determine the
level of a student’s preparedness for courses transferable to a four-year degree. The
COMPASS scores are used by counselors and academic advisors in assisting students
with advising, course selection, and registration.

The COMPASS and placement levels have been the topics of dialogue on campus and
across UH community college campuses in a collaborative effort to determine relevance
and consistency.

The COMPASS is also used by the Financial Aid Office. It is an approved Ability-to-
Benefit test per federal Title IV regulations. Students who have not received either a high
school diploma or the General Education Diploma (GED) must take the COMPASS test
in a manner prescribed by federal Title IV regulations and receive scores at or above the
minimal score for each section of the COMPASS test to show Ability to Benefit for
federal Title IV eligibility.

The counselors assisting students with disabilities use documentation to determine
barriers that would impact the students’ ability to access information and fully participate
in the learning experience. Reasonable accommodations are then provided.

Except for a small number of unclassified students (approximately 2% annually of all
Hilo and West Hawai‘i HawCC students), the vast majority have a declared major either
in a Career and Technical Education program or in the Liberal Arts program, either
seeking employment upon graduation from HawCC or transferring to a four-year post-
secondary institution.

Both the Hilo and West Hawai‘i campuses offer the Running Start program for qualified
public high school juniors and seniors. The West Hawai‘i campus also offers the
federally-funded Educational Talent Search program to approximately 1000 public
school students in grades six through twelve who meet the financial need criteria and who
are potential first generation college applicants.

To facilitate the application and admission process, both the Hilo and West Hawai‘i
campuses use a New Student Checklist (HawCC, 2005e) to guide our diverse student
population through the application/admission process.

Below is a chart showing numbers gathered from the various units in Student Services
(Hilo) for Fall 2004 and Spring 2005.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               138
Standard IIB: Student Support Services


                                                                           FALL 2004   SPRING 2005
Number of applications processed                                              2192         1585
Number of lacked applications                                                  121           65
Number of students accepted                                                   2071         1520
Number of students enrolled includes complete withdrawal                      2537         2454
Number of new, transfer, returning students enrolled, all SPEA                1287          768
Number of high school students admitted early                                   50           55
Number of transfer transcripts processed                                       437          422
Number of students conferred at least one certificate or degree,                88          240
per program
Number of student contacts made by counselors*                                1114         1187
Number of students who used the Career Center services                         200          215
Number of students who used the Job Referral services                           45           54
Number of students with a disability served                                    121          132
Number of CTE students served by the counselor/case-manager                    356          328
Number of eligible applicants according to federal FISAP                      1299         1299
reporting regulations (annual report FY04)
Number of students receiving federal funds (annual report                      841         841
FY04)
Number of students in student government, registered student                   155         230
organizations*
* estimates

The students’ institutional experience from application and matriculation through
retention and transition to employment and/or further education is characterized by a
concern for student access, progress, learning, and success. Student support services
needs to use student learning outcomes, faculty and staff input, and other appropriate
measures in order to improve the effectiveness of these services. The following list has
been proposed by the counselors as a starting point for this dialogue:

   1) Admission
      • Completes application to the college and is admitted
      • Uses orientation, placement, and career options information to decide on
         major and select appropriate courses
      • Begins to develop an educational plan to recognize strengths, interests, values,
         priorities, responsibilities, and barriers consistent with the plan
      • Recognizes needs and seeks assistance for transferring in, financial needs,
         childcare, and/or special accommodations
   2) Retention
      • Identifies barriers to retention and progress and seeks educational, career,
         financial, personal, and/or relationship counseling
      • Maintains at least a 2.0 grade-point average (GPA) to be in good academic
         standing and seeks educational counseling when the GPA falls below 2.0
      • Participates with instructors and fellow students in group activities which
         contribute to the class, college, and/or community


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              139
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

   3) Transition
      • Monitors academic progress and applies for graduation as program
          requirements are being completed
      • Uses decision-making skills to develop plans for further education
      • Uses skills, knowledge, and preferences to successfully seek employment
      • When stopping out, knows what to do to return
   4) The following are proposed student learning outcomes once the student has left
      the college:
      • Defines barriers and problems and uses skills, knowledge, and external
          resources to successfully minimize or solve them
      • Has values, goals, and priorities to use in decision-making
      • Uses knowledge and skills to be gainfully and meaningfully employed and
          contributes to the family and community
      • Engages in personal and professional development and critical thinking to
          meet the challenges of a complex and ever-changing world

Planning Agenda:

During 2006-2007, the Student Services Unit under the leadership of the Dean of Student
Services will identify student learning outcomes and achievements as the student enters
the college, is enrolled, and prepares to exit. They will discuss ways to assess these
student learning outcomes.


B.1. The institution assures the quality of student support services and demonstrates
that these services, regardless of location or means of delivery, support student
learning and enhance achievement of the mission of the institution.

Descriptive Summary:

The student support services units in Hilo under the Office of Student Services include
Admissions and Registration, Records and Data Management, Counseling (educational,
career, personal, and case-management), Disability-Related Support, Financial Aid,
Student Life, and Job Referral.

The West Hawai‘i Center (UHCWH) also provides student support services through its
Student Services Center. However, UHCWH has no Career Center. If the students
require in-depth access to a Career Center, it is essential for them to utilize the Career
Center in Hilo. Some career assessment and planning resources are available online, but
it is recommended that the interpretation of the information be done by the career
counselor at the Hilo campus. UHCWH counselors provide general information and
referrals to the career counselor in Hilo. In response to requests, the career counselor in
Hilo has gone to West Hawai‘i to provide career counseling services. During 2004-2005
the Job Referral Counselor based in Hilo provided support services through class
presentations, particularly to students in the career and technical programs. The Student
Services Specialist in West Hawai‘i provides financial aid assistance and coordinates

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               140
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

with system Financial Aid Offices to deliver financial aid services as appropriate.
Records and data management are managed by the Registrar on the Hilo Campus.

All of these services support student learning and enhance achievement of the college
mission. In addition to the proposed student learning outcomes listed in the previous
section, various units under the Office of Student Services have engaged in dialogue to
develop mission statements, which support the overall HawCC Mission Statement.

Student Services Mission Statements
   Hawai‘i Community College Office of Student Services Mission Statement: To
   provide an accessible and responsive learner environment that facilitates the
   achievement of educational, professional, and personal goals by our students and
   other members of our communities in an atmosphere that embraces academic
   excellence, diversity, and innovation.

   Hawai‘i Community College Office of Admissions and Registration Mission
   Statement: To provide accessibility to educational opportunities at Hawai‘i
   Community College through effective, efficient, consistent, and inclusive
   admissions and registration policies and procedures.

   Hawai‘i Community College Records and Data Management Office Mission
   Statement: Create a student-centered atmosphere providing academic and
   administrative support to students, faculty, staff and UH System.

   Hawai‘i Community College Counseling Center Mission Statement: Through
   encouragement and with respect and integrity, counselors inform and empower a
   diverse group of students to reach their educational goals and to enrich their
   communities.

   Hawai‘i Community College Career Center Mission Statement: The mission of the
   HawCC Career Center is to assist and support students and prospective students in
   clarifying and planning purposeful career, employment and educational goals through
   the use of informational resources and career counseling.

   For students with a disability: Hawai‘i Community College Ha`awi Kokua
   Program - Mission Statement: The Ha`awi Kokua Program mission is to promote an
   equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities, to gain the maximum benefit from
   their educational/learning experience by participating fully in their regular courses
   and activities offered at Hawai‘i Community College.

   Hawai‘i Community College Financial Aid Office Mission Statement: To assist
   current and prospective Hawai‘i Community College students in funding their
   educational goals through quality customer service and efficient, timely, and accurate
   processing in accordance with federal, state, and institutional regulations, guidelines,
   policies, and procedures.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               141
Standard IIB: Student Support Services


Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard.

Assuring Quality and Supporting Student Learning
HawCC has used external assessment to determine the quality of its student support
services. The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) found the
following HawCC successes and challenges related to student services for 2002 (HawCC,
n.d.a) and 2004 (HawCC, n.d.b).

Successes (2002)/Above the Mean (2004)                                      2002   2004
Developing clearer career goals                                              X
Gaining information about career opportunities                               X
Importance of student organizations                                                 X
Had serious conversations with students of a different race or               X      X
ethnicity other than your own
Had serious conversations with students who differ from you in               X      X
terms of their religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal
values
Encouraging contact among students from different economic,                  X      X
social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds
Helping you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work,              X      X
family etc.)
Providing the support you need to thrive socially                            X      X
Preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, rehearsing, doing                  X
homework, or other activities related to your program)
Relationships with other students                                            X      X
Relationships with instructors                                               X
Acquiring a broad general education                                                 X
Acquiring job or work-related knowledge and skills                                  X
Thinking critically and analytically                                         X      X
Working effectively with others                                              X      X
Voting in local, state, or national elections                                X
Learning effectively on your own                                             X      X
Understanding yourself                                                       X      X
Understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds                  X      X
Developing a personal code of values and ethics                              X      X
Contributing to the welfare of your community                                X      X
Lack of finances                                                                    X
Caring for dependents                                                               X
Working full-time                                                                   X




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               142
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

When compared with similar-sized colleges, the 2004 CCSSE mean for HawCC was
significantly higher at the .001 level in the following areas:
    • Encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial
        or ethnic backgrounds
    • Helping you cope with non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.)
    • Providing the support you need to thrive socially

Challenges – Areas for Improvement (2002)/Below the Mean                              2002       2004
(2004)
Providing the financial support you need to afford your education                      X              X
Financial aid advising                                                                 X
Frequency: Financial aid advising                                                                     X
Frequency: Transfer credit assistance                                                                 X
Satisfaction: Financial aid advising                                                                  X
Satisfaction: Transfer credit assistance                                                              X

When compared with similar-sized colleges, the 2004 CCSSE mean for HawCC was
significantly lower at the .001 level in the following area:
    • Providing the financial support you need to afford your education

As a result of student concerns and CCSSE reports, the Dean of Student Services
engaged an instructional faculty member and counselors to offer a series of workshops to
the Financial Aid Office staff to improve services to students needing financial
assistance. He has also instructed the Registrar to give priority to the processing of
transfer transcripts.

To assist students with the FAFSA application, Perkins-funded student assistants trained
by the Financial Aid director assist peers in the Counseling and Support Services Center.
Very recently, it was decided that these peer assistants will be working in the Financial
Aid Office instead of in the Counseling and Support Services Center.

The institution assures the quality of its student support services by also using internally
created assessment measures. During the fall of 2002 the Office of Student Services
conducted a Continuing Students’ Survey to assess student satisfaction. The ratings are
given below in terms of the percentage of responses.

                                                     Excel-   Good    Satis-   Fair    Poor   Never   Blank
                                                      lent           factory                  Used
Early Registration (Drop Off)                         57      32      10        1       0      0          0
Registration (Class Schedule Pick Up)                 49      31      13        0       1      6          1
Registration (In Person)                              38      26      15        7       0     13          1
Add/Drop Procedure                                    33      24      14         6       0    24          0
Withdrawal Procedure                                  26      24      15        3       0     32          0
Overall Services of Admissions & Records              53      29       8        6       3      0          1
Financial Aid Peer Advising                           11      13      17         7      19    32          1
Financial Aid Application Processing                  11      15      15        15      24    18          1


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               143
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

                                                     Excel-   Good    Satis-   Fair   Poor   Never   Blank
                                                      lent           factory                 Used
Financial Aid Check Distribution                      14      11      18         7    25     24       1
Overall Services of Financial Aid Office              13      14      17        15    22     18       1
Counseling/Advising                                   38      29      14        4     0      11       4
Counseling Workshop                                   17      15      15        7     0      40       6
Career Center Services                                22      18       8        6     0      40       6
Change of Major                                       17      17      13         6    1      40       7
Transcript Evaluation                                 19      13      15        8     3      36       6
Student Employment Service                            18      13      11        4     6      44       4
Orientation                                           29      22      17        3     1      19       7
Disability Services                                   22      8       10        3     0      51       6
Overall Services of Counseling & Support              26      32      17        10    1       7       6
Services Office
Kukui News Newsletter                                 28      29      22        4      3      8       6

The Student Orientation Evaluation (HawCC, 2004b) is also administered as part of
SOAR (Student Orientation Advising and Registration) for new, transferring, and
returning students who have stopped out for three or more years. Students receive a
SOAR packet (HawCC, n.d.f), which contains an evaluation. The feedback is used to
improve the next semester’s SOAR. The Fall 2004 Student Orientation Evaluation
results (HawCC, 2004a) indicated that 89 percent of new, returning and transfer students
were “new.” A wealth of information is given by the presenters and in the orientation
packets to inform first-time college students about college and about HawCC (HawCC, .
The most problematic issue was financial aid. The orientation informs students about the
services provided by the Financial Aid Office and by peer assistants trained to assist with
completing the FAFSA online. Students may also do an online orientation, but to date
there is no evaluation of this orientation.

In addition, feedback from academic advisors, counselors, and other Student Services
staff involved with SOAR is solicited during debriefing and used for evaluation,
planning, and improvement.

Individual counselors also receive a Counselor Evaluation (HawCC, 2003) from students
who come for an advising/counseling session. This form assesses the reason(s) for the
student’s seeing a counselor and is a means of determining the student’s needs at the
time, such as General Information, Pick or Change Major, Course Selection, Registration,
Financial Aid, Scholarships, College Success Strategies, Career Counseling, Disability
Counseling, Personal Counseling, and Job Preparation. The counselor feedback is used
by individual counselors to improve their skills and service to our students and is also
included in dossiers for contract renewal, tenure, and promotion. Counselors are rated on
variables such as understanding the student’s needs, rapport with student, providing
helpful information, and referring to other services when needed. Students are also asked
to check the reason(s) for their visit to see a counselor.

Course evaluations are also administered by counselors who teach college success
courses (i.e., LSK 70, LSK 102, UNIV 101). For example, LSK 102 results for

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               144
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

Spring 2004 and 2005 are included (HawCC, 2004c). This important student feedback is
used to evaluate course content and delivery and plan for improvement when it is next
taught. Course evaluations are also included in the counselor’s dossier for contract
renewal, tenure, and promotion. In West Hawai‘i UNIV 101 has been adapted as both an
internet course and a hybrid course (internet delivery with some face-to-face interaction).

The Career Center uses the Career Center Feedback Form (HawCC, 2005c) to evaluate
its services. On a scale of 1 to 10, an average of 8.9 was reported for January 2004
through May 2005, reflecting a very high level of helpfulness to the students using the
Career Center. During Fall 2006, this form was revised to reflect student learning
outcomes (HawCC, 2006a).

To support student learning in the academic area, the Office of Records and Data
Management generates reports for faculty, staff, and administration. These reports are
used as bases for dialogue and to provide/improve student services and instructional
services. At-risk student lists obtained from the Office of Records and Data Management
are used by counselors to do follow-up educational counseling with these students who
are on academic warning, probation, or continued probation, or who have been
readmitted following academic dismissal.

Also to support student learning in the academic area, counselors assist new students in
learning to use technology to register and access grades, e-mail, college announcements,
and other information.

Except for financial aid services and transfer transcript evaluation services, student
satisfaction with HawCC student services is generally better than satisfactory. HawCC
has assessed the quality of various components of its student services. However, overall
assessment of the quality of student services has not been routinely done as part of its
overall operation. As part of this self-study, HawCC has prepared and is administering a
Student Survey for Accreditation (HawCC, n.d.g). The results of that survey are not
available as of this writing.

College-wide Dialogue
On March 4, 2005 the HawCC Chancellor launched “Paddling Our Own Canoe,” an all-
day college-wide discussion on student learning outcomes, assessment, and program
review. This brought the college, including West Hawai‘i faculty and staff, to a fuller
understanding of the self-study as an on-going process of understanding student needs,
identifying SLOs, assessing and reviewing college courses and programs, and continually
improving programs and services.

A year later on March 3, 2006, HawCC held a “Learning Day” (a non-instructional day
for students) for all administrators, faculty, and staff from both East and West Hawai‘i to
revisit the college mission and incorporate a vision statement along with imperatives.
The afternoon was spent sharing the draft of planning agendas for each of the standards
for the self-study and soliciting college-wide input for the next draft of the self-study
report. This was a college-wide event and opportunity for dialogue. Most of the


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               145
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

participants found the day well spent and important to enhancing student learning and
fostering institutional improvement.

Dialogue also occurs when the administration presents a draft biennium budget to the
College Council and the Academic Senate to request resources to support student
learning outcomes in instruction and student achievement and learning outcomes in
student services. This provides an opportunity for the campus leadership (administrative,
faculty and staff) to continue a dialogue, which began with the extensive evaluation of
program review documents that provide the source authority for data-driven budget
requests.

The College Council has college-wide representation and serves as an organizational unit
for dialogue with the administration in supporting student learning outcomes, assessment,
program reviews, and institutional self-study. The Academic Senate is the organization
that enables faculty from instruction and from student services to engage in dialogue
related to curriculum review, educational policy, and faculty policy.

There have been other occasions for dialogue with representatives from student services
and instruction. These include preparing for and debriefing after SOAR (Student
Orientation Advising, and Registration), preparing for Perkins grant proposals, Building
Better Bridges Conferences (HawCC counselors and department heads and Hawai‘i
Island high school counselors), and preparing the GEAR UP proposal.

Although dialogue among representatives from the various units of the college to discuss
student and college needs has led to better delivery of educational programs and student
services, there have been only two truly college-wide discussions about student learning
outcomes, student access, progress, learning, and success since the submission of the last
self-study. These two events occurred in a year’s span under the leadership of new
administrators and with the guidance of ACCJC. More truly college-wide dialogue is
expected to occur as HawCC makes an institutional commitment to this strategy of
identifying, assuring, and assessing student learning outcomes.

Student Services Personnel
Every unit in Student Services has qualified personnel to serve our students (HawCC,
2005b). However, some personnel (the counselor for students with a disability, APT and
clerk in the Financial Aid Office, the job referral counselor, and the counselors/case-
managers for CTE programs) are on federal funds or are temporary hires even though the
services they provide are not temporary but essential and on-going. The college currently
lacks state funds to fully support positions that provide services mandated by federal law
(ADA-504) to ensure access of persons with disabilities. In order to serve Liberal Arts
students, the state funds 20 per cent of the salary for the counselor who assists students
with disabilities and partially funds interpreters for hearing impaired students. Thus
HawCC, a state institution, has relied on federal funds to comply with federal laws.
However, the Dean of Student Services submitted a request in the current Supplemental
Budget for a counselor who assists students with a disability. The Legislature has funded
this request and the position is in the process of being filled. The 2007-2009 Biennium


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               146
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

Budget includes the request to convert temporary positions to state-funded positions and
to add much-needed positions: three financial aid specialists, a half-time admissions
specialist, one student life coordinator, one transcript evaluator, three clerk typists, one
and a half data management positions, one recruitment specialist, one marketing
specialist, and four academic advisors.

Each year 300 to 400 students are served by the Career Center with the help of college
work study students. However, these funds support only 20 to 25 hours per week of
student employee assistance. The career counselor not only assists students with career
counseling and job search assistance, but also assists at-risk students with success
strategies and new students with course registration. The career counselor also serves on
numerous college committees. When student assistants are not on duty and the career
counselor is assisting students or serving on committees, walk-ins do not receive
assistance in the career center. If the career center had a permanent professional
assistant, even on a half-time basis, more students would be served.

Every semester HawCC has enrolled an average of 100 international students, about 40
percent F-1 visa students and 60 percent visa exempt. Until Fall 2005 one counselor
served these students in addition to assisting Liberal Arts majors, Running Start students,
and Beacon students. Now the other counselors also serve this population depending on
their major. The direct assistance given these students has been primarily educational,
career, and personal counseling. No direct assistance is provided regarding housing,
banking, shopping, transportation, or cross-cultural orientation. In addition to
international students in credit programs, there are approximately 30 each semester in
non-credit courses, primarily in the Intensive English Program (28) and in the
Fundamentals of Reading, Writing, and Math Program (2) coordinated and offered by the
Office of Continuing Education and Training. Of the IEP students, approximately 20
percent are new, as returning students usually advance to the next level. These non-credit
students do not have their own student services personnel and in serious cases are
referred to the college counselors. The services of college counselors rendered to these
non-credit students have come under discussion. The relationship between OCET and
the rest of HawCC is an organizational issue that needs to be clarified to determine how
OCET students will be provided student services.

For student life activities, one of the counselors in Hilo is using half of her time to serve
as an advisor for student government and student activities. In West Hawai‘i no
additional remuneration is provided for faculty or staff who serves as student
government/activities advisor. The 2007-2009 biennium budget addresses this need in
Hilo.




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                147
Standard IIB: Student Support Services


Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the college shall do the
following:

   1. Through program reviews and dialogue among instructional and counseling
      faculty facilitated by the Dean of Student Services and the Vice Chancellor for
      Academic Affairs during 2005-2007, HawCC is making an institutional
      commitment to address the basic skills needs of academically under-prepared
      students and ESL students.

   2. Under the leadership of the Chancellor, HawCC plans to promote on-going
      college-wide dialogue about student access, progress, learning, and success during
      2006-2011.

   3. During 2006-2007 the relationship between the Office of Continuing Education
      and Training and the rest of HawCC will be explored by administrators with input
      from faculty and staff, and a plan will be developed to ensure that the student
      services needs of non-credit students enrolled through OCET will be met.

   4. Under the leadership of the Dean of Student Services and as part of evaluation,
      planning, and improvement, a mechanism to assess the quality of student services
      and their contribution to student learning outcomes will be developed during
      2006-2008. The following are possible variables to include in the assessment:
      student needs, student demand/interest, efficiency of response, student use of
      services offered, and student satisfaction with services. A related goal is to
      maintain the integrity and quality of student data.

   5. To respond to the expected increase in enrollment at the UH Center at West
      Hawai‘i and to the demands for student support services, the Director will provide
      leadership in developing and implementing plans for online orientation, on-site
      career support services, and a Financial Aid Office during 2006-2011.

   6. During 2006-2007 student leaders, the temporary Student Life Coordinator, the
      Dean of Student Services, and the Chancellor will advocate for a state-funded
      Student Life Coordinator in Hilo and also in West Hawai‘i as the enrollment
      warrants.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              148
Standard IIB: Student Support Services



B.2. The institution provides a catalog for its constituencies with precise, accurate, and
current information concerning the following:
       a. General Information
           • Official Name, Address(es), Telephone Number(s), and Web Site
               Address of the Institution
           • Educational Mission
           • Course, Program, and Degree Offerings
           • Academic Calendar and Program Length
           • Available Student Financial Aid
           • Available Learning Resources
           • Names and Degrees of Administrators and Faculty
           • Names of Governing Board Members
       b. Requirements
           • Admissions
           • Student Fees and Other Financial Obligations
           • Degree, Certificates, Graduation and Transfer
       c. Major Policies Affecting Students
           • Academic Regulations, including Academic Honesty
           • Nondiscrimination
           • Acceptance of Transfer Credits
           • Grievance and Complaint Procedures
           • Sexual Harassment
           • Refund of Fees
       d. Locations or Publications Where Other Policies May be Found

Descriptive Summary:

After the last self-study, information regarding transferring to and from HawCC and
processing the evaluation of transfer credits has been included in the HawCC General
Catalog (HawCC, 2005a). All other items listed above are included in the current catalog
except for the Academic Freedom Statement. This is found in the 2003-2009 Agreement
between the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly and the Board of Regents of
the University of Hawai‘i (UHPA), which students would not normally access (UHPA,
2003).

The HawCC catalog is updated and published annually. During the spring semester,
sections are sent from the staff member responsible for the catalog to pertinent
individuals. After modifications have been made, the next academic year’s catalog is
usually ready for distribution in July.

The catalog is given free of charge to new, returning, and transferring students who
complete an online or on-campus orientation and who come in for advising and
registration. Copies are also sold at the Bookstore to other students and the general
public. The catalog is also available online some time after the fall semester begins.

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               149
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

The complete Academic Grievance Policy (Haw 5.101) (HawCC Office of the Provost
[OP], 1997) and the Student Conduct Regulations (Haw 7.101) (HawCC OP, 1996) are
not included in the catalog. The catalog states that copies of the former are available in
the offices of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the Dean of Student Services,
and Director of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i. The catalog also states that copies of the
latter are available in the offices of the Dean of Student Services and Director of the UH
Center at West Hawai‘i.

The catalog includes a section on illicit drugs and alcohol. The catalog states that copies
of the entire policies are available in the Office of the Dean of Student Services. The UH
system’s Official Notice to Faculty, Staff and Students Regarding Substance Abuse in
University Campus Communities and Worksites (UH OP, 2005) is also distributed in
each SOAR packet. The catalog also includes a section on the UH system smoking
policy and states that detailed information is available on the Internet.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard that speaks to the issue of institutional integrity.
Although the HawCC catalog is fairly well organized with a table of contents and index
to facilitate the location of information, some errors need to be corrected. Having each
section checked annually by the affiliated individuals for updates has not resulted in
editing that ensures accuracy of information. Some of these errors (e.g., the section on
Digital Media Arts which refers to HSER majors) (HawCC, 2005a, p.46) seem to have
resulted from the copying of passages from a program with similar requirements without
making the appropriate changes.

The catalog is only part of the information which is online at the HawCC website, which
also is in need of serious attention. Its appearance and content reveal the lack of a
HawCC webmaster. Many different individuals of varying degrees of expertise in web
design have contributed to the HawCC web site. Without them HawCC would probably
not have a website. The college’s current biennium budget request includes a Webmaster
who could address the foregoing challenges. The webmaster position is embedded in the
broader college funding request for a Computer and Media Services Department.

Students need to have easier access to the Academic Grievance Policy and the Student
Conduct Regulations in their entirety.

Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the college shall do the
following:

   1. To reflect institutional integrity and to provide students with current and accurate
      information, each section of the college catalog will have a knowledgeable person
      responsible for the accuracy of the information. An editor, possibly a faculty



                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                150
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

       member on reassigned time, will edit the catalog for clarity of language and
       consistency of format beginning Fall 2007.

   2. The administration will allocate resources to upgrade and maintain the college
      website as a centralized data source sometime during 2006-2008.

   3. A reviewer of the catalog will include a statement on Academic Freedom
      beginning with the 2006-2007 catalog.

   4. A webmaster or someone knowledgeable will create a link on the college website
      to the Academic Grievance Policy and Student Conduct Code during 2006-2007.


B.3. The institution researches and identifies the learning support needs of its student
population and provides appropriate services and programs to address those needs.

Descriptive Summary:

In the early 1990’s new students were asked to complete the New Student Questionnaire.
The responses were compiled by the Office of the Chancellor for the Community
Colleges, and a report was eventually sent back to HawCC. The most needed assistance
reported by students was financial aid. HawCC has the highest percentage of students
receiving financial aid among the UH system campuses. When the institutional
researcher left the Chancellor’s Office, the New Student Questionnaire was discontinued.

Currently there is no instrument in place to determine the support needs of HawCC
students. However, HawCC has used the CCSSE in 2002 and 2004 and in 2006 is using
it again. It is a very helpful national survey that compares HawCC results with other
institutions and with like-size institutions in terms of activities in which students engage
and their level of satisfaction. Besides HOW SATISFIED, the survey items under the
Student Services category related to Standard II B also report HOW OFTEN and HOW
IMPORTANT the following services are: academic advising/planning, career
counseling, financial aid advising, student organizations, transfer credit assistance, and
services to students with disabilities.

Various student services personnel have developed some tools for assessing student
needs. The Applied Technical Education counselor/case-manager developed an Initial
Student Survey (HawCC, n.d.d) to determine ATE students’ needs as well as barriers to
success. She also uses the COMPASS scores to determine academic skill levels and
counsels students accordingly.

The Career Center coordinator/counselor uses the Career Center Intake Form to
determine which types of services are needed by the student. This form was revised
using a student learning outcomes format during Fall 2005 (HawCC, 2005d).




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               151
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

The counselor for the Ha`awi Kokua Program for students with disabilities has also
developed a needs assessment instrument to quickly determine the student’s disability
and the accommodations needed (HawCC Ha‘awi Kokua Program, n.d.).

To determine the students’ counseling needs, they are asked the reason(s) for seeing a
counselor on the Counselor Evaluation Form (HawCC, 2003).

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Although there have been pockets of
assessments ascertaining students’ student services needs, HawCC as an institution has
not recently used a comprehensive student-wide assessment to ascertain these needs.

Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the College under the
leadership of the Dean of Student Services, the student services faculty and staff will
develop or identify during 2006-2007 an assessment tool to ascertain student needs and
student learning outcomes for evaluation, planning, and improvement of student services.


   B.3.a. The institution assures equitable access to all of its students by providing
   appropriate, comprehensive, and reliable services to students regardless of
   service location or delivery method.

Descriptive Summary:

HawCC provides instruction and student services in Hilo, in West Hawai‘i, at satellite
locations (i.e., Waimea, Ka`u, Honoka`a), and to other UH system campuses through
distance learning.

Students can access student services at the Hilo campus and to a lesser extent at
UHCWH. Outreach programs at satellite locations assist students with registration.

HawCC does not have an Office of Distance Education and Services. However, the
2007-2009 Biennium Budget request calls for the funding of a faculty position to act as
the Distance Education coordinator as part of a Computing and Media Support Services
Department. In addition, the Academic Senate has recently authorized the formation of
an ad hoc Committee on Distance Education to advise the administration on academic,
student support and student services issues related to distance learning.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Despite the lack of an institutional and
systematic assessment of student needs for student services, regardless of location, all
student services units respond to students and prospective students island-wide and


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               152
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

world-wide by e-mail, telephone, fax, and mail. Outreach at high schools and community
sites have included information sessions, orientation sessions, and registration sessions.
Transition packets are sent to each high school to assist in accommodating any barriers
for new college students with disabilities. Some career assessment and information tools
are also available online. During Fall 2005, the counselors engaged in dialogue to
review, test their old Student Contact Log and revise it into one that included specific
student needs and included the approximate time each session took in quarters of an hour
(HawCC, n.d.c.).

Except for feedback from the Orientation Evaluation, which includes on-line orientation
and orientation offered at the high schools, there has been no systematic evaluation of on-
line services, which also include on-line check class availability, registration, access to
term-end grades, access to transcript information, services at the Career Center (CISS:
Career Interest and Skill Survey, MBTI Career Report, on-line version of Career Kokua),
and the college catalog. Neither has there been any systematic evaluation of services at
off-site locations.

Services provided on the main campus by the counselor/case-manager working with
select ATE programs are evaluated through the counselor evaluation. Services offered at
UHCWH are evaluated through its own program review.

Students from HawCC and other sister campuses who want to take on-line courses call or
e-mail HawCC counselors when they have questions, but no resources are specifically
designated for student services for students taking distance education courses.

Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the College shall do
the following:

   1. Assessment of student needs and student learning outcomes for evaluation,
      planning, and improvement will include students at satellite sites and students
      taking distance learning courses beginning sometime during 2006-2008.
      Electronic collection of data will hopefully begin by 2010.

   2. For their Unit Review, the counselors will continue their dialogue about their
      assessment tools during 2005-2006 and consider revising or replacing them to
      better assess student needs during admission, retention, and transition as they
      relate to student learning outcomes.

   3. During 2006-2007 the UH Center at West Hawai‘i will use the NCHEMS
      (National Center for Higher Education Management System) entering and
      continuing student survey and survey questions unique to this location to identify
      learning support needs of students.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               153
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

   4. HawCC has made an institutional commitment to establish an ad hoc Committee
      on Distance Education, which will meet during 2006-2007, solicit college-wide
      input, report its findings, and make its recommendation to the administration
      regarding services and accompanying resources needed to support distance
      learning and online services.

   5. During 2006-2007 under the leadership of the Dean of Student Services, HawCC
      students, staff, faculty, and administrators will continue to explore Strategic
      Enrollment Management as an all-campus approach to determine student learning
      outcomes, student needs, and budgetary appropriations.


   B.3.b. The institution provides an environment that encourages personal and
   civic responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development
   for all of its students.

Descriptive Summary:

HawCC provides its students with many opportunities that promote personal and civic
responsibility as well as intellectual and personal development. The 2002 and 2004
CCSSE results reported earlier indicate that HawCC has provided an environment for
personal, intellectual, academic, and civic development. However, these reports do not
address aesthetic development. In fact, art, literature, and some of the vocational courses
emphasize the aesthetic aspects of the processes and products in these courses.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. An underlying tenet of the mission of the
community college is the development of the whole person. General education courses
provide opportunities for intellectual development, including communication and critical
thinking skills. Courses in Art, English, Dance, Hawaiian Studies, and various CTE
programs (Agriculture, Architectural/Engineering/CAD Technologies, Auto Body Repair
and Painting, Carpentry, Early Childhood Education, and Food Service) provide
opportunities for creativity and aesthetic development.

Career and Technical Education programs emphasize personal development and soft
skills in addition to the trade knowledge and skills. Counseling services contribute to
personal and educational/career development. Some Student Services faculty members
attended a workshop on universal design teaching, which emphasized a holistic approach
to teaching and the student.

The Ha`awi Kokua Program offers a Technology Lab with Assistive Technology to
provide students with disabilities tools to accommodate their disability-related limitations
and provide a distraction-free environment and support which are conducive to learning.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               154
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

Through student government, student life activities, and service learning activities,
students are provided opportunities to develop personal and civic responsibility. Phi
Theta Kappa provides its honor society members the opportunity for scholarly dialogue
on its annual honors topic. Certain courses, such as AJ 101, HSER 110, HWST 260, and
SOC 100, also promote personal and civic responsibility. Ola’a Community Center
which was started in 2003 as a faculty-student project in a SOC 265: Community
Development class has received legislative recognition from both the State House of
Representatives and Senate for its contributions to the community and its role in
stemming an epidemic drug problem on the Big Island. Former and present HawCC
students continue to work there as staff members running an After-School and summer
program for Middle School students.
Each of the instructional units and the college as a whole have been engaged in dialogue
focused on student learning outcomes related to the development of the whole person.

Despite not having a designated staff member paid to assist with student life activities
until recently, and at that only half-time and on a temporary basis, development of
student leadership and organizational skills has been addressed through student
government and student clubs. A designated state-funded student life coordinator
position is needed. In the Supplemental Budget, the Legislature recently funded three
counselor/faculty positions and one has been designated for the Student Life Coordinator.
This position is in the process of being filled.

Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the College shall do
the following:

   1. During 2006-2007 under the leadership of the College Council, HawCC will
      develop a mechanism to better publicize student involvement and achievement in
      civic, intellectual, aesthetic, and personal endeavors via campus e-mail, the
      college newsletter, the local paper, and local radio stations.

   2. During 2006-2011 the Staff Development Committee will provide opportunities
      for instructors to learn more about best pedagogical practices in creating a good
      learning environment, which promotes the development of the whole person.

   3. The college will conduct a dialogue to articulate its general education philosophy
      in support of its responsibility as a purveyor of the aesthetic development of all of
      its students.

   4. The administration will support efforts to create a state-funded Student Life
      Coordinator’s position during 2006-2009.

   5. Those who receive reports such as the CCSSE, as part of the on-going review of
      programs and the institution during 2006-2010, will continue what has recently



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              155
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

       been established in seeing that such reports are widely accessible throughout the
       college by continuing to post such reports on the HawCC Assessment website.


   B.3.c. The institution designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling and/or
   academic advising programs to support student development and success and
   prepares faculty and other personnel responsible for the advising function.

Descriptive Summary:

HawCC counselors provide educational counseling, career and job referral counseling,
and personal counseling. The institution has distinguished between educational
counseling and academic advising.

Educational counseling includes academic advising. Educational counseling includes
assisting students with determining their major during the application process; selecting
courses based on COMPASS scores, previous college work, and degree/certificate
requirements; scheduling the courses during the semester considering possible family
and/or employment responsibilities; developing an educational plan for subsequent
semesters; possibly changing the major; possibly transferring to another two-year
institution; possibly transferring to a four-year institution; and possibly transitioning to
employment. All of these processes include identification of values and goals; awareness
of strengths, skills, and interests; awareness of priorities; and problem-solving and
decision-making. In addition, the counselor for students with disabilities assists with
classroom accommodations and adaptive equipment in the Technology Lab.

Academic advising is primarily concerned with assisting the students in selecting the
courses needed to complete the requirements of their program degree/certificate.
Instructional faculty members assist with academic advising primarily during regular
registration.

All the counselors are trained in educational counseling and academic advising. All
counselors have a master’s degree. Two have a doctoral degree. The counselors
continue to participate in professional development activities by attending conferences
(i.e., League of Innovations Conference, National Council for Community and Education
Partnerships/ GEAR UP National Conference) and workshops (i.e., Student Achievement
Grounded in Equity, diversity, sexual harassment, women in transition, Career Kokua
training, civil rights, gay/lesbian orientation) which will increase their knowledge and
skills in counseling and in teaching.

Instructional faculty members who assist with advising during regular registration have
received training and refresher training facilitated by counselors and/or their
division/department heads.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               156
Standard IIB: Student Support Services


Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Using the Counselor Evaluation form (HawCC,
2003), counselors are evaluated by the students they assist. They are also evaluated by
their peers. These evaluations have been used primarily by individual counselors to
improve their service to students and to be submitted along with critical analysis in their
contract renewal, tenure, and promotion documents. To present an overall evaluation of
the counselors, evaluations for individual counselors were combined, and the compilation
is presented below for Fall 2002 through Spring 2005.

                                          Strongly        Agree       Disagree   Strongly     *Not
                                           Agree                                 Disagree   Applicable
The counselor listened to me and         F2 91%         F2    9%      F2         F1         F1
understood my reason(s) for              S3 91%         S3    9%      S3         F2         F2
seeking help, then responded to          F3 91%         F3    9%      F3         F3         F3
my concerns.                             S4 92%         S4    8%      S4         S4         S4
                                         F4 95%         F4    5%      F4         F4         F4
                                         S5 94%         S5    6%      S5         S5         S5
The counselor provided me with           F2 90%         F2   10%      F2         F1         F1
helpful information.                     S3 91%         S3    9%      S3         F2         F2
                                         F3 89%         F3   10%      F3 1%      F3         F3
                                         S4 95%         S4    5%      S4         S4         S4
                                         F4 96%         F4    4%      F4         F4         F4
                                         S5 93%         S5    7%      S5         S5         S5
I felt comfortable discussing my         F2 89%         F2 10%        F2         F1         F1 1%
questions and concerns with the          S3 93%         S3    6%      S3 5%      F2 .5%     F2
counselor.                               F3 89%         F3   10%      F3 1%      F3         F3
                                         S4 90%         S4   10%      S4         S4         S4
                                         F4 95%         F4    4%      F4         F4         F4 1%
                                         S5 93%         S5    7%      S5         S5         S5
When needed, the counselor               F2 83%         F2  6%        F2 1%      F1         F1 10%
assisted me in getting information       S3 82%         S3 13%        S3 5%      F2         F2 4.5%
from another office or agency.           F3 81%         F3  9%        F 1%       F3         F3 9%
                                         S4 85%         S4  8%        S4 1%      S4         S4 6%
                                         F4 89%         F4  6%        F4         F4         F4 5%
                                         S5 86%         S5  8%        S5         S5         S5 6%
If I need to see a counselor in the      F2 88%         F2 12%        F2         F1         F1
future, I would choose to see this       S3 91%         S3    8%      S3 .5%     F2         F2 5%
counselor, again.                        F3 88%         F3   11%      F3 1%      F3         F3
                                         S4 92%         S4    8%      S4         S4         S4
                                         F4 94%         F4    5%      F4         F4         F4 1%
                                         S5 92%         S5    7%      S5         S5         S5 1%
*also Blank




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                157
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

During this three-year period from Fall 2002 through Spring 2005, the rank order for
reasons for the visit to a counselor is as follows from the most frequent reason to the least
frequent reason:
                    • Course selection
                    • Career counseling
                    • Registration
                    • General information
                    • Financial aid
                    • Change or pick major
                    • College success strategies
                    • Other
                    • Personal
                    • Scholarships
                    • Job preparation
                    • Disability counseling

Although counselors have been evaluated by students they assist, the counselor
evaluation forms have not been consistently given to and collected from students. One of
the counselors sends the form to all students specifically identified. Other counselors rely
on professional and student assistants at the front desk of the Counseling and Support
Services Center to issue the forms and to collect them.

The counselor for students with disabilities also asks the students she assists to evaluate
the services provided through classroom accommodations and the Technology Lab.

In addition, some of the counselors are involved in teaching college success courses and
offer workshops (e.g., information sessions, orientations, scholarship workshops, transfer
workshops, non-traditional student workshops). Except for information sessions,
students attending workshops are asked to evaluate these sessions.

The ATE Perkins-funded counselor/case-manager has developed a case management
system and forms. Evaluation includes core indicators (academic achievement,
vocational achievement, degrees and credentialing, job placement, retention in
employment, nontraditional participation, and nontraditional completion) as part of the
Perkins funding requirements.

In West Hawai‘i an individualized evaluation form for the instructor-counselor was
developed to obtain feedback regarding counseling and advising services. This form can
be administered in the classroom or mailed to students. The results are available for
inclusion in the dossier for contract renewal, tenure, and promotion.

The institution is making an effort to include instructional faculty more fully in the
academic advising process. Academic advising is part of the instructional faculty’s
responsibility per the employment contract, and students have more contact time with
instructional faculty than with counselors. Studies such as, those based on the Tinto
model (1975), also indicate that establishing positive student-faculty-staff relationships

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               158
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

especially during the first year seems to be correlated with better student retention.
During spring 2005 the Academic Senate created an ad hoc committee co-chaired by the
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the Dean of Student Services to generate a
dialogue and develop a model for academic advising. A pilot project was designed to
provide academic advising by instructional faculty to first semester Liberal Arts students
who were continuing into their second semester. Excluded from this pilot project were
international F-1 visa students and Running Start/Early Admit students. About eight
general education faculty members volunteered for this project. They went through a
training session facilitated by counselors. The academic advising consisted of assisting
students with course selection to meet their degree requirements based on their
COMPASS scores and previously completed courses. Feedback from the participating
faculty members indicated that some of the students, e.g., international visa-exempt
students such as those from the Federated States of Micronesia, need more specialized
academic advising. No feedback from the students in this pilot project was obtained.

In general, current evaluation of counseling and advising has focused on the counselor,
workshop, or service rather than evaluation of counseling and academic advising in terms
of how they enhance student development and success in meeting student learning
outcomes.

Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the college shall do the
following:

   1. During 2006-2007 the HawCC counseling unit plans to revise its computer intake
      questions to collect pertinent information, revise the counselor evaluation form to
      reflect student achievement and student learning outcomes, and devise a better
      method of collecting this information, which will be used for evaluation, planning
      and improvement.

   2. Under the leadership of the Dean of Student Services, HawCC will explore a
      model for academic advising using Strategic Enrollment Management during
      2006-2007.

   3. Through program reviews and college-wide dialogue facilitated by the Vice
      Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the Dean of Student Services during 2006-
      2008, an institutional commitment will be made to (1) identify the criteria for
      student development and student success and (2) design the assessment strategies
      that will provide evidence of the extent to which educational counseling and
      academic advising enhance student development and success.

   4. Through dialogue and collaboration, counselors will work with the Staff
      Development Committee to provide ongoing training for academic advisors
      beginning 2006-2007.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               159
Standard IIB: Student Support Services



   B.3.d. The institution designs and maintains appropriate programs, practices,
   and services that support and enhance student understanding and appreciation
   of diversity.

Descriptive Summary:

Hawai‘i Island is known for its ethnic and cultural diversity. The counselor who has
worked with the international students has encouraged them to join the International
Student Association, a UH Hilo and HawCC student organization which annually
presents “International Nite.” This has become a two-night presentation of song, dance,
and drama from many countries represented by international students and Hawaiian
students.

To promote better understanding of our Micronesian students and their culture, one of the
counselors applied for and received a University of Hawai‘i President’s Diversity and
Equity Initiative grant to invite Franz Hezel, a well-known authority on Micronesia, its
history and economic, social, and educational challenges.

Our student population is also diverse in gender, age, economic resources, social
standing, academic preparation, and other ways. In the Applied Technical Education
programs, some of which include predominantly male students, the counselor/case-
manager has worked with the female students and their male peers and the faculty to
promote and support gender equity.

The Financial Aid Office plays a key role in supporting economic and social diversity.
Without financial aid many students who are economically challenged would not be able
to attend college.

The credit and non-credit instructional programs provide remedial and developmental
courses to strengthen the basic skills in reading, writing, and mathematics of students
who arrive at the college academically under-prepared.

The Ha`awi Kokua Program counselor provides counseling and services for students with
disabilities. These students add to the diversity of our student population. This program
partners annually with the student government to provide a campus-wide activity with the
goal of increasing awareness of students with disabilities on campus.

Three counselors have been trained in providing the Safe Zone Program for students with
different sexual orientations.

Mediation was used to reach agreement between student and faculty and between faculty
and faculty in three instances in 2003-2004. This is a service offered by one of the
counselors to facilitate better understanding of cultural differences. Student fees also
support the creation of a Student Mediation Service for students experiencing conflicts



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               160
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

with other students or faculty. Coming together to hear everyone’s needs and requests
helps promote student understanding and appreciation of differences.

Under the leadership of the Chancellor, HawCC has made an institutional commitment to
promote the understanding and appreciation of diversity through a series of Cultural
Transformation Initiative workshops organized by the Staff Development Committee and
the Dean of the Office of Continuing Education and Training. The first mandatory
workshop for faculty and staff held during fall 2005 was on violence in the workplace
and sexual harassment. This training is expected also to support and enhance our
students’ understanding and appreciation of diversity as faculty members teach and
mentor students and serve as role models.

Recognizing the increase in veterans on campus, the counseling unit is in the process of
setting up in-service training for counselors and instructional faculty to assist returning
veterans with their transition from combat to college.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. The 2002 and 2004 CCSSE reports indicate that
HawCC has created an environment that promotes the understanding and appreciation of
diversity. The following experiences were rated by students as occurring “very often”:

   •    Had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity other than
        your own
   •    Had serious conversations with students who differ from you in terms of their
        religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values
   •    Encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial
        or ethnic backgrounds
   •    Understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds
   •    Relationships with other students
   •    Relationships with instructors
   •    Working effectively with others
   •    Providing the support you need to thrive socially

Planning Agenda:

None.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               161
Standard IIB: Student Support Services



   B.3.e. The institution regularly evaluates admissions and placement
   instruments and practices to validate their effectiveness while minimizing
   biases.

Descriptive Summary:

As a community college with an “open door policy,” HawCC admits all individuals who
are at least 18 years old and/or who have a high school or general education diploma.
Those exempt from this minimum age requirement are Early Admit and Running Start
students (high school students who qualify to take college courses based on their
COMPASS scores; earning dual high school/college credit in Running Start). In order to
register, the student must submit a TB clearance and MMR clearance. The latter health
clearance is required of students born after 1956 who did not attend a Hawai‘i high
school.

The Admission and Registration Office uses the UH system application and complies
with the residency requirements for tuition purposes.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Because the UH System Application Form
(UH, 2006) has sections which do not apply to seniors graduating from high school,
HawCC has also developed a simplified application form, the Kama`aina Application
(HawCC, 2006c). The use of the Kama`aina Application has increased the enrollment of
graduating high school seniors.

Running Start students were required to complete the UH system application and re-apply
if they wanted to return the following semester while they were still in high school. This
process required parents/guardians to repeatedly demonstrate their residency status. For
some parents who needed to obtain documentation for Hawai‘i residency, this became
onerous. After a dialogue with the Admissions Officer and the Dean of Student Services,
the HawCC Running Start counselor created a simplified Running Start Program Re-
Application Form (HawCC, n.d.e).

The placement process is driven primarily by the COMPASS placement test. Students
who do not have evidence of previous college work are required to take the COMPASS
to determine their reading, writing, and math levels. Writing courses also require a
writing sample on the first day of instruction to verify the COMPASS writing level. If
the student’s in-class writing sample places the student at a different level from the
COMPASS placement, the student is encouraged to move either up or down for more
accurate placement.

The reading, writing, and math faculty engage in dialogue regarding the range of the
COMPASS scores deemed appropriate for the various skills levels in their fields. Lower-
level credit courses in reading, writing, and math have been developed in order to


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              162
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

strengthen basic skills and increase student success in courses required for their particular
program/major. This dialogue is being held across the UH community colleges campuses
to minimize bias and ensure appropriate placement and successful achievement of student
learning outcomes.

There is no non-credit course to prepare prospective students for the COMPASS.
However, they may take all or any one of the three tests again after at least 120 days have
passed since the last test date. The length of this waiting period is one of several related
issues being discussed by a COMPASS Placement Testing Advisory Work Group
convened in fall 2005 by the UHCC system.

International students do not take the COMPASS objective writing test on the computer.
Instead they are asked to write an essay on one of the topics submitted by the ESL
writing faculty. This has been done to minimize possible cultural and linguistic bias in
COMPASS. There has been dialogue between instructors in the IEP (Intensive English
Program) non-credit program and the ESL (English as a Second Language) credit
program in Hilo to minimize bias and determine the curriculum which will prepare
students to begin the next level of building English skills and to commence their degree
programs.

ESL courses are not currently offered in West Hawai‘i. In response to the migrant
worker population often employed in the coffee, macadamia nut, and diversified
agriculture industry, a federal grant proposal for CAMP (College Assistance to Students
of Migrant Parents Program) was submitted in 2005. UHCWH is awaiting the response
to this grant proposal. With the growing immigrant population, it is expected that access
to academic courses through ESL courses will be a requirement in the near future.

HawCC and the other UH community colleges will be launching an online application
process for the academic year 2006-2007.

Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the college shall do the
following:

   1. Under the leadership of the Director of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i, ways of
      meeting the ESL needs of its growing immigrant population will be explored
      during 2006-2008.

   2. Under the leadership of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Dean of
      Student Services, and Dean of the Office of Continuing Education and Training,
      dialogue will commence during 2006-2007 to determine the pedagogical and
      fiscal ramifications of offering a non-credit COMPASS preparation course.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               163
Standard IIB: Student Support Services



   B.3.f. The institution maintains student records permanently, securely, and
   confidentially, with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the
   form in which those files are maintained. The institution publishes and follows
   established policies for release of student records.

Descriptive Summary:

Under the Registrar, the Records and Data Management Office maintains student records
permanently, securely, and confidentially.

Under the Financial Aid Coordinator, the Financial Aid Office maintains student
financial aid application files electronically and in paper files. All student financial aid
application files are maintained in accordance with federal Title IV regulations.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. Paper records are maintained for five years after a
student stops attending. Current electronic records are backed up at least once a month
using 300 gb of external hard-drive storage.

When old or no-longer-needed information is purged, any piece of paper with an
identifiable student name or number is shredded before disposing of it.

Student information is released according to FERPA. In other words, only directory
information can be released without written permission from the student. The FERPA
policy is included in the HawCC catalog and in the Registration Information Booklet for
each semester. The Running Start brochure and enrollment form (HawCC, 2006b)
inform students and their parents about the confidentiality of college student information,
which can be released to the high school when the student signs the release of
information on the enrollment, form.

Students who do not want their directory information to be released complete a
confidentiality form (HawCC Records Office, 2006). The Registrar informs HawCC
counselors about these students, so that even their directory information is not released
without the students’ written permission.

Student financial aid information is released according to FERPA and federal Title IV
regulations. Students must provide a picture ID or their name, social security number,
and password to obtain any information regarding the existence of an application or the
information contained in the application.

Planning Agenda:

None.



                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                164
Standard IIB: Student Support Services



B.4. The institution evaluates student support services to assure their adequacy in
meeting identified student needs. Evaluation of these services provides evidence that
they contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes. The institution uses
the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

On an irregular basis the institution has attempted to determine student satisfaction with
the various units of Student Services: Admissions and Registration, Records and Data
Management, Counseling, and Financial Aid. Previous surveys and questionnaires have
focused on student awareness and satisfaction of services.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. As part of the Hawai‘i Community College
2000 Accreditation Self-Study Report (HawCC, 2000), HawCC conducted a
comprehensive student survey. The questionnaire basically asked students if they were
aware of the various student services. In 2002 Student Services conducted a survey of
continuing students to determine student satisfaction with its services. These surveys did
not ascertain students’ student services needs or the adequacy with which they were met.
Recognizing this shortcoming, a more recent Student Survey for Accreditation (HawCC,
n.d.g) was conducted during Fall 2005 to access student satisfaction with Student
Services. The results were not yet available at the time this draft was written.

In the past five years sporadic effort by Student Services has been made to determine
students’ needs. Counselors have determined students’ counseling needs through reasons
for seeing a counselor on the Counselor Evaluation form. The counselor/case-manager
has assessed the needs and barriers of the ATE students she has assisted. Finally, CCSSE
surveys in 2002 & 2004 have provided a significant sampling of student perceptions
concerning the services available to them.

In general, previous evaluation has not assessed how student support services contribute
to the student achievement and student learning outcomes.

Planning Agenda:

To enhance student learning and foster institutional improvement, the college shall do the
following:

   1. The various units of Student Services are utilizing program and unit reviews for
      evaluation, planning, and improvement based on student achievement and student
      learning outcomes beginning 2005.

   2. The various units of Student Services will be developing assessment strategies to
      measure student achievement and student learning outcomes. Program reviews


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               165
Standard IIB: Student Support Services

      and evaluation will reveal the adequacy of student services in meeting identified
      student needs and student learning outcomes and will be used to improve student
      services.




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             166
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services


C. Library and Learning Support Services:
   Library and other learning support services for students are sufficient to support
   the institution’s instructional programs and intellectual, aesthetic, and cultural
   activities in whatever format and wherever they are offered. Such services include
   library services and collections, tutoring, learning centers, computer laboratories,
   and learning technology development and training. The institution provides access
   and training to students so that library and other learning support services may be
   used effectively and efficiently. The institution systematically assesses these
   services using student learning outcomes, faculty input, and other appropriate
   measures in order to improve the effectiveness of the services.

The following discussion includes three separate programs: Edwin H. Mookini
Library in Hilo, the Hilo Learning Support Services, and West Hawai‘i’s Library and
Learning Center services combined. Each program has a separate Descriptive
Summary, Self-evaluation, Planning Agenda, and References. Standard II.C.1.a-e are
covered together and are followed by the coverage for Standard II.C.2. for each of the
three programs.


C.1. The institution supports the quality of its instructional programs by providing
library and other learning support services that are sufficient in quantity, currency,
depth, and variety to facilitate educational offerings, regardless of location or means of
delivery.

   a. Relying on appropriate expertise of faculty, including librarians and other
      learning support services professionals, the institution selects and maintains
      educational equipment and materials to support student learning and enhance
      the achievement of the mission of the institution.
   b. The institution provides ongoing instruction for users of library and other
      learning support services so that students are able to develop skills in
      information competency.
   c. The institution provides students and personnel responsible for student learning
      programs and services adequate access to the library and other learning support
      services, regardless of their location or means of delivery.
   d. The institution provides effective maintenance and security for its library and
      other learning support services.
   e. When the institution collaborates with other institutions or other sources for
      library and other learning support services for its instructional programs, it
      documents that formal agreements exist and that such resources and services
      are adequate for the institution’s intended purposes, are easily accessible, and
      utilized. The performance of these services is evaluated on a regular basis. The
      institution takes responsibility for and assures the reliability of all services
      provided either directly or through contractual arrangement.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              167
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services


Descriptive Summary:

Library at East Hawai‘i
The Edwin H. Mookini Library is shared by Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) and
the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (UHH) and is located on the upper campus. It has 3
floors and is administered by UHH, which receives the budget allocation to purchase new
materials, catalog, process and shelve materials, subscribe to online and paper
periodicals, and provide for reference assistance. Library collections include:
    • 260,000+ volumes, including books and back issues of periodicals
    • 1200+ serial subscriptions, including print and online periodicals and newspapers
    • microfilm and microfiche periodicals, newspapers and government documents
    • instructional videos and recreational DVD’s
    • general reference collection
    • State of Hawai‘i and U.S. Federal documents (partial depository for both)
    • the largest open-shelf Hawaiian Collection in the state (i.e., patrons can browse
        the shelves during most hours the library is open; paging is done when the
        Hawaiian Collection Room is closed)
    • READ Collection for developmental and remedial readers
    • ESL graded readers

A list, explanations and maps for the collections can be found on the library’s web site
(UHH Library, 2005c).

Information on library services can be found on the library’s web site (UHH Library,
2005e). Major library services include:
    • Reference assistance provided in person, Sunday (4 hours), Monday through
       Thursday (32 hours total for the days and 8 hours total for the evenings) and
       Friday (8 hours) during the semester. On-call assistance is provided during
       summer sessions and break periods
    • Library instruction
    • Reserves, including e-reserves (i.e., required course readings)
    • Distance education (DE) support for students and faculty including scheduling
       and use of library videos for interactive television courses
    • Audiovisual playback and viewing carrels, AV equipment loan and assistance for
       faculty in classrooms on Upper Campus
    • Intrasystem and interlibrary loans
    • Collection development
    • Computer access: campus PC lab (35 computers), library PC’s for searching
       catalog, etc. (16 computers), library classroom PC’s as back-up lab (20+ PC’s),
       wireless carrels for personal laptops and laptops to check out, all with internet
       access
    • Photocopying, including black and white and color, and PC with scanner
    • ATM
    • Fax service for students
    • Group study rooms

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               168
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services


   •   Validation of student ID
   •   ADA accommodations on designated PCs
   •   Limited community borrowing privileges

For personnel, HawCC allocates general funds for one 9-month, tenure-track faculty
position that provides library instruction to HawCC students and general reference
assistance, is responsible for specific areas in collection development, and coordinates
library services for all UH system community college distance education students. As of
July 1, 2004, UH at Hilo had 22 general-funded clerical, paraprofessional and library
faculty positions, including 3 assigned to Media Services as indicated on the most recent
library organization chart (UHH Academic Affairs [AA]: 2004). The shared library is
included as one item among several under the terms of an agreement about facilities
shared between UH at Hilo and HawCC (Simone: 1990).

The campus administration has been engaging in preliminary discussions with a potential
developer for the purpose of planning a new campus in Hilo on Komohana Street. Phase
I is supposed to include a combined library and learning center facility to support
HawCC’s instructional programs, both on- and off-campus. Groundbreaking is
anticipated to be in 2007. In the meantime, a major renovation of the entire library
building will begin in the 2006/2007 academic year and will be accomplished floor by
floor. The purpose of the renovation is to replace carpeting and remove tiles containing
asbestos.

All library patrons, including distance learners and those from the community, are taught
how to find information and evaluate it to become competent information seekers.
Library instruction involves 3 approaches:
   •   Face-to-face (f2f) reference assistance at the Reference Desk. Reference
       librarians show patrons how to find and evaluate information using the
       information literacy guidelines developed by the Association of College &
       Research Libraries (ACRL) and adopted by the library (ACRL, 2000). Print
       subject guides are available in the library lobby and at point-of-use for certain
       resources.
   •   Formal instruction for classes whose instructors have scheduled a session with the
       HawCC or UH at Hilo instruction librarians. Summer instruction for HawCC is
       provided by UHH.
   •   To accommodate remote access and DE, on-line tutorials (UHH Library, 2006b)
       and most of the subject guides (UHH Library, 2005d) are available from the
       library’s home page. On-line reference is provided through library’s web page
       with a turn around time of 2 days (UHH Library, 2003b).

Access to the library during fall and spring semesters is available 7 days a week,
beginning the second week of instruction; hours are posted on the library’s home page
(UHH Library, 2006a). For 13 weeks each semester, the library is open an average of
80.5 hours. During the last 3 weeks of instruction, hours for each Saturday are increased
by 3. Hours for the last two Sundays are increased by 2.5 each and a total of 3 hours is

                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              169
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

added during the last week of instruction and the first 2 days of finals in the evenings,
Monday through Thursday. Hours are reduced during summer sessions.

The library has an anti-theft system, and many books are tattle-taped to set off an alarm if
a library item is taken without being checked out and desensitized by the Circulation
Desk staff. Alarms are also at all other emergency exits. DVD’s are kept behind the
Circulation Desk with the covers displayed on open shelves, arranged alphabetically by
title. Audiovisual equipment and computer monitors have security cables that connect
them to tables. In addition to the physical security of library materials, effects of the
environment on microfilm have been found and are being mitigated. Evaluation of older
issues of periodicals and newspapers preserved in microfilm format revealed that many
suffer from the Vinegar Syndrome (i.e., a chemical reaction caused by excessive
humidity and acid present in nonarchival film) and are deteriorating. The microfilm reels
have been isolated and relocated to the open storage area adjacent to the Government
Documents collection on the library’s third floor.

Many of the library’s subscriptions to online indexes for full-text periodicals are ordered
consortially through the University of Hawai‘i libraries. As new databases become
available or prices change dramatically, the system-wide Library Council consults with
campus librarians, reviews invoices, and makes recommendations for renewing,
canceling or ordering new subscriptions. Serials Solution, an interface to check
periodical citations against the library’s periodical holdings, was purchased in 2002 and
integrated into the library’s web site (UHH Library, 2006e). The library’s major full-text
databases include:
    •   EBSCOhost
    •   JSTOR
    •   Science Direct
    •   LexisNexis Academic

Other full-text databases can be accessed from the library’s web site (UHH Library,
2006c).

The Learning Center (TLC) and Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC)
at East Hawai‘i:
Under a faculty Coordinator who is a member of the Academic Support Unit and who
reports to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, TLC provides academic support
services for both UH at Hilo and HawCC students and faculty. Services include tutoring
in Reading, Writing, Math, English as a Second Language, content subjects, and learning
skills. The HKATC includes a test environment that is secure, allows for paper and
pencil as well as online capabilities for placement testing, make-up testing, distance
education testing (including proctoring), and community testing including certifications,
ACT and Pearson Vue. HKATC is looking into providing other tests in the future. The
concept of the newly opened HKATC involved extensive dialogue and evaluation,
planning and improvement meetings between instructional and academic support faculty
and staff with the administration in order to develop a state-of-the-art facility using
technology. It is located on the lower campus and is administered by a center manager

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               170
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

under the supervision of TLC’s Coordinator. Both centers provide the college population
with access to computers and the Internet. TLC’s service includes instructional computer
programs which faculty use as an extension of their classroom. TLC provides a
multimedia classroom that can be scheduled for orientations, presentations, and
instruction. The HKATC also has an electronic classroom that includes video
conferencing capability, as evidence of the college’s institutional commitment to infuse
technology into the learning environment.

A comprehensive chart of statistics for a 6 year period immediately follows. The number
of student contacts (including unduplicated and repeat users), DE tests administered,
placement tests given and the number of centers for a 6 year period are shown on the
upper part of the following chart. The middle portion indicates the funding sources and
the lower portion summarizes staffing and equipment.

                                              Table 1
                          TLC & HKATC Operating Statistics

 HILO (TLC,        2000-         2001-          2002-          2003-          2004-        2005-
 Satellites and    2001          2002           2003           2004           2005         2006
 HKATC)                                                                      HKATC
                                                                              Start
 # of Student       34,088         30,088        25,519         22,895         38,646       44,328
 Contacts
 # of Students       2,814          2,629         3,512           3,222         4,728        4,914
 Unduplicated
 Distance tests                         123            273            838        551              744
 Placement test       1212              820           1355            774       1749              759
 # of Centers            3                3              1              1          2                2

 General          $ 32,000      $ 32,000       $ 30,000       $ 26,565       $ 51,649      $ 51,649
 Funds
 Voc. Ed.           39,780         38,000             -00-            -00-          -00-         -00-
 Funds
 UHH FWS             6,000         4,000          4,000          6,000          6,750         6,750
 HawCC FWS           3,050         3,466          8,460          7,470          7,470         7,623
 Supplies           10,000        10,000         10,000         10,000         17,000        17,000
  Total funds     $ 90,830      $ 87,466       $ 52,460       $ 50,035       $ 82,869      $ 83,022

 # of                72            72             72             72            116          111
 Computers
 # of Printers       4              4              1              2             5            5

 Tutors              42            40             23             22            23            22
 Faculty             1             1              1              1             1             1


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                171
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services


 HILO (TLC,        2000-         2001-          2002-          2003-         2004-   2005-
 Satellites and    2001          2002           2003           2004          2005    2006
 HKATC)                                                                     HKATC
                                                                             Start
 Assigned             4             4              4              4            4      4
 Faculty (3cr.)
 Ed. Spec.            1            1               1              1            2       2
 Support Staff       1             1              1              1            1       1
 Total               49            47             30             29           31      30
 personnel

The college seeks to infuse technology into every aspect of learning. The college offers
students the opportunity to use distance education, the Internet, video conferencing,
global positioning system, computer assisted design and certificate and degree programs
in Information Technology and CISCO networking. TLC and HKATC support these
efforts with their resources. Computers are available for individuals and classes to use
for instruction, research, and communication. Also, educational technology is used in the
centers to familiarize students with technology. Technology in the centers includes an
electronic classroom with SmartBoards, projection units, computer(s), and video
conferencing. Students are encouraged to use the TLC multi media classroom to do class
presentations. The HKATC is also used for student registration, which is online. Faculty
and staff at HKATC and the TLC assist students, many of who are first time computer
users. At each of the centers, staff is available to help students and faculty use
educational technology. Students sometimes get their first experience using technology
by registering online at the centers.

The Learning Center is open M-F 8:00 to 4:30, Wednesday until 8:30. The HKATC is
open M-F 8:00 to 4:30 and twice a month on Saturdays for testing.

Maintenance of the TLC facility is done on an as needed basis and if resources are
available. TLC has been in its present location since May 1992. Maintenance on TLC
and HKATC equipment, especially computers, is most crucial. General maintenance of
our computer networks including our server and individual computers is provided by the
Academic Computing Unit. Day to day maintenance is done by TLC and HKATC staff.
Security is provided by the UHH’s Auxiliary Services. This unit contracts security
officers to patrol the campus 24/7.

The HKATC has entered into contracts to offer testing services for ACT and Pearson Vue
as a service to the community, and has an agreement to offer testing, including those
requiring proctoring, with the University of Hawai‘i System in support of distance
education.

University of Hawai‘i, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning Center (WHLLC):
The WHLLC is located at the UH Center, West Hawai‘i in Kealakekua, and serves all of
the students, faculty and staff who take classes from or work for the University of
Hawai‘i system and reside on the Western side of the island of Hawai‘i. The majority of

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               172
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

the students served attend Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) programs and classes.
The regular staff consists of three positions, the Librarian (faculty position), a Learning
Center Coordinator (APT position), and a Library Assistant (civil service). All positions
report to the Director of the UH Center. Student assistants are used for tutoring and for
library service and assistance.

The WHLLC also provides the college population with access to computers and the
Internet, and multimedia equipment for orientation, presentations, and instructional
support. Twelve Windows XP computer workstations are available for class related
purposes. Information research, online class access, word processing, PowerPoint
presentation authoring, and spreadsheet design are common activities engaged in by
students and instructors. Head phones are available for audio files now common to
online courses. A high quality scanner is available for image creation and management,
and for use with selected ADA compliant software applications. The sole ADA equipped
computer workstation for the center is located at the WHLLC. Specialized computer
programs for Reading, Writing, Math, English as a Second Language, learning skills, and
Nursing are installed on selective workstations.

While the facility is very small, typical academic support services are provided for
HawCC students and faculty located in the west side of the island. Library services
include reference and information research assistance and instruction, the circulation of
library materials, (on site and Intrasystem loans), and instruction on how to use the
WHLLC computer workstations and software applications. Learning Center services
include tutoring in Reading, Writing, Math, English, and learning skills, and COMPASS
placement testing. Other test proctoring includes make-up testing for on site HawCC
classes and distance education testing for students in any UH system course or accredited
distance education from other colleges and universities. All testing services operate
under the direction of the Learning Center Coordinator.

The WHLLC staff assists students and instructors with beginning to intermediate skills in
the computer applications mentioned above. When they cannot adequately assist the
user, referrals are made to either the ITS staff at either HawCC or the University system
ITS staff located at UH Manoa.

Hours of operation during Fall and Spring Semester are Monday –Thursday 7:45am –
6:45pm, Friday 7:45am – 4:30pm, and 10am – 4:30pm Saturday. Hours are reduced
during term breaks and Summer session.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard.

Library at East Hawai‘i
Table 2 shows UHH’s allocation to the library for personnel (A budget), including
graphics staff, for the 2002/03 to 2005/06 fiscal years. The A budget does not include
student help or the HawCC librarian. The table also indicates the library’s B+C budget


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               173
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

for the 2000/01 to 2004/05 fiscal years. The B+C budget includes all library materials;
therefore, the right column shows the breakout of the library’s expenditures on books,
periodicals, audiovisuals, and online services only (H. Rogers, 2006; L. Golian-Lui,
2006).

As indicated in Table 1a for 2002/03, there was a budget reduction. Because subscription
costs had been steadily rising due to inflation, the library conducted a major review of
periodicals in 2002. Librarians facilitated a series of dialogues with faculty library
liaisons and in some cases, entire departments, to determine “essential” and “higher
priority” titles to be retained, based on student learning needs. Titles to be cancelled
were posted on the library’s web page for review by instructional faculty, and a notice
was sent to faculty and department chairs (Golian-Lui, 2002).

                                        Table 2
                                    Library Budget
                             Fiscal Years 2000/01-2005/06
                            Allocations:    Expenditures: Expenditures:
                            Personnel (A      Operating    Materials
           Year               budget)           (B+C)      (part of C)
           2000/01           Not Available         549,000        357,425
           2001/02           Not Available         413,861        292,875
           2002/03                 836,654         420,000        254,510
           2003/04                 882,067         420,500        346,521
           2004/05                 960,475         518,764        372,705
           2005/06               1,016,648         445,500        307,050

Table 3 shows the fiscal support given by HawCC to the library for salary and materials
over a 6 year period (Golian-Lui, 2006).

                                       Table 3
                               HawCC Library Support
                             Fiscal Years 2000/01-2005/06
                       Year                  Salary               Materials
                      2000/01                45,576
                      2001/02                47,901
                      2002/03                54,850
                      2003/04                55,392               5,560.73
                      2004/05                24,984               4,160.73
                      2005/06                27,760               4,548.23




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              174
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

Table 4 covers a 9 year period and indicates the College Workstudy allocations HawCC
contributed to the library until the end of the 2001/02 fiscal year (Golian-Lui, 2006).

                                     Table 4
                HawCC College Work Study Allocation for the Library
                          Fiscal Years 1997/98-2001/02
                                   Year                Workstudy
                                                       Allocation
                                 1997/98                  11,000
                                 1998/99                   9,000
                                 1999/00                  10,000
                                 2000/01                   3,050
                                 2001/02                   3,466
                                 2002/03                       0
                                 2003/04                       0
                                 2004/05                       0
                                 2005/06                       0


Library book holdings and reserve readings are searchable using Hawai‘i Voyager, a web
catalog shared by all UH libraries, from the library’s home page (UHH Edwin H.
Mookini Library, 2006). The library’s collection is developed through dialogue between
HawCC’s and UHH’s academic departments, which both have faculty liaisons that
consult with a librarian about subject or content areas (UHH Library, 2006f). Using
collection development guidelines (UHH Library, 2006d), faculty submit book requests
throughout the year, but ordering generally occurs between August 1 and April 1.
Standards of institutional integrity are upheld by the library on behalf of DE faculty when
ordering interactive television and library videos by seeking permission to transmit
videos from the producer at the time of purchase. Once transmission rights have been
granted or purchased, HawCC’s librarian actively works with HawCC DE faculty to plan
and schedule video showings for each course (UHH Edwin H. Mookini Library, n.d.).
HawCC’s curriculum changes that might affect the library collection are not consistently
transmitted to the library.

Specific examples of the institutional commitment to collection development made to
accommodate HawCC students’ learning needs include the development, in 1994, and
continuous enhancement of the READ Collection. The READ Collection web site
(Okuma, 2005b) is regularly maintained by the HawCC librarian who consults with
HawCC Reading faculty to add new titles. The READ Collection, consisting of 450+
titles, and its web site are used each semester by HawCC faculty in several sections of
reading courses—ENG 20R, ENG 21 and ENG 102. During the 2001/2002 academic
year, a successful grant proposal was supported by the UH President’s Educational
Improvement Fund (EIF) to purchase almost 200 titles of adult-level, graded vocabulary
readers to be added to the library’s collection for use by HawCC and UH at Hilo English
as a Second Language (ESL) students (Okuma, 2001b). ESL faculty and librarians
developed a list of specific titles and vocabulary levels available through Penguin
Readers, a division of Longman. The books were added as an extension to the READ
Collection with an ESL call number. The HawCC librarian’s sabbatical project of


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               175
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

2004/2005 was used to determine how other libraries address the reading needs of ESL
students. A follow-up list of recommended purchases was submitted to librarians and
appropriate ESL faculty (Okuma, 2005c). Information about Penguin graded readers was
added to the READ Collection web site (Okuma, 2005a) to improve access by ESL
students and faculty. Although Hawai‘i Voyager is unable to differentiate between
HawCC and UH at Hilo student and faculty circulation statistics, Table 5 does show
some evidence that books from the READ Collection, which is primarily used by HawCC
students, circulate frequently.

                                          Table 5
                   Selected READ Collection and Total Checkout Statistics
                                  2002/03-March 2006
                       READ Collection checkouts by UHH/HawCC                   Total of all checkouts by
                       Students                                                 UHH/HawCC & community
2002/03                927                                                                                   57,236
2003/04                543, July ‘03-February ’04 (total for READ circulation                               *59,482
                       is unavailable)
2004/05                (data unavailable)                                                        (data unavailable)
July ’05-March ‘06     682 (fiscal year not finished; not all data available)                             *45,986
*does not include renewals, only initial charges

HawCC is fortunate to have the collections and services that the UH at Hilo library offers
as part of the agreement about the separation of HawCC from UH at Hilo (Simone,
1991), but the organizational structure of shared services between the campuses has not
been ideal. The change in library administration almost 4 years ago has not improved the
strained relationship between UH at Hilo and HawCC over the shared library, particularly
in the areas of staffing, reporting lines and financial support. In 2004, audiovisual
support by the library for HawCC faculty on the lower campus was eliminated. In the
late 1990’s, HawCC administration cut a permanent library paraprofessional position and
then later, as evidenced in Table 1c, stopped providing College Work Study funds for 2
student assistants in the library. To promote positive dialogue between the library
administration and HawCC, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs (VCAA) has
initiated several actions:
    •    HawCC’s administration and the Academic Senate, in the current biennium
         budget cycle, requested a reinstatement of the paraprofessional position and
         another librarian position to support DE.
    •    In Fall 2005, the VCAA and the library director met to determine what HawCC’s
         annual share would be to support EBSCOhost (est. $4,200 or 34% of UHH’s and
         HawCC’s combined bill) based on full-time equivalent students (FTES).
    •    Until 2004/05, the HawCC librarian reported directly to the HawCC Dean of
         Instruction (DOI). Starting 2004/05, the temporary HawCC librarian reports to
         the UH at Hilo Library Director.
    •    The temporary HawCC librarian attends semi-monthly meetings of the HawCC
         Academic Support Unit convened by the VCAA.
    •    A joint meeting between the VCAA, the library director, the temporary and
         former HawCC librarians and the HawCC Assessment Coordinator was held on
         May 22, 2006 to discuss the preparation of the library program review that is due
         November 2008.

                                 Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                        176
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

As a result of the agreement made to separate HawCC from UH at Hilo in 1990, the
HawCC instruction librarian would provide library instruction for all HawCC courses,
work on the reference desk 10 hours per week, be responsible for several subjects for
collection development, and coordinate all DE services for the library. This support
targeted any DE courses generated by HawCC or UH at Hilo or received by either
campus from another UH campus. Increases in UH at Hilo DE programs and courses at
the same time HawCC library instruction was growing were more than one librarian
could manage. As a result, in 2000, UH at Hilo DE library support was given to a UH at
Hilo librarian while the HawCC instruction librarian continued to be responsible for all
other library support for HawCC DE and incoming UH system DE offerings. Further
interest by HawCC’s administration to increase HawCC’s DE offerings, will require an
increase in library personnel resources. To review DE at HawCC, the new Academic
Senate’s ad hoc DE Committee has been charged to look at a variety of issues, including
library support, and will submit a report to the Senate by the end of Spring 2007 (Okuma,
2006).

Campus dialogue involving the proposed new campus on Komohana began with the
Chancellor during November of 2005. It is anticipated that Phase I will include a
combined library and learning center facility demonstrating an institutional commitment
to focus library services to support the needs of HawCC’s students, faculty and staff, both
on-campus and at remote sites. Sufficient materials, services, staffing and state-of-the-art
technology will be the primary focus in developing the master plan for the facility.

Students have the opportunity to learn information competency skills through a variety of
means to assure preparedness for their HawCC courses. The library has a networked,
electronic classroom with 20+ PC’s and computer projector. All HawCC Reading classes
receive library instruction based on the individual assignment required for each course.
Because successful completion of ENG 102, College Reading Skills, is required for any
student receiving an Associate of Arts degree from HawCC, information competency
skills, even at a basic level, are taught through library instruction. Many of the
developmental and remedial reading classes utilize the READ Collection and its
accompanying worksheet (Okuma, 2003), both of which help develop basic information
literacy skills such as those found in the ACRL standards.

A library unit is required for all of HawCC’s ENG 100 students in Hilo. The library unit
included, until Fall 2004, a free print workbook (Library Activities Packet or LAP) that
was given to all students in ENG 100 when the librarian met each class ([Okuma]:
2001a). Beginning Fall 2004, the LAP was integrated into the UH at Hilo library
workbook, offered via WebCT (UHH Library, 2005b), and since then, HawCC students
have received their library instruction in this manner.

In 2003, the system-wide instruction librarians organized as the University of Hawai‘i
Libraries Instruction Librarians Committee (UHLILC) and began to hold monthly
meetings for a continuing dialogue to further develop shared information literacy goals.
A collaboratively-written grant proposal was submitted in spring 2004 for EIF funding
(Okuma, Abarca, Geary: 2004) to provide a workshop on LOBO, an innovative, online


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               177
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

information literacy tutorial from the North Carolina State University libraries. The grant
was funded and LOBO’s project coordinator was given a stipend to develop and present
the workshop, held at Windward Community College on May 18, 2004. Over 30
instruction librarians and English faculty throughout the UH system attended and learned
how LOBO could be adapted to UH information literacy teaching needs. As a result, a
pilot information literacy project, named LILO (Learning Information Literacy Online)
(UH, 2006), was developed and implemented in fall 2005. HawCC and UH at Hilo ENG
100 faculty were invited to use LILO as an option to WebCT. Eventually WebCT will be
phased out and LILO will become the online tutorial used by all ENG 100 classes in the
UH system that require a library or information competency unit. The focus of LILO is
to integrate writing and research as a process throughout the semester with a building
block approach to help students learn information literacy competencies as developed by
ACRL. A UH Manoa member of the UHLILC recently mapped LILO’s competencies to
ACRL’s (Lebbin, V., 2006) for future assessment purposes.

Table 6 indicates the numbers of sessions and HawCC students that received library
instruction over a 5-year period. Starting with the 2003/04 academic year, the HawCC
librarian also offered librarian instruction to UH at Hilo classes; those numbers are not
reflected in Table 6.
                                           Table 6
                  HawCC Library Instruction Sessions at the Hilo Campus
                                             2000/01-2005/06


                       2000/01         2001/02        2002/03         2003/04        2004/05        2005/06*
       Sessions                  106             98             114             92             76                79
       Students               1,752           2,134          1,647           1,314            997               927
*Statistics for 2005-06 are not complete. The official statistics will be available at the end of fiscal year
2005/06.


Although Table 6 indicates a high number of sessions and students served, only the
English classes make use of HawCC’s library instruction services in Hilo on a regular
basis. A few vocational instructors—Nursing, Carpentry, Electrical Maintenance and
Installation Technology, and Auto Body—schedule library instruction sessions.
Although more information is available using the Internet, few 100 level classes, with the
exception of the English instructors, utilize library instruction where information literacy
can be learned from print as well as internet sources. Many of the 100 level courses
require term projects using outside sources. Students in disciplines other than English
will often not be introduced on a basic level to literature in the field unless they transfer
to UH at Hilo or UH Manoa. In the 1990’s, large amounts of user satisfaction data were
collected at the end of each library session by the HawCC librarian, but were very time-
consuming to summarize. Those data and more recent anecdotal information shared by
HawCC students indicate that using the library is perceived as intimidating and
overwhelming. Because the library is organized primarily to support UH at Hilo, the size
of it may be a contributing factor. A few anecdotal comments heard at the reference desk

                                Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                      178
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

when HawCC students needed help to begin doing a research paper, indicate that some
instructors tell their students to do research for a paper without having scheduled a library
session. Few HawCC faculty utilize the library for academic or personal reasons. The
Staff Development Coordinator has worked with the HawCC librarian in the past to offer
workshops where faculty and the HawCC librarian have had dialogue about new
databases or services with limited attendance.

Besides formal library instruction sessions, reference librarians provide information
literacy instruction at the reference desk. Each interaction is tallied and statistics are
annually summarized. Data for 5 years are in Table 7. Patrons are not identified by
campus affiliation, so statistics do not differentiate between HawCC and UH at Hilo
patrons. Library staff follow the Association of College and Research Libraries’ policy
of refraining from asking library users to identify their institution when offering reference
services. The library will be able to collect data on the needs of HawCC students when it
conducts an Association of Research Libraries (ARL) LibQUAL+ survey in 2008, which
will ask survey participants to identify their institution. The LibQUAL+ survey is
available on the internet at http://www.libqual.org/

                                                   Table 7
                                        Public Services Statistics
                                             2000/01-2004/05
Type of Stats        2000/01            2001/02             2002/03            2003/04      2004/05
Reference                       8,304             10,836              11,137       10,590         7,824
Technical                        918                957                1,492           Not          Not
                                                                                 applicable   applicable
Informational                   3,964             21,425              27,023           Not          Not
                                                                                 applicable   applicable
                               13,186    32,261 33,218      38,160 39,652              Not          Not
                                                                                 applicable   applicable
* Beginning in 2001/02, statistics taken at the circulation desk were added to the informational statistics
taken at the reference desk.

Access to the library and its services based on the number of hours it is open is
considered optimal based on library staffing and the FTES for both campuses. Hours for
each semester and summer session are determined by the public service units after an
assessment of past usage statistics for specific time periods. Students have been
generally satisfied with the hours, especially with the extra hours added during the 2
weeks preceding finals.

All of the library’s full-text databases are available to HawCC students, faculty or staff
when they are in the library. Most but not all of the library’s full-text databases can be
accessed remotely by HawCC students, faculty or staff. The unique UH number, a
barcode on a photo student ID, or a library card is necessary for authentication, which is
done by a proxy server. Unfortunately, HawCC students do not always purchase a

                                Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                      179
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

student ID early in their academic career at HawCC. The ID costs $10 and can be
revalidated at no charge for each semester the student is enrolled. It continues to be a
problem encouraging HawCC students to purchase a student ID after the semester starts.
According to University of Hawai‘i Library Council policy, students must have a current
university ID or other photo ID to check out books and reserve readings, and to access
databases remotely. To encourage students to get their ID’s, some HawCC faculty have
taken an entire class on a field trip to the ID station. Many HawCC and UH at Hilo
students are confused about the ID policy. While the library prefers that students use a
university ID, students can access library resources by showing another photo ID.

Under current library policy, DE students cannot get a photo student ID except by
coming on campus. However, the library is making the institutional commitment to
providing access for DE students to apply for library accounts online beginning fall 2006.

Of the full-text databases with remote access, some are restricted to UH at Hilo students,
faculty and staff only. PsycARTICLES is one of several full-text databases with
restricted use. Due to site licensing fees that are expensive and are based on FTES,
subscriptions for these restricted databases are paid only for UH at Hilo access. For
HawCC students, such restrictions are not usually a problem because the literature
covered in the databases is usually at the upper division to graduate levels. However,
such restrictions could pose an access problem for HawCC faculty who may wish to do
research requiring specialized literature. It is not clear from the library’s web site that
database access is restricted until the specific database is chosen and the HawCC user
puts in his or her UH ID #, which is not accepted. Besides getting a response that
indicates the database is licensed only to UH at Hilo students, faculty and staff, the
reference desk phone number is given to ask questions about access.

A report prepared for the Library Council for 2002/03-2004/05 shows the numbers of
sessions and searches, and usage of full-text articles for the EBSCOHost periodical
indexes for the entire UH system and by individual campus (UH Library Council, n.d.a).
HawCC’s usage is ranked 11th out of the 11 campuses. Table 8 summarizes that
information and indicates that HawCC’s usage, from the Hilo site, of EBSCOHost
accounts for approximately 1% or less of total UH system usage although HawCC’s
headcount enrollment for Fall 2004 was 4.8% of the UH system (UH Institutional
Research Office, table 1, 2005).
                                              Table 8
                   EBSCOHost Usage for All UH Sites and HawCC
                                          2002/03-2004/05
                  2002/03       2002/03       2003/04      2003/04      2004/05 All   2004/05
                    All                         All
                                HawCC                      HawCC                      HawCC
  #sessions      139,680       296          224,616       383           285,599       208
  #searches      561,588       821          893,210       1,035         1,141,621     2,237
  # full-text    475,291       987          485,059       492           489,843       1,117



                            Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                 180
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

Perhaps some confusion about ID policy may contribute to the low numbers for HawCC
EBSCOHost usage. However, the numbers for HawCC usage only reflect users who are
identified as using a HawCC IP address. Many students access EBSCOHost at the
library by logging in to the campus system. Students are required to log on to the
computers in the library by using a university issued account number and password. Log
on in the library is required due to licensing agreements with database providers. Once
students are logged in to the system, there is no way to determine the students’
institution. The library is aware of this problem and has tried to find software that can
help to identify different categories of library users and collect this type of statistics.

Table 9 shows selected statistics from the Library Council’s report for off-campus
(remote) and on-campus access to EBSCOHost via UH at Hilo library’s proxy server but
these are not broken down by HawCC or UH at Hilo users ([UH Library Council], n.d.b).

                                            Table 9
              EBSCOHost Off-campus and On-campus Monthly Logins
                               Edwin H. Mookini Library
                                  Spring Semester, 2003


                   January          February            March               April
  On campus        949              1,422               1,606               2,271
  Off campus       304              541                 734                 1,132

Access to other services include checkout privileges and intrasystem (ISL) loans of
books, photocopies of periodical articles, and media loans for all UH students, regardless
of the site where a course is offered. ISL requests can be filed by on-campus and DE
HawCC and UH at Hilo students and faculty/staff (UHH Library, 2005a). HawCC and
UH at Hilo faculty can also use the electronic reserves service, which allows students to
read required, full-text readings via the library’s web site (UHH Library, 2004).

The Learning Center (TLC) and Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC)
at East Hawai‘i:
The college partially meets this standard. The Learning Center and the HKATC select
educational equipment and material by consulting with faculty to enhance the mission of
the college. Faculty area Lab instructors are assigned to TLC in Reading, Writing, Math,
and English as a Second Language as part of their teaching load. These assigned faculty
provide tutor training in their respective content areas, and oversee the development of
resource materials for classes and students. The use of departmentally assigned Lab
instructors provides a special and unique linkage between services for the students and
the enhancement of the mission for instruction regarding academic support services.
Direct communication exists on a one to one level and at the department level. This
direct communication provides a quick response time to provide necessary services.
Each of the centers (TLC, HKATC) maintains constant communication with faculty

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               181
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

using the support services. As needs and concerns arise, action can be taken
immediately. TLC, with the input of faculty, has collected over a hundred computer
instructional programs and resource materials reflecting an institutional commitment to
support the classroom learning environment. All centers are considered an extension of
the classroom. The lab instructors also maintain regular dialogue between their
departments and TLC regarding services offered. Evaluation, planning and improvement
are key to this dialogue in order for student needs and resources to be appropriately
aligned.

Student learning needs are mainly determined by TLC faculty area Lab coordinators and
other faculty. The information gathered regarding student learning needs is used to
provide services to meet the demand of instruction. Informal dialogue about student
learning needs also occurs among TLC staff--the Coordinator, faculty area Lab
coordinators, and tutors. Part of the evaluation, planning and improvement process
utilizes information gathered formally through an annual TLC evaluation of students who
use services. Dialogue about evaluation results is done at TLC Coordinator meetings,
and services are adjusted as needed. Such services include tutoring, facility requests,
testing services, instructional materials, computer instruction and center hours. Decisions
are based on available resources. User requests are mainly for more services such as
tutors and available hours. TLC staff (faculty and tutors) also provides feedback formally
in TLC evaluations the Coordinator collects. Informal feedback is also gathered.

To meet students’ learning needs, the centers provide computer programs and material
for Reading, Writing, Math, and English as a Second Language, learning skills,
vocational trades, Nursing, Business, languages, and other student resources. Students
from HawCC as well as UH at Hilo are given access to computers for word processing,
the Internet and for printing. Students and faculty are also welcome to use the TLC
multimedia classroom for presentations and orientations. It contains a computer,
projection unit and Smart Board. TLC also provides space for individual study as well as
a place for faculty and students to meet. Except for make-up testing services offered by
TLC for faculty on the upper campus, all testing services are provided by the HKATC
(Manono campus).

The process of maintaining constant informal dialogue with users, including faculty, is
very effective. The quality and depth of the materials are recommended by the faculty to
assure appropriateness and usage.

The college assesses the effectiveness of academic support materials and services by
reviewing responses on evaluations such as the CCSSE. TLC reviews informal and
formal requests from faculty, staff, administration, and students. The quantity, depth, and
variety of services are based on user satisfaction. The quality of TLC services and
resources is determined by the users and availability of funding and staffing resources.
Evaluations from both students and faculty reveal their satisfaction (read summary in
II.C.2). Student evaluations reveal that the majority of users feel that TLC provides
services to meet their needs. Most responses are “agree to strongly agree” ([Hawai‘i



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               182
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

Community College] [HawCC] Learning Center, 2005a). The amount of faculty (18 for
Fall 2005) input from evaluations is very small ([HawCC] Learning Center, 2005b).
Aside from the formal evaluation, constant feedback from faculty and students is used to
plan improvements in services. To address distance learning (DE) support services, the
system-wide ITS office distributes a 2-part survey to DE students to evaluate support
services. During the fall 2005 semester, dialogue was initiated by the ITS office with
various system-wide distance learning committees to determine the suitability of the 2-
part survey and other surveys being used, to add areas for review, to identify any
duplication in survey instruments, and to standardize questions in order for students in all
modes of distance education delivery to evaluate support services. This process is
currently in the evaluation, planning, and improvement stage because input is being
gathered from each campus before revised draft instruments will be circulated for review
([University of Hawai‘i Information Technology Services], [2005a]; [2005b]).

Student learning for TLC is specific to tutoring. The goal for tutoring is to help students
become independent learners. Tutors infuse learning strategies while tutoring so students
learn strategies and become effective learners. One question on the student evaluation
asks students if “TLC helps them to become better students.” This rating provides us
information regarding this learning outcome. According to the Fall 2005 student
evaluations, 91% of the respondents agreed that TLC helped them become better students
([HawCC], 2005a).

Assessment of the effectiveness of TLC facilities, services, equipment (mainly computers
and educational technology), and materials was compiled throughout the years by faculty
who use TLC to support their instructional needs. Constant informal dialogue with
faculty, administration, and students and TLC’s Coordinator keeps the centers current.
The HKATC is a prime example of how HawCC has made an institutional commitment
to meet the needs of the college and the community. The emphasis at HKATC is on
testing and educational technology. It was established because of expressed needs by all
constituents. The quantity, quality, depth, and variety of services and materials provided
both by TLC and HKATC support instructional needs. Because the centers serve as
extensions of the classroom, TLC resources are used as part of class curriculum. Because
of this direct usage, materials are current as well as extensive.

The sufficiency of the quantity of TLC services is difficult to evaluate. Based on
facilities, personnel, and budget, TLC and HKATC have a wide variety of services
available for the college population. Based on annual user evaluations, more computers,
tutors, and available hours are always requested ([HawCC], 2005a). There was a period
when TLC suffered due to the loss of vocational funds in 2003(see chart); satellite centers
for Business Education and the Manono Campus were closed. And along with the
closing of facilities, computer tutors, subject tutors, learning skills tutors and evening
hours became limited to non-existent. Only TLC remained open with basic services
supporting Reading, Writing, Math, ESL, some content tutoring, make-up testing,
distance education test proctoring and placement testing. Since 2004, TLC has recovered
somewhat when general funding increased, and the college opened the new HKATC at
the Manono Campus. To support the new facility, TLC relocated its center manager to


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               183
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

oversee setup and operations. Thus, the TLC Coordinator assumed the TLC Manager’s
responsibilities such as tutor training and computer maintenance. The college has also
provided funds to hire a temporary Educational Specialist and student assistants to
support the HKATC. This temporary position needs to be made permanent to establish a
good foundation. It has been a constant struggle to maintain adequate resources, when
the college’s overall funds are low.

To determine whether TLC is enhancing student learning, results of student evaluations
and TLC’s goals are evaluated for planning and improvement. The goal for tutoring is to
foster independent learning. By integrating learning skills with tutoring, students see the
practical use of the study strategies and techniques. High student ratings regarding their
success in becoming better students provide supportive evidence. According to Fall 2005
student evaluations, 95% of the respondents agreed that studying in the center helped
them become more independent ([HawCC], 2005a).

To support the college’s goal in promoting technology, TLC and HKATC provide access
and support for student, faculty and staff to technology. The centers offer computer labs,
computerized instruction, internet access, electronic classrooms, placement/distance
education testing and certification through the internet. TLC and HKATC staff members
provide assistance to those who are unfamiliar with our technological resources, allowing
students to learn technical competence in information retrieval. According to TLC and
HawCC stats, at least 35 classes use the centers as part of their curriculum and at least 5
courses are scheduled in the electronic classroom at the HKATC. Students taking classes
that stress online support use WebCT. Professors are able to use the online Distance
Reading Lab to support classes. Students enrolled in such courses use TLC’s resources.
As more and more classes use online support, the centers try to provide assistance. This
trend is growing to allow students more options as they become competent in information
retrieval. According to Fall 2005 student evaluations, 87% of the respondents agreed that
using and receiving assistance from TLC helped them recognize the importance of
technology in the world today.

The use of technology throughout the campus is wide-spread. A good working
relationship between faculty and TLC/HKATC supports this effort. Center personnel
work on individual, program, and college requests for educational technology.

The hours of operation for TLC and HKATC are determined by consultation between
TLC’s Coordinator, TLC and HKATC staff, and faculty whose students use the facilities.
Scheduling is based on personnel resources available. Hours during the day are in the
highest demand. When funding is low, evenings are cut because there are fewer users
than during the day.

An increase in the number of DE students from other UH campuses is impacting test
proctoring services of HKATC. DE testing is more fully described in the following
paragraphs. In January 2006, a dialogue was initiated with the VC for Academic Affairs
(VCAA), TLC’s Coordinator, the Supplemental Instruction Supervisor (who also attends
the system-wide Campus Distance Coordinators monthly meetings), the Assistant to the


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               184
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

VCAA, 2 faculty members who are reviewing DE issues at HawCC and the West
Hawai‘i Education Center’s Director.

TLC has been operating in its present facility since 1992. Thus wear and tear is evident
in the physical appearance. The biggest concern has been the carpeting. Some furniture
is much older than 1992. After an evaluation of the facilities, replacement of flooring has
been scheduled in the entire Library building. Funds were secured by UH at Hilo for the
entire building. When this project is complete next year, TLC will have its carpet and
vinyl tile replaced and the issue will be resolved. Replacing some of TLC’s older
furniture such as chairs and chairs with desks attached needs to be done due to heavy use,
and its upcoming program/unit review will provide the opportunity to report this need.
HKATC is a new facility, so maintenance is low aside from cleaning. Computer
maintenance is very important and necessary to keep current in the field. The entire
college will utilize the program/unit review process to systematically replace and upgrade
computers on a cycle. Finally, security is adequate; the centers have not experienced any
major problems with break-ins.

For the community, over a hundred tests are available through ACT and Pearson Vue.
For 2004 to 2005, HKATC administered 408 ACT and Pearson Vue tests (HawCC Hale
Kea Advancement and Testing Center [HKATC], 2005). These tests represent an
institutional commitment so students and community members do not need to fly to
O‘ahu to take the tests. The college does make some money from administering ACT
and Pearson Vue tests. In order to administer these tests, staff members must be
individually certified. They are trained and tested before certification. To assure quality,
many details and procedures are required for a site to become a certified test center. All
contracts are approved by the UH system which sometimes takes months, a definite
drawback. ACT testing by HawCC was relocated from West Hawai‘i to Hilo’s newly
opened HKATC when the West Hawai‘i BTTI Center was closed. Hilo’s HKATC had to
reestablish itself as an ACT Test Center.

For 2004 to 2005, HKATC administered 551 distance education tests which follow a
standardized form throughout the UH system (HawCC HKATC, 2005). Distance
education test proctoring is an agreement between all the community colleges statewide
and is a growing segment of testing. The UH system-wide distance education policy and
the distance education proctoring form are evidence of such agreements. The HKATC
facility is quickly beginning to reach its maximum. The contracted testing services
provided at this time are sufficient in relation to the personnel and facilities. The college
needs to establish a second permanent position for the HKATC to create a stable
foundation for further development and maintaining current services. More testing
services are needed, however, as evidenced by the 2004/05 HKATC statistics; only one
survey has been completed so far since the opening of this new facility.

The HKATC has been in operation for almost two years and the staff has received
positive feedback from the ACT trainer as being one of the best test centers they have
worked with. This is due to the efficient and detail oriented staff at HKATC. Statistics



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               185
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

collected regarding test administration show demand. These statistics are one of the
factors that the college uses to determine need and feasibility.

University of Hawaii, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning Center (WHLLC):
The college partially meets this standard. One facility and one group of staff provides the
organizational structure with an emphasis upon cooperation to serve both the library and
learning center related needs for Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) students. While
the services and materials are similar to those provided by the three sites in Hilo, space
and budget limitations influence how those services and materials are delivered.

Over the years, the Mookini Library and WHLLC have formed a strong, collaborative
relationship. The relationship has included advice on cataloging, help with proxy servers,
and donations of materials.

The WHLLC is the smallest independent collection in the UH System, and the shelving
space for books, videos, and DVDs is used to the maximum. In order for new items to be
added to the collection, culling must be done to free up space. Given this space restraint,
the development of the permanent collection has been limited to increasing materials in
areas most important to the college programs available at the center. In the past five
years, most attention has been paid to the Hawaiiana collection, the culinary collection,
and basic cultural history. These items have been acquired via a federal Title III grant
(Hawaiiana), private gifts (culinary), and purchase from operating funds (history). Items
were identified and selected in consultation with the Hawaiian Studies, Food Service, and
history instructors. Additional student research and instructor instructional needs are
fulfilled by using the UH library system. Using Voyager, books, videos, and other
materials are identified in other UH libraries and requested for the user. This intra system
loan service is fast and free to the user. The items usually arrive within a week, and the
videos/DVDs can be scheduled ahead of time to allow an instructor to incorporate the
material into their class syllabus. The cost of the priority postage and any other usage
fees are paid by the WHLLC.

Reference service and general help with using the collection and the computer
workstations is available from one of the staff any time that the WHLLC is open. Since
there is currently no internet workstation equipped classroom available for formal
instruction, classes are invited into the WHLLC for informal sessions on information
search strategy, and basic search techniques for using the UH system catalog Voyager
and the EBSCO electronic full text databases. On occasion an instructor will request a
longer strategy session that takes place in his or her regular classroom.

The UH system currently contracts with the Hawai‘i Library Consortium for the use of a
selection of EBSCO electronic periodical databases. Hawai‘i Community College is
assessed a portion of the $100,000 yearly licensing fee based on student FTE. HawCC
students based in West Hawai‘i are included in this assessment. Other licensed electronic
databases are also made available through agreements made on the college’s behalf via
the UH at Hilo Mookini Library.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               186
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

There is, of course, a huge amount of information available to students and instructors via
the open internet. The responsibility of the staff is to assist the students to critically
evaluate the information they find. This is done informally as the students search for
information, and students are referred to helpful evaluation web links via the Edwin H.
Mookini Library web site. Statistics regarding the various operating aspects of the
WHLLC can be found in the University of Hawai‘i Library Council Statistics, 2001-2005
(UH Library Council, 2006a).

Table 10 indicates the numbers of sessions and HawCC students that received library
instruction over a 4-year period.

                                                  Table 10
              HawCC Library Instruction Sessions at the West Hawai‘i Site
                                             2002/03-2005/06

                                 2002/03        2003/04           2004/05         2005/06*
                  Sessions          17             17                15               12
                  Students         176             176              198              120
*Statistics for 2005-06 are not complete. The official statistics will be available at the end of fiscal year
2005/06.


The COMPASS placement test is offered twice a day during the week and once on
Saturdays on a walk-in basis. Testing is provided free, regardless of the college
destination of the tester. The COMPASS placement testing room is small and the
computers are still on Windows 98, which limits their usefulness for other applications.
Student Peer tutoring is offered in the areas of Math and English. The Learning Center
Coordinator consults with the Math and English faculty to identify appropriate students
for tutors. Tutors are hired and supervised by the Coordinator. Because of the small
number of students to choose from, recruiting competent student tutors has been a
continuing challenge.

Under the supervision of the Coordinator, an average of 400 tests is proctored each year
at the WHLLC. The majority of the tests are for HawCC students in online courses
(Hopson, M. 2006). Providing an environment conducive for the administration of
proctored tests will continue to be problematic until more and quieter space is made
available. Students taking course related tests must compete for space with general users
in the study areas and the computer workstations. Sound from the activities in the two
general classrooms next door readily bleeds through into the WHLLC. Since students
can call and schedule an appointment to take a proctored test, the staff tries to encourage
students to take their tests at times during the week when the facility isn’t as busy, or on
Saturdays.




                                Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                        187
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services


Planning Agenda:

Library at East Hawai‘i
1. Throughout the academic year, the HawCC librarian should request a summary of
   approved curriculum changes from the VCAA during regularly scheduled meetings.
   Consultation with other stakeholders will determine the need to add to, delete from or
   maintain library collections and services in response to changes.

2. The VCAA will monitor the current biennium budget submissions, which include a
   request to reinstate the library technician position and the funding of one additional
   FTEF librarian to provide DE library support and one new faculty position to
   coordinate DE at the Hilo campus. Both DE positions will improve support not only
   for DE students, but also for faculty teaching DE courses.

3. The VCAA, HawCC librarian and the library administration should continue to
   engage in dialogue about the share of the library budget HawCC may be expected to
   pay. Funds have been allocated for 2006-07 by the legislature for shared facilities.
   HawCC and UH at Hilo are working on a process to determine fair distribution for
   shared used services.

4. The Academic Senate’s ad hoc Distance Education Committee (approved at the
   February 23, 2006 Academic Senate meeting) will address library support and other
   DE issues. Its final report is due to the Chair of the Academic Senate by the last
   meeting of Spring 2007.

5. HawCC’s library support and information needs of students and faculty will be
   included in discussions and plans for the new campus on the Hilo side.

6. Beginning Fall 2006, HawCC instructional and library faculty will begin a dialogue
   to evaluate, plan and develop improvements for how information literacy skills will
   be integrated into student learning at the transfer, developmental and remedial levels,
   and how to maximize the library instruction services.

7. Beginning Spring 2007, the HawCC librarian and the Staff Development Coordinator
   will organize a series of workshops to introduce faculty to information literacy
   standards and skills.

8. In 2006/2007, the HawCC librarian and campus administration will investigate ways
   to optimize how HawCC students can get a student ID.

The Learning Center (TLC) and Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC)
at East Hawai‘i
1. All of the centers will continue maintaining close relationships with faculty and
    student users. The Learning Center will continue to support classroom instruction by
    providing educational resources as an extension of the classroom. The Coordinator
    will continue to dialogue with faculty regarding resources needed to support future


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               188
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

   instruction. Using student and faculty evaluation results and the needs of the college,
   TLC will utilize evaluation and planning to improve services with the resources
   available. These Learning Center planning items will be the responsibility of the
   TLC Coordinator to initiate with Area Coordinators, HKATC Manager and students.

2. During the program review process for all centers, institutional competencies for
   informational retrieval will be identified, and practices to support these competencies
   will be developed. An assessment tool will be developed to provide measurement in
   student competencies after receiving support from the centers. The TLC Coordinator
   will be responsible for identifying the institutional competencies and will consult with
   the HKATC’s Manager in developing the assessment tool for Fall 2006.

3. TLC will continue to make use of limited resources so that maximum access is
   provided to students and faculty. Because of the rapid growth of distance education
   and the demand for proctoring services, it is imperative that a second permanent
   position be established for the HKATC. The TLC Coordinator will be responsible for
   determining the use of limited resources and will champion the need for additional
   permanent staff for the HKATC. These activities are ongoing and will be addressed
   further in the program review due November 2006.

4. For TLC and HKATC, a maintenance schedule to replace and upgrade computers
   needs to be incorporated into the college’s overall plan. Aside from the computers,
   no additional planning needs to be done. The TLC Coordinator will be responsible
   for developing a maintenance and replacement schedule of computers for both the
   TLC and the HKATC. This process will be addressed further in the program review
   due November 2006.

5. Future plans for TLC could include more testing to secure additional funds to
   supplement the HKATC budget. A second permanent position needs to be
   established to provide stability for the newly opened center. The decision to offer
   other testing will involve the availability of personnel, the facility and technical
   support. Evaluation is done to determine the continuation of a particular testing
   service or whether to add new ones. The college needs to be flexible enough to be
   able to provide services as needed. The TLC Coordinator and the HKATC Manager
   with approval from the VCAA will be responsible for determining testing services
   and activities. These decisions will be ongoing and will be further assessed during
   the program review process scheduled for November 2006.

University of Hawaii, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning Center (WHLLC)
1. Continue to build or adapt the library collection according to the needs of the
   programs offered at the center. Environmental studies and forest ecosystem
   management are two programs that will be added to the center curriculum in the next
   few years.

2. As the college courses, programs and academic support units develop their SLO’s,
   align the development of the WHLLC SLO’s with them.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               189
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

3. As part of the college program review cycle of assessment, the center will conduct a
   review in Fall 2006. The WHLLC will be included in this review.

4. Participate in the planning and development of a new and larger instructional site for
   the center. Both the temporary relocation to larger leased quarters or the design and
   construction of a permanent facility will be welcomed.

5. Continue to replace computer work stations on a regular basis per the HawCC
   technology replacement plan.

6. Continue to build strong, collaborative working relationships with the Edwin H.
   Mookini Library and other libraries in the UH system for student learning support.


C.2. The institution evaluates library and other learning support services to assure
their adequacy in meeting identified student needs. Evaluation of these services
provides evidence that they contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes.
The institution uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

Library at East Hawai‘i:
The library has evaluated its services in the past but more recently began a formal, in-
depth and lengthy two-phase strategic planning process between Fall 2002 and Spring
2004. Service quality was emphasized through extensive dialogue between the library
staff and committee members. In Phase 1 a library mission statement was developed to
support HawCC’s and UHH’s missions, approved by library staff, and posted on the
library’s web site (UHH Library, 2003c). In Phase 2 a library strategic plan with goals
and objectives was initiated, using the mission statement as the foundation. The
committee met often to identify goals and objectives. Unit representatives solicited
feedback on strengths, weaknesses and action plan activities so that an honest assessment
of shortcomings and achievements could be done. A planning retreat for all library staff
members was held on May 20, 2003 to review 7 goals approved by the staff prior to the
retreat. Staff continued to review the goals into the 2003/04 academic year. Voting was
held during December 2003 for staff to decide the top 10 strategies that could be
addressed. After reviewing the results of the vote and due to staff shortages in permanent
positions and a reorganization plan that was in transition, the strategic plan committee
and the library administration decided that with limited resources, only one strategy could
reasonably be addressed under the circumstances. That strategy was, "regularly review
each functional unit's primary services and resources to determine if they should be
continued, modified or discontinued” ([UHH] Edwin H. Mookini Library Strategic Plan
Strategy Vote Results, 2004: Strategy 1, Goal 3, Objective 2).

HawCC’s four-year cycle of program reviews includes the library, which will file a report
in November 2008.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               190
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

On May 6, 2003 a pilot study using a focus group to gather input about student
satisfaction with collections and services was conducted by the library. Six library
student assistants were the focus group participants, the Library Director served as
transcriber, a UH at Hilo librarian was the observer, and the Library Director from
Kapiolani Community College facilitated the session.

HawCC participates in the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE),
which includes questions students are asked about satisfaction of various campus
functions and services. CCSSE results may be used as indicators of effectiveness for the
library.

The UH system libraries have endorsed the use of LILO for teaching information literacy
skills. Because LILO is based on the ACRL information literacy competencies, student
learning outcomes (SLO’s) for information literacy can be more easily assessed by UH
libraries.

The Learning Center (TLC) and Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC)
at the Hilo site
TLC evaluates its services each fall semester. Responses to student and faculty
evaluation instruments provide evidence that services are used and necessary. HKATC
will be developing its first evaluation instrument for Fall 2006. The student evaluation
focuses on learner needs including tutor availability, tutor knowledge, tutor concern
about the student’s progress, and if the learning materials are helpful. The evaluation
also asks if the office assistants are helpful, if they enjoy working at the center and if the
work that they do helps them become better students. TLC’s evaluation was revised in
Fall 2005 because of the college’s focus on developing student learning outcomes.
Questions were developed to provide evidence of Student Learning Outcomes that are
related to TLC’s mission as well as the college’s ([HawCC], 2005a). General comments
are also received. Faculty evaluations ask faculty to rate the overall services of the
center, how satisfied they are with services, if they use our make-up exam service, if they
are getting TLC information, the overall effectiveness of the tutors, suggestions they
might have, and what they feel are our strengths, weakness, and also suggestions they
may have for our improvement.

To assess center usage, access, and relationship of the services to student learning, all of
the centers including the TLC and the HKATC keep user statistics and evaluations
(HawCC HKATC, 2005; [HawCC], 2005a). The HKATC is in the process of developing
its own evaluation instrument because it opened less than two years ago. Based on the
time of high usage, the majority of each center’s limited resources are concentrated in
those areas.

University of Hawai‘i, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning Center (WHLLC)
The WHLLC has not yet employed a formal system to evaluate the effectiveness of its
services and resources. The WHLLC librarian has attended workshops in recent years on
library service and on learning assessment as it applies to the community college. She
also attends the college Assessment Committee meetings on behalf of the Center, and in


                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                191
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

these ways is preparing for the application of new assessment models to the WHLLC.
The WHLLC will be included with Edwin H. Mookini Library in the 2008 ARL
LibQual+ self evaluation program.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard.

Library at East Hawai‘i
Continuing staff shortages in the library have not allowed the strategic plan to be fully
utilized to assess the quantity, quality, depth and variety of the library collections and
services. However, more assessment information can be obtained from the program
review process, which has been implemented by both campuses. During Spring 2006, the
system-wide Library Council developed, in consultation with the Chief Academic
Officers group (VCAA’s and DOI’s), a draft program review template for community
college use. The library is scheduled to submit its program review for HawCC in Fall
2008, using the template ([UH Library Council], 2006b).

The temporary HawCC librarian has been assigned by the library director to write the
library’s program review for HawCC. A meeting on May 22, 2006 was held between the
Library Director, VCAA, temporary HawCC librarian, the Assessment Coordinator, and
the former HawCC librarian to discuss the format of the program review and the items to
be included. The template of standardized data elements was developed by the UH
Community Colleges’ Deans of Instruction/VCAA’s and was further modified and
approved by the UH Library Council to include SLO’s for library instruction ([UH
Library Council], 2006b).

In a review of the May 2003 focus group transcript ([UHH Library], 2003a), students
were generally satisfied with the assistance they received from librarians but would like
to see more remote access to internet-based resources. In addition, complaints about
excessive noise due to activities that take place on the library lanai were voiced. No
additional focus groups have been scheduled since 2003.

In Fall 2002 the HawCC librarian and the UH at Hilo instruction librarian consulted with
ENG 100 faculty and decided the librarians would administer pre-tests as well as post-
tests for ENG 100 library instruction units in order to gather more student learning
assessment data. UH at Hilo ENG 100 classes were already using WebCT, which allows
for easy tabulation of pre- and post-test results. In Spring 2003, the HawCC librarian did
a sample pre-test (anonymous) and post-test (with student name) using paper and pencil
to see if the library instruction process, including the LAP, helped students learn basic
information literacy skills in 8 sections of ENG 100 ([Okuma], 2004). In the pre-test,
118 students scored an average of 73%. In the post-test, 125 scored an average of 85%, a
difference of +12%. The results indicate that the process of completing the LAP, taking
the quiz and reviewing the LAP’s content did contribute to students’ acquisition of
specific information literacy skills.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               192
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

With LILO, submissions by students are done incrementally on a worksheet turned in
electronically to the ENG 100 instructor and to the instruction librarian if he or she
wishes. During Fall 2005, two HawCC ENG 100 instructors utilized selected modules of
LILO and found many of its features and the worksheet very useful for assessing specific
SLO’s in information literacy. At Leeward Community College, an English 100
instructor provided her instruction librarian with student feedback about LILO. The
librarian then circulated the information to the UHLILC (Matsumoto, 2005).

The Learning Center (TLC) and Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC)
at East Hawai‘i
TLC and HKATC meet this standard. Student and Faculty evaluations are used to
determine how, what, and when services are provided at the TLC. Evaluations are
compiled and discussed at the area coordinators’ meeting and shared at all staff meetings
and trainings sessions. Student evaluations have been good. Evaluation responses are
usually in the high range for faculty--“good” to “excellent”--and in the high range for
students—“agree” to “strongly agree.” We conduct evaluations during the twelfth week
of the Fall semester so users have had time to become familiar with the services.
Additional comments that users have are the need for more tutors, controlling noise, time
available, and more space. Based on user statistics plans are adjusted to allocate more
funds to the area with higher usage. Based on our 2004-2005 statistics in the TLC, our
high usage is in the Reading area with 7,419 student contacts, followed by ESL with
4,060, and general usage at 5,843. Overall the TLC collects data for nine other areas with
a total of 21,963 student contacts for the 2004/05 academic year. At the HKATC the
areas of high usage are in the general area at 6,858, Internet at 2,649, placement testing at
1794, math at 1628 and Reading at 1103. HKATC also collects data in 10 other areas
with a total of 16,683 student contacts for the 2004 – 2005 school year. Overall, the
number of student contacts for the TLC/HKATC is 38,664 (HawCC HKATC, 2005;
HawCC The Learning Center, 2005; [HawCC], 2005a).

An area that could be improved is increasing the number of faculty evaluations. Aside
from formal evaluations, the centers have much contact with faculty and center users.
Adjustments can be made immediately to provide necessary services.

 To address how services are assessed in regard to student learning, one of the questions
in the student evaluation asks students if their work in TLC helps them become a better
student. In Fall 2004, 90% of the 146 students who submitted surveys responded in the
“highly agree” to “strongly agree” categories. These student responses are tied to the
goal of assisting students to become independent learners. This is the closest TLC gets to
determining if services affect overall student learning ([HawCC], 2005a).

Feedback from TLC users is taken very seriously. Aside from the formal evaluations,
constant informal dialogue with users and staff provides necessary information, which
affects how and what the Centers provide.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               193
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services


University of Hawai‘i, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning Center (WHLLC)
There were several questions regarding the WHLLC on two user satisfaction surveys
done at the Center in Spring 2006. This data will be used in the Center review starting in
Summer 2006.

A general service and satisfaction survey, modeled on one done periodically by another
community college in the UH system, was done in Spring 2002 ([Gregory], 2002). The
survey showed that students and instructors were generally satisfied with the help they
received, but were not happy about the cramped space. They recognized that the amount
of materials on site was limited, and adapted to this by using electronic periodicals and
the internet. Because of the small size of the facility, immediate, informal help is
emphasized. Informal dialogue and comments from both students and the limited
number of instructors stationed at the Center are used to gain feedback and improve
services and materials as the budget allows.

Certain issues continue to surface regarding service and equipment in the WHLLC. The
first is the lack of space, for informal study, for tutoring, and for the administration of
proctored tests. Students often solve the first issue by studying outside the building in
two covered areas that contain a couple of picnic tables and benches. While these areas
are shaded by overhanging roofs, they are open to the weather and the distractions of the
parking lot and the bar next to the WHLLC. Tutors also resort to these marginal spaces
when attempting to find a spot to sit down with a student for a tutorial session.

There is a need for upgrading or replacement of computer workstations on a regular
schedule. While the majority of the workstations are XP compatible now, the WHLLC
still has several workstations that run on the Windows 98 operating system. These
workstations are slow, tend to freeze up, and are no longer technically supported by the
UH system ITS group (only XP and higher). To address this need, computer replacement
has been identified as a priority and was included in the 2007-09 biennium budget.

A related issue, which affects the entire center, is the lack of assigned ITS staff to West
Hawai‘i. While the Hilo based staff is responsible and responsive to the network and
computer workstation needs of the center, the 100 plus miles between the Hilo campus
and the center make the scheduling of routine maintenance and emergency repairs a big
challenge.

Planning Agenda:

Library at East Hawai‘i
1. As librarian positions are filled with permanent staff and the library’s strategic plan is
   once again used to assess library services, the HawCC librarian will communicate the
   strategic planning goals and objectives to HawCC’s Academic Support Unit.

2. The HawCC librarian will consult with the VCAA and the Academic Support Unit
   while preparing the library program review.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               194
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services

3. The HawCC librarian will work with faculty to develop SLO’s and assessment
   rubrics for library instruction in remedial, developmental, ESL and transfer level
   courses. SLO’s will include various levels of information literacy.

The Learning Center (TLC) and Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center (HKATC)
at East Hawai‘i
The TLC/HKATC will be doing a program review that is due November 2006. Part of
the program review process will be used to revise the evaluation tool to better assess
student learning. The HKATC will develop its initial evaluation tool to be implemented
by Fall 2006. The coordinator will initiate a program review, which will identify goals
and objectives that support student learning outcomes. TLC’s Coordinator will be
responsible for the program review for TLC and HKATC due in November 2006. The
HKATC’s Manager will be responsible for developing an assessment tool for evaluation
to be used for Fall 2006.

University of Hawai‘i, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning Center (WHLLC)
1. The WHLLC will participate in the 2006 Program/Unit review for the West Hawai'i
   campus and use it to assess effectiveness in meeting students’ learning needs.

2. In 2008, the WHLLC will participate in the ARL LibQual+ self evaluation program
   and will review the results to determine priorities for planning and improvement.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              195
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs -- References


                               Standard IIA: References

American Culinary Federation. (2006). Accredited culinary programs. St. Augustine,
Florida: author. Retrieved May 12, 2006 from http://www.acfchefs.org/drctaccr.html
Commission on English Language Program Accreditation. (2006, May 6). CEA
accredited programs and institutions. Alexandria, VA: author. Retrieved May 12, 2006
from http://www.cea-accredit.org/accredited.php

Dykstra, D. (2005, December 5). CERC review procedures and functions [memo].
Hilo: HawCC.

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date a). Academic development plan 2002-2010. Hilo:
author. Retrieved July 5, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/hawccadp.htm

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date b). CCSSE 2002 documentation. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 14, 2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/CCSSE
2002 Documentation.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date c). CCSSE 2004 documentation. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 14, 2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/CCSSE
2004 Documentation.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date d). Graduate leaver survey academic year end
2002-2004. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/Grad Leaver Survey Results
AYE02_03_04.xls

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date e.). HawCC administrative policies and
procedures manual. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/adminsvcs/adminmanual.htm

[Hawai‘i Community College]. (no date f). Index [to course outline and syllabi]. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2000). Grant application for the strengthening
institutions program Title III, 1999-2004. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2003?). Strengthening Hawaiian Studies access and
academic quality [Title III], 2004-2009. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2004). System wide return to industry program. Hilo:
author.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              196
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs -- References

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005a). 2005-2006 Program health indicators,
accounting (ACC). Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005b). General catalog 2005-2006. Hilo: author. Also
available at http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/learningresources/2006catalog.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006a, February 2). Program/Unit Review Process. Hilo:
author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program%20Reviews/AC%20PR%20Review
%20Process.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006b, May 18). Hawai‘i Community College assessment
website. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 14, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006c, June 1). Initiate a new course. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/curricula/Forms/Proposal%20to%20Initiate%20New%20C
ourse%20All%20Forms%20June%201%202006.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006d, June 16). Curricula affairs protocol. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 16, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/curricula/

[Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate]. (n.d.).

Hawai‘i Community College faculty and instructional staff professional standards and
ethics. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/sd/facultyethics.htm

[Hawai‘i Community College] Academic Senate. (2005a, October 28). Minutes, Senate
program review template. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 5, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.ag.sup.oct/oct.28.supportingdocuments.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate. (2005b, December 2). Charter. Hilo:
author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/charter.htm

[Hawai‘i Community College] Academic Senate. (2006, February 24). Agenda
Academic Senate February 24, 2006. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.ag.sup.feb.06.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate Educational Policy Committee. (2005)
Minutes. Hilo: author. Retrieved January 21, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.edpolicy.min.htm




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              197
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs -- References

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate Educational Policy Committee. (2006,
April 28). Review of the curriculum process report. Hilo: author. Retrieved June 16,
2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/curr.review.procedures.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Assessment Committee. (2006). Course and program
SLO’s and maps. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College College Council. ([2006?]). Draft College Council
program/unit review standardized assessment tool. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Office of Continuing Education and Training. (2006).
Learning for those on-the-go 2006 spring-summer non-credit schedule. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 16, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/ocet/Catalog.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College Office of the Provost. (2001, February 21). Course review
policy and procedures. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 15, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/adminsvcs/haw5.000.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Staff Development. (n.d.). Faculty/staff handbook. Hilo:
author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/sd/sdhandbook.htm

[Hawai‘i Community College Staff Development Committee]. (n.d.). Staff Development
Activities, Fall 2000-Spring 2006. Hilo: author.

Leeward Community College. (2006). Hawai‘i National Great Teachers Seminar. Pearl
City, HI: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from http://www.greatteacher.hawaii.edu/

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. (2005). NY: author. Retrieved
June 16, 2006 from http://www.nlnac.org/manuals/NLNACManual2005.pdf

Onishi, J. and M. Wong. (2005, August 23). Information needed for accreditation self-
study, questions for department/division chairs [memo]. Hilo: HawCC.

Robison, B. (2006, January 9). HawCC Reading Lab. Hilo: HawCC. Retrieved June
16, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/wwwreading/default.html

Rota, M. (2004, June 15). E-mail correspondence and UHCC policy conversion
analysis.

Tsunoda, J. (2001, May 1). Revised faculty minimum qualifications and salary
placement guidelines (memorandum). Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai'i. (2006a, February 24). Frequently asked questions (FAQs) about
DL at UH. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 15, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/dl/general/resources/



                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             198
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs -- References

University of Hawai'i. (2006b, May 1). Articulation agreements within the UH system.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/vpaa/system_aa/articulation/articulation.html

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2002a, October 18). Chapter 1, General
provisions. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch1.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2002b, October 18). Chapter 5, Academic
Affairs. Honolulu: author. Retrieved May 5, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/borp/borpch5.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents and Office of the President. (2002, June).
University of Hawai‘i system strategic plan 2002-2010. Honolulu: author. Retrieved
June 14, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/stratplan/UHstratplan.pdf

[University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges]. (1985, October 11). CCCM #6002
Review of provisional and established academic programs. Honolulu: author. Retrieved
June 16, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CCCM_PDF/6002-101185.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (1991). CCCM #6100 Policies and
procedures for approval of new and modified courses. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June
16, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CCCM_PDF/6100-082891.pdf

[University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges]. (1998, April). CCCM #2600 (revised)
Statement on professional ethics (faculty). Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006
from http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CCCM_PDF/2600-040198.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2002, September). Strategic Plan, 2002-
2010. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CC_Strategicpl/strategic%20plan.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2005a). Guidelines for tenure and
promotion 2005-2006. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/geninfo/ptguide.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2005b, October). UHCCP #5.202 Review
of established programs. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/UHCCP_5.202-
Review_of_Established_Programs.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2006, April 25). Reports online.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/iro/maps.htm

University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. (2004, July
16). Progress report on student and credit transfer within the University of Hawai'i.


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              199
Standard IIA: Instructional Programs -- References

Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/vpaa/vpaa_memo/Progress_Report_on_Student_and_Credit_Tran
sfer.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice President for Planning and Policy. (1998a,
May). E5.204 University of Hawai‘i distance learning plans, policies, and procedures.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved May 1, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/dl/ppp.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice President for Planning and Policy. (1998b,
June). E 5.209 University of Hawai‘i System Student Transfer and Inter-campus
Articulation. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e5/e5209.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice President for Planning and Policy. (1999, June
15). E5.210 Institutional accountability and performance. Honolulu: author. Retrieved
June 16, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e5/e5210.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly. (2003, April 24). 2003-2009 Agreement
between the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly and the Board of Regents of
the University of Hawai'i. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/2003-2009-uhpa-uh-bor-agreement.pdf/view

University of Hawai‘i Vice President for Student Affairs. (1999, June). E 7.205
Administrative policy and procedures governing system-wide student disciplinary
sanctions. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 16, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e7/e7205.pdf

Yamane, N. (2005, March 1). Memo, program health indicator report (PHI) 2004-2005.
Hilo: Hawai‘i Community College.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              200
Standard IIB: Student Support Services -- References


                              Standard IIB: References

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date a). CCSSE 2002 documentation. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 19, 2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/CCSSE
2002 Documentation.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date b). CCSSE 2004 documentation. Hilo: author.
Retrieved June 19, 2006 from http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/CCSSE
2004 Documentation.doc

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date c). Counselor log. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date d). Initial student survey. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date e). Running Start re-application form (for
students who want to continue into another semester/session). Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date f). SOAR packet. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (no date g). Student survey for accreditation. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2000, September). Accreditation self-study report. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2003, Fall). Counselor evaluation for… Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2004a). Student orientation evaluation results for Fall
2004. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2004b, October). Student orientation evaluation. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2004c, Spring). LSK 102: Evaluation for Spring 04.
Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005a). General catalog 2005-2006. Hilo: author. Also
available at http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/learningresources/catalog.html

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005b). Student Services personnel 2005-2006. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005c, April). Career Center feedback form. Hilo:
author.




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             201
Standard IIB: Student Support Services -- References

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005d, September). Career Center intake form 2005-
2006. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005e, December 20). New student checklist. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006a, Spring). Career Center feedback form. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006b, Spring). Running Start re-application form (for
students who want to continue into another semester/session). Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006c, Fall). Kama‘aina admission form. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Ha‘awi Kokua Program. (n.d.). Intake form for student
with a disability. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Office of the Provost. (1996, October 30). HAW 7.101
Student conduct code. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Office of the Provost. (1997, August 1). HAW 5.101
Student academic grievance policy. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Records Office. (2006, January 25). Request not to release
directory information. Hilo: author.

Tinto, V. (1975). Dropout from higher education: A theoretical synthesis of recent
research. Review of Educational Research, 45(1), 89-125.

University of Hawai‘i. (2006). System application form academic year 2006-2007.
Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (1997, January). Civil rights
nondiscrimination policy. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Office of the President. (1991, July). E 1.202 University
statement of nondiscrimination and affirmative action. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June
19, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e1/e1202.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Office of the President. (2005, October 1). Official notice to
faculty, staff and students regarding substance abuse in University campus communities
and worksites. Honolulu: author.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              202
Standard IIB: Student Support Services -- References

University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly. (2003, April 24). 2003-2009 Agreement
between the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly and the Board of Regents of
the University of Hawai'i. Honolulu: author. Retrieved June 19, 2006 from
http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/2003-2009-uhpa-uh-bor-agreement.pdf/view




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             203
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services -- References


                               Standard IIC: References

Association of College and Research Libraries. (2000, January 18). Information literacy
competency standards for higher education. Chicago: author. Retrieved May 18, 2006
from http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/informationliteracycompetency.htm#stan

Golian-Lui, L. (2002, August 27). Mookini Library serials review project 2002. Hilo:
author.

Golian-Lui, L. (2006, June 8). Conversation about library budget and statistics. Hilo:
UHH.

[Gregory, L.] (2002). University of Hawai‘i Center, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning
Center User Survey, Spring 2002. Kealakekua: UHCWHLLC.

Hawai‘i Community College Hale Kea Advancement and Testing Center. (2005).
Academic year, 06/01/2004 to 05/31/2005. Hilo: author.

[Hawai‘i Community College] Learning Center. (2005a). Learning Center evaluations,
Fall 2005. Hilo: author.

[Hawai‘i Community College] Learning Center. (2005b). TLC evaluation by faculty
users, Fall 2005. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College The Learning Center. (2005). Academic year, 06/01/2004
to 05/31/2005. Hilo: author.

Hopson, M. (2006). University of Hawai‘i Center, West Hawai‘i Library and Learning
Center Test Proctoring Statistics 2001-2006. Kealakekua: UHCWHLLC.

[Lebbin, V.] (2006, January). LILO mapped to the information literacy competency
standards for higher education. Honolulu: author.

Matsumoto, Donna. (2005). Comments from campus English 100 students, Leeward
Community College, Fall 2005, compiled by Donna Matsumoto, English instructor.
Honolulu: author.

[Okuma, E.] (2001a). Library activities packet: An introduction to Mookini Library for
Hawai‘i Community College students. Hilo: Hawai‘i Community College.

Okuma, E. (2001b, November 19). Developing information literacy skills for ESL
students: The president’s educational improvement fund (EIF) 2001-2002. Hilo: Hawai‘i
Community College.

Okuma, E. (2003, May 12). READ collection worksheet. Hilo: author. Retrieved May
21, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/read/worksheet.html


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              204
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services -- References

[Okuma, E.] (2004). English 100 quiz, spring 2004. Hilo: [Hawai‘i Community
College].

Okuma, E., Abarca, T., Geary, G. (2004, February 24). [LILO (Learning information
literacy online): A UH system tutorial to ensure student success in information literacy, a
general education requirement]. The president’s educational improvement fund (EIF),
2003-2004. Hilo: Hawai‘i Community College.

Okuma, E. (2005a, August 29). Books for English as second language (ESL) readers.
Hilo: author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/read/ESL.htm

Okuma, E. (2005b, September 14). Mookini Library: The READ collection. Hilo:
Hawai‘i Community College. Retrieved May April 10, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/read/

Okuma, E. (2005c, September 14). Sabbatical report for 2004/05. Hilo: author.

Okuma, E. (2006, April 20). [Memo regarding Academic Senate ad hoc Distance
Education Committee]. Hilo: author.

Rogers, H. (2006, May 3). Telephone interview. Hilo: UHH.

Simone, A. (1991, January 3). Refined implementation plan for the separation of
Hawai‘i Community College from the University of Hawaii-Hilo. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawaii. (2006). Welcome to learning information literacy online at UH!
[Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Libraries Information Literacy Committee].

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Academic Affairs. (2004, July 1). Library Services
Position Organization Chart IIIF. Hilo: author.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Edwin H. Mookini Library. (n.d.). ITV/HITS faculty
reservation for library video/film. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/services/ITVHITSform.pdf

[University of Hawai‘i at Hilo] Edwin H. Mookini Library. (2004, January 7). Strategy
Vote Results. Hilo: author.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Edwin H. Mookini Library. (2006, May 3). Voyager
catalog. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/

[University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library]. (2003a, May 6). Transcript: Edwin H. Mookini
Library and Graphic Services library focus group. Hilo: author.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               205
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services -- References

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2003b, October 28). Ask-a-librarian email
service. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 18, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/services/ask_librarian.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2003c, October 28). Mookini library mission
statement. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/mookini/mission.htm

University of Hawai‘i Library. (2004, August 11). Reserve services. Hilo: author.
Retrieved May 21, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/services/reserves.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2005a, September 26). Loans from other
libraries. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 21, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/services/ill.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2005b, November 15). Library instruction. Hilo:
author. Retrieved May 21, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/services/library_instruction.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2005c, December 1). Library collections. Hilo:
author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/collections.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2005d, December 1). Research guides. Hilo:
author. Retrieved May 21, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/research_tools/guides.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2005e, December 12). Library services. Hilo:
author. Retrieved May 19, 2006
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/services.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2006a, January 5). Library hours. Hilo: author.
Retrieved May 18, 2006 from http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/library_hours.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2006b, January 23). Find books, periodicals, and
audiovisual materials. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 18, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/books.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2006c, February 17). Full-text articles. Hilo:
author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/articles/fulltext.htm

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2006d, February 21). Collection development
policy. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/policies/coll_dev_policy.htm


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              206
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services -- References



University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2006e, May 3). Title begins with … find
periodicals. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 19, 2006 from http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Library. (2006f, May 8). Collection development
librarians. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 19, 2006, from
http://library.uhh.hawaii.edu/lib_services/services/coll_dev_liaisons.htm

[University of Hawai‘i Information Technology Services]. ([2005a]). Distance learning
student survey 1. Honolulu: author.

[University of Hawai‘i Information Technology Services]. ([2005b]). Distance learning
student survey 1. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Institutional Research Office. (2005, May). Fall enrollment report:
Fall 2004, table 1. [Honolulu]: author.

University of Hawai‘i Library Council. (n.d.a). EbscoHost usage, 2002/03-2004/05.
[Honolulu]: author.

University of Hawai‘i Library Council. (n.d.b). Monthly statistics of database/index
logins – spring 2003. [Honolulu]: author.

University of Hawai‘i Library Council. (2006a, May). University of Hawai‘i System
Library data fiscal year 2001-2005. Honolulu: author.

[University of Hawai‘i Library Council]. (2006b, May 1). Hawai‘i community colleges
library program review procedures and measures. Honolulu: author.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              207
Standard IIC: Library and Learning Support Services -- References




                        This page intentionally left blank.




                      Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                           208
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________


                                 Standard III: Resources

The institution effectively uses its human, physical, technological, and financial
resources to achieve its broad educational purposes, including stated student-learning
outcomes, to improve institutional effectiveness.

A. Human Resources
   The institution employs qualified personnel to support student learning programs
   and services wherever offered and by whatever means delivered to improve
   institutional effectiveness. Personnel are treated equitably, are evaluated regularly
   and systematically, and are provided opportunities for professional development.
   Consistent with its mission, the institution demonstrates its commitment to the
   significant educational role played by persons of diverse backgrounds by making
   positive efforts to encourage such diversity. Human resource planning is
   integrated with institutional planning.


A.1. The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by
employing personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training, and
experience to provide and support these programs and services.

Descriptive Summary:

Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC) employs qualified faculty, staff, and
administrators to meet the needs of students enrolled in its educational programs. Quality
is assured by requiring a prescribed evaluation process administered at regular intervals
in order to assess personnel effectiveness and encourage improvement, and by upholding
the ethical standards of all personnel.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard; however, a planning agenda is included for on-going
institutional evaluation and improvement. The college assures the integrity and quality of
its programs and services by employing personnel who are qualified. HawCC’s
comprehensive hiring process begins with a committee review of all applications,
followed by interviews, which may include demonstrations and examinations.

Faculty, Administrators, and Administrative/Professional/Technical (APT) Personnel
HawCC encourages diversity in its applicant pool and the equitable treatment of all
applicants by advertising its faculty, administrative, and APT position vacancies locally
and globally. Announcements are posted on the world-wide web at the University of
Hawai‘i (UH) Work at UH (UH, 2006b). In addition, vacancies are publicized in local
and state newspapers (Hawai‘i Tribune Herald and/or West Hawai‘i Today, and in the
Honolulu Star Bulletin).



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               209
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________

Department and Division Chairs, in consultation with Vice Chancellors, Deans, or
Directors, determine the duties listed in job advertisements. UH Administrative Policy
A9.540, Recruitment and Selection of Faculty, Administrative, and APT Personnel (UH
Office of Human Resources [OHR], 2002) is consistently followed in all hiring
situations.

Each faculty job advertisement must include the minimum qualifications (MQs) specified
in the University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges (UHCC) System document, Revised
Faculty Minimum Qualifications and Salary Placement Guidelines, (UH CC, 2001).
Desirable qualifications (DQs) are usually included in each ad and are determined by the
discipline, department, division, or unit head via dialogue with the appropriate
administrator.

After the job vacancy is advertised, a screening/interview committee is formed. The
EEO/AA Coordinator ensures that membership on the selection committee is equitable
and diverse.

Selection committee members meet with the appropriate administrator or supervisor and
the EEO/AA Coordinator to review hiring procedures (HawCC, 2004b). The committee
then determines strategies to rate each applicant, often including teaching demonstrations,
role playing, examinations, and interview questions. These must all be pre-approved by
the EEO/AA Coordinator prior to the committee members’ review of applications.

Applicants who do not meet the MQs are not considered. A degree from a non-U.S.
institution is recognized only if it is determined to be equivalent to a degree established
by the UH Graduate School at Manoa. Applications that meet MQs are then rated with
the pre-approved rating system developed by the committee. This process ensures that all
applicants are provided fair and equitable treatment.

The selection committee interviews the top candidates based on the rating system. The
committee then determines the strengths and weaknesses of these candidates. The
assessment of strengths and weaknesses is forwarded to the appropriate administrator
who then conducts his/her own assessment of the top candidates. The administrator’s
recommendation is forwarded to the Chancellor who makes the final selection.

Clerical and Custodial Personnel
The clerical and custodial civil service recruitment process is governed by the rules and
regulations of the State Department of Human Resource Development (DHRD).
Applications for these positions are sent directly to DHRD. Job announcements for
clerical and janitorial staff are published on the web at the Rainbow of Opportunities
through the UH Office of Human Resources (OHR) (UH OHR, 2006b).

Systematic Performance Evaluations
In addition to ensuring the integrity and quality of its programs and services through the
initial hiring process, HawCC requires a systematic performance evaluation of all



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               210
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                     ________

personnel. Evaluation procedures are in place for all tenured and non-tenured faculty,
lecturers, APT, civil service staff, and administrators.

Faculty are evaluated regularly during the probationary period in accordance with Section
9-15 of the Board of Regents’ (BOR) policies (UH BOR, 2005). Tenure-track faculty
may apply for tenure after completing five years of successful probation. They must
submit scheduled self-analyses of their own performance of their duties and participation
in college and community service activities pertinent to their area of expertise. The
Community Colleges’ Contract Renewal Suggested Guidelines (UH CC, 2005a) and the
Tenure and Promotion Guidelines (UH CC, 2005b) provide written criteria for faculty to
measure their teaching effectiveness and commitment of service to their college and
community.

Faculty effectiveness is measured through self, student, peer, and administrative
evaluations. Students rate each instructor and course on a variety of issues. In addition,
written comments and feedback are collected. Peer reviewers may use a form selected by
the faculty member or may be written in a narrative format. Division or Department
Chairs generally write a narrative evaluation.

The Division Personnel Committee (DPC) consisting of tenured faculty, the Division or
Department Chair, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and Chancellor are
included in the review process for contract renewal or tenure/promotion. Faculty
applying for tenure or promotion are additionally evaluated by the Tenure and Promotion
Review Committee (TPRC), which is composed of five tenured faculty: two members
from other University of Hawai‘i System campuses and three members from HawCC.

Non-tenure track faculty are annually reviewed and must adhere to the same promotion
process as other faculty. The Division/Dept. Chair selects the evaluation instrument and
the appropriate person to conduct lecturer evaluations. Newly hired lecturers are
evaluated in their first semester of teaching. All lecturers are evaluated on a regular
basis.

Evaluation procedures are in place for civil service staff, as stated in the State of Hawai‘i
Employee Performance Appraisal, HRD 526, 527, 529 (Hawai‘i Department of HRD,
2001). The annual civil service performance appraisal process includes performance
planning, observations, monitoring, and coaching throughout the appraisal period, and a
final conference with the supervisor to review the past and plan for the future.

A newly designed evaluation process has been instituted for APTs (UH OHR, 2006a).
These procedures are systematic and conducted annually by appropriate supervisors.

The Chancellor conducts annual evaluations of Executive/Managerial personnel. A 360
Assessment Online Evaluation is available for any administrator wishing to participate
(UH OHR, 2003). The evaluation group consists of peers, constituents, and subordinates
selected by the participating administrator. The UH System conducts this evaluation and
results are sent to the Chancellor and the UH President. The Chancellor meets with each


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               211
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                    ________

administrator to discuss his/her accomplishments, goals/objectives, and results of the 360
Assessment.

The Chancellor of HawCC is evaluated by the UH President and the Vice President for
Community Colleges. A performance appraisal, which includes a self-assessment of the
year’s accomplishments, is submitted annually. The optional 360 Assessment Online
Evaluation may be requested, with results forwarded to the President.

The college is committed to uphold the professional ethics of all personnel and follows
state policies that define ethical behavior and situations (Hawaii, 2005). In addition to
the general state ethics guidelines there are other University policies regarding conflict of
interest, Executive Policy E5.214, Conflicts of Interest, (UH Vice President for Research
and Graduate Education, 1995), outside employment, A9.240 Record of Outside
Employment, (UH Personnel Management Office, 1982), nepotism (UH OHR, 2001), and
use and management of information technology resources, Executive Memorandum No.
99-7 (UH Office of the Senior VP for Administration, 1999). Ethics guidelines are
periodically distributed to all personnel to assure institutional integrity in conformance
with established standards.

To promote and guide the professional conduct of Hawai‘i Community College faculty
and instructional staff, the Academic Senate recently engaged in a serious review and
discussion to develop a code of professional conduct. As a result, the Academic Senate
voted to accept the Hawai‘i Community College Faculty and Instructional Staff
Professional Standards and Ethics document at its April 1, 2005 meeting (HawCC
Academic Senate [AS], 2005).

Dialogue is a part of the on-going improvement of the hiring process. Human Resources
personnel meet regularly to discuss system-wide issues and concerns; to assess and
improve the clarity, understandability, accessibility, and appropriateness of its
publications; to ensure that policies and procedures are in place and enforced to provide a
safe, equitable, and diverse working environment. The Vice Chancellors of Academic
Affairs from the various campuses periodically review the minimum qualifications of
faculty positions to define/redefine and judge the scholarship of candidates in particular
disciplines as needed.

Dialogue that includes faculty and staff is also part of every recruitment process through
the formation of a selection committee. These committees are monitored by the EEO/AA
Officer of the college not only to ensure the fair and equitable treatment of all applicants
but also to ensure that the committees are made up with those who are knowledgeable to
determine the suitability of the candidates for the recruited positions. In addition, the
EEO/AA Officer ensures that each selection committee is balanced for equity and
diversity.

Personnel are systematically evaluated at specific intervals. Written criteria for
evaluations include the performance of assigned duties. The evaluation processes seek to
evaluate the effectiveness of personnel and encourages dialogue with supervisors to


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               212
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                    ________

improve and to set goals. All evaluations and actions taken are formal, timely,
confidential, and documented.

The college has made an institutional commitment to review every educational program
and unit for the purpose of ongoing evaluation and improvement to help serve students
better by determining staffing needs on a data driven basis. The college has completed
the reviews of 12 program and/or unit reviews, and is committed to complete the cycle of
reviews by 2008 when a total of 44 programs and units of the college will have been
reviewed (HawCC, 2006).

With each Program Review, there has been an attempt to include all personnel directly
responsible for the achievement of Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) in the dialogue to
formulate program SLOs. The dialogue and process continues as each program makes
the necessary changes to course content, sequencing, and assessment strategies to
evaluate the program’s effectiveness to achieve these SLOs.

Institutional commitment to ongoing evaluation, planning, and improvement is evidenced
through the guidance of the ad hoc Assessment Committee. This committee oversees the
general direction and improvement of the college’s program review process, monitors the
progress of each program/unit in the review process and provides assistance and guidance
through a cadre of trained faculty to complete the Program/Unit Reviews as scheduled
(HawCC, 2006).

In addition, the Assessment Committee has planned numerous college-wide activities to
improve the college’s ability to understand and define student learning, to develop and
incorporate SLOs in educational programs and courses, and to develop methods and
instruments to assess these SLOs. Dr. Ruth Stiehl, nationally recognized for her work
with outcomes-based teaching/learning, has provided much needed guidance and training
to make the necessary changes to improve the quality of the learning environment for our
students. Since 2004, Dr. Stiehl has worked with individual programs and the college as
a whole on several different occasions to provide training in program mapping, Student
Learning Outcomes (SLOs), and assessment of SLOs. She has walked the college
through the beginning stages of transformation and improvement at HawCC (HawCC,
2005a).

The Assessment Committee has been instrumental in planning the last two annual All-
College Day events. On March 4, 2005, the All-College Day event was devoted to
formally informing everyone about the accreditation process. On March 3, 2006, the All-
College Day event involved the College in two major activities. The first was revisiting
the mission statement and creating a vision statement; the second was engaging the
college in dialogue and providing feedback to the Accreditation Standard Committees
regarding the planning agenda items that have been included in this Self-Study Report
(HawCC, 2006).

The college’s commitment to the program review process and on-going institutional
dialogue and improvement is also evidenced by the actions of the Academic Senate,


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              213
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________

which includes all faculty, and the College Council, which includes representatives from
every program, unit, and employee category. Both governance bodies have been
included in the Program Review process and have reviewed and discussed the first cohort
of program/unit reviews as indicated on the CERC flow chart (HawCC, 2006). In
addition, the Academic Senate and College Council have been included in discussions
with the Chancellor and his administrative team on the allocation of funds for human
resources in the 2007-2009 Biennium Budget requests from the college (HawCC
Academic Senate [AS], 2006) (HawCC AS Executive Committee, 2006a; 2006b)
(HawCC College Council, 2006a; 2006b).

Progress is being made to incorporate the effectiveness to produce SLOs as a component
of the evaluation of faculty and others directly responsible for student learning outcomes.
 Recently, a draft of a modified Faculty Classification Plan that incorporates the
responsibility of faculty to promote and help students to achieve SLOs was developed.
This document still needs to be reviewed at the system level before being circulated to
the faculty union (UHPA) and faculty governance bodies.

The college is committed to upholding the professional ethics of all its personnel. The
Academic Senate, which is represented by all faculty, has made a strong and sincere
commitment to promote and foster a safe and ethical environment for faculty,
instructional staff, and students by adhering to their recently accepted Professional
Standards and Ethics code of conduct. To maintain its commitment, the Academic
Senate has taken responsibility to distribute and inform all newly-hired faculty of these
Professional Standards and Ethics, to disseminate and review this written code with all
faculty and instructional staff every semester, and to make revisions as needed through
the Academic Senate (HawCC AS, 2005).

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will support the UH System in its effort to modify the Faculty
   Classification Plan which evaluates faculty effectiveness to promote and help students
   achieve student learning outcomes.

2. The college will continue to improve and refine the program review/resource
   allocation process that the college has begun.


A.2. The institution maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty with full-time
responsibility to the institution. The institution has a sufficient number of staff and
administrators with appropriate preparation and experience to provide the
administrative services necessary to support the institution’s mission and purposes.

Descriptive Summary:

Historically, Hawai‘i Community College has had an on-going process to assess human
resource needs. Recently, the college has begun a formal data-driven program review


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               214
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________

process to identify human resource needs, to prioritize based on the strategic planning
goals, and to allocate resources. This review process allows the college to have a more
organized method of communication and decision making. This organization also
supports learning in that each of the programs and units will have an opportunity to be
reviewed for its effectiveness in supporting student learning outcomes and the mission of
the college. This process will also allow for the ongoing and systematic cycle of
evaluation of programs and units, integrated institutional planning, implementation, and
re-evaluation.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard; however, a planning agenda is included to evaluate,
improve, and refine the program review process to effectively allocate its resources to
support learning.

There are several ways that the college determines the sufficiency of staffing for each
program and service. Bi-monthly meetings of the Division/Department Chairs of each
instructional program with the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs allow for
discussions regarding human, physical, and other resource needs on a regular basis.
Projected enrollments and vacancies, leaves, or reassigned duties for faculty and lecturers
determine the Division/Department’s human resource needs. Based on these discussions,
each Chair assesses whether classes should be taught by full-time or adjunct faculty. The
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is notified about any impending faculty vacancies
so that recruitment processes can be initiated to fill these vacancies.

All non-instructional programs and units review their on-going staffing needs on a
regular basis. These staffing needs are brought to the administrative team for further
dialogue by the respective vice chancellors, deans or directors of the programs or units.
The college uses the Quarterly Vacancy Report (UH, 2006a), which is an updated listing
of all vacant positions for discussion and prioritization based on the Academic
Development Plan and current needs of the college.

In addition to these on-going department/unit and administrative assessments of human
resources, the college now has a program review process that will allow for a more
formal, data-driven assessment of human resource needs. This process will allow
instructional programs to statistically gauge the efficiency of the FTE teaching load by
cross-checking data elements for student semester hour output and class fill rates. Non-
instructional units will also be able to gauge efficiency of staffing levels, although the
measures will vary from unit to unit depending upon the nature of the service provided.

In November 2005, the first cohort of 12 Program/Unit Reviews was completed. These
Program/Unit Reviews were reviewed by the College Effectiveness Review Committee
(CERC) and later, by the Academic Senate and College Council. The Academic Senate
based their review on the program/unit’s effectiveness in promoting the mission of the
College. The College Council based their review on the program/unit’s effectiveness in
fulfilling the goals of the Academic Development Plan. Their input was forwarded to the


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               215
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________

Chancellor. The process is indicated on the CERC Flow Chart (HawCC, 2006). Using
the data from the Program/Unit Reviews along with other information, the administrative
team prioritized requests for additional staffing needs, mindful of the college’s mission
and the goals set by the college’s Academic Development Plan and UH System and UH
Community College System Strategic Plans, to prepare the 2007-2009 biennium budget.

Planning Agenda:

The college will continue with the projected plan to review all of the programs and units
of the college by 2008 and concurrently to improve the program review process. The
college will align the timetables for the review process with the biennium budget cycle to
maximize the opportunity for college-wide dialogue and input.


A.3. The institution systematically develops personnel policies and procedures that are
available for information and review. Such policies and procedures are equitably and
consistently administered.

Descriptive Summary:

Personnel policies and procedures are well defined and developed through a system-wide
process for all campuses of the UH system. All personnel policies and procedures are
consistently and equitably administered and are available for information and review.

The Personnel Officer and staff maintain accurate and complete personnel records.
These records are confidential and kept in a secure, locked location with restricted
access. Employees may request an appointment with the Personnel Officer to view their
files.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. Institutional integrity is demonstrated by its concern and
commitment to provide honest, truthful information and to provide fair and equitable
treatment of all personnel.

Personnel policies and procedures are comprehensive and not limited to conditions for
employment (salaries, promotion, etc.), but include hiring practices, EEO/AA policies,
policies on non-discrimination, grievance, and complaint. The University of Hawai‘i’s
system-wide Administrative Procedures Information System (APIS) contains the
following information and can be found on the UH web site (UH, 2000):
    • Board of Regents’ Policies,
    • UH Systemwide Administrative Procedures,
    • UH Systemwide Executive Policies,
    • State of Hawai‘i Civil Service Policies and Procedures, and
    • UH Administrative Rules


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               216
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                  ________

In addition, union contract agreements for faculty and staff are negotiated between the
employer and the unions. The articles within these contracts serve as guidelines for
development and implementation of specific UH system-wide policies and procedures.
The following union contract agreements have been distributed to all members and are
available for information and review:
    • 2003-2009 Agreement Between the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly
        (UHPA) and Board of Regents of the University (UH, 2003)
    • Unit 3 (Clerical) Non-Supervisory Employees, Contract Agreement, July 1, 2005-
        June 30, 2007 (UH System, 2005a)
    • Unit 8 (APT), Administrative Professional & Technical Employees of the
        University of Hawai‘i, Contract Agreement, July 1, 2005-June 30, 2007 (UH,
        2005b)
    • Unit 1 Agreement, UPW, AFSCME, Local 646, AFL-CIO (United Public
        Workers, 2003)

Planning Agenda:

None.


A.4. The institution demonstrates through policies and practices an appropriate
understanding of and concern for issues of equality and diversity.

Descriptive Summary:

The Board of Regents (BOR) and the Office of the UH System President have established
policies that advocate, support, and ensure the fair treatment of the college’s diverse
personnel. These include policies on unlawful discrimination, anti-harassment, persons
with disabilities, equal employment opportunity, drug-free workplace and campus,
violence in workplace, and gender equity. These policies are available for viewing and
printing at the UH system website at http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy

In addition to the various Board and system policies that define the appropriate treatment
of employees and support all institutional constituencies, there is extensive language in
all collective bargaining unit agreements that define employee rights. These rights ensure
fairness in benefits and working conditions.

The Director of Equal Employment Opportunity at the Associate Vice President for
Community Colleges’ office is responsible for the overall community colleges’ system
implementation of EEO/AA Policies. The HawCC EEO/AA Coordinator is appointed to
implement the Affirmative Action Plan at the campus and has the lead role in
administering college hiring procedures. The Coordinator is responsible for overseeing
the recruitment of personnel and ensuring the strict adherence to all policies.

The EEO/AA Officer tracks and maintains annual employment figures and conducts in-
depth analyses of equity and diversity with federal affirmative action statistics. This

                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              217
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________

information can be found in the Affirmative Action Program Statement Policy 2003-2004
(HawCC, 2004a) that is published annually.

The college specifically advocates, supports, and ensures the fair treatment of students as
well. The Hawai‘i Community College General Catalog, 2005-2006 (HawCC, 2005b,
pp. 31-32) includes policies and grievance procedures on Sexual Harassment and Non-
Discrimination, Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action. A Student Grievance Committee
and Student Conduct Code Committee, made up of faculty, staff and students, are
selected each year. These committees meet when a grievance in either area is filed.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard; however, a planning agenda is included to facilitate
ongoing dialogue, evaluation, planning, and improvement of the college. The college
maintains its institutional integrity by providing an environment to support issues of
equity and by fostering an appreciation for diversity.

The EEO/AA Officer maintains the college’s employment record and monitors and
strongly advocates for the maintenance and/or improvement of a balance for equity and
diversity that is consistent with its mission. The University of Hawai‘i System advocates,
supports, and ensures the fair treatment of its diverse population of employees and
students.

In addition, HawCC has a newly created Cultural Transformation Initiative work group
that has planned and presented a mandatory series of sexual harassment/workplace
violence workshops for all faculty and staff (HawCC Cultural Transformation Initiative
Work Group, 2006). These workshops have provided an opportunity for training and
dialogue for faculty, staff, and administrators to provide a safer and equitable
environment for all employees and students.

Planning Agenda:

The college will continue to plan on-going staff development training that will ensure a
safe and equitable environment for all.


A.5. The institution provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for
continued professional development, consistent with the institutional mission and
based on identified teaching and learning needs.

Descriptive Summary:

The institutional mission of HawCC is to provide the community with a responsive
educational environment that empowers learners to develop skills and knowledge to be
responsible and productive in a complex world. To do this, faculty and staff must



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               218
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                    ________

maintain currency in their fields and develop the necessary teaching skills, abilities, and
tools to assist learners.

Staff development is provided to assist faculty and staff in these endeavors. Staff
development is extended to administration, faculty, and support staff. Activities include
on-campus workshops, skill training, new staff orientations, conference travel, and
faculty sabbaticals. All workshops and activities are evaluated by participants.

The college’s Staff Development Committee surveys the needs of all faculty and staff
and solicits suggestions for staff development activities. In addition, this committee
works with other groups such as the Assessment Committee and the Cultural
Transformation Work Group to coordinate focused college-wide training events.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard; however, a planning agenda is included to improve
institutional planning and commitment to staff development.

The HawCC Staff Development Committee works with the administrative team and with
groups such as the Assessment Committee and Cultural Transformation Workgroup to
plan and implement college-wide activities. This Committee also assesses and plans on-
going staff development training for specific needs and areas of interest.

A non-instructional day is set aside annually as part of a system wide institutional
commitment to staff development on the first Friday of March for educational activities
that would benefit the entire college. Since institutionalizing assessment has been a top
priority for the college, the Assessment Committee, working closely with the Staff
Development Committee, planned the March 4, 2005 All-College Learning Day to
formally kick-off and explain the need to institutionalize a continuous cycle of
assessment as part of the accreditation process to everyone at the college. The March 3,
2006 All-College Learning Day also focused on the needs of the assessment process and
was planned to accomplish two major goals. The first goal was to provide the
opportunity for faculty, staff, and student representatives to revisit the mission statement,
discuss the Four Cornerstones of the college, and develop a vision statement for the
college. Several discussion groups were formed to address these areas of concern and
interest. The results of these comprehensive group discussions were forwarded to a task
force for further refinement and will be presented to the college for approval. The second
goal was to provide a broad based opportunity for dialogue to provide feedback about the
proposed planning agendas for the 2006 Accreditation Self-Study Report.

Another area of college-wide attention has been on the cultural transformation initiative.
The first series of mandatory workshops were held from May 2005 through November
2005 to address issues of sexual harassment and workplace violence, to create a safer
environment for all, and to support and encourage diversity.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               219
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________

In addition to college-focused training, HawCC has been working with the University of
Hawai‘i Community Colleges (UHCC) to plan and coordinate staff development
activities. The development of student learning outcomes (SLOs) and program reviews
have been identified as shared concerns among all of the UH community colleges.
Therefore, the UHCC System has coordinated training, which was provided by Dr. Ruth
Stiehl, nationally recognized for her work with assessment and student learning
outcomes, and Skip Downing who addressed student-centered learning approaches.

The Wo Learning Champion group is also a system-wide commitment. The Wo
Foundation provides opportunities for innovation and improvement for faculty and staff.
Paul Pearsall’s “A Toxic Success: How to Stop Striving and Start Thriving” and Gwen
Fujie’s “Tongue Fu,” were sponsored by the Wo Foundation.

The Return to Industry Program is a system-wide initiative that is available to faculty.
Faculty members are paid a stipend during the summer to interview/visit ten business
sites. This allows faculty to dialogue with those who are in industry and develop SLOs
that are current with industry expectations and relevant to the community in which they
live and work (UH CC, 2004)

Every spring, a statewide Technology, Colleges, and Community (TCC) web conference
is made available, free of charge, to faculty and staff. This conference is a world-wide
event and includes expert presenters in the field of technology and education.
Presentations are on the Internet and include live chat, bulletin board, email, and text
presentations. TCC is produced by Kapiolani Community College (KapCC) (KapCC,
2005).

Distance education training opportunities are also available system-wide through the
Teaching and Learning with Electronic Networked Technologies (TALENT) program.
TALENT is a faculty development program supported by all campuses of the University
of Hawai‘i system. It provides Instructional Sessions and Resources to interested faculty
throughout the year (UH, 2005c).

Instructional sessions consist of various, semester offerings and the TALENT Summer
Institute. During fall and spring, TALENT hosts free Web Course Tools (WebCT)
workshops focusing on the on-line course management system. Introductory sessions on
how to use many of the system-supported software are available via one-on-one sessions.
Throughout the semester, TALENT broadcasts PBS teleconferences system-wide as well
as offers UH Manoa-based guest presentations delivered by visitors across the state.

During the summer, TALENT hosts the Summer Institute, a series of programs
comprised of an Internet-based course and various levels of hands-on workshops
(TALENT 101, 102 & 201). The focus of the institute is to present/discuss issues and
pedagogical strategies surrounding the design, creation, and delivery of Internet support-
course materials.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               220
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                   ________

Other system-wide training opportunities are available through the Hawai‘i Interactive
Television System (HITS). These course offerings are offered in response to department
or division requests through the UH at Hilo Media Center. The list of offerings can be
found at the Distance Learning Website (UHH, 2006).

The Hawai‘i National Great Teachers’ Seminar is a six-day summer retreat held on
Hawai‘i Island that brings teachers together to learn from each other and exchange
innovative developments in the design of the learning environment, as well as solutions
to teaching problems. Partial tuitions are provided for faculty members who wish to
attend this seminar. Leeward Community College (LCC) hosts this seminar (LCC,
2006).

Sabbatical, professional, and personal leaves are available for faculty. The guidelines
and application process are outlined in the union contract and managerial manuals.

Clerical staff is invited to an annual University of Hawai‘i Clerical Conference on Oahu.
It is a one-day event with speakers throughout the day. The UH at Hilo Auxiliary
Services Unit has an annual workshop for custodial staff.

Funding is available through an application process for faculty and staff to attend
additional professional development activities on other islands and the mainland.
Applications are available through the Staff Development Committee, which oversees
this fund. The applicant may apply for monies up to $100.

The University of Hawai‘i Center at West Hawai‘i faculty and staff are regularly notified
of staff development activities in Hilo; however, the distance is often prohibitive for
participation. The Center Director works with the college to align faculty and staff to
attend the college and system staff development activities. In addition, the Director
identifies and encourages appropriate staff development activities for faculty and staff as
part of their periodic evaluation to meet performance objectives.

New faculty and staff orientation sessions are held at the beginning of each academic
year. The day includes information from the Chancellor and other administrators,
Financial Aid Officer, Librarian, The Learning Center Coordinator, Student Government
Advisor, Counselor for the Disabled/Disadvantaged, and the Faculty and Staff
Development Chair (HawCC Staff Development Committee [SDC], 2004)

Staff development activities are open to all faculty and staff. From 2000 to 2005 there
were sixty-three staff development activities offered (HawCC SDC, 2005).

The Staff Development Committee reviews all activity evaluations to improve on-going
workshops and training and to organize future events. In addition, the Committee solicits
suggestions through email or written surveys to determine staff development needs. The
college has provided a wide range of staff development opportunities; however, more
needs to be done to improve institutional effectiveness in this area.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               221
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                    ________

The college has taken major steps to change the way things are done in the last two years.
The new program review process will require faculty and staff to be knowledgeable not
only in student learning outcomes and assessment but in the shared governance processes
of the college. The Cultural Trans-formation Initiative seeks to provide faculty, staff, and
students with a safe and accepting environment for all. The college also recognizes the
need for stronger commitment and institutional coordination of distance education.
Finally, HawCC is facing a new future with the development of two new campuses in
East and West Hawai‘i.

As these major changes and initiatives are implemented, the development of the college’s
most important resource must be at the forefront. Staff development must become much
more a part of overall institutional planning if the college is to continue in its successful
initial attempts to transform the culture and to change the way we “do business.”
Institutional commitment to staff development must not only be reflected in planning but
also in allocating a set budget for it. Currently, the Staff Development Committee
operates with no yearly budget. Although this Committee has done a great job
coordinating system-wide opportunities, tapping into different funding sources, and
directing people to their own division and/or department to support various activities, the
college must begin to set aside monies to invest in its human resources.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will reassess how staff development planning can be incorporated into
   institutional planning and will develop a plan of action. The college must direct the
   development of its human resources to achieve institutional goals.

2. The college will allocate a set budget for staff development.

3. The college will reevaluate faculty and staff orientations to ensure that all new
   employees understand and support the college’s commitment to providing a safe,
   equitable environment for all and to develop the necessary skills to provide a student-
   centered learning environment.


A.6. Human resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The
institution systematically assesses the effective use of human resources and uses the
results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

There are two areas of human resource planning that must be integrated into institutional
planning. The first is the planning of new hires. The college has begun the cycle of
planning with its program review process. This process has allowed the college to review
program and unit human resources needs, which, in turn, assists in the prioritization of
institutional allocation of resources in its biennium budget planning. As positions



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               222
Standard IIIA: Human Resources                                                  ________

become vacant, the college uses the Quarterly Vacancy Report (UH, 2006a) to evaluate
staffing needs and set priorities.

The second type of human resource planning is the development of existing college
personnel. Currently the Staff Development Committee plans and coordinates a variety
of on-going staff development activities and training for the college.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The college has taken the first major steps
toward a more systematic cycle of evaluation, integrated planning, implementation, and
reevaluation. As this process is refined and improved, the college will be able to
systematically identify human resources needs and prioritize the allocation of these
resources.

The college must take steps to integrate the development of existing human resources
with institutional planning. The college must assess current practices and funding
sources and develop a plan of action for the future. This plan should determine how the
college will systematically integrate human resource development with institutional
planning. It should also include a set budget to insure the financial support to plan and
implement staff development activities rather than relying primarily on other funding
sources.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will continue to evaluate and refine the program review process to
   allocate human resources in the biennium budget process.

2. The college will assess current staff development planning and develop a plan of
   action that would be integrated with institutional planning.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               223
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                               ________


B. Physical Resources
   Physical resources, which include facilities, equipment, land, and other assets
   support student learning programs and services and improve institutional
   effectiveness. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.

Overview
Hawai‘i Community College’s (HawCC) physical resources are located in three major
locations throughout the Big Island. In East Hawai‘i, the college is co-located with the
University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (UHH) on the Main/Upper Campus and the Manono
Campus. In West Hawai‘i, the campus is located in leased facilities in Kealakekua, near
Kailua-Kona. There are other locations throughout the island, such as the Pana‘ewa
Agricultural Park in Hilo, where instruction is offered by the college.

East Hawai‘i
HawCC shares its physical resources in multiple locations with the University of Hawai‘i
at Hilo (UHH). The Main/Upper Campus and the Manono Campus in Hilo are closely
located (UHH, 2005). The Pana‘ewa Agricultural Park is located nearby in Hilo.

The Main/Upper Campus consists of approximately 115 acres and houses approximately
25 buildings serving both UH at Hilo and HawCC. The following facilities are shared
with UHH: Edwin H. Mookini Library, The Learning Center (TLC), Campus Center,
theatre, bookstore, classrooms, and office space.

The Manono Campus is a 20.7-acre site and is situated approximately three city blocks
from the Main/Upper Campus. This location consists of approximately 25 medium and
small-sized buildings including a cafeteria, student learning and testing center, faculty
offices, business office, counseling offices, a registration and records office,
administrative offices, academic computing unit, classrooms, labs, and vocational shops.
HawCC occupies most of these buildings with UH at Hilo occupying approximately five
of these 25 buildings.

A 110-acre University Agricultural Farm Laboratory is located approximately five miles
away from the Main/Upper Campus in the Pana‘ewa Agricultural Park. The farm lab
includes a small office building, numerous green house structures, crop fields, and
auxiliary buildings for livestock. This agricultural site is shared with UHH.

On all three sites, the standard classroom size is 20 square feet per student and the
standard office space is 120 - 150 square feet per academic staff. Generally, automobile
parking is adequate at the East Hawai‘i locations.

West Hawai‘i
Hawai‘i Community College and its University of Hawai‘i Center at West Hawai‘i
(UHCWH) is located at the Central Kona Center (CKC) in Kealakekua. The UHCWH is
one of three University Centers in the state and was established by the Board of Regents
in 1996. Administrative responsibility for this Center was assigned to HawCC in 1997.
The purpose of the Center is primarily instructional, providing access to multiple HawCC


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              224
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                 ________

disciplines as well as serving as a receive site for programs that originate from other
campuses within the University System.

The UH Center at West Hawai‘i occupies leased space in five buildings of the Central
Kona Center (UHCWH, 2006). CKC is a single, two-story office complex; however, the
college/Center leases only first floor space for ADA accommodation requirements. The
rented space is approximately 13,500 square feet. There is an open courtyard area, which
is utilized for special events such as the Thursday and Friday Food Service luncheons,
etc. Storage for the College/Center and ETS is rented from a nearby storage facility.

Other Sites
There are twenty-five other locations throughout the island that are generally utilized by
the college to offer classes through Title III (I Ola Haloa), Office of Continuing
Education and Training (OCET), Rural Development Project (RDP), and other
sponsoring programs.


B.1. The institution provides safe and sufficient physical resources that support and
assure the integrity and quality of its programs and services, regardless of location or
means of delivery.

Descriptive Summary:

Health and safety issues are addressed on a system-wide basis as well as by the individual
campuses. “The University of Hawai‘i’s Environmental Health and Safety Office
(EHSO) ensures safe campus environments through the development and administration
of health and safety programs critical to the university experience” (UH EHSO, 2006).
This University System Office oversees the coordination of health and safety concerns
and training for all campuses within the system.

The UHCC System’s Environmental Safety Specialist (ESS) works directly with all
community colleges on health and safety issues. Every year a visual inspection of the
main campuses in East Hawai‘i is conducted by the ESS working through the
Community College Facilities Planning and Construction Office (CCFPCO). CCFPCO
and the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Affairs tour the Main/Upper and Manono
campuses to identify and assess any health, safety, ADA, and/or repair/maintenance
issues that need attention. Completed and ongoing Repair and Maintenance (R&M)
projects are inspected and updated for further work. If necessary, new projects are added.
R&M Projects are identified, prioritized, and submitted to the UH System by the college
(HawCC, 2005a). After the campus tours are completed, all of the R&M Projects are
compiled, reprioritized by the System, and summarized in the Current Funded/Deferred
R&M Project Listing (UH Community Colleges [CC], 2005). The prioritization and
completion of R&M Projects for the college and the System is contingent upon the
availability and allocation of state monies for such projects.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               225
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                 ________

In addition to the annual review of the facilities, the UHCC System’s ESS conducts
annual environmental hazards training and a variety of other safety training for faculty
and staff. Another very important function of the ESS is to monitor the inventory of
hazardous products and review and approve all acquisitions of such products (HawCC,
2002d).

Off-site locations are utilized to provide credit and non-credit instruction throughout the
island community. The sponsoring program that offers these classes reviews the safety
and sufficiency of the facility. The owner or facility administrator is responsible for any
repair and maintenance concerns that are conveyed by the program coordinator.

Faculty and staff are encouraged to relay the health and safety concerns of their physical
environment to the Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs. On a day-to-day basis,
any requests or concerns regarding safety, security, repairs, maintenance, and other
general services are handled by UHH’s Auxiliary Services unit and/or UHH’s ESS as
part of the shared services arrangement.

The college and the UH System are attentive to the access needs of its facilities. The
college relies on CCFPCO as well as UH at Hilo for planning, design coordination, and
project management for projects that address accessibility. Campus-wide improvements
have been made since 2003 to provide accessibility to all existing buildings. Parking
stalls, ramps, sidewalks, and signs now meet handicap accessibility standards. Further
improvements for the physically challenged are currently in progress on the Manono and
Main/Upper Campuses.

Many construction projects are administered by the CCFPCO with on-site support
provided by the college. Most of these improvement projects include contingency funds
to make adjustments to improve facilities beyond the original requirements of the
contract or to allow for unforeseen circumstances or changing conditions encountered
during project completion. The CCFPCO also maintains a safety contingency fund to
address unforeseen safety concerns of the colleges.

To meet the needs of their programs and services, faculty and staff may submit requests
for modifications of space to the Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs. This
process requires dialogue and coordination with UHH’s Facilities Planning Office in
order to evaluate and accomplish improvement projects in common areas.

Equipment replacement is determined and prioritized by the respective divisions of the
college. All equipment that is not part of the facility is maintained and serviced by the
specific program user or service unit. Equipment that is part of the facility such as air
conditioners, hoists, etc., are serviced, repaired, and maintained by the UH at Hilo
Auxiliary Services unit.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               226
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                ________


East Hawai‘i
Facilities are regularly inspected by the UHCC’s Community College Facilities Planning
and Construction Office (CCFPCO), the UH at Hilo Facilities Planning Office, and
HawCC’s Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs for health and safety, maintenance
and repairs, and access. Minor problems are addressed and serviced; major problems are
identified as R&M projects.

Faculty, staff, and administrators deem the college to be a safe place to work. In a 2005
survey, 58% strongly agreed that the workplace was safe, 36% agreed, 3% disagreed and
3% were neutral (HawCC, 2005b).

Although the physical environment is deemed safe, there have been several challenges
with regard to the shared facilities and services with UH at Hilo that is unique to this
college.

In Fall 1991, Hawai‘i Community College and the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo
officially separated and became two independent institutions. A co-location agreement
was then proposed by HawCC’s administration and presented to the UH at Hilo
administration to establish policies and procedures for managing the shared facilities and
services of HawCC and UH at Hilo (Simone, 1991). Since separation, there has been
much dialogue and effort to come to a mutually agreeable co-location plan.
Recommendation Four of the October 2000 Evaluation Report from ACCJC to Hawai‘i
Community College states that “the relationship, communication and cooperation
between the leadership of University of Hawai‘i -Hilo and Hawai‘i Community College
must be strengthened. Previous agreements and areas of cooperation need to be reviewed
and renewed, particularly with regard to facility utilization” (ACCJC, 2001, p.7).

Since the 2000 Accreditation Self Study, the college has made many attempts to
communicate and work cooperatively with UHH. As reported in the 2003 Accreditation
Midterm Report to ACCJC, in HawCC’s response to recommendation four, during Spring
2001 the HawCC College Council undertook a comprehensive and objective review of
the services shared between the two campuses (HawCC, 2003, p.14).

In June 2001, administrators agreed upon the reorganization of several key facilities
assignments. Building 393 on the Manono campus was successfully transferred from UH
at Hilo to HawCC. This warehouse structure has since been converted into classrooms,
labs, faculty offices, storage areas and ADA compliant restroom facilities and houses the
College’s Tropical Forest Ecosystem and Agro-forestry Management (Forest TEAM),
Agriculture, and Early Childhood Education Programs. Similar transfer agreements were
reached regarding specific rooms in other buildings.

In October 2001, the President of the University of Hawai‘i introduced the idea of
reviewing shared services between HawCC and UHH. He challenged the faculty of both
institutions to propose a structure that would best benefit the island of Hawai‘i.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               227
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                 ________

A subcommittee was formed in November 2001 to help organize a HawCC College
Council retreat entitled “Exploring New Models for Shared Services with UH Hilo”
(HawCC, 2002a). At the January 7, 2002 retreat, presented models included the
University of Washington at Bothell and Cascadia Community College; Oregon State
University and Central Oregon Community College; Denver’s Auraria Higher Education
Center; and the Claremont system in California.

The retreat was followed by an open meeting on January 25, 2002 for faculty and staff,
using the retreat’s title, “Exploring New Models for Shared Services with UH-Hilo”
(HawCC, 2002b). Information generated by the dialogue at the open meeting was
recorded, organized, and distributed to college faculty and staff (HawCC, 2002c).

Faculty discussions continued at both institutions. Efforts were made by both the College
Council and Academic Senate to determine the appropriate relationship between HawCC
and UHH. Discussions included topics ranging from reintegrating HawCC with UH at
Hilo to HawCC developing its own capability for telephone, mail, and facilities
maintenance services to a third party entity handling certain services for everyone
(HawCC, 2003, p.15).

Although a new agreed upon structure was not negotiated and articulated at that time,
communication between the HawCC Academic Senate and the UH at Hilo Faculty
Congress resulted in an agreement that site utilization, shared services, and other factors
should be determined by the leadership of the two institutions and not prescribed by
Presidential decree. This position was sent to President Evan Dobelle on July 5, 2002
(Goya and Buchanan, 2003; HawCC, 2003, p.15)

Since 2002, negotiations with HawCC and UH at Hilo administrators have continued;
however, progress was affected by the demands of System planning, SCT Banner
installation and training, and state budget realities after September 11, 2001.
Additionally, the UH system and HawCC experienced major upheaval in its
administrative structure and staffing and has only recently begun to stabilize.

After reviewing the difficulties of the efforts to negotiate a co-location agreement with
UH at Hilo for many years and recognizing the improvement of the state’s economic
health, Chancellor Rockne Freitas and his new administrative team decided to seek
additional legislative funding support at the 2006 Session of the State Legislature. House
Bill (H.B.) No. 3178 stated that “…it is vital that Hawai‘i Community College
immediately address the growing needs of the college to manage campus operations that
are currently administered by UH-Hilo such as janitorial and maintenance functions,
electricians, and campus security. Funds are needed to allow Hawai‘i Community
College to administer and manage the resources required to operate the facilities and
services to better serve students, faculty, and staff” (Hawai‘i House of Representatives,
2006, p.1). The college was successful in obtaining this requested funding and is
currently recruiting to establish its own auxiliary services unit.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               228
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                               ________

Although the challenge of negotiating a shared services agreement with UH at Hilo has
been resolved with the establishment of a separate auxiliary services unit, the college’s
primary goal remains site autonomy with the development of a separate campus. Since
1996 when the Board of Regents approved the Long Range Development Plan for the
Komohana site in East Hawai‘i, (PBR Hawai‘i and Kajioka Okada Yamachi Architects
[KOYA], 1996) the college has explored other site options for an autonomous campus.
In 1998, feasibility studies were done for a downtown relocation (Helber Hastert & Fee,
Planners, 1998) as well as to build up the existing Manono campus site (PBR Hawai‘i
and KOYA, 1998). All of the stakeholders were engaged in a dialogue to discuss current
and future needs of the college at that time. Although various options were explored, the
reality of a new campus in East Hawai‘i was projected to be 10-15 years in the future
because of the state’s poor economic health for many years. Therefore, as part of the
Long Range Development Plan Update of May 2003 for the East Hawai‘i campus, a
facilities Transition and Phasing Plan was included (PBR Hawai‘i and Wesley R. Segawa
& Associates [WRS&A], 2003, p. 5.1-5.10). This Facilities Transition and Phasing Plan
focused on major building renovations and site improvements at the Manono campus
combined with several renovation projects on the Main/Upper campus that would ensure
functionality and greater independence for HawCC.

One component of facility planning is the upgrading of infrastructure on the Manono
campus. The campus’s electrical system was upgraded in 1996 (HawCC, 2003, p.26).
An upgraded sewer system, a new fire hydrant system, and handicap accessibility
improvements were completed in Fall 2003. Lighting upgrades including a new campus-
wide lighting system and the installation of a new campus-wide fire alarm system were
completed in 2005. In 2006, campus-wide paving, parking, and drainage improvements
were completed.

A second component of the Facilities Transition and Phasing Plan is the transformation
of older unused or under-utilized buildings into modern classrooms and offices. Building
388 is an example of this transformation. An existing warehouse structure housing trade
and apprenticeship training programs was completely renovated in Spring 2000 and
converted into two large classrooms with a multi-paneled movable room divider, a video-
conferencing classroom, a students with disabilities learning center lab, faculty offices,
storage rooms, a maintenance closet, and ADA compliant restroom facilities (HawCC,
2003, p.26).

In February 2003, Building 389A, a former material storage facility, was transformed
into a Hawaiian Studies hula classroom. In 2004, Building 387, a former Machine Shop
warehouse, was converted into a student testing and learning center, a multi-media
classroom, and new workrooms and offices for the academic computing support unit.
Building 393, a former UH Hilo Astronomy warehouse, was transformed into facilities
for the Agriculture, Forest TEAM, and Early Childhood Education Programs, including a
new Children’s Center.

Other Manono campus renovations included the re-roofing of Building 382 (Food
Service Program cafeteria and dining facility), Building 392 (Applied Technical


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              229
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                              ________

Education Division Office), Building 386 (Agriculture Program shop facilities), and
Building 380 (Architectural, Engineering and CAD Technologies Program and Office of
Continuing Education and Training computer labs). Re-roofing for all these projects was
completed by April 2003.

In addition to re-roofing, Building 382 (Food Service Program) received a new air-
conditioning and interior ceiling system, new fire suppression and exhaust ventilation
systems, and ADA compliant restroom and locker room facilities. This project was
completed during spring 2003. Building 386B was renovated to include a new shop and
office for the Carpentry Program.

Besides major renovations and improvements on the Manono Campus, the Main/Upper
Campus has also undergone changes. Buildings 321 (Auto Body), 322 (Auto Mech), and
323 (Diesel) that house automotive technology shops have been upgraded with new
drainage collection and oil interceptor systems and have undergone restroom and office
renovations. Buildings 321 and 322 have also been re-roofed.

Campus-wide improvements have been made since 2003 to provide accessibility to all
existing buildings. Parking stalls, ramps, sidewalks, and signs now meet accessibility
standards. Buildings 381A, 385A, 385B and 385C are currently undergoing facility
improvements to become ADA compliant.

Although steady progress has been made on the implementation of the Facilities
Transition and Phasing Plan for East Hawai‘i, HawCC has taken several major steps
toward the fulfillment of Recommendation Seven of ACCJC’s Evaluation Report for the
2000 Accreditation Self Study. The report recommended that the college “focus its
facility planning on the goal of becoming autonomous at a site, which when built out,
will house all functions of a comprehensive community college” (ACCJC, 2001, p.8).

In 2005, the State Legislature of Hawai‘i passed Act 178, Item G.120, thereby
appropriating approximately $18.21 million to move forward with plans, design,
construction, and equipment “for the development of Hawai‘i Community College,
which is located mauka of Komohana Street” (Hawai‘i Legislature, 2005, p.435, 544).
This Act was amended in the 2006 session of the State Legislature to include the
planning and development of a new campus in West Hawai‘i as well.

In October 2005, after reviewing several proposals, the Board of Regents (BOR) selected
Hawai‘i Campus Developers LLC (HCD) as the lead developer to plan, finance, and
build the Komohana campus in East Hawai‘i. On April 20, 2006, the BOR approved the
Development Services Agreement with HCD for the Planning and Design of the Hawai‘i
Community College campus (UH BOR, 2006).

The Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) that was approved by the Board of Regents
on March 22, 1996 was for a 100-acre site to accommodate a student enrollment of 5,000
full-time equivalent (FTE), which would equate to approximately a 7,500 person
headcount (PBR Hawai‘i and KOYA, 1996). The Komohana site is now comprised of a


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              230
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                ________

122-acre parcel. The college is seeking another 28 acres in order to secure a total of 150
acres for the development of the campus along with related support services.
It is now anticipated that the plan of the Komohana campus will change from the site plan
shown on the Long Range Development Plan Update of May 2003 (PBR Hawai‘i and
WRS&A, 2003) with additional provisions for student and faculty housing. In addition,
the site is now expected to include commercial and private development areas that will,
in effect, offset project and construction costs and support the feasibility of the
development.

The recent addition of this housing requirement is indicative of the college’s commitment
to address the growing needs of students and faculty in the community where a housing
and dormitory shortage currently exists. It demonstrates the college’s understanding of
the broader context of faculty, students, and the community needs as planning for the new
campus progresses.

West Hawai‘i
In its current location, providing sufficient classroom, office, general student study and
general service space at the UH Center at West Hawai‘i continues to be a challenge for
the college. Several spaces must serve in a multi-functional capacity. For example, the
Food Service Program offers lunch service to the public in the courtyard area adjacent to
the kitchen. Classrooms commonly designated for specific uses at a traditional campus,
(i.e.) a Hawaiian music class, must be scheduled in a regular lecture room.

Since the complex was designed for normal noise levels in an office environment, classes
that have higher than normal sound levels can be disturbing to adjacent classrooms or
labs. Because there is no student center, students have little choice but to gather in
covered outdoor spaces at picnic tables to study, eat, or relax with their classmates. Some
students study in their cars between classes. With room for only fourteen study spots, the
library can only accommodate a limited number of students at one time. Therefore,
recognizing this lack of general student space, the librarian has adjusted normal rules to
accommodate the learning needs of students by allowing them to eat and drink in the
library so they will not be forced into an either/or decision between nourishment and
access to a study space when it opens.

Convenient automobile access to this site is a growing concern that is directly associated
with traffic congestion problems related to the booming growth in the immediate and
surrounding areas of this locale.

The Director of the UH West Hawai‘i Center in Kealakekua is responsible for assuring
that the physical needs of the facility are addressed with the landlord. The landlord is
responsible for any repair and/or maintenance that are necessary to provide a safe and
healthy environment for the college.

The Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs assists the Director whenever necessary
to obtain additional support to address any facility concerns. The UHCC System’s
Community College Facilities Planning and Construction Office (CCFPCO) provides an


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               231
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                ________

organizational support structure by doing periodic site visitations and providing health
and safety training for faculty and staff.
The Academic Development Plan, 1997-2003 (HawCC, 1997, p. 22) states that the
University of Hawai‘i had entered into a three-year lease in 1997. The college had
intended to continue operations and then relocate at the end of that period or shortly
thereafter. The college’s lease arrangement at the Central Kona Center in Kealakekua
continues in 2006 with another two years of occupancy at this location.

In 1991, the BOR identified and selected a 500-acre site at Kalaoa for the proposed new
campus. This site is approximately two miles from the Kona airport, above Queen
Ka`ahumanu Highway. The planning process for this site was to establish a 30-acre
campus that would accommodate a headcount of 1,500 students. The planning included
faculty, staff, student, and community consultation. The BOR approved the Long Range
Development Plan in October 1998 (Wil Chee – Planning, Inc., 1998). This plan was
considered the number one UHCC CIP priority and was included as a high priority in the
BOR legislative requests for 2001-2003 and 2003-2005, but the LRDP did not receive
appropriations. Thus far, only design funding has been appropriated by the legislature
and design work has been done.

The college is greatly in need of improving sufficiency and capacity of its facilities in
West Hawai‘i. This community is one of the fastest growing areas in Hawai‘i County,
and the need for a new location to support Hawai‘i Community College’s programs and
services has long been recognized. It is the college’s hope that the significant progress
made in the 2005 legislative session will provide the impetus to build a new campus in
West Hawai‘i in the near future.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will continue to implement the Facilities Transition and Phasing Plan to
   improve existing campus structures at the Manono and Main/Upper Campuses in East
   Hawai‘i.

2. The college will strive to continue in its significant progress towards the development
   and construction of new campuses in East and West Hawai‘i.

3. The college will involve all stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty,
   administrators, and community members in dialogue, as the formal planning process
   begins.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               232
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                   ________



B.2. To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of physical resources in supporting
institutional programs and services, the institution plans and evaluates its facilities
and equipment on a regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant data into
account.

Descriptive Summary:

Hawai‘i Community College plans and evaluates its facilities and equipment needs on a
regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant data into account.

All of the college’s existing space on the Manono and Main/Upper Campuses is assigned
to specific units or divisions. Space assignment is determined by the general and
historical use of the space. Divisions/units generally have priority use over their assigned
spaces to assure the quality and stability of program needs.

Each semester, the allocation of existing space begins at the ground level in division/unit
meetings. Each division/unit ascertains the effectiveness or lack thereof of currently
utilized space through dialogue among the faculty. Room assignments are determined by
students’ needs as well as prior assignments and are continually re-evaluated. After
space needs have been assessed at the divisional/unit level, further dialogue among the
division/unit chairs determines the final room assignments for the upcoming semester. If
necessary adjustments to space allocation are required, the first option is to settle it at the
division/unit chair level. Usually space can be found by contacting other divisions/units
of the college that have assigned spaces, which may fulfill these needs. If space is not
available based on these requirements, a request for space is forwarded to the Space
Management and Allocation Committee (SMAC), chaired by the Vice Chancellor for
Administrative Affairs (HawCC SMAC, 2003b).

The purpose of the SMAC is “to establish and maintain a comprehensive space
management program for the University of Hawai‘i -Hawai‘i Community College”
(HawCC SMAC, 2003a, [p. 1]). When new or additional space is requested or an
existing space is vacated, the SMAC is convened by the Vice Chancellor to discuss
priorities and to determine how to resolve space management requirements. All divisions
and units are represented in this Committee. Student government, organizations, and
activities needs are requested through the Student Services Division.

Normally, space is found through mutual agreement to share or trade spaces among units
and/or divisions. Sometimes, additional space is negotiated with UH at Hilo to meet
specific space requirements.

In addition to the ongoing assessment of space needs, the college’s program review
process requires each program/unit to address their resource sufficiency, as indicated on
the template used to prepare the report in Parts II and IX (HawCC, 2006). This provides
the college with a formal, data-driven review of each program/unit’s sufficiency of
physical and equipment needs.


                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                233
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                ________

Through regular assessment of space needs, the Vice Chancellor for Administrative
Affairs is kept informed to request minor repairs and maintenance and to plan for Capital
Improvement Projects (CIP).

Recently, because of the state’s healthy economic condition, many of the initial CIPs
requested to fulfill the college’s Facilities Transition and Phasing Plan for East Hawai‘i
have been completed or are near completion. More CIPs are being requested to upgrade
both Main/Upper and Manono Campus facilities and infrastructure.

Since 1996 when the LRDP was done for the Komohana site in East Hawai‘i, two more
feasibility studies for alternate sites and another LRDP 2003 Update have been done for
East Hawai‘i. Since 1998 when the LRDP was completed for the Kalaoa site in West
Hawai‘i, only design work has been appropriated and completed.

After many years of dialogue and planning for new campuses, significant progress has
been made with the recent appropriations from the State Legislature and approval by the
UH Board of Regents of the Development Services Agreement with Hawai‘i Campus
Developers LLC. This allows the college to progress further towards the completion of
the LRDPs for East and West Hawai‘i.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. HawCC plans and evaluates its facilities and
equipment on a regular basis. Through a process of regular, inclusive, informed, and
intentional dialogue on several levels and through regular inspection, repair, and
maintenance of facilities, on-going planning and evaluation takes place. Although
HawCC has made steady progress, especially in the last three years, in fulfilling the
Facilities Transition and Phasing Plan for East Hawai‘i, it is clear that the development of
new campuses for East and West Hawai‘i is vital for the college’s continued growth and
support of its mission and purpose.

Most of the buildings on the Manono Campus were designed and built in the 1950s and
1960s. Although the buildings have been renovated and retrofitted to accommodate the
growing technological needs of the college, the basic infrastructure was not designed to
accommodate the requirements of a high tech environment. It is obvious that the Facility
Transition and Phasing Plan is only meant to accommodate the needs of the college in the
short term and not intended for long term use.

The current leased property in West Hawai‘i is not adequate for growth and support of
the college’s mission and purpose. The facilities were not designed to house an
educational institution. Since 1996, the University of Hawai‘i Center at West Hawai‘i
was established by the Board of Regents as one of three University Centers in the state.
The purpose of the Center is not only to offer programs of HawCC but also to serve as a
receive site for programs that originate from other campuses within the University of
Hawai‘i System. This function requires a robust technological infrastructure and
facilities that accommodate both traditional and distance education classes. In the long


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               234
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources                                                  ________

term, the current facilities are not adequate to accomplish these goals and to serve its
community.

Fortunately, the University of Hawai‘i System and the state legislature have recognized
the college’s need to build new campuses and have recently appropriated monies for the
planning, design, and phased-in construction of these campuses through a public/private
partnership. It is the college’s intention and desire to continue to work with the UH
System, government, and private/public partners to fulfill this goal in the near future.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will continue to move forward in its progress to build new campuses in
   East and West Hawai‘i.

2. The college will involve all stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty,
   administration, and community members in dialogue as the formal planning process
   begins.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               235
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

C. Technology Resources
   Technology resources are used to support student learning programs and services
   and to improve institutional effectiveness. Technology planning is integrated with
   institutional planning.


C.1. The institution assures that any technology support it provides is designed to meet
the needs of learning, teaching, college-wide communications, research, and
operational systems.

Descriptive Summary:

Planning, acquisition, and support of technology for the college are principally carried
out by the Academic Computing Unit (ACU) under the guidance of the Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs (VCAA). The ACU is responsible for technical support and
maintenance of computer hardware/software and peripherals. Most HawCC offices,
Learning Centers, and multiple classrooms are equipped with computers and peripheral
devices that are connected to the University of Hawai‘i network/internet. The primary
concern of the ACU is to work with faculty and administrators to ensure that the campus
network(s) and all computers are functioning properly. Work is handled through a work
request form, which is completed and forwarded to the ACU.

The Academic Computing Unit staffing has not maintained pace with the dramatic
increase in the number of computers supported by the college since the 2000
accreditation visit. “Currently, the Academic Computing Unit (ACU) consists of two full-
time Information Technology (IT) Specialists: one specialist for the ACU, and the second
specialist is assigned to primarily work on the system-wide Banner student information
system. This position maintains the Banner system to provide report processing, queries,
and access to student records. The College also has two ACU temporary, full-time
information technology specialists. In the area of multi-media, the College has two full-
time media specialists paid by Title III federal grant monies in East Hawai‘i. The
reporting structure for these positions is through the Office of the Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs” (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.4).

In Kealakekua, the University of Hawai‘i Center at West Hawai‘i has two .50 media
specialist II positions on general funds. These positions report to the Director of the
Center. The Center supports the Hawai‘i Interactive Television System (HITS)
programming for the bachelor’s, master’s, and graduate-level certificate programs; select
community college HITS courses sent between the two campuses; and classes supported
by the Title III program. The Center’s facilities are generally used for distance education
7:45 a.m. through 10 p.m., Monday through Friday and often Saturdays. With increased
distance education demands, more staffing will be needed at the UH Center at West
Hawai‘i as well.

The ACU is responsible for assisting faculty and staff with the selection of equipment
and/or materials to support computer-based education. The computer hardware and


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               236
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

software purchased by HawCC is subject to the review and approval of the Academic
Computing Specialist to ensure compatibility with existing or proposed standards. The
ACU supports and maintains the computer labs during instructional periods and annually
disassembles and cleans all internal and external components.

Extensive inventory figures attached to the Program Review Report, Academic
Computing Unit/Department of Information Technology (HawCC ACU, 2005, Appendix
B-1, p. 31), “demonstrate substantial technology acquisitions at the HawCC campus. All
facets of the HawCC operations that include Instruction, Student Services and the Office
of Continuing Education are provided with 937 computers, 147 printers, 46 computer
projectors, 13 VCR, 17 DVD-VCR and nine ELMO overheads (HawCC ACU, 2005,
p.5).” The HawCC campus in Hilo provides students with direct access to 523 of the
computers, and HawCC students are able to access an additional 135 that belong to UH-
Hilo. The UH Center at West Hawai‘i maintains an inventory of 76 computers, thirty-
three of which are directly accessible to students. Additionally the Center maintains 11
printers and one computer projector (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.6).

The Academic Computing Unit has been allocated a budget of $10,000 per academic year
for the period 2002 through 2004. In the current academic year, 2005 - 2006, the
supplies budget for the ACU has been increased to $15,000 (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.6).
These monies have been used primarily to further refine the network infrastructure across
the campuses and to provide updated computers in selected classrooms and labs.

Human and fiscal resources continue to be severely over-extended as the college
maintains an island-wide delivery of services and support. In 1999, a task force was
established to advise the administration on matters related to the current and evolving use
of technology. This task force was not fully utilized to establish a college-wide
computing plan.

Distance Learning
Open access to higher education is an essential mission component of both the University
of Hawai‘i System and Hawai‘i Community College. Because of the location, size, and
rural nature of the island of Hawai‘i, a distributed learning model is essential for island-
wide access to educational opportunities. Since the 2000 Accreditation Self-Study visit,
the UH System, UHCC System, and HawCC have developed and pursued strategies to
improve distance learning opportunities and support services and to secure financial
resources.

The Executive Policy E5.204, University of Hawai‘i, Distance Learning Plans, Policies
and Procedures (University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice President for Planning and
Policy [UH OVPPP], 1998) addresses the comprehensive planning direction, policy base,
and procedural guidelines for distance learning for the UH system. As a result of this
Executive Policy E5.204, units and groups were formed with specific responsibilities for
distance learning.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               237
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

The OVPPP provides overall coordination of the system-wide distance learning effort.
This office is responsible for the continual refinement and updating of UH system
distance learning plans, policies, and procedures. OVPPP is responsible for gathering
and consolidating planning data and works with Information Technology Services (ITS)
and campuses to gather assessment data from students and faculty on support services
(UH OVPPP, 1998, p.9).

Information Technology Services (ITS) is responsible for the overall design,
development, maintenance, and support of the system-wide telecommunications
infrastructure that supports UH distance learning in-state and out-of-state. ITS is also
responsible for developing system technical standards to ensure the efficient and effective
operation of all distance learning technologies.

The Distance Learning and Instructional Technology (DLIT) unit within ITS has the
responsibility for critical support functions. It provides leadership by coordinating the
distance learning activities of campus media center directors and various originating and
receiving site personnel. Within the program priorities established by the Master
Scheduling Group (MSG), the DLIT unit coordinates and is responsible for scheduling
air time on Hawai‘i Interactive Television System (HITS) for all credit and non-credit
classes, seminars, conferences, meetings, and other appropriate uses of the system in-
state and out-of-state. DLIT also coordinates Oahu cable-access channel scheduling and
the distribution of cable programming via HITS. Additionally DLIT has leadership
responsibility for training faculty and students in the effective use of telecommunication
technology.

The Master Scheduling Group (MSG) coordinates the production of a rolling three-year
master schedule as well as annual programming schedules. This group focuses on
scheduling programs requiring system-wide resources, but all distance learning, including
off-site offerings and those solely dependent upon campus- or program-specific resources
is coordinated with the work of the MSG (UH OVPPP, 1998, p.10).

The UHCC Distance Education Committee (currently known as the UHCC Distance
Education Steering Committee) is a UH Community College System committee
composed of administrators, faculty, media center coordinators, librarians, and student
services personnel. This Committee is charged with coordinating community college
distance learning efforts. Input from this committee is used by and informs the work of
the DLIT, ITS, and OVPPP.

For community colleges, distance education issues first focused on student concerns such
as financial aid, admissions, registration, advising, counseling, and library services. The
next step was to address instructional issues. In prioritizing instructional issues, the
UHCC Distance Education Committee was charged with developing a strategic action
plan and coordinating a statewide distance-delivered Associate of Arts degree. In May
2000, the UHCC Distance Education Committee produced the Distance Learning
Strategic Action Plan (UH CC, 2000b) to address a collaborative community college
system infrastructure for the delivery of distance education. This plan recognized the


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               238
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

need for on-going review and improvement for access, quality, accountability, and
collaboration. Therefore, four areas were targeted for strategic distance learning action:
    • Assessment and Evaluation
    • Curriculum Development and Academic Support Services
    • Student Services and Information and Marketing
    • Resources, Technology and Facilities (p. 1)

Thereafter, the UH Community Colleges Implementation Plan for Integrating Distance
Learning into Campus Operations (UH CC, 2000a) was developed to implement the
strategic plan and the distance-delivered Associate in Arts degree. The implementation at
both campus and UHCC levels is accomplished through cross-campus groups. Every
campus has a representative on each of the four targeted areas for action. A Campus
Distance Learning Coordinator (CDLC) serves as campus single point of contact between
those with distance-related problems and those who can provide answers (p.5).

In addition to the planning and coordination of the UH Community Colleges, the
University of Hawai‘i system recognized the need to coordinate distance and distributed
learning on a system-wide level. On May 8, 2003, the University of Hawai‘i Distance
and Distributed Learning Action Plan (UH, 2003) was put into effect. The ten specific
recommendations in the Action Plan are as follows: (1) ensure students a transforming
education using technology to support learning, (2) implement a state-of-the-art student
information system, (3) provide on-line electronic support and comprehensive orientation
and training for students, (4) coordinate and facilitate distance learning in the seven
colleges and three universities through a system-wide council, (5) secure the funding to
help create a first-rate information technology infrastructure, (6) provide the technical
support and services to ensure access, (7) implement strategies to engage, train, and
support faculty and staff in technology-enhanced teaching, learning, and student services
to support student learning outcomes across the curriculum, (8) resolve issues that create
barriers to faculty participation including intellectual property rights, workload, and
tenure and promotional processes, (9) capitalize on strategic international markets for
profit-generation, (10) develop a coherent pricing and funding model (p.2).

The Distributed Learning Advisory Council (DLAC) is the system-wide council
appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs with responsibility to oversee and
lead the mainstreamed implementation of this Action Plan (UH, 2003, p. 3).

One of the recommendations set forth in system-wide distance learning strategic planning
was to provide the technical support for faculty and students in technology-enhanced
teaching and learning. To accomplish this goal, students and faculty can access the
distance learning website for support (UH, n.d.).

System-wide training for HawCC faculty and lecturers is available through Teaching and
Learning with Electronic Networked Technologies (TALENT) (UH, 2006). TALENT is
a faculty development program supported by all campuses of the University of Hawai‘i
system. It provides Instructional Sessions and Resources to interested faculty throughout
the year.

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               239
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

Instructional Sessions consist of various Semester Offerings and the TALENT Summer
Institute. During fall and spring, TALENT hosts free Web Courses Tools (WebCT)
workshops focusing on the on-line course management system. Introductory sessions on
how to use many of the system-supported software are available via one-on-one sessions.
Throughout the semester, TALENT broadcasts PBS teleconferences system-wide as well
as offers Manoa-based guest presentations delivered by visitors across the state.

During the summer, TALENT hosts the Summer Institute, a series of programs
comprised of an Internet-based course and various levels of hands-on workshops
(TALENT 101, 102 & 201). The focus of the Institute is to present/discuss issues and
pedagogical strategies surrounding the design, creation, and delivery of Internet support
course materials.

Under Resources, TALENT provides fast access to the WebCT Support and Resource
Tools website. This site is a one-stop shop for faculty/staff and students needing
guidance in using and working with WebCT.

In addition to TALENT training, Leeward Community College (LCC) offers a distance
education summer institute that is open to all faculty in the system (LCC, 2006). A
Technology, Colleges and Community (TCC) annual worldwide online conference,
produced by Kapiolani Community College (KapCC), is also available system-wide to all
faculty. These conferences explore new information sources and emerging technologies
as it impacts the learner in colleges and universities worldwide (KapCC, 2006).

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. There have been some changes in the college’s
technological resources since the Accreditation Committee’s last visit. Perhaps most
significant is the change from analog to digital technology. Changes in site equipment
were made at the college, in West Hawai‘i, and at the new Waimea and Ka`u sites.

Another technological resource increase was the development of a new, system-wide
computerized student information system through SCT Banner. The implementation of
the SCT Banner registration system enables students who qualify to register online for
any course offered by any college in the System, including distance education courses.
This computerized registration system is much more streamlined and distance learning
accessible than previous registration methods (HawCC, 2003, p.18-19).

Although the college has made some improvements in technology resources, the
academic support services provide a special challenge to the campus. The Academic
Computing Unit has not been adequately supported heretofore and is in crisis as it
operates on a triage model for prioritization of its tasks. To ensure college-wide
dialogue, the Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the Dean of Continuing
Education and Training co-chaired the Technology Advisory Support Committee
(TASC), an ad hoc committee of more than a dozen faculty, staff, and administrators
appointed by the College Council to review the Academic Computing Unit and make


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               240
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

recommendations to the college and its administration about the future of technology at
Hawai‘i Community College. As stated in the Summer Task Force Summary Reports
([HawCC] TASC, 2005)

       “The mission of the Technology Advisory Support Committee is to meet our
       Colleges’ growing demands in technology by creating and staffing a newly
       expanded Technology Department to include the areas of Media Service and
       Institutional Technology for the purpose of meeting increasing technological
       needs and requirements to successfully service students, staff and faculty living,
       learning and working on our island” (p.1).

Three subcommittees were formed and met regularly since April 2005:
   • Subcommittee I – Mission and Vision
   • Subcommittee II – Demand and Efficiency Measures
   • Subcommittee III – Staffing and Facilities

The Mission and Vision Subcommittee produced two maps and a schematic that served
as visual aids from which Subcommittees II and III drew upon when discussing,
identifying, and finalizing efficiency measurements, staffing, equipment, and facilities
requirements. The Future Map and the Department Schematic served as the vision of the
new Hawai‘i Community College Information Technology Department. This vision was
further refined and included in the Program Review Report, Academic Computing
Unit/Department of Information Technology (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.28-29) and are
included here as Figures 1 and 2.

The Demand and Efficiency Measures Subcommittee endeavored to produce a specific
deliverable to the larger Technology Support Advisory Committee namely a “snap”
program review of the existing support structure and to define the data elements needed
to illuminate the demand and efficiency profile of the unit. The major activities of the
unit were grouped into Media Services and Technology and the major services provided
by the department were listed under each of the two technology groupings. Each activity
was then reduced to its smallest component to determine what types of measures one
would need in order to identify what would constitute a successful program – namely, the
demand and efficiency measures. The Subcommittee found that most of the data required
for the purpose of measurement fell into one of two categories. The data is non-existent,
in that the activities to be measured were not occurring, or the data to document the
activity was not adequately recorded.

The Staffing and Facilities Subcommittee identified job categories and initial position
descriptions of the staff positions required to provide the services outlined in the Future
Schematic developed by Subcommittee I. This organization was refined and included in
the Program Review Report, Academic Computing Unit/Department of Information
Technology, Part X (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.20), and is included here as Table 1.

The Action Plan of the Program Review Report includes a detailed description of the
proposed organization and the budgetary resources needed to staff the positions. The


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               241
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

magnitude of the expenditures, $1,110,000 – Start up costs and $857,500 – Annual
Budget, are so significant that the college will package this proposal as a major biennium
budget request for review by the 2007 State Legislature. “The timing is right for the
College to proceed with such a request in light of the planning on the horizon for new
campuses on both the east and west sides of the Big Island. If the college is to maintain
its commitment to technology as one of its ‘Cornerstones’ then it is obliged to
supplement the staffing of its technology support and media services operations along the
lines outlined here. Committing to a ‘cornerstone’ value implies pursuit of state of the art
operations and the foregoing budget or a reasonable facsimile will attain that ideal”
(HawCC ACU, 2005, p.25). The budget request includes the following identified staffing
positions (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.20).

                             Table 1 - Identified Staffing Positions

                         IDENTIFIED STAFFING POSITIONS
              # Staff   Position Title
                   1    Director
                   2    Coordinator
                   1    APT Ed Specialist
                   1    Admin Specialist
                   3    TECH: Hilo Poly Com
                   1    TECH: West Hawai‘i (.5 media & .5 IT)
                   1    TECH: Banner
                   3    TECH: Academic Computing Support
                   2    TECH: Server Admin. Maintenance
                   1    TECH: Webmaster
                   1    TECH: Network Management
                 (12)   (Number of Technicians)
                  17    TOTAL

These positions would have the duties shown in Figure 1 (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.28).




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               242
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources


                                 Hawaii Community College Technology Department


                                                     Director & Advisor of
                                                          Technology


                                                                 Administrative Support
       Coordinator/Unit Head                                                                      Coordinator/Unit Head
         Media Services                                                                          Institutional Technology
                                                      Educational Specialist I (A)


                                                               Shared Duties
                 4-Technicians
        •2 Poly Com (Hilo)                                                                           8-Technicians
        •1 WH Hits                                                                            •1 Banner
        •.5 Poly Com (WH)                                                                     •3 Computer Services
                                                    •Staff development                        •2 Server Administration
        •.5 IT (WH)
                                                    •Distributive learning                    •1 Webmaster
                                                    •Hardware/software                        •1 Webmaster
 *Video Conferencing
                                                    • support (equipment)                 *College Computing
 *Projector
                                                    •Policies/procedures                  *Server Administration
 *A/V
                                                    •Standards                             Maintenance
 *PA System
 *Telephone                                                                               *Webmaster
 *Interactive Television                                                                  *Banner
                                                                                          *Network Mngmnt.

                                                     Assistive Technology



                                                           Shared Duties

                        Figure 1 - Proposed Information Technology Department




The Map of this future Department of Information Technology is shown as Figure 2
(HawCC ACU, 2005, p.29).




                                  Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                       243
  Standard IIIC: Technology Resources



 Future Map                                                      UHH                       ITS
                                                                                                             U HC
                                                                                                                    WH
                                                                                                                                                Unit Outcomes
                                                                  OCET              DOSS             DOAS                                        •Deploy Video
                                                         A
                                                  VC A
                                                                                                                                                 Conferencing and HITS
                                       @                                                                            H aw                         network to service 4,00
                                     CC aii                                                                                  CC                  sq mi area
                                 aw Haw
                                H t                                                                                                              • Implement and
                                   s
                                We                                                                                                               maintain college-wide
                        ts                                                                                                                       website
                   an                             Projector         Audio Visual          Video                                                  •Deliver and maintain
              Gr                                                                       Conferencing      Webmaster
                                                                                                                                                 web services (work ord
                                 Network                                                                                                         system)
                                Management                                                                                                       •Operate college-wide
                                                             PA System                                                                           helpdesk (telephone/w
                                                                                        Telephone         Interactive                            service)
                                                                                         Systems           Television
                                                                                                                                                 •Provide and maintain
                                  Campus-wide                                                                                                    state-of-the-art telepho
Previous Staffing:                  Training                                                                        Future Staffing:             system
•4 staff                                                                                                                                         •Maintain servers (web,
                                                       Assistive Technology                                         •Director
                                                                                                                    •2 Coordinators
                                                                                                                                                 email, file)
                                                                                                                    •11 technicians              •Provide technical
                                         Academic                                                                                                Support to library syste
                                                                                                     General        •1 Ed Spec I (A)
                                        Computing/                       Shared Duties:                                                          •Maintain, upgrade and
                                                                                                   Administration   •1 Administrative Support
                                          Support                        •Staff Development                                                      administer projectors,
                                                                        •Distributive learning                                                   audio visual, and public
                                                                     •Hardware/software support                                                  address systems
                                                                       •Policies & procedures
                                                   Library                   •Standards                                                          •Maintain and provide
                                                                        •Facility Retrofit/New                Server                             network services
                                                   Services
                               Supervising                                  •Consultation                  Administration/
                                                                                                                                                 •Provide academic and
                              And Training                                                                  Maintenance                          administrative computin
                             Student Workers                                                                                                     and support
                                                  Banner             Web               Help Desk                                                 •Implement, maintain a
                                                                    Services                                                                     develop data inquiry too
                                                                                                                                                 for Banner system
                                                                                                                                                 •Train faculty on
     Key                                                                                                                                         techniques of video and
                                                                                                                                                 internet Distance
                                                                                                                                                 Education distribution
  Customer                        UH
                                       HH
                                            ITS

    Service
                                                                                                                                                      Tech Subcommittee
                                                                                                                                                      I
                                                                                                                                                                     rjk


                                       Hawaii Community College Technology Department
                        Figure 2 - Proposed Future Map of the Information Technology Department

  Distance Learning
  The University of Hawai‘i Distance and Distributed Learning Action Plan (UH, 2003,
  p.3) defines distance learning as the delivery of instruction when the student and faculty
  member are not in the same physical location. Distance learning is generally mediated or
  assisted by some form(s) of technology –interactive video, email, the web, course
  management systems (e.g., WebCT), CDROM, DVD, Cable Telephone and/or streaming
  media. Because distance learning is generally focused on extending access to educational
  opportunities, the University of Hawai‘i also includes and defines its face-to-face off-
  campus programs as part of its distance learning program.

  The Action Plan also defines distributed learning to include distance learning and
  encompass the broader campus-based use of technologies that enhance teaching and
  learning and the provision of complete online courses and services to campus-based
  students.


                                                  Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                                                    244
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

Currently, Hawai‘i Community College uses the Hawai‘i Interactive Television System
(HITS), Video Conferencing (VidCon), and Internet or web-based instruction like
WebCT. According to the SCT Banner computer specialist, there were 606 courses
offered in the Spring 2006 semester, of which 24 were web-based, five were HITS, seven
were VidCon, and 13 were a combination of VidCon and on-line hybrid courses (UH CC,
2006). This represented 7% to 8% of the total number of classes offered by the college.

The college is connected via VidCon to distributed sites on the island in Ka‘u, Waimea,
and Kealakekua. The college has plans to expand the number of sites to Na‘alehu, Puna,
and Honoka‘a (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.4).

Currently, there are two media specialists in East Hawai‘i who provide technical support
of VidCon and DL classes paid by Title III federal funds. Policies and procedures for the
use of VidCon are available for faculty and staff.

The University of Hawai‘i System has committed to broad-based, system-wide planning
and support and provides for the reliability, disaster recovery, privacy and security of
technology-assisted activities. Implementation of UHCC system-wide distance learning
is accomplished through the cross-campus groups that were established in the UHCC
Implementation Plan For Integrating Distance Learning into Campus Operations (UH
CC, 2000a, p.3-6). In addition, the UH Distance and Distributed Learning Action Plan
(UH, 2003, p.3-10) established several action groups to address specific issues in
academic, faculty engagement and support, student support, research and development,
faculty-related policies, financing, and technology infrastructure.

The UHCC System has committed to increasing the number of students who register for
distance education courses and programs to 7, 500 by Fall 2010 and has set a resource
requirement level of $1,000,000 for distance learning infrastructure development in
addition to $7,000,000 for MIS and Technology Infrastructure (UH CC, 2002, p.18).

In addition to System support, HawCC continues to request funding through the formal
University of Hawai‘i budgeting process. Because of the state’s poor economic health
and ensuing budget constraints, the college had been unsuccessful in getting additional IT
support through its biennium budget requests for 2001-2003 and 2003-2005. After the
2003-2005 budget request was denied, the college reallocated its existing budget to
support one of the two current IT Specialist’s positions. This position is supported half-
time by general funds and half-time by special funds. A full-time general-funded
position that was approved for the 2005-2007 biennium budget has been filled.

During the “lean” economic period for the state, the college gained financial support for
distance education by securing two large federal grants. These grants provided monies
for curriculum development, equipment purchases, and both site and professional
development. The Title III grant provided monies to develop distance learning in
Waimea and Ka`u, to increase both video conferencing and on-site class offerings, to
expand distance learning instruction positions in Hawaiian Studies, and to provide
technical support (HawCC, 2003, p.18).


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               245
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

The Rural Development Project grant also helped support distance education through its
project to assist potential rural area teachers to gain access to studies leading to a BA in
Elementary Education (HawCC, 2003, p.18).

Although the college has been able to continue building its distance learning
infrastructure through grants, it is necessary to secure funding for permanent positions to
continue the technical support provided through grants. In the biennium budget proposal
for 2007-2009, the college has requested funding for these grant-supported positions in
addition to other much-needed IT positions.

Planning Agenda:

The college has submitted a major biennium budget request for review by the 2007 State
Legislature to “create a new academic and administrative support unit with a Director
reporting to the Chancellor to provide all necessary support for academic and
administration computing as well as media support services for instruction; particularly
for the distance delivery of credit and non-credit instruction and all necessary student
services and academic support for distance education students” ([HawCC], 2006).


C.2. Technology planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution
systematically assesses the effective use of technology resources and uses the results of
evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

“In 1996 the core of the Academic Computing Unit (ACU) began to take shape when
Hawai‘i Community College hired a full time temporary IT specialist to manage the
Novell network and the computer labs on the Upper Campus in the Business Technology
building. This assignment provided the College with its first IT position in support of
academic computing to complement a full time IT specialist already on staff assigned to
administrative and student information systems computing/programming. The academic
computing position was made permanent in 1999, and a second full time temporary IT
specialist position was added to address the burgeoning demands of academic
computing” (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.2).

“Computer usage proliferated in these years with all faculty offices equipped by utilizing
year end supplies funds as well as roll outs from renovated computer labs. With the
addition of the West Hawai‘i campus in 1999-2000 and the renovation/modernization of
several buildings on the Manono campus the ACU was expanded to include an additional
full time temporary IT specialist as well as two student help positions. Finally, in ’04-’05
the College created two .5 positions to be stationed at West Hawai‘i for media and
computing support. Initially, a single candidate filled the foregoing position, but his
tenure lasted less than a year. Currently the positions are unfilled and the responsibilities
for support in West Hawai‘i have reverted to the Hilo staff” (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.2).



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               246
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

“The ACU provides direct technology-related services college-wide. The outcomes
listed therefore have a substantial indirect impact to student learning outcomes. The
current program outcomes for the Academic Computing Unit are:

       •   Deploy Video Conferencing and HITS network to service 4,000 sq mi area
       •   Implement, maintain and develop data inquiry tools for Banner system
       •   Provide academic and administrative computing and support
       •   Train faculty on techniques of video Distance Education distribution
       •   Maintain servers (web, email, file)” (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.3)

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The combination of technology planning and
institutional planning has not been effectively integrated in the past. There has not been a
campus-wide plan for the implementation of technology and many of the computer
systems have been fielded by individual departments and programs utilizing departmental
funds or grant monies. In spite of this the college has had success in providing service,
support, and the development of Information Technology. While the ACU does provide
advice on the purchase of hardware and software for compatibility and interoperability
they often are consulted after the fact when purchase decisions have already been made.

According to tables and data on student satisfaction survey results (Part VI) from the
Program Review Report, Academic Computing Unit/Department of Information
Technology (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.13-15):

       These “data elements were provided by the Community College Survey of
       Student Engagement (CCSSE) organization. It is taken from the most recently
       published report for 2004. CCSSE is a nationally recognized organization, which
       provides a much-needed tool for assessing quality in community college
       education. The survey asks questions about institutional practices and student
       behaviors that are highly correlated with student learning and retention. This data
       is readily available from the Hawai‘i Community College Assessment Website,
       under the ‘Resources’ link in our Survey Library.

       The following examples highlight the need for continued investment in the area of
       technology services and support at our institution going forward: Student Services
       by Use, Satisfaction, and Importance




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               247
    Standard IIIC: Technology Resources




Student Services                                           Use           Satisfaction Importance
Academic advising/planning                                  54%              70%         88%
Career counseling                                           30%              46%         79%
Job placement assistance                                    10%              21%         63%
Peer or other tutoring                                      25%              38%         69%
Skill labs (writing, math, etc.)                            40%              51%         74%
Child care                                                   5%              11%         45%
Financial aid advising                                      43%              48%         76%
Computer lab                                              59%                69%         82%

            As highlighted above, the Computer Labs on the Hawai‘i Community College
            campuses rated the second highest of all student services. Although the
            percentage of students that either use the service sometimes or often as seen in the
            ‘Use’ column was only 59%, the fact that the students regard this as being
            important to them illustrates the need to improve this important service. By
            enhancing the infrastructure in which the service is supported, the hope is that we
            will be able to increase both the ‘use’ and ‘satisfaction’ numbers up to the level of
            ‘importance.’

    Percentage of Students Who Reported Participating Often or Very Often in
    Selected Activities by Enrollment Status

                                                                                Less
                                                                                Than
                                                                                        Full-
                                                                                Full-
      Most Frequent Student Activity Items                             All      time    time

     Asked questions in class or contributed to class
                                                                      63%       61%     65%
     discussions
     Worked on a paper or project that required
     integrating ideas or information from various                    59%       52%     70%
     sources

     Used the Internet or instant messaging to work
                                                                      57%       51%     68%
     on an assignment
     Received prompt feedback (written or oral) from
                                                                      56%       55%     56%
     instructors on your performance
     Discussed ideas from your readings or classes
     with others outside of class (students, family                   50%       49%     53%
     members, coworkers, etc.)
     Prepared two or more drafts of a paper or
                                                                      50%       46%     57%
     assignment before turning it in


                              Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                   248
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

      “In analyzing levels of engagement by reviewing what activities students most
      often participate in, the use of either the Internet or instant messaging rated
      second from the top of the list for most frequently performed activities. We have
      a certain responsibility to facilitate learning by the means preferred by our
      students. Access to the Internet and real time communication with their peers
      through instant messaging is the method of choice for our students. Also note the
      consistently high level of engagement of our full-time students here compared
      with their part-time counter parts” (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.14).

      “How much has your experience at this college contributed to your knowledge,
      skills, and personal development in the following areas?

                                                               Very       Quite          Very
                                                               much       a bit   Some   Little
 g. Using computing and information technology                  28         35      27     10

      A full 63% of our students indicate that they rate computing and IT experiences
      gained at our institution as having either ‘very much’ or ‘quite a bit’ of
      contribution to their knowledge and skills base. Only 10% said the experiences in
      this area had ‘very little’ contribution (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.15).

      In comparing Hawai‘i Community College students with other students from
      comparable small colleges, for the most part they rate their email, IM, Internet,
      computing, and information usage quite high and above their counterparts. There
      is still work that needs to be done in computer labs regarding both frequency of
      use and student satisfaction with this service. Based on the evidence from CCSSE
      it appears that Hawai‘i Community College has been moving in the right direction
      and should be focused on improving their ability to provide service, support, and
      further development in the area on Information Technology” (HawCC ACU,
      2005, p.15).

Part VII of the Program Review Report, Academic Computing Unit/Department of
Information Technology (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.15) summarizes a survey of faculty and
staff satisfaction with technology and support:

      “During fall term 2005, a comprehensive Faculty and Staff Satisfaction Survey
      was administered to all Hawai‘i Community College faculty, staff, and
      administrators. The results show that 8 out of 10 (78%) of our College faculty
      and staff believe that the computer and software they use is adequate for their
      needs. Only 42% of our faculty and staff believe their software is current with
      today’s technology. Additionally, only 14% of those surveyed feel that Hawai‘i
      Community College is equal or superior to other college’s in the UH System in
      the area of technology. Based upon theses findings, it is apparent that an
      investment in technology and services for the Hawai‘i Community College
      campus is a necessity” (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.15).


                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             249
              Standard IIIC: Technology Resources


                                       Strongly Agree          Agree            Neutral            Disagree   Strongly Disagree         Total
          Technology
                                       #         %         #           %   #              %   #           %    #          %        #            %
1. The computer and software I
                                       28      22%        70       56%     8         6%       14        11%    6        5%        126      100%
 use are adequate for my needs.
2. The computer and software on
 my personal computer is more
                                       21      17%        31       25%     34        27%      30        24%    9         7%       125      100%
 up-to-date than my office or
 classroom computer.
3. In the area of technology the
 college is equal or superior to the
                                       5        4%        12       10%     55        44%      36        29%   16        13%       124      100%
 other community colleges in the
 UH System.
4. I need additional training in
 how to effectively use                25      20%        57       45%     21        17%      20        16%    3         2%       126      100%
 technology.


              This faculty/staff survey “shows that 42% of the faculty and staff believe that their
              personal computers and software at home are more up-to-date than computing equipment
              at the campus. Perhaps that same 42% disagree that the college is equal to or superior to
              other UH community colleges. Faculty members visit other campuses in this State and
              they talk about the services that are available at the various sites so these opinions on the
              state of technology at HawCC are serious indicators of weaknesses. Finally, the same
              survey device revealed that 65% of faculty and staff at HawCC feel a need for training in
              the effective use of technology. This becomes a serious weakness because there is very
              limited ability for the Tech staff to provide training on a collective basis” (HawCC ACU,
              2005, p.18).

              “Student accessibility to computers appears to be adequate for HawCC with
              approximately 700 computers available for a student body of 1600 full-time-equivalent
              students on both east and west sides of the Big Island. The hardware is available, but
              once again the staffing problem is such that the computers cannot be reliably serviced in
              a timely fashion nor can they be adequately monitored for students to gain access to an
              open lab environment. Repeatedly, the problem of providing administrative rights to the
              computers rises with academic programs forced to seek such rights for their student tech
              workers because the college staff is not large enough to follow-up with the needs of
              individual labs. The fragmentation of lab management that ensues may lead to severe
              maintenance and management problems if the college staff is not augmented soon”
              (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.18).

              Distance Learning
              Since the last accreditation review, there have been advances made at the system-level to
              communicate, coordinate, and plan. The UHCC Distance Education Committee has
              developed an Action Plan to advance and support system-wide distance education at the
              community colleges. An Action Plan was also developed by the University of Hawai‘i
              System to support distance and distributed learning.




                                                     Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                                           250
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

System-wide support has also been planned and developed for faculty who are currently
teaching technology-mediated courses and for students to assist them in their distance
learning courses.

As these system-wide action plans are implemented and improved, there needs to be a
more effective means of communication and coordination on the institutional level.
Although the college is represented on the various distance learning committees, each
representative does not fully understand the overall distance learning infrastructure of the
system.

In researching the technology resources of the college as it relates to distance education,
Standard Three committee members discovered a lack of coordination in this area.
Although there was much focus and dialogue regarding the need for an organizational
structure to address the needs of the Academic Computing Unit/Department of
Information Technology, there was no institutional coordination or dialogue about
distance education in general. As a result, this issue was brought up and discussed at the
January 26, 2006 Accreditation Steering Committee meeting (HawCC Accreditation
Steering Committee, 2006). During this meeting, the Committee decided that the
Academic Senate would be the proper venue for further deep discussion and planning for
the college’s future direction in distance education. As a result of this discussion, the
Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs requested the Chair of the Academic Senate to set
up an ad hoc committee of the Academic Senate:

       “to work in conjunction with HawCC faculty experienced in distance education
       and its support (both videoconferencing and WEB-CT), including knowledgeable
       technical staff members to propose a Distance Education Curriculum, Staffing,
       and Support Review Policy for the campus.

       The charge would be to produce a recommended policy/process for faculty peer
       review of distance education course structure, course evaluation procedures, and
       faculty staff development needs. Additionally, the review process would include
       a mechanism for establishing and updating standards for academic support and
       student services support to be provided to the college's distance education
       students in general rather than on a course-by-course basis.

       Given the foregoing charge, the committee membership in addition to the Chair
       should include at least one faculty member adept at the use of video conferencing
       for instruction, one faculty member adept at the use of WEB-CT, an APT Media
       Staff adviser, an APT IT specialist, a Student Services faculty member committed
       to distance delivery, an Academic Support Faculty member knowledgeable in
       distance delivery of support services” (HawCC Academic Senate, 2006a).

At the February 24, 2006, Academic Senate meeting, a resolution was approved to
establish an ad hoc Distance Education committee with representation from instruction,
students, and academic support. This committee would be charged with using the
Guidelines for Implementation presented in the Accrediting Commission for Community


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               251
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources

and Junior College’s (ACCJC) Distance Learning Manual (ACCJC, 2005, p.10-14) and
relevant UH system policies to review and make recommendations for HawCC’s distance
education effort. This Committee would complete its charge by the end of May 2007 in
the form of a written report.
In addition, the resolution also recommended that a Distance Education Coordinator
faculty position be established to continue the work of the ad hoc committee and to
coordinate and evaluate the effectiveness of current activities, and to plan for and
implement future DE efforts in support of HawCC’s mission (HawCC Academic Senate,
2006b). This Distance Education Media Coordinator Faculty position has been requested
in the 2007-2009 Biennium Budget.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will systematically establish a Department of Information Technology to
   better integrate planning and technology.

2. The college will establish a Director’s position of this Department of Information
   Technology that would report directly to the Chancellor and bear responsibility for
   academic and administrative computing, as well as all forms of media
   services/distance education technologies (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.18).

3. The college will recognize the principles to guide facilities management following “a
   policy of centralization of location and management of its computer lab classrooms to
   economize its management” not only in its current practices but also as it plans for
   the new campuses in East and West Hawai‘i (HawCC ACU, 2005, p.20).

4. The college will set a depreciation policy for the variety of equipment and will
   develop a replacement plan for its equipment.

5. The college will integrate state-of-the art technology resource planning into the
   institutional planning and design of the new campuses in East and West Hawai‘i.

6. The Academic Senate’s ad hoc committee on Distance Education will complete its
   work to review the college’s distance education activities and make recommendations
   for the future by May 2007.

7. The college will establish the Distance Education Media Coordinator Faculty position
   which has been requested in the 2007-2009 Biennium Budget (HawCC, 2006) to
   continue the work of the ad hoc committee, to coordinate and evaluate the
   effectiveness of current activities, and to plan for and implement future distance
   education efforts.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              252
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

D. Financial Resources
   Financial resources are sufficient to support student learning programs and
   services and to improve institutional effectiveness. The distribution of resources
   supports the development, maintenance, and enhancement of programs and
   services. The institution plans and manages its financial affairs with integrity and
   in a manner that ensures financial stability. The level of financial resources
   provides a reasonable expectation of both short-term and long-term financial
   solvency.


D.1. The institution relies upon its mission and goals as the foundation for financial
planning.

Descriptive Summary:

Many factors influence the relationship between distribution of resources and mission.
Some are universal, similar to all colleges. Others are more distinctive, factors belonging
to the UH system, and still others are unique to Hawai‘i Community College (HawCC).

Historically, Hawai‘i has followed a strong top-down, organizational model. This is due
in part to the dominating influence of the sugar plantation industry followed by a labor
movement that operated with strong central authority. Traditionally, Asian and Pacific
Island cultures favor organizational structures under central authority. Additionally,
Hawai‘i is a small state composed of several islands that are isolated from both the
mainland and from one another. This geographic reality combined with historical and
cultural influences resulted in both the State of Hawai‘i and the University of Hawai‘i
System’s financial planning being much more centralized than counterparts on the
mainland. Additionally, only one president and one board of regents supervise a system
that includes both universities and community colleges.

Therefore, Hawai‘i Community College’s mission and goals are in direct alignment with
both the UH System’s and the UH Community Colleges’ (UHCC) Strategic Plans.
Mission alignment and goals selection, as well as HawCC individual strategies and
resource needs for meeting selected goals, were developed through the College Council.
Both the process of development, including stakeholders’ input, and HawCC’s strategic
plan until 2010, are published in the Academic Development Plan 2002-2010 (HawCC,
n.d., p.5-6). This document illustrates the college’s commitment to fiscal planning based
on long-term priorities.

The UH System and Hawai‘i Community College utilize a program-based, full-cost
incremental budget system. The budget is prepared and authorized on a biennial basis by
the state legislature. Biennium budget requests to the Hawai‘i State Legislature from
individual colleges include an informational narrative that explains how resource
demands relate to the system and to the individual college’s strategic plans ([HawCC],
2006a). HawCC has added information gained through a recent program review process
to help determine biennium budget requests. The program review template employed in


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               253
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

the process is intentionally designed to support shared governance and to emphasize the
importance of student learning outcomes; nevertheless, determination of resource
allocation is, for the most part, a UH system-based decision that is determined by Hawai‘i
State Government actions.

Once resource allocation is determined, the college receives accurate information about
available funds including on-going and anticipated fiscal commitment within the annual
UH system budget. Fiscal information pertaining only to the individual college must be
generated by the college, and fiscal information that is visible at the program or unit level
demands an even more complex extrapolation process. The UH System budget, more
transparent for system-wide budget communication, becomes less so as it moves into
individual college budget communication, and it is not readily transparent at the unit or
program level without the help of a translation process.

This biennium budget process has been in place for several years, but with major
administrative changes on the UHCC System-level, there has been some confusion. In
response, President David McClain initiated an individual campus “stock-taking”
process. This initiative’s purpose was to review campus priorities, assess needs, and
communicate state-of-the-campus findings to the UH System Budget Advisory
Committee.

Recent administrative personnel changes have been even more pronounced at HawCC
than those found at the UHCC level. The Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor for Academic
Affairs, Vice-Chancellor for Administrative Affairs, and the Dean of Continuing
Education and Training at Hawai‘i Community College are in their first or second year of
service. Though not seen as a long-term factor, this present leadership-in-transition
reality at both system and college level did affect the current budget process and the
information distribution associated with it.

Even though UH System financial communication and processing is challenging, there
are many advantages to belonging to a Hawai‘i state-based system. For instance, the
college knows that long term liabilities and obligations such as employee-related health
benefits will be paid by the state. In addition, the state is self-insured. This allows the
college assurance of liability coverage without the direct cost. Additionally, repairs and
maintenance of buildings are system-based.

Financial reserves will be further strengthened through a UH System agreement with the
Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) that requires each
individual campus to establish and maintain 3% of their total budget in reserve to be used
for emergencies such as fluctuating electrical costs or other unexpected expenses or
shortfalls. HawCC met this 3% reserve goal at the end of Spring 2006 (UH CC, 2005).

Finally, it should be underscored that money has been appropriated for new HawCC
campuses in both East and West Hawai‘i. This will dramatically alter the identity of the
college. All aspects of financial planning and resource distribution will be significantly
influenced by this new reality. If the college wishes to present itself as an institution that


                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                254
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

represents the views of all with integrity, it needs to develop and carry out a plan by
which both faculty and the community can offer meaningful input.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. Financial planning for Hawai‘i Community
College is organized through the College Council and governed by the following plans:

   •   The University system’s overall mission as defined in The University of Hawai‘i
       System Strategic Plan: Entering the University’s Second Century, 2002-20010
       (UH Board of Regents [BOR] and Office of the President, 2002)
   •   The University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges system mission and goals as
       defined in the University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges Strategic Plan, 2002-
       2010 (UH CC, 2002)
   •   The specific priorities of Hawai‘i Community College which are detailed in the
       HawCC Academic Development Plan 2002-2010 (HawCC, n.d.)

Both external and internal research data was employed to guide the strategic planning
represented in the college’s Academic Development Plan (ADP). Influential external
factors included: geography, demographics, lower education trends, constraints and
challenges, opportunities, and state and county economic outlooks (HawCC, n.d., p.7-13).

Internal factors that guided the planning process included: CCSSE research results,
statistics on enrollment (headcount, major, registration status, location, ethnicity, age, and
attendance status), degrees earned, curriculum overview, and Office of Continuing
Education and Training (OCET) enrollment statistics (HawCC, n.d., p.13-21).

Institutional commitment, dialogue, and the process of evaluation and planning to
develop the strategic plans for the college are also documented in the HawCC Strategic
Planning Binder (HawCC, 2002.)

Recently, as a means to increase institutional effectiveness, the college instituted a
program/unit review process. This process will provide information and data to facilitate
institutional planning and resource distribution. It is an organizational structure designed
to help ensure that dialogue guides institutional change. Additionally, it is expected that
the program review process will help the college formulate, commit to, and make public
its student learning outcomes.

The first program/unit reviews were completed in November 2005. These individual
reviews and details of planning process guidelines can be viewed at the Hawai‘i
Community College Assessment web site (HawCC, 2005).

Administratively, the UH System and HawCC are becoming more stable. Administrators
should now begin to further develop a set biennium budget process that distributes
understandable fiscal information early enough to allow serious review, promote


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               255
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

dialogue, evaluate, and set priorities on an annual basis—a continuous assessment of
current reality’s relationship to long-term planning.

The college is currently poised to resolve an on-going recommendation by the ACCJC to
“focus its facility planning on the goal of becoming autonomous at a site, which when
built out, will house all functions of a comprehensive community college” (ACCJC,
2001, p.8).

Since 1991 when HawCC and UH at Hilo officially separated to become two independent
institutions, the college has worked towards autonomy and towards the development of
independent sites for both East and West Hawai‘i. Progress towards becoming a fully
functioning comprehensive community college and towards fulfilling the college’s
mission to “serve the island wide community” did materialize, but due to the State’s poor
economic condition throughout the 1990’s, developing independent sites was not
possible. Fortunately, this reality has changed.

In 2005, amidst a thriving state economy, the college was able to secure $18.21 million
from the Hawai‘i State Legislature to begin the planning, design, and phased-in
construction of the campuses in East and West Hawai‘i through a private/public
partnership (Hawai‘i Legislature, 2005, p.435, 544). At the April 20, 2006, Board of
Regents’ meeting, the request to enter into a Developmental Services Agreement (DSA)
with Hawai‘i Campus Developers, LLC for the Planning and Design of the Hawai‘i
Community College campus was approved (UH BOR, 2006, p.3-4). The first major step
towards the development of two autonomous sites has been taken. Continued support
from the UH System and the state legislature is expected.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will continue to develop and improve the strategic planning process by
   developing an on-going planning, prioritizing, and evaluation cycle to better tie in the
   mission and goals of the colleges to resource allocations.

2. The college will continue to develop and improve the program/unit review process by
   further defining the College Council’s and the Academic Senate’s role in this process.
   The college will improve its biennium budget process through task analysis and
   benchmark dating to establish best methods for stakeholders’ input.

3. The college will ensure that the planning and design of the two new campuses
   matches its mission and goals and includes stakeholder’s input.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               256
Standard IIID: Financial Resources



D.2. To assure the financial integrity of the institution and responsible use of financial
resources, the financial management system has appropriate control mechanisms and
widely disseminates dependable and timely information for sound financial decision
making.

Descriptive Summary:

Some factors that influence the relationship between distribution of resources and
mission are unique to Hawai‘i Community College. These unique realities include: a
high percentage of under-prepared and at-risk students, a vast service area, operating
costs for the UH Center West Hawai‘i, a history of inadequate start-up resources and
significantly less direct allocations because of shared services with the University of
Hawai‘i at Hilo. One cannot begin to understand the relationship between financial
resources and institutional effectiveness at the college unless these unique factors are
considered.

Though under-prepared students and at-risk students are found in every community
college in the nation, they are found in significantly larger numbers at HawCC. Many of
our students need to take additional courses in developmental reading (46%), writing
(51%), and/or math (48%). At-risk students (economically disadvantaged, limited
English proficiency and special education) represent over 50% of the island’s public
school population (HawCC, 2001, p.8, 14).

By most measurements Hawai‘i County is the poorest county in the state. The
percentage of island families falling under the federal poverty threshold is 10.9%, in
comparison to 6% of families statewide. According to the Community College Survey of
Student Engagement Report (CCSSE), more than half (56%) of HawCC students are first
generation college students, with neither parent having an AA/AS degree or higher, and
they tend to work for pay off campus (65%) (HawCC, 2001, p.8, 16).

These above mentioned student realities (under prepared, at-risk, first generation in
college, and working while in school), place additional resource demands on this college
to a degree that most other colleges do not face. Equally significant is the challenge of
distance.

Hawai‘i Community College’s service area is 4,000 square miles. The distance between
the East Hawai‘i Campus in Hilo and the UH Center, West Hawai‘i is 110 miles and
takes approximately 2 ½ hours to drive. No other community college in the UH system
provides services to such a large land area, but despite the demands of distance, HawCC
has committed itself to providing island-wide services through its mission statement and
in its Academic Development Plan 2002-2010.

The function of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i is to provide access for rural area
students to higher education options including community college, bachelors, masters,
and graduate level certificates and degrees via on site and distance education classes.


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               257
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

Students who are enrolled in the upper level offerings brokered by the Center from UH
Manoa, UH Hilo, and UH West Oahu are counted in the university headcounts, but
operating costs associated with running the Center comes from the Hawai‘i Community
College’s budget.

This cost factor of running the Center is amplified by certain conditions. By definition,
the Center’s function at this location is to provide appropriate academic support services
of the library, learning center, distance education technology and space support as
appropriate to both HawCC and the sister system institutions, but unlike the UH Centers
assigned to the main campuses on Maui and on Kauai, this Center is located ll0 miles
from the main community college campus.

This separate site reality and the legitimate resource needs associated with a separate
location, including high rental costs for leased facilities, is a resource demand unique to
HawCC. Furthermore, operating costs continue to increase; therefore, the College/Center
has requested significant additional infrastructure and support funding through the
biennium budget process. Support for the Center seems justified considering the fact that
West Hawai‘i is the only geographic area in the State of Hawai‘i that does not have a
permanent presence of a facility to serve the island residents.

Equally significant from a resource/institutional effectiveness perspective is the shared
services relationship between HawCC and UHH. Officially separated in 1991, resource
distribution to HawCC was determined as part of a process so protracted that participants
are unable to report that HawCC’s needs were fully funded by the results. Initially, the
HawCC budget consisted of faculty positions and the fringe benefits associated with
them. All other support monies were administered through UH Hilo. It was more than
five years later before a full administration under direct budgeting was established. At
this point, it became more difficult to secure other necessary new HawCC positions
through the transfer of previous positions in place when UH Hilo and HawCC were one
school. HawCC had to seek new positions through legislative action during a decade
when the Hawai‘i state economy was in a state of malaise due to several negative
economic shocks.

These shocks included a substantial reduction of visitor arrivals from the United States
because of the 1990-1991 recession, the closure of California military bases and defense
plants, and the uncertainty over the safety of air travel during the Gulf War. Equally
disconcerting was a substantial reduction of visitor arrivals from Japan because of that
country’s slow economic growth throughout the 1990s. Additionally, the on-going
decline in sugar and pineapple production gathered steam in the 1990s, with only a
handful of plantations still in business by 2001. The cumulative impact of these adverse
shocks was severe, as real per capita personal income did not change between 1991 and
1998 (La Croix, 2001).

While the whole university system was affected by this situation, Hawai‘i Community
College was most impacted. All of the other institutions in the system simply tried to



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               258
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

maintain their operations while Hawai‘i Community College was in a transition stage to
build up its essential services.

Recently, with the improvement of the state’s economy, several of these ongoing needs
are being addressed. As part of the transition plan to develop a new campus in East
Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i Community College sought to establish a separate auxiliary services
unit. House Bill Number 3178 was introduced in the 2006 session of the State
Legislature to request additional resources for the College to administer and manage its
own facilities and services (Hawai‘i House of Representatives, 2006a). Monies were
appropriated and the college is currently recruiting to establish its own auxiliary services
unit. House Bill Number 3179 (Hawai'i House of Representatives, 2006b) was also
introduced for capital improvement projects to continue with the Facilities Transition and
Phasing Plan as the college awaits the development of the new campus in East Hawai‘i.
The University of Hawai‘i System was appropriated monies for capital improvement
projects; HawCC anticipates a portion of these monies for campus improvement. In
addition, the college received a substantial increase in its budget, the first time in fourteen
years, to address other shared services needs.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. For many years, HawCC’s financial resources
were insufficient due, in part, to the state’s economic conditions and to a lack of
understanding about HawCC’s unique needs. Recently, however, with the healthier
economic conditions of the state, there has been a movement by the UH system and the
state legislature to support HawCC with additional budget increases to develop a fully
functioning community college at autonomous sites in East and West Hawai‘i.

Concerning the college’s need to provide financial budget information, the Budget and
Finance Unit (BFU) does provide regular revenue and expenditure reports for the senior
administrative staff. The unit also provides reports that indicate changes in budget
allocations or assessments and monthly updates of non-personnel and personnel
expenditures including remaining balance against budget (HawCC, 2006b).

The BFU responds to other stakeholders’ requests for financial information, including
student government and other related groups. It provides regular updates for Board of
Regents reports and requests for financial information from the UH system.
Additionally, the BFU provides instructions on how to obtain financial data from the
online University’s Financial Management Information System (FMIS) to the appropriate
college personnel.

Budget information is reported to the College Council, which is a shared governance
body with representation from all major areas of the college. Minutes of the meetings of
these groups are distributed via e-mail to the entire campus, and reports on the state of the
budget, presented in these meetings, are available for distribution.




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                259
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

Additionally, the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs, the Director of UH Center, West
Hawai‘i, and the Deans of Continuing Education and Training and of Student Services
are provided budget information by the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Affairs. More
recently all administrators have made efforts to communicate the budget directly to
faculty and staff, but find it difficult to present an individual college account (HawCC)
within a multiple account (UH System) view.

One recent administrative effort to create an environment that is more conducive to
dialogue, shared governance, and fiscal transparency involved presenting a draft of the
biennium budget requests to the College Council and the Academic Senate. Both groups
were requested to engage in open discussion and then to provide feedback including
budget item prioritization if desired.

One significant limitation to the administration’s recent effort was that the time between
information distribution and input deadline was insufficient. As the college continues to
evaluate and refine the program review process, it must take into account the budget
process timetable and adjust the review process to allow more time for stakeholder input.

Even though the above listed efforts to provide financial information throughout the
institution should be applauded, the college as a whole still has limited understanding of
fiscal issues including what the biennium budget process is and/or how it is developed.
Additionally, student and faculty satisfaction with the Business Financial Unit and the
college’s distribution of appropriate financial information is unknown. No survey
instruments are in place to measure these factors. The UH System and HawCC have
control mechanisms in place to assure financial integrity and responsible use of
resources. Annually, the UH System conducts mandatory independently contracted
audits of general funds and tuition and fees. A separate financial aid independent audit is
also conducted annually. These audit reports may be found at the website of the UH
System’s Office of the Chief Financial Officer (UH Vice President for Budget and
Finance/CFO, 2006).

In addition to these annually mandated audits, Price Waterhouse is scheduled to perform
an independent audit of all UH System special and revolving accounts for fiscal year
July, 2005-June, 2006. The Hawai‘i State Legislative Auditor will also conduct a
separate audit of general funds and tuition and fees for the same period.

The fiscal management of all grants, externally funded programs, and contractual
agreements is reviewed and approved through the UH System Office of Research
Services (ORS). The UH System and the college follow audit guidelines for all such
externally funded programs. HawCC promptly responds to any request for additional
information and/or guidelines resulting from system audits.

Although the UH System does assure financial integrity and responsible use of resources
by conducting regular audits, the weakness of the current auditing process is that it is a
UH System rather than an individual college audit. These system audits review separate
campuses and report findings accordingly, but both the depth and the transparency is less


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               260
Standard IIID: Financial Resources

than what one would find in an individual campus audit. Additionally, as is the case with
the UH system-wide biennium budget report, audit information is available, but this
information must go through an individual college translation process before
transparency, evaluation, and shared governance planning can occur.

Though there are challenges resulting from being a part of a centralized Hawai‘i State
system, one major advantage is the ability to respond to unexpected emergencies. Both
the UH System and the UHCC System have set aside monies to cover unexpected
emergencies. In addition, direct appeal to the Hawai‘i State government can be made
when appropriate.

Payroll security is another important advantage to being part of the Hawai‘i State system.
Over 90% of HawCC’s current budget is channeled to payroll expenses. Though not
anticipated, in the event of a HawCC shortfall, the State Department of Accounting and
General Services would continue to process the payroll.

Scrutiny of all types of contractual agreements is another service and advantage the UH
System provides HawCC. Before any contract can be finalized and signed, it must go
through several levels of review. First, unit, department, or division level administrators
evaluate the document; then they are reviewed by the college’s Chancellor. Finally, the
System verifies that the contract follows all procurement laws, risk management and
other legal requirements. The UH System assures that the contract clearly delineates the
roles and responsibilities of each party, the service being rendered, and the inclusion of
appropriate termination clauses.

Planning Agenda:

1. The college will continue to communicate its unique financial needs directly to the
   UH System, the Board of Regents, and the Hawai‘i State Legislature in an effort to
   secure financial resources at an appropriate level.

2. The college will continue to engage in the program/unit review process with all
   programs and units reporting by the end of a four-year cycle. The college will
   continue to develop the tie between program/unit review and the biennium budget
   process.

3. The college will support and actively participate in the planned UH System upgrade
   of the Fiscal Management Information System (FMIS) so that the financial
   information of the individual colleges within the system will be more readily
   available.

4. The college will try to secure biennium budget funding to hire a budget specialist to
   help disseminate dependable and timely fiscal information and to facilitate an
   evaluation of the BFU unit performance.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               261
Standard IIIA: Human Resources -- References

                              Standard IIIA -- References

Hawai‘i. (2005, December). Statutes and rules: Chapter 84, State Ethics Code.
Honolulu: Legislature. Retrieved April 19, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.gov/ethics/noindex.Laws.htm

Hawai‘i Community College. (2004a). Affirmative action program statement policy
2003-2004. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2004b, April 28). Hiring procedures and responsibilities.
Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005a). College professional development: Program
review & assessment, 2005- 2006. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005b). General catalog 2005-2006. Hilo: author. Also
available at http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/learningresources/2006catalog.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006, May 18). Hawai‘i Community College assessment
website. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 16 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate. (2005, April 1). Hawai‘i Community
College faculty professional standards and ethics. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 2, 2006
from http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.facpolicy.code.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate. (2006, February 24). Agenda and
minutes. Hilo: author. Retrieved April 24, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/minfeb.06.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate Executive Committee. (2006a, February
13). Minutes of special meeting. Hilo: author. Retrieved April 24, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.ex.min.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate Executive Committee. (2006b, February
22). Minutes of special meeting. Hilo: author. Retrieved April 24, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.ex.min.htm

Hawai‘i Community College College Council. (2006a, February 6). College Council
minutes of special meeting February 6, 2006. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College College Council. (2006b, March 10). Minutes of meeting
March 10, 2006. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Cultural Transformation Initiative Work Group. (2006).
Cultural initiative training. Hilo: author.


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              262
Standard IIIA: Human Resources -- References

Hawai‘i Community College Staff Development Committee. (2004, August 19). New
faculty and staff orientation agenda. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Staff Development Committee. (2005). Staff development
activities. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Department of Human Resources Development . (2001, July). Performance
appraisal system (PAS) forms 526, 527 and 529. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 19,
2006 from http://www.hawaii.gov/hrd/main/HRDInfoCentral/FormsCentral/PAS

Kapiolani Community College. (2005). TCC 2005 Online Conference. Honolulu:
author. Retrieved May 26, 2006 from http://tcc.kcc.hawaii.edu/previousconferences.html

Leeward Community College. (2006). Hawai‘i National Teachers Seminar. Honolulu:
author. Retrieved July 17, 2006 from http://www.greatteacher.hawaii.edu/Seminar.html

United Public Workers. (2003, July). Unit 1 agreement. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai'i. (2000). Administrative Procedures Information System.
Honolulu: University of Hawaii. Retrieved May 2, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/

University of Hawai'i. (2003). 2003-2009 University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly
(UHPA) and University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents (BOR) agreement. Honolulu:
author. Retrieved April 25, 2006 from http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/2003-
2009-uhpa-uh-bor-agreement.pdf/view

University of Hawai'i. (2005a). Unit 3 collective bargaining agreement July 1, 2005-
June 30, 2007 [between the Hawai‘i Government Employees Association, AFSCME
Local 152, AFL-CIO, hereinafter called the Union, and the State of Hawaii, the City and
County of Honolulu, the County of Hawaii, the County of Maui, the County of Kauai, the
Hawai‘i Health Systems Corporation, and the Judiciary, hereinafter called the Employer].
Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/download/collbarg/Unit03-05-07.pdf

University of Hawai'i. (2005b). Unit 8 collective bargaining agreement July 1, 2005-
June 30, 2007 [between the State of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, University of Hawaii,
hereinafter the Employer, and the Hawai‘i Government Employees Association,
AFSCME Local 152, AFL-CIO, hereinafter the Union . Honolulu: author. Retrieved
April 25, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/download/collbarg/Unit08-05-07.pdf

University of Hawai'i. (2005c, August 11). TALENT Weblinks. Honolulu: author.
Retrieved April 24, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/talent/weblinks.htm




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              263
Standard IIIA: Human Resources -- References

University of Hawai'i. (2006a, April 7). Quarterly Vacancy Report. Honolulu: author.
University of Hawai'i. (2006b, April 19). Work at UH. Honolulu: author. Retrieved
April 19, 2006 from http://workatuh.hawaii.edu/

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. (2006). Distance learning class schedules. Hilo: author.
Retrieved April 24, 2006 from
http://www.uhh.hawaii.edu/academics/dl/ClassSchedules.php

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2005, August 11). Chapter 9 personnel.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 24, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy.

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2001, May 1). Revised faculty minimum
qualifications and salary placement guidelines. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2004, Summer). Return to industry
program guidelines and forms. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2005a, August 12). Contract renewal
suggested guidelines. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2005b, August 28). Guidelines for tenure
and promotion. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Office of Human Resources. (2001, November). A9.335
employment of relatives. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 19, 2006 from
http://www.svpa.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9335.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Office of Human Resources. (2002, May). A9.540 Recruitment
and selection of faculty and APT personnel. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 12, 2006
from http://www.svpa.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9540.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Office of Human Resources. (2003, July 12). 360 Assessment.
Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Office of Human Resources. (2006a, March 20). APT broadband
system. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 19, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/projects/projects.html

University of Hawai‘i Office of Human Resources. (2006b, July 14). Civil Service
employment opportunities. Honolulu: author. Retrieved July 14, 2006, from
http://www.pers.hawaii.edu/roe/vacancy.asp




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              264
Standard IIIA: Human Resources -- References

University of Hawai‘i Office of the Senior Vice President for Administration. (1999,
October). Executive memorandum 99-7 (E2.210 Use and management of information
technology sources). Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 19, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e2/e2210.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Personnel Management Office. (1982, July). A9.240 Record of
outside employment. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 19, 2006 from
http://www.svpa.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e5/e5214.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Vice President for Research and Graduate Education. (1995,
February). E5.214: Conflicts of interest executive policy. Honolulu: author. Retrieved
April 19, 2006 from http://www.svpa.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e5/e5214.pdf




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              265
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources -- References                                        _


                             Standard IIIB -- References

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. (2001, January 19).
Evaluation report, Hawai‘i Community College; K. Ramirez, Chair. Novato, California:
author. Retrieved April 27, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/Final_accreditation_eval_report.pdf

Goya, M. and N. Buchanan (2002, July 5). [letter to] Evan S. Dobelle President
regarding Hawai‘i Community College and University of Hawai‘i at Hilo organizational
structures and shared services. Hilo: HawCC. Information also found in HawCC, Co-
Location With UH Hilo binder.

Hawai‘i Community College. (n.d.). Co-location with UH Hilo binder. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (1997). Academic Development Plan 1997-2003. Hilo:
author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2002a, January 7). [agenda] Exploring new models for
shared services with UH Hilo. Hilo: author. Information also found in HawCC, Co-
Location With UH Hilo binder.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2002b, January 10). [E-mail correspondence with faculty
and staff with subject]--Exploring new models for shared services with UH Hilo [for
meeting on January 25, 2002]. Hilo: author. Information also found in HawCC, Co-
Location With UH Hilo binder.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2002c, January 25). Open meeting on exploring new
models for shared services with UH Hilo: Agenda and unedited notes of SWOT process.
Hilo: author. Information also found in HawCC, Co-Location With UH Hilo binder.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2002d, December). Hazardous materials/hazardous
waste management program. Hilo: author. Retrieved July 18, 2006 from
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/employeeservices/hazardous management1.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2003, September 23). Midterm accreditation report.
Hilo: author. Retrieved April 27, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/abouthawcc/mar.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005a, July 5). Repairs and maintenance information and
justification sheet. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005b, August 15). Faculty, staff, administrators annual
survey. Hilo: author. Retrieved July 18, 2006 from
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Resources/unofficial_survey2005_results%20(2).doc




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             266
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources -- References                                       _

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006). Program review report [template]. Hilo: author.
Retrieved July 19, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program%20Reviews/2006%20Program%20R
eview/PROGRAM%20REVIEW%20TEMPLATE.5.10.06.doc

Hawai‘i Community College Space Management and Allocation Committee. (2003a).
Guidelines, minutes, agenda. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Space Management and Allocation Committee. (2003b).
Request log (pending, deferred, referred, approved). Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i House of Representatives, Twenty-Third Legislature. (2006). HB 3178, A bill
for an act relating to the University of Hawai‘i ’s Hawai‘i Community College.
Retrieved April 29, 2006 from
http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/sessioncurrent/bills/hb3178_.htm

Hawai‘i Legislature, Twenty-Third Legislature. (2005). Session laws: HB 100, A bill
for an act relating to the state budget (the General Appropriations Act). Honolulu:
author.

Helber Hastert & Fee, Planners. (1998, May). Downtown relocation analysis Hawai‘i
Community College. Honolulu: author.

PBR Hawai‘i and Kajioka Okada Yamachi Architects. (1996, March). Hawai‘i
Community College long range development plan final draft. Honolulu: author.

PBR Hawai‘i and Kajioka Yamachi Architects. (1998, August). Hawai‘i Community
College Manono campus study. Honolulu: author.

PBR Hawai‘i and Wesley R. Segawa & Associates. (2003, May). Hawai‘i Community
College long range development plan update. Honolulu: author.

Simone, A. (1991, January 3). Refined implementation plan for the separation of
Hawai‘i Community College from the University of Hawaii-Hilo. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. (2005, April 29). Main and Manono campus parking
map. Hilo: author. Retrieved July 18, 2006 from
http://www.uhh.hawaii.edu/security/parking.php

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2006, April 20). Board of Regents’ meeting
agenda. Retrieved April 29, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/notice/20060420.regular.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Center at West Hawai‘i. (2006). [Map]. Kealakekua: author.




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             267
Standard IIIB: Physical Resources -- References                                     _

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2005, August 29). Current funded R&M
project Listing. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Environmental Health and Safety Office. (2006, January 11).
Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 26, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/ehso/

Wil Chee – Planning, Inc. (1998, October). University of Hawai‘i Center at West
Hawai‘i long range development plan.




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             268
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources -- References                                      _


                              Standard IIIC -- References

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. (2005, August). Distance
learning manual. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.accjc.org/documents/Distance%20Learning%20Manual%202005.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (2003, September 23). Midterm accreditation report.
Hilo: author. Retrieved April 27, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/abouthawcc/mar.pdf

[Hawai'i Community College]. (2006). Budget adjustment details. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Computing Unit. (2005, November 14).
Program review report: Academic Computing Unit/Department of Information
Technology. Hilo: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program%20Reviews/ACU.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate. (2006a, January 27). Agenda and
Chair’s Report. Hilo: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.ag.sup.jan.06.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Academic Senate. (2006b, February 14). Agenda, minutes
and resolution: Distance education at HawCC. Hilo: author. Retrieved May 2, 2006
from http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/senate/sen.ag.sup.feb.06.htm

Hawai‘i Community College Accreditation Steering Committee. (2006, January 26).
Meeting notes. Hilo: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/accreditation/sc12606min.htm

[Hawai‘i Community College] Technology Advisory Support Committee. (2005,
September 15). Summer task force summary reports. Hilo: author.

Kapiolani Community College. (2006, April). Technology, Colleges and Community
Online Conference: Technology remix, what do students say? 11th annual TCC
worldwide online conference. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 29, 2006 from
http://tcc.kcc.hawaii.edu/

Leeward Community College. (2006). WebFUN, WebCT fundamentals summer
institute. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai'i. (n.d.). Welcome to distance learning @ the University of Hawai‘i
website. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/dl/

University of Hawai'i. (2003, May 8). University of Hawai‘i distance and distributed
learning action plan. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/dlplan/


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              269
Standard IIIC: Technology Resources -- References                                     _

University of Hawai'i. (2006, March 17). TALENT: Teaching and learning with
electronic networked technologies. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/talent

University of Hawai'i Community Colleges. (2000a, April). Implementation plan for
integrating distance learning into campus operations. Honolulu, author.

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2000b, May). Distance learning strategic
action plan. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/dl_strategic_action_plan_may_2000.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2002, September). Strategic plan 2002-
2010. Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CC_Strategicpl/strategic%20plan.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2006, January 18). UHCC Spring 2006
Schedule of Distributed Learning Classes. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Office of the Vice President for Planning and Policy. (1998, May).
E5.204, University of Hawaii, Distance Learning Plans, Policies and Procedures.
Honolulu: author. Retrieved April 30, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/dl/ppp.pdf




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              270
Standard IIID: Financial Resources -- References                                       _


                             Standard IIID -- References

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. (2001, January 19).
Evaluation report, Hawai‘i Community College; K. Ramirez, Chair. Novato, California:
author. Retrieved July 21, 2006 from
http://www.hawcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/Final_accreditation_eval_report.pdf

Hawai‘i Community College. (n.d.). Academic development plan 2002-2010. Hilo:
author. Also available at http://www.hawaii.hawaii.edu/accreditation/hawccadp.htm

Hawai‘i Community College. (2002, November 14). HawCC strategic planning
[binder]. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2005). 2005 Program reviews. Retrieved April 30, 2006
from
http://hawaii.hawaii.edu/assessment/Program%20Reviews/2005_program_reviews_page.
htm

[Hawai‘i Community College]. (2006a). Budget adjustment details. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i Community College. (2006b, January 31). Special and Revolving Fund
Balances [and] FY06 Budget GF and TFSF. Hilo: author.

Hawai‘i House of Representatives, Twenty-Third Legislature. (2006a). HB 3178, A bill
for an act relating to the University of Hawai‘i ’s Hawai‘i Community College.
Retrieved April 29, 2006 from
http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/sessioncurrent/bills/hb3178_.htm

Hawai‘i House of Representatives, Twenty-Third Legislature. (2006b). HB 3179, A bill
for an act relating to capital improvement projects for the benefit of the Hawai‘i
Community College. Retrieved April 29, 2006 from
http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/sessioncurrent/bills/hb3179_.htm

Hawai‘i Legislature, Twenty-Third Legislature. (2005). Session laws: HB 100, A bill
for an act relating to the state budget (the General Appropriations Act). Honolulu:
author.

La Croix, Sumner. (2001, September 28). Economic history of Hawai'i. Retrieved April
30, 2006 from http://www.eh.net/encyclopedia/article/lacroix.hawaii.history

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents. (2006, April 20). Agenda, minutes and
attached letter. Retrieved April 29, 2006 from
http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/notice/20060420.regular.pdf




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             271
Standard IIID: Financial Resources -- References                                     _

University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents and Office of the President. (2002, June).
University of Hawai‘i system strategic plan 2002-2010. Honolulu: author. Retrieved
May 1, 2006 from http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/stratplan/UHstratplan.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2002, September). Strategic Plan, 2002-
2010. Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. Retrieved May 1, 2006
from http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CC_Strategicpl/strategic%20plan.pdf

University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges. (2005, June 30). Reserve status report –
unrestricted funds (general, special, revolving. Honolulu: author.

University of Hawai‘i Vice President for Budget and Finance/CFO. (2006, May 23).
Directory [of CFO reports]. Retrieved May 2, 2006 from
http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/. Honolulu: author.




                        Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                             272
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes


                      Standard IV: Leadership and Governance

The institution recognizes and utilizes the contributions of leadership throughout the
organization for continuous improvement of the institution. Governance roles are
designed to facilitate decisions that support student learning programs and services
and improve institutional effectiveness, while acknowledging the designated
responsibilities of the governing board and the chief administrator.

A. Decision-Making Roles and Processes
   The institution recognizes that ethical and effective leadership throughout the
   organization enables the institution to identify institutional values, set and achieve
   goals, learn, and improve.


A.1. Institutional leaders create an environment for empowerment, innovation, and
institutional excellence. They encourage staff, faculty, administrator, and students, no
matter what their official titles, to take initiative in improving the practices, programs,
and services in which they are involved. When ideas for improvement have policy or
significant institution-wide implications, systematic participative processes are used to
assure effective discussion, planning, and implementation.

Descriptive Summary:

Hawai‘i Community College’s commitment to institutional excellence in support of
student learning is demonstrated by its Academic Development Plan: “The mission of
Hawai‘i Community College is to provide the community with a responsive educational
environment that empowers learners to develop skills and knowledge to be responsible
and productive in a complex world.” Additional statements clearly articulate the
institution’s goals and values: “Four Cornerstones frame the educational experience at
Hawai‘i Community College: Hawaiian Culture, Environment, Technology, and
Community Work-Based Learning.” In addition to these directional markers, the plan
further states five long term goals: promoting learning and teaching for student success;
functioning as a seamless state system, promoting workforce and economic development,
developing human resources through recruitment, retention, and renewal; and developing
an effective, efficient, and sustainable infrastructure to support student learning.
(HawCC, n.d.a, p.6).

To assure broad based preparedness for dialogue in the planning and implementation of
new ideas, the college posts a web-based Faculty/Staff Handbook as a reference tool to
all members of the college family. The site provides information about the college’s
mission, goals, values, history, structure, directories, publications and governance
procedures (HawCC Staff Development [SD], n.d.).




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               273
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

In a recent survey (HawCC, 2005b), the faculty, staff and administrators, responded in
this manner to the statement: “I have a good understanding of the college’s mission, goals
and values.”
                Strongly Agree     40%
                Agree              50%
                Neutral             9%
                Disagree            2%

In the same survey, administered at the beginning of the 2005-2006 academic year, the
following responses spoke to the statement: “I understand how my work directly
contributes to the overall success of the college.”
                Strongly Agree      60%
                Agree               37%
                Neutral              2%

Information about the institutional performance is circulated and available to staff and
students through printed and web-based publications. The following are examples of
available information.

The “University of Hawai‘i Measuring Our Progress [December 2005 Performance
Indicators]” brochure (UH Office of Academic Planning and Policy [OAPP], 2005)
highlights and updates a subset of U H performance indicators. The complete report is
entitled Measuring Our Progress 2004 Update (UH Council of Chief Academic Officers
and the Office of Planning and Policy [CCAO OPP], 2004) and is available in printed
form at U H campus libraries. The next update will be available in late 2006.

The UH Community Colleges Strategic Plan Update: 2002-2010 (UH CC, 2002) is the
result of an ambitious effort to review, debate, and integrate newly identified needs and
goals into a pro-active strategy. This effort, coupled with campus academic development
plans, involved a collaborative dialogue among students, faculty, and administration to
ensure that critical issues were identified, and that a mutual commitment to the
accomplishment of shared goals and priorities was established with a commitment to
revisit this document regularly to ensure our pathway remains true to our mission.

The organizational structure consists of two governing bodies that provide venues where
the evaluations of the institution’s performance can be made available to all staff. The
College Council has the responsibility for measuring and assessing progress toward
achieving goals and priorities described in the ADP, the college’s primary long-term
planning document. The Academic Senate of Hawai‘i Community College is an
organization whose primary purpose is to ensure academic integrity of the college. The
Senate functions as a recommending and governing body and responsibilities include but
are not limited to the development, modification, initiation, and review of academic
policies and dialogue about issues in consultation with the Chancellor and others as
needed (HawCC Academic Senate [AS], 2005).




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               274
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

Students and every unit of the college have at least one representative on one or more of
the college’s governing bodies (College Council, Academic Senate, Chairs of
Departments and Divisions) so the interests of stakeholders of the college are adequately
represented relative to any review, action, or opportunity to participate in the dialogue
regarding institutional evaluation, planning and improvements. The communication
structure of the college reflects the attempt to ensure the entire college community has
opportunities for meaningful input and discussion. Schedules of Senate meetings,
minutes, and information are disseminated by email and are posted on the college website
(HawCC AS, 2006a). College Council minutes and agenda are distributed via e-mail.

The college also has a student government whose President, Vice-President, Secretary,
Treasurer, and Senators are elected yearly by the student body. Information concerning
Student Government activity is posted on the college web site (HawCC Student
Government [ASUH-HawCC], 2005).

The college is very supportive of Faculty and Staff Development, with an institutional
commitment to funding its comprehensive staff development program to serve all
personnel including faculty, staff, and administration. There is an active Faculty and
Staff Development Committee at the college to create and present programs to promote
organizational, professional and personal development of college personnel, as well as
provide opportunities for social networking. It also maintains the library of staff
development materials, serves as a clearinghouse for general workshops, conferences and
seminars, and establishes information networks for various campus interest groups
(HawCC SD, 2005).

   •   The college implemented a Cultural Transformation Initiative comprised of a
       series of interactive sessions to better understand the importance of how and what
       each member of the college contributes to the environment and collective culture.
   •   Dr. Ruth Stiehl guided faculty through the process of composing student learning
       outcomes for programs; composing student learning outcomes for courses;
       program mapping; and assessment strategies (HawCC, [2006]a).
   •   1 hour workshop on building rubrics to use as a tool for assessing students'
       performances (HawCC, n.d.b).

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. Clearly articulated institutional goals and reliable
information exchange stimulates empowerment, innovation, and institutional excellence
through ongoing self-reflection and exchange of ideas. An organizational structure is in
place to assure effective discussion, planning and implementation.

To continue its strong commitment to improving its practices, programs, and service,
while at the same time encouraging all members of the administration, faculty, and staff
to participate in the evaluation, planning and improvement process, the college offers the
following planning agenda items.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               275
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes


Planning Agenda:

1. The administration will engage the appropriate campus governance bodies in dialogue
   to determine the best means of supporting members of the college community who
   are leaders in stimulating evaluation, planning, and improvement activities.

2. The administration will request the Assessment Committee to consider the question
   of employing external evaluators to review college efforts to implement and utilize
   program review and learning outcome assessments and to report its determination to
   the Chancellor and the appropriate campus governance bodies.


A.2. The institution establishes and implements a written policy providing for faculty,
staff, administrator, and student participation in decision-making processes. The
policy specifies the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas from their
constituencies and work together on the appropriate policy, planning and special-
purpose bodies.

   A.2.a. Faculty and administrations have a substantive and clearly defined role
   in institutional governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional
   policies, planning, and budget that relates to their areas of responsibility.
   Students and staff also have established mechanisms or organizations for
   providing input into institutional decisions.

Descriptive Summary:

The Chancellor is the full-time chief executive for Hawai‘i Community College and has a
dual line of reporting to the Vice President for Community Colleges and President of the
University of Hawai‘i System, according to the Systemwide Administration Organization
Chart (UH Board of Regents [BOR], 2005, p.3-3). The office of the Chancellor is
responsible for directing all aspects of the College, including budget preparation and
allocations of resources according to GE102 of the Classification and Compensation Plan
for UH Executive and Managerial Classes, which is maintained by the UH Office of
Human Resources (OHR).

The Chancellor directs the college’s effort to maintain academic and administrative
standards, thus assuring compliance with the statutes, regulations and BOR policies. In
addition, the Chancellor acts as a liaison officer representing the college with the
community, county and state agencies, civic groups, business and industry, labor and
professional organizations, the state Legislature, and other components of the UH
System. The Chancellor’s duties are more fully explained in GE102 (UH OHR, 2003).

In an effort to accomplish these endeavors, the Chancellor works with seven
administrative officers (listed below), the College Council, and the Academic Senate to
establish priorities and answer strategic concerns.


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              276
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes


   •   Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs
   •   Vice-Chancellor for Administration Affairs
   •   Dean of Student Services
   •   Director of Continuing Education and Training
   •   Director of the UH Center at West Hawai‘i
   •   Interim Assistant Dean of Arts, Sciences and Public Services
   •   Interim Assistant Dean of Career and Technical Education

The duties and responsibilities of the administrative officers can be obtained from the
college’s Personnel Officer.

The College Council, with representation from all campus areas, acts as an interface
between the Chancellor’s administration and all areas of the college. Hawai‘i
Community College policy documents such as HAW 3.301, describe the Council as “a
vehicle for dialogue” and a “recommending body to Administration on issues that affect
the entire college and are not governed by other bodies” (HawCC Office of the Provost
[OP], 1996, p.2).

The primary opportunity for faculty participation in governance is the Academic Senate,
the organization that was formed in response to Board of Regents (BOR) policy in
Chapter One, General Provisions (UH BOR, 2002, Section 1-10). The Academic Senate
operates under the rules of its Charter, which requires an Executive Committee,
Curriculum Committee, Faculty Policy Committee, and Educational Policy Committee.
Its Charter contains rules for election and selection of officers and operating procedures
for itself and its committees (HawCC AS, 2005). Meetings are scheduled monthly, with
minutes and agenda posted on the web.

Faculty responsibilities are further described in BOR policy that defines the relation
between administration, the BOR and faculty (UH BOR, 2002, Section 1-10); the
Faculty/Staff Handbook (HawCC SD, n.d.), and in Article IV (Faculty Professional
Responsibilities and Workload) of the 2003-2009 University of Hawai‘i Professional
Assembly (UHPA)-UH BOR Agreement (UHPA, 2003).

The role of students in the organizational structure of the college is described in the By-
Laws for Student Government (HawCC Student Government [ASUH-HawCC], 2005).
Students elect officers who meet on a regular basis and represent the college at meetings
with their counterparts from across the system.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. During the last two years, as part of its
commitment to institutional evaluation and change, the college has made numerous
efforts to adjust its organization to best meet the needs of the students, faculty, and the
community, while at the same time keeping all stakeholders informed.




                           Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                                277
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

As UH System and HawCC leadership changed, the college and the UH System have
fostered a continuing dialogue with faculty, students and community to gather input and
distribute information. Campus meetings, internet websites, and support for system-wide
meetings have helped to illuminate the continuing process of organizational
improvement. As plans go forward for hiring new faculty and staff, building two new
campuses, and addressing the needs for assessment and accreditation, information from
the System and the college is regularly posted on the web (UH, 2006). The Chancellor
meets regularly with the Academic Senate Chair, College Council, faculty and staff. To
ensure a healthy dialogue, agendas and minutes of College Council and Senate meetings
are posted on the Web or circulated through e-mail, and a monthly college newsletter is
distributed via e-mail (HawCC Office of the Chancellor, various dates).

The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs (VCAA) meets regularly with the department
chairs, and then department chairs meet regularly with their faculty as part of the
organizational pattern. To provide for organization and leadership on a system-wide
basis, the President of the system and the Chancellors provide funds for the Academic
Senate Chair to travel to meetings of the All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs
(UH ACCFSC, n.d.). ACCFSC meetings are scheduled to coincide in both time and
place with BOR meetings.

The chain of command has been further developed by the Chancellor’s establishment, in
2004, of an ad hoc Assessment Committee and its vigorous effort to adopt an assessment
program and 4-year cycle of program reviews (HawCC ad hoc Assessment Committee
[AC], 2004). This institutional commitment to having dialogue for improvement in the
area of program reviews, student learning outcomes, and institutional improvement has
consumed numerous personnel hours for meetings, information distribution, and
workshops.

Planning Agenda:

To continue its strong commitment to dialogue and organizational integrity, the college’s
administration and governance structures will commit to:

   1. Providing more budgetary information to the faculty and staff so that they are
      better able to take part in the process to improve institutional effectiveness.

   2. Creating an organizational structure that makes maximum use of two new
      Assistant Deans.

   3. Exploring organizational structures that offer cohesive leadership for the Liberal
      Arts Program.

   4. Exploring organizational structures that offer cohesive leadership for those
      programs concerned with workforce development.




                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              278
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes



   A.2.b. The institution relies on faculty, its academic senate or other appropriate
   faculty structures, the curriculum committee and academic administrators for
   recommendations about student learning programs and services.

Descriptive Summary:

As noted earlier, by Board of Regent policy, the Academic Senate is the formal
governance body for the faculty at HawCC (UH BOR, 2002, Section 1-10). At the
Chancellor’s direction, the College Council is the body responsible for ensuring a
continuing dialogue among administrators, staff, and faculty.

According to the Senate’s Charter, Article II Section 1:
   “The Senate is an organization whose primary purpose is to ensure academic
   integrity of the College. The Senate will function as a recommending and
   governing body. Senate responsibilities will include but not be limited to the
   development, modification, initiation, and review of academic policies and issues
   in consultation with the Chancellor and others as needed” (HawCC AS, 2005).

Every faculty member is a voting member of the Senate, although much of the work is
done in committees before being presented to the Senate for action. The Senate has four
standing committees (Executive, Education Policy, Faculty Policy, and Curriculum) and
currently has four ad hoc committees (Writing Intensive, Campus Development, Distance
Learning, and Mission Statement). Standing Committees are composed of elected
representatives from the college’s departments. Resolutions from the Senate committees,
such as proposals for changes to curriculum, are brought to the Senate floor for action
and processed through channels to the appropriate administrators.

“The academic policies and issues addressed by the Senate will include but not be limited
to the following areas:

       1. Mission and goals of the College
       2. Nature and scope of its educational curricula
       3. Standards of teaching, services, and scholarship
       4. Standards of professional ethics
       5. Budget planning, review and implementation
       6. Student services
       7. Evaluation of faculty, subject to provisions of the UHPA-UH contract, and
          academic administrators
       8. Standards for and evaluation of admission, graduation, certification, and
          grading” (HawCC AS, 2005, Art. II Sect. 2)

For example, in matters of curriculum, all proposals are prepared by the faculty and
departments involved, forwarded to the Curriculum Review Committee for consideration,
to the Senate for action, and then sent to the VCAA for approval. Resolutions from the



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              279
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

Assessment Committee are brought to the College Council and Senate for consideration
and action before being sent to the Chancellor or VCAA for approval.
The Academic Senate and College Council meet monthly, as does each of the Senate’s
committees. Meetings are announced in the campus newsletter and by e-mail circulation.
Meeting agendas, minutes and supporting documents are posted on the Senate’s website
(HawCC AS, 2006b), or, in the case of the College Council, reported by e-mail.
Meetings are scheduled in a room where video conferencing equipment is available for
connection with West Hawai‘i faculty.

By charter, the Academic Senate Chair is required to meet on a regular basis with the
Chancellor to discuss faculty concerns and to maintain an open dialogue with
administration. Although these duties are not specifically spelled out in its charter, to
further the goals of the college, the Senate chair is also a member of the ad hoc
Assessment Committee, the College Council, and Accreditation steering committee. The
Chair and the Senate have taken an active part in the development of the Program Review
Process by working with the Assessment Committee and the College Council. Agendas
and Minutes can be found at the Senate Website (HawCC AS, 2006b).

As evidenced by the Senate minutes, College Council minutes, and especially the
Assessment Committee’s website (HawCC, 2006b), the college is actively involved in a
dialogue that centers on institutional commitments to students and the means to best
fulfill those commitments.

For example, in Spring 2006, the Educational Policy Committee (EPC), with assistance
from the Curriculum Review Committee, did a thorough review of the curriculum
process (HawCC AS EPC, 2006). A newly appointed ad hoc Committee for Distance
Learning began its study of distance education at the college to propose campus standards
for:
          • Student evaluation policies customized to DE;
          • Peer review policy as applicable to DE;
          • Student Services support plan;
          • Academic Support plan;
          • DE faculty/staff development standards;
          • DE faculty coordinator position description;
          • Estimates of financial requirements of a fully funded DE support
               commitment
          (HawCC AS ad hoc Distance Education Committee, 2006)

The Executive Committee and the Senate helped with the first round of program reviews,
and its Chair worked as a member of the Assessment, Accreditation and CERC
Committees (HawCC AS Executive Committee, 2005-2006).

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The college should continue to improve its
performance as it seeks to develop an organizational model that speaks to evaluation,

                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              280
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

planning and improvement, especially in the area of program reviews. Unfortunately, at
this time, the Senate lacks the financial support needed for faculty to have adequate time
to work on this valuable project. The college’s ad hoc Assessment Committee has
proposed campus policies for program review, program mapping and student learning
outcome identification. As the Committee develops strategies for student learning
outcome assessment it approaches the completion of its mandate. Some campus
constituencies have expressed uncertainty about the lines of responsibility, reporting
authority and duration of the tenure of the Assessment Committee.

Planning Agenda:

To continue its strong commitment to dialogue and its institutional commitment to shared
governance, the college will:

   1. Request the Chancellor to charge the ad hoc Assessment Committee with the
      production of a prospectus outlining expected outcomes for the coming year and
      recommendations concerning the ongoing implementation of its policies in the
      future to be presented to the campus governance bodies.

   2. Clarify the role, membership, composition, and location in the organizational
      chart of the Ad Hoc Assessment Committee.

   3. Finalize the charter of the College Council to determine its membership, method
      of selection for members, and more clearly define its role in the governance
      process.

   4. Request the Chancellor to charge key administrators to engage the leadership of
      the Senate, College Council and Assessment Committee in a dialogue to review
      the support needs of faculty and staff responsible for program reviews and
      leadership posts in campus governance bodies including discipline coordinators
      and/or department chairs responsible for significant system-wide meetings.

   5. Provide funds and/or website development software for all governing bodies,
      including the Academic Senate and College Council.


A.3. Through established governance structures, processes, and practices, the
governing board, administrators, faculty, staff, and students work together for the
good of the institution. These processes facilitate discussion of ideas and effective
communication among the institution’s constituencies.

Descriptive Summary:

As evidenced by the Board of Regents (BOR), UH System, and HawCC policy, the
college, its staff, faculty, and administrators are committed to a system of shared
governance (UH BOR, 2002, Section 1-10). This system of shared governance bespeaks

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               281
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

an institutional commitment that requires a free flow of information between the BOR,
UH System, each college and its administration, faculty, staff and students. In order to be
effective, this dialogue is structured as an information loop, with avenues at all levels for
input. In a 2005 Annual Survey of Faculty and Staff (HawCC, 2005b), campus members
were asked to rate how well information was shared at HawCC:

   •   64% strongly agreed or agreed that information was shared openly, within the
       college;
   •   78% strongly agreed or agreed that department chairs shared information openly;
   •   73% strongly agreed or agreed that information flowed openly from the
       Chancellor to departments;
   •   26% strongly agreed or agreed that information flowed openly from the
       community college system office (60% were neutral);
   •   22% strongly agreed or agreed that information flowed openly from the System
       President (68% neutral).

Over the past two years, the college has made an institutional commitment to making the
decision-making process as transparent as possible. The Senate has continued to develop
and update its website (HawCC AS, 2006b), the College Council has updated its
collection of minutes and agendas (HawCC College Council, 2003-2006). The ad hoc
Assessment Committee and the Accreditation Steering Committee have developed
websites and posted important information such as meeting minutes in order to keep all
constituents focused on mission, evaluation, planning and improvement.

The drive to develop student learning outcomes, a new mission statement, and an
assessment plan that institutionalizes an ongoing process of evaluation, planning, and
improvement is the product of a plethora of dialogues and campus-wide development
activities. As mentioned earlier in this report, workshops for developing student learning
outcomes have been held. The ad hoc Assessment Committee and Accreditation Steering
Committee have met twice monthly for the last two years. The Chancellor has supported
special Learning Day activities such as the Paddling Our Own Canoe Power Point
presentation and professional development exercises held on March 4, 2006 (HawCC,
2005a), to disseminate the necessity for continuous quality improvement through
strategic planning based on a regular cycle of program reviews and dialogues concerning
the review of the college vision/mission and accompanying statements (HawCC, n.d.c).
All of this activity has required a continued dedication to the spread of information
sharing among faculty, staff, students and the governance structures.

The VCAA, as a member of the leadership team, meets regularly with the Chancellor and
other administrative and managerial personnel and with his colleagues at other campuses
in the system. Results of these meetings are shared with the College Council and
department chairs. As an interface between all sections of the campus, the College
Council acts as the “vehicle for dialogue and consultation on college-wide matters
including budget, strategic planning, facilities, community relations” (HawCC Office of
the Provost [OP], 1996, p.2).



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               282
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

The Academic Senate interfaces with other campuses through the All Campus Council of
Faculty Senate Chairs (UH ACCFSC, n.d.), which acts as a coordinating body for
communication from each Senate in the system to the System president, Vice President
for Community Colleges (UH Community Colleges, 2006) and the BOR (UH, 2006).

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. As evidenced by the 2005 Annual Survey of
Faculty and Staff (HawCC, 2005b), approximately two-thirds or more of the campus
constituency reports satisfaction with the level of communication flow between
administration, mid-level managers and faculty and staff. Despite the intensity of activity
involved in creating a new college culture based on evidenced-based assessment and new
structures and processes to ensure that these are created from the time-consuming
dialogues involved with shared governance, it is clear that campus morale has greatly
improved with the new administration. The UH system survey on morale sponsored by
the ACCFSC, had found HawCC at the bottom of the campuses in terms of morale
(Johnsrud, 2002, p.5-6). In the last accreditation study, HawCC had been commended by
the ACCJC 2000 Accreditation Review Team thusly: “Notably, the faculty and staff of
this college have sustained a cohesive and committed effort to deliver excellent
educational services and instruction to their students. In spite of challenging economic
conditions, Hawai‘i Community College is a place where teaching and learning flourish”
(ACCJC, 2001, p.5). This tremendous educational verve and commitment has continued
now buttressed by strong new leadership at the campus level.

However, as evidenced by the low “agreeable” response (approximately one quarter of
respondents) to the flow of communication between the System and the campus and the
President’s Office and the campus in the 2005 Annual Survey of Faculty and Staff
(HawCC, 2005b), there is room for improvement in terms of the higher levels and the
campus level. Granted the System is in a state of transition in terms of reorganization
and these mechanisms may be worked out. However, a need for further dialogue with
System and campus level leadership seems to be in order to increase the flow of
communication and to more fully support the efforts at the various campuses.

Planning Agenda:

To continue its strong commitment to the flow of ideas, the college will:

   1. Request the Chancellor to charge key administrators to engage the leadership of
      the campus governance bodies: Academic Senate, College Council, ad hoc
      Assessment Committee, and department chairs and discipline coordinators in a
      dialogue to review the support needs of faculty and staff responsible for program
      reviews and leadership in system-wide meetings.

   2. Provide funds and/or website development software for all governing bodies,
      including the Academic Senate and College Council.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               283
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

   3. Determine the necessary support needs of the College Council and provide it with
      the resources to enable that body to finalize its charter, membership, and method
      of selection for members, as the college undergoes a re-organization.

   4. Explore mechanisms for better communication with the UH System and the
      President’s Office.


A.4. The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its
relationships with external agencies. It agrees to comply with Accrediting Commission
standards, policies, and guidelines, and Commission requirements for public
disclosure, self study, and other reports, team visits, and prior approval of substantive
changes. The institution moves expeditiously to respond to recommendations made by
the Commission.

Descriptive Summary:

Since Hawai‘i Community College’s administrative separation from the umbrella of
University of Hawai‘i at Hilo and its subsequent reorganization under the Chancellor of
Community Colleges in 1990, it has completed only two ACCJC Accreditation Self-
Study Reports as a separate institution in 1994 and 2000. The 2006 Self-Study Report
constitutes its third separate review as one of the seven community colleges in the UH
system.

Having to play catch-up as a comprehensive community college accredited by ACCJC
rather than as an entity of the four-year college at UH-Hilo has been a major challenge
for Hawai‘i Community College, but one that has followed its characteristic motto: E
‘Imi Pono--to seek excellence. Thus, it has demonstrated its ability to fully comply with
ACCJC’s standards, policies, and guidelines as evidenced by its satisfactory responses to
the ACCJC visiting team recommendations in the 1997 Midterm Report (HawCC, 2000,
p.33) and its acceptance by ACCJC.

Furthermore, in a letter dated January 23, 2004 to Interim Chancellor Shirley Daniel from
ACCJC President Barbara Beno, Hawai‘i Community College’s 2003 Midterm Report
was accepted with a further recommendation made to all University of Hawai‘i
Community Colleges to “engage in regular assessment of institutional effectiveness,
including program review” (Beno, 2004, p.1).

In meeting ACCJC’s standard for public disclosure, copies of the 1994 and 2000 Self-
Study reports were made available to the college community and in the UH-Hilo Library.
More recently, drafts of the 2006 Self-Study, Midterm, and Progress reports were made
available on the college’s Accreditation website (HawCC, n.d.b). Also, the twelve 2005
Program/Unit reviews are available on the college’s Assessment website (HawCC, n.d.d).

On September 14, 2004 six Hawai‘i Community College faculty and staff representatives
attended the ACCJC training hosted by Honolulu Community College on the new


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              284
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

standards and themes instituted by ACCJC in 2002. One of the faculty members who
attended this training became the Accreditation Liaison Officer and another became Self-
Study Co-Chair. This assured the integrity of the current Self-Study to reflect the latest
standards and expectations of the Commission.

No substantive changes have been requested by Hawai‘i Community College during this
review period, but all appropriate reports have been filed by the Accreditation Liaison
Officer in an accurate and timely manner.

Self-evaluation:

The college meets this standard. A striking example of the college’s ability to respond
honestly and expeditiously to Commission recommendations was its recent response to
being placed “on warning” in a letter dated June 28, 2005 by Executive Director Barbara
Beno (Beno, 2005). The college, along with the other University of Hawai‘i Community
Colleges who were put on warning for up to two years prior to Hawai‘i Community
College’s warning, was asked to submit a progress report by October 15, 2005 (HawCC,
2005c) and prepare for a team visit on November 14, 2005 to address the concerns about
an institutional program review process.

After complying with the requirements of both a progress report and a team visit, Hawai‘i
Community College received a letter dated Jan. 31, 2006 taking the college off warning.
The Progress Report Visitation Team stated: “In the team’s opinion, the College has
developed an approach to planning and assessment that is integrated and systematic. It
features common data elements in program review, adoption of student learning
outcomes that are integral to program review, and a program mapping process that
graphically and in reality represent all elements of the program. In all, the College is well
positioned to use systematic evaluation and planning to improve Hawai‘i Community
College” (Beno, 2006).

Due to the coordinated efforts of administration, the Assessment Committee, the College
Council and the Academic Senate, Hawai‘i Community College had succeeded in making
significant progress in institutionalizing the program review process in such a short time
that they were able to get off warning in six months. In their report, the Progress Report
Team recognized the honesty and integrity of Hawai‘i Community College’s efforts to
build a workable program review process which lays the foundation for meaningful
institutional change based on student learning and shared governance.

In a letter dated March 1, 2006 to Chancellor Freitas, Academic Senate Chair Lou Zitnik
recommended changes to the assessment process based on the Senate’s experience with
the first cohort of program reviews, discussions in Senate meetings, a report requested by
and submitted to the Senate, and a resolution passed by the Senate on February 24, 2006
(HawCC AS, 2006c). As a result of this request, the Assessment Committee convened a
subcommittee to clarify and simplify the Instructional Program Review template
(HawCC ad hoc Assessment Committee, 2006b). The Assessment Coordinator also
obtained feedback from the first cohort of Program/Unit review Initiators/writers at a


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               285
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

feedback session held on Feb. 2, 2006 (HawCC ad hoc Assessment Committee, 2006a).
The revised templates for instruction and unit program reviews are posted on the
Assessment website (HawCC, n.d.e). On May 9, 2006, a training session was held by the
VCAA, the Institutional Researcher, and the Assessment Committee Chair for the second
cohort of Program Review Initiators/writers using this revised template. Additional
refinements and improvements are expected to occur with the program review process
and all of these will be made public through the Assessment website.

Planning Agenda:

The college will continue its institutional commitment to evaluation and improvement
based on ACCJC standards and the coordinated efforts of its college governance
structures.



A.5. The role of leadership and the institution's governance and decision-making
structures and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and
effectiveness. The institution widely communicates the results of these evaluations and
uses them as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

HawCC regularly evaluates some of the college's decision-making and governing entities.
The Chancellor undergoes a Presidential Performance Review annually, likewise the
remainder of the "executive/managerial" staff are annually evaluated by the Chancellor
using an instrument entitled "360 Assessment" according to the BOR Policy (UH OHR,
2000). All of the college's Division/Department Chairpersons are also evaluated annually
via a proprietary assessment form, which has been voluntarily instituted.

The College Council and the Academic Senate are two important bodies that wield
substantial influence in both the institution's governance and decision-making but neither
of which is currently subject to an official evaluation of integrity or effectiveness. The
results of all of the administrative assessments are strictly confidential and thus are not
appropriate for at-large dissemination to any other faculty or staff.

Self-evaluation:

The college partially meets this standard. The current levels of assessment for
executive/managerial personnel appear to be sufficient, but the results of the
administrative assessments and department chairs as cited above are strictly confidential
and not disseminated to the campus community. Thus, it is not possible to determine if
they are an effective tool for evaluation and planning.

Evaluating the methods used to assess the executive/managerial team is further
complicated by the fact that 70+% (5/7) of the administrative team have been in their
current positions less than two years, which includes the Chancellor and both Vice-

                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               286
Standard IVA: Decision-Making Roles and Processes

Chancellors. However, the 2005 Annual Survey results indicate an 85+% approval of the
administration's leadership. Concerning communication, the figures were somewhat
lower with a broad range of variance depending on the particular position being cited.
Department/division chairs had the highest rating (78%), followed by the Chancellor
(73%), both Vice-Chancellors (73% & 67%), both Deans (60% & 56%), and finally the
Director of UH Center at West Hawai‘i ranking the lowest (38%). Two newly acquired
positions, the Assistant Dean of Arts, Science and Public Services as well as the Assistant
Dean of Career and Technical Education were not available at the time of the survey
(HawCC, 2005b).

The 2005 Annual Survey did not possess any inquiries addressing the College Council
and no other means of determining its evaluation of planning or improvements were
found. The lone item in the faculty survey pertaining to the Academic Senate found that
only 36% of respondents attended a Senate meeting during the 2004-2005 academic year.
(HawCC, 2005b).

The Academic Senate also has no procedures in place with which to review its
effectiveness. The Senate does, however, regularly publish its findings and actions
online, and this year it published a year-end report concerning its ability to meet its
priorities (HawCC AS, 2006d).

Both the College Council and the Academic Senate have been encouraged to participate
in the Biennium Budget formation process. Information from Program/Unit reviews
flows to these bodies to help inform them in addition to budget briefing materials that are
either presented orally or made available by the administration in the form of spreadsheet
reports via the Division Chairs. Establishing a routine process for providing the
necessary budgetary information may yet require a dialogue with the administration to
determine the needs and expectations of the two bodies.

Planning Agenda:

1. The College Council and Academic Senate should be charged with assessing their
   effectiveness, regularly, ideally in conjunction with the college’s program review
   cycle. The precise nature of this endeavor is beyond the scope of this assessment.
   However, the process might (1) include the Senate's Executive Committee working in
   cooperation with the College Council (concordant with the practice of self-
   governance) or perhaps, (2) involve an independent, community-based reviewer
   group in order to obtain a more objective accountability.

2. The College Council and the Academic Senate should routinely consider budgetary
   constraints and implications in their decision-making and governance
   procedures/policies. Budget briefings provided to the Academic Senate and College
   Council should become a routine feature of the academic year with both bodies
   encouraged to request additional information as they may require to inform their
   deliberations and contribute to their effectiveness.



                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               287
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization


B. In addition to the leadership of individuals and constituencies, institutions
recognize the designated responsibilities of the governing board for setting policies and
of the chief administrator for the effective operation of the institution. Multi-college
districts/systems clearly define the organizational roles of the district/system and the
colleges.

Introduction:

In 1907, the University of Hawai‘i was established on the model of the American system
of land-grant universities created initially by the Morrill Act of 1862. In the 1960’s and
1970’s, the University was developed into a system of accessible and affordable
campuses.

These institutions currently include:

   A research university at Manoa, offering a comprehensive array of undergraduate,
   graduate, and professional degrees through the doctoral level, including law and
   medicine.

   A comprehensive, primarily baccalaureate institution at Hilo, offering
   professional programs based on a liberal arts foundation and selected graduate
   degrees.

   An upper division institution at West O`ahu, offering liberal arts and selected
   professional studies.

   A system of seven open-door community colleges spread across the islands of
   Kaua`i, O`ahu, Maui, and Hawai‘i, offering quality liberal arts and workforce
   programs. In addition to the seven colleges, outreach centers are located on the
   islands of Molokai and Lanai (administered by Maui CC), on the island of Hawai‘i in
   Kealakekua (administered by Hawai‘i CC), and in the Waianae/Nanakuli area of
   O`ahu (administered by Leeward CC).

The University of Hawai‘i Community College system, led by the Vice President for
Community Colleges, is located on the UH Manoa campus on O`ahu.

The University of Hawai‘i system has undergone several administrative reorganizations
since the 2000 comprehensive visit. The following briefly outline the major events:

University System Reorganization - 2002
As part of a University system administrative reorganization, the University of Hawai‘i
Board of Regents (BOR) received a proposal in November 2002 that included the
elimination of the Office of the Chancellor for Community Colleges and reassigned the
functions of the office to various system-level vice presidential offices and to the
community colleges. This reorganization proposal was approved by the BOR in
December 2002. The reorganization changed the title of the college chief executive


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               288
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization

officer (CEO) and the reporting relationship between the CEOs of the individually
accredited community colleges and the University system. Each newly titled community
college chancellor assumed the responsibility and authority previously delegated to the
Chancellor for Community Colleges including, within the scope of BOR and University
Executive policies: making faculty and staff appointments, approving faculty promotions
and tenure, approving out-of-state travel, approving campus budget requests and external
grant applications, executing the campus annual expenditure plan, approving Certificates
of Completion, approving internal staff and fiscal re-allocations, etc. UH Community
College coordination was facilitated through designated Community College Associate
Vice Presidents reporting to the UH System Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs and
Administration.

The reorganization created the Council of Chancellors reporting directly to the President.
The council included the chancellors of each of the ten individual campuses within the
UH system. Four additional key decision making/consultative groups were established:
President’s senior staff, the University Executive Council, the President’s Advisory
Council, and the Council of Chief Academic Officers. Existing policy guidance provided
to the campuses through the Community Colleges Chancellor’s Memorandum (CCCM)
were to be evaluated by the Community Colleges Executive Council (composed of CC
Chancellors, Vice Chancellors and Deans, and Associate Vice Presidents) to determine
which policies to continue so as to provide a core of common practices across the
community college campuses.

The BOR-approved reorganization was sent forward to the Accrediting Commission for
Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) in compliance with the Commission’s
Substantive Change approval process in January 2003. In spring 2003, the ACCJC gave
conditional approval to a Substantive Change Request.

Change in University System Leadership - 2004
As noted in the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities Special
Visit (March 2004) to the UH System Office, the “relationship between the Board and the
President had deteriorated significantly, and in turn, had affected other elements of the
University” (WASC ASCSU, 2004). The BOR rescinded authority to the President in
several areas related to budget and personnel. In the summer of 2004 the President
resigned from the University and an Interim President was named by the BOR.

University System Reorganization - 2004
The Interim President requested and the BOR approved a reorganization of the
President’s office reducing the number of direct executive reports and re-describing other
executive positions. The UH Council of Chancellors, which is not an administrative unit,
continued to report directly to the President and met on a regular basis to provide advice
on strategic planning, program development and other matters of concern. The Vice
President Academic Planning and Policy convened the Council of Chief Academic
Officers, and the agenda included items of system-wide academic concern. The
delegation of authority from the BOR to the President and the President’s designees that



                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              289
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization

began immediately after the appointment of the Interim President has continued (ACCJC,
2005, p.6-8).

Community Colleges System Re-established - 2005
In granting its approval with reservations to the 2002 reorganization of the University of
Hawai‘i system, the ACCJC required that the UH Community Colleges provide reports to
the Commission in August 2003, November 2003, and in April 2004. The November and
April reports were followed by a team visit to validate the reports and examine the degree
to which the University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges had developed effective
administrative systems to allow it to meet accreditation standards, and to insure the
University of Hawai‘i system had adequate means to support the mission and operation
of the community colleges.

As a result of the series of reports and visits from the ACCJC, it became increasingly
clear that the new organization presented significant challenges in the colleges’ abilities
to continue to meet the Commission’s standards in a number of areas.

Following a review of several alternative organizational models and discussion and
consultation, the Interim President recommended a reorganization that reestablished a
community colleges’ system administration.

In June 2005 the BOR approved a reorganization of the community colleges including
the creation of a Vice President for Community Colleges who is responsible for executive
leadership, policy decision-making, resource allocation, development of appropriate
support services for the seven community colleges, and called for the re-consolidation of
the academic and administrative support units for the community colleges (UH Office of
the President, 2005). A dual reporting relationship was created whereby the community
college chancellors report to the Vice President for Community Colleges for leadership
and coordination of community college matters, and concurrently report to the President
for University system-wide policymaking and decisions impacting the campuses. The
dual reporting relationship preserves previous BOR action, which promoted and
facilitated campus autonomy in balance with system-wide academic and administrative
functions and operations. College chancellors retained responsibility and control over
campus operations, administration, and management.

The June 2005 reorganization created no other organizational or functional changes to the
system-wide offices. All ten chancellors continue to report to the President and
collectively meet as the Council of Chancellors to advise the President on strategic
planning, program development, and other matters of concern. The community college
chancellors meet as the Council of Community College Chancellors to provide advice to
the President and Vice President for Community Colleges on community college policy
issues and other matters of community college interest.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               290
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization


BOR Committee Reorganization - 2005
At its September 16, 2005 meeting, the BOR enlarged the community college standing
committee and clarified its duties to allow the BOR to address ACCJC standards without
impacting the other business of the BOR in its governance of the University system and
the baccalaureate campuses (UH BOR, 2005d, p.43-45). The newly reorganized
committee increased the number of members to six and adopted quarterly meetings
independent of the full BOR meetings.


B.1. The institution has a governing board that is responsible for establishing policies
to assure the quality, integrity, and effectiveness of the student learning programs and
services and the financial stability of the institution. The governing board adheres to a
clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the chief administrator for the
college or the district/system.

   B.1.a. The governing board is an independent policy-making body that
   reflects the public interest in board activities and decisions. Once the board
   reaches a decision, it acts as a whole. It advocates for and defends the
   institution and protects it from undue influence or pressure.

Descriptive Summary:

Governance of the University of Hawai‘i is vested in a 12-member BOR appointed by the
Governor of Hawai‘i, with the approval of the State Legislature. Membership on the
BOR is controlled by State Law in the Hawai‘i Revised Statutes (HRS) (HRS, §304-3).
That statute states that the “affairs of the university shall be under the general
management and control of the Board of Regents.” That statute indicates that the
members of the BOR are appointed by the Governor of the State of Hawai‘i, and also
indicates the size of the BOR, how the members are selected, their terms of office, when
the BOR is expected to meet, and how they are compensated.

Board of Regents By-Laws and Policies define the duties and responsibilities of the
Board and its officers and committees. The BOR is responsible for the internal
organization and management of the University, including, but not limited to,
establishing the general mission and goals of the system and approving any changes to
them; adopting academic and facilities planning documents for the system and the
campuses; adopting broad policy that guides all aspects of University governance;
appointing and evaluating the President; establishing the administrative structure and
approving major administrative appointments; approving all major contractual
obligations of the University; approving new academic and other programs and major
organizational changes; reviewing all fiscal audits of University operations; and
approving the University budget, long-range financial plans, and budget requests for state
funding.

The BOR appoints and evaluates the President of the University and approves other
executive appointments, including vice presidents, chancellors, and deans. In November


                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              291
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization

2000, the citizens of Hawai‘i approved a constitutional amendment to give greater
autonomy to the University of Hawai‘i. Although the Constitution had previously
granted the BOR of the University authority to manage the University, a clause “in
accordance with law” had been interpreted to mean that the BOR could not take action
unless legislation specifically permitted the action. The constitutional amendment
removed that clause (HRS, §304-4). The BOR and administration are currently working
with external and internal constituents to establish and carry out the principles that will
guide the changed relationship the University seeks with the State.

The BOR elects its own officers and hires its own staff. Currently, the BOR has two
professional staff members (the Executive Administrator and Secretary to the BOR and
the Executive Assistant) and three secretaries. System administrative staff also provides
support to the BOR as needed.

BOR Policy Chapter 9, Section 9-1 a.(2), addresses recruitment and appointment of
Executive and Managerial personnel (UH BOR, 2003b). BOR Policy Chapter 2, Section
2-3 details the evaluation of the President (UH BOR, 2002a).

In accord with the State’s Sunshine Law (HRS, §92-3), all meetings are public, except
those involving discussion of personnel and legal matters. Board of Regents By-Laws
and Policies—as well as agenda and minutes of meetings—are publicly available at the
BOR’s website (UH BOR, 2006d).

Self-evaluation:

The college/BOR partially met this standard. From the BOR website it is impossible to
determine when minutes and notices of agenda were posted; however, anecdotal evidence
suggests the time between the posting and the actual meeting is not always enough time
for neighbor-island people to plan for and attend important meetings.

This short lead-time is also a problem when the BOR schedules “special meetings,” as
was the case when the BOR, as its last item of business on Friday, February 17, 2006,
decided to review a task force proposal to cancel a search for a System president at a
special meeting to be held “at the earliest possible date” (UH BOR, 2006a, p.16).

The special meeting was held eleven days later on a Tuesday, February 28th, a day when
faculty-- not only those on the neighbor islands, were teaching (UH BOR, 2006b). At
this meeting, the Board voted to cancel the search for a new President and appoint the
current Interim President to the permanent post. One week later, at another special
meeting again scheduled for a Tuesday, the Board agreed to terms with the President (UH
BOR, 2006c). In less that a month, the Board had concluded a selection process that
many in the community had assumed would take a year.




                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               292
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization


Planning Agenda:

1. The Office of the Vice President for Community Colleges (OVPCC), with
   representation from each college, should work with the BOR to include a posting date
   for BOR website documents.

2. The OVPCC, with representation from each college, should work with the BOR to
   make every effort to post agenda of special meetings well in advance, at least a week,
   to allow for the logistical challenges faced by the neighbor islands and instructional
   faculty schedules.


   B.1.b. The governing board establishes policies consistent with the mission
   statement to ensure the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning
   programs and services and the resources necessary to support them.

Descriptive Summary:

BOR policies are implemented through administrative policies and procedures and
delegations of authority published and promulgated by means of the University of
Hawai‘i Systemwide Executive Policies (UH, n.d.c) and the University of Hawai‘i
Systemwide Administrative Procedures Manual (UH, n.d.b). These and other policies
and procedures are available through the Administrative Procedures Information System
(APIS) on the internet (UH, n.d.a).

BOR Policy Chapters 4 (UH BOR, 2002b) and 5 (UH BOR, 2002c) detail BOR planning
and evaluation policies. At the September 2005 BOR meeting, the BOR changed its
committee structure to more fully address ACCJC’s concerns raised during the series of
reports and visits from Commission staff following the 2002 reorganization. The
reorganized and expanded standing Committee on Community Colleges (CCC) (UH
BOR CCC, 2005) conducts quarterly meetings in addition to the full BOR meetings. The
meetings are designed to focus on the following areas:

   •   The broad community college mission (November 4, 2005)
   •   The financial health of the community colleges (April 21, 2006)
   •   Program review and assessment (July 21, 2006)
   •   Planning directions for the next year (August 25, 2006)

The University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges Strategic Plan 2002-2010, adopted by
the BOR November 22, 2002 (UH BOR, 2002f, p.7), states that within the overall
mission of the University of Hawai‘i, the Community Colleges have as their special
mission:

   •   Access: To broaden access to postsecondary education in Hawai‘i, regionally, and
       internationally by providing open-door opportunities for students to enter quality
       educational programs within their own communities.

                         Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                              293
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization


   •    Learning and Teaching: To specialize in the effective teaching of
        remedial/developmental education, general education, and other introductory
        liberal arts, pre-professional, and selected baccalaureate courses and programs.

   •    Workforce Development: To provide the trained workforce needed in the State,
        the region, and internationally by offering occupational, technical, and
        professional courses and programs, which prepare students for immediate
        employment and career advancement.

   •    Personal Development: To provide opportunities for personal enrichment,
        occupational upgrading, and career mobility through credit and non-credit courses
        and activities.

   •    Community Development: To contribute to and stimulate the cultural and
        intellectual life of the community by providing a forum for the discussion of
        ideas; by providing leadership, knowledge, problem-solving skills, and general
        informational services; and by providing opportunities for community members to
        develop their creativity and appreciate the creative endeavors of others.

   •    Diversity: By building upon Hawai‘i’s unique multi-cultural environment and
        geographic location, through efforts in curriculum development, and productive
        relationships with international counterparts in Asia and the Pacific, UHCC
        students’ learning experiences will prepare them for the global workplace.

Self-evaluation:

The system/college meets this standard reflecting its institutional commitment to
maintaining high standards for its student learning programs.

Planning Agenda:

None.



   B.1.c. The governing board has ultimate responsibility for educational quality,
   legal matters, and financial integrity.

Descriptive Summary:

The descriptive summary for Standard IV.B.1.b above describes the BOR’s responsibility
for educational quality. Regarding legal matters and financial integrity, the BOR is
responsible for the internal organization and management of the University. Increased
autonomy granted to the University by the Legislature over the past decade guarantees
that the University has the right to determine where budgets will be cut or reallocated


                          Hawai‘i Community College Self-Study, July 2006
                                               294
Standard IVB: Board and Administrative Organization

when state appropriations are reduced. Implementation of Board policies is the
responsibility of the President and the executive and managerial team.

Upon approval by the Board of Regents, the University’s operating and Capital
Improvement Projects (CIP) budget requests are submitted simultaneously to the
Governor for review and incorporation into the executive budget request for the State and
to the Legislature for informational purposes. The executive budget request for the State
is submitted to the Legislature in December for consideration in the regular session of the
Legislature in January. Appropriations by the Legislature (General or Supplemental
Appropriations Act) are usually passed in May and transmitted to the Governor for
approval. Upon approval by the Governor in June, allocation notices are transmitted to
all state agencies, including any restrictions imposed on Legislative appropriations. The
Governor can impose restrictions at any time of the year based on economic conditions.

Legislative appropriations for operating funds are specifically designated by fund type for
major organizational units (UH-Mānoa, UH-Hilo, West O‘ahu, Community Colleges,
Systemwide Programs, etc.). State law allows the Governor to withhold or restrict
Legislative appropriations. General fund allocations are made to each major
organizational unit, less any restrictions imposed by the Governor. The President is
authorized to determine distributions of general fund restrictions as well as reallocation
transfers between major organizational units. The Vice President for Community
Colleges and the Community College Chancellors determine the general fund allocations
to the individual community colleges, normally maintaining established levels of current
service funding.

Due to declining levels of State funding support, it has become necessary to assess each
campus a pro rata share of certain unfunded costs that are administered on a system-wide
basis. These costs include the risk management program costs (including legal
settlements), private fundraising costs, and workers’ compensation/unemployment
insurance premiums.

In terms of financial integrity, external auditors audit the University of Hawai‘i annually.
The University’s financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally accepted
auditing standards and Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) principles. In
July of 2005, with changing auditing standards, the ACCJC accepted “…the presentation
of a combined balance sheet and income statement of the community college system as
supplemental information to the University’s co