For extra services running behind your router. What to do after IP

Document Sample
For extra services running behind your router. What to do after IP Powered By Docstoc
					                                       For extra services running
                                          behind your router.
                                       What to do after IP change

This guide is for customers who meet the following conditions:
      - Customers who have moved from a TPG Layer 3 plan to a TPG Layer 2 PPPoE
          plan or your TPG PPPoE Layer 2 Fixed IP has changed AND
      - You have extra services running behind your router

Before you continue with this guide, if you previously have a Layer 3 connection, you must
reconfigure your router/modem in PPPoE Layer 2 to be able to resume Internet services
with TPG. You can use one of the modem reconfiguration manuals provided on the TPG
Helpdesk page
http://www.tpg.com.au/helpdesk/support.php?type=pppoe&soft=layerchange

This guide will provide you with general information on how to ensure your extra services
are restored and functional again. If you require further assistance, please contact the TPG
Technical Support Team (please see details below) or your nominated network technician.

Please see the sections of this guide that are relevant to you circumstances

What needs to be done if I have one or more of these extra services behind my
router?
        1. Mail Server on Public IP
        2. Web Server on Public IP
        3. Additional IPs (Subnet)
        4. Port Forwarding including:
                       Mail Server on Private IP
                       Web Server on Private IP
                       Setup of VPN Passthrough
        5. VPN


1. Mail Server on Public IP
   If previously your mail server was operating on a public IP address and now this has
   changed, you need to make sure your MX (Mail Exchanger) record now points to the
   new correct IP address.
   You need to contact the organisation that provides Domain Name Hosting services for
   your domain and ask for your MX record to point to your new mail server IP address.
   If you have registered for Domain Name Hosting with TPG, you can contact TPG
   Technical Support Team (see details below) to get this fixed.
   If your mail server is running on a new subnet public IP you may have purchased from
   TPG, please also see Section3

2. Web Sever on Public IP
   If previously your web server was operating on a public IP address and now this has
   changed, you need to make sure your A (Address) record now points to the new correct
   IP address.
   You need to contact the organisation that provides Domain Name Hosting services for
   your domain and ask for your A record to point to your new web server IP address.
                                                                                  1
   If you have registered for Domain Name Hosting with TPG, you can contact TPG
   Technical Support Team (see details below) to get this fixed.
   If your mail server is running on a new subnet public IP you may have purchased from
   TPG, please also see Section3

3. Additional IPs (Subnet)
   If you had a block of IPs purchased from TPG and now have a new block assigned, you
   need to configure your router and network with this new IP range.
   When you purchase a block of IP’s, the first and last IP addresses are not used in your
   network. They are used for identification and routing of the block to your WAN IP
   address.
   The second IP in the block (a.k.a ‘Subnet Gateway’) can be configured on your router’s
   LAN side. IP’s that remain can be used in your network for example on a server or PC.
   These PC’s will be identified with public IPs.

   Example of a setup:
     Lets look at a block of 8 IPs
            IP 1 Not used
            IP 2 Subnet Gateway (to be the LAN address of your router)
            IP 3
            IP 4
            IP 5
            IP 6
            IP 7
            IP 8 Not used

      You also need to be aware of the subnet mask associated with your block of IPs.
      Please refer to the below table and use the subnet mask that is relevant in your
      circumstance.

        Number of IPs in the block                       Subnet Mask used
4                                             255.255.255.252
8                                             255.255.255.248
16                                            255.255.255.240
32                                            255.255.255.224
64                                            255.255.255.192
128                                           255.255.255.128
256                                           255.255.255.0

      Although there may be different ways to setup your network with your new additional
      public IP’s, here are 7 easy steps you may want to consider:

      Step 1:
            Make sure your router is connected to your router via Ethernet and configured
            in Layer 2 PPPoE

      Step 2:
            Ensure your network card TCP/IP settings have “Obtain an IP address
            automatically” and “Obtain DNS server address automatically” selected

      Step 3:
            Log into your router interface
                                                                                2
      Step 4:
            Change the LAN address to your Subnet Gateway and assign the
            corresponding Subnet Mask


      Step 5:
            Disable NAT (Network Address Translation)

      Step 6:
            Save and reboot your router

      Step 7:
            Now go back to your Network Card -> TCP/IP settings.
            Manually enter
                             An IP from the available IPs in your block
                             The corresponding Subnet Mask (see the table above) and
                             TPG DNS Settings (Primary 203.12.160.35 and Secondary
                             203.12.160.36).
            Option: You can setup DNS on your router to avoid manually assigning on
            your network card. Also if you have a large block of IPs, you can setup your
            router to dynamically assign IP addresses from your block. You need to
            access the routers DHCP feature and assign the range along with the
            corresponding subnet mask (see the table above)

      Your network now should have Internet access.


4. Port Forwarding
   Port Forwarding is used to provide services on PRIVATE networks behind NAT
   (Network Address Translation). A specific port must be transparent across NAT from
   public to private networks.
   Although instructions will vary from router to router, there are a few basic steps to
   consider when setting up port forwarding.

   Selecting Pre Defined Category
         a. Log into your router interface
         b. Locate the port forwarding setup page (usually in the Advanced section)
         c. Choose the private IP for which you are setting up the port forwarding service
            for
         d. Choose the category of service. There should be a predefined list including
            services like: Application, Servers, Games, Audio/Video, VPN etc
         e. Now choose an available rule of the service you have selected. For example
            if you selected Servers, some available rules may be: web server, FTP
            server, DNS Server etc
         f. Apply these settings
         g. You may need to save your settings and reboot your router

   Here is an example of Port Forwarding setup using a predefined Category




                                                                                 3
Customise Port Forwarding
Alternatively you may want to customise port forwarding. Here you are able to apply
more customised settings




Here you would need to provide:
   - Source IP address and netmask
   - Destination IP and netmask (nominated private IP and the subnet mask)
Traffic coming from source IP would be forwarded to destination IP
You may be able to leave the source IP blank to indicate traffic not coming from a
specific IP
   - Destination Port Start and End. For a list of most common ports used for
        services, you can use http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/n100495.asp as
        a reference. If there is only one port number, both the start and end port number
        would be the same




                                                                               4
5. VPN
   VPN (Virtual Private Networks) is a private communications network used to
   communicate over the public network. VPN operates between the VPN user and the
   VPN service provider. A VPN can send data across secured and encrypted private
   channels between the two points.


   VPN setup on one PC using a private IP address

   This setup is based on one to one relationship where your PC (VPN user) is installed
   with VPN software, has a private IP and is setup to connect to an external public IP
   address which is the VPN service provider.

   If your Internet connection, which allows VPN access, is the one that now operates on a
   new PPPoE Layer 2 IP:
       - Your router needs to be reconfigured to Layer2 PPPoE setup if you have recently
           moved from a Layer 3 to Layer 2 PPPoE plan (please see guides on TPG
           Helpdesk page). After your router authenticates, it will receive a new WAN
           (public) IP
       - You need to have Port Forwarding for VPN setup on your router. Please see
           section 4 above
       - The VPN service provider (service you are connecting to) may also need to be
           aware of your new public IP (WAN IP) so as to allow the VPN connection from
           your PC (VPN service provider access lists may need to be updated to show
           your new WAN IP). You may need to contact your VPN service provider for
           clarification



       VPN
      Service
      Provider



                                                                  VPN User
                               Router holds your            PC holds a Private IP
                             PPPoE WAN IP (public)          with VPN software




                                                                                5
 VPN setup on a PC using a subnet public IP address purchased from TPG

 This setup is based on your PC (VPN user) is operating on a subnet (additional public
 IP addresses purchased from TPG) and is setup to connect to an external public IP
 address which is the VPN service provider.
 If your Internet connection, which allows VPN access, is the one that now operates on a
 new PPPoE Layer 2 IP and new subnet:
     - Your router needs to be reconfigured to Layer2 PPPoE setup if you have recently
         moved from a Layer 3 to Layer 2 PPPoE plan (please see guides on TPG
         Helpdesk page). After your router authenticates, it will receive a new WAN
         (public) IP
     - Your PC needs to operate on a new public IP from your subnet. Please see
         section 3 for this
     - The VPN service provider (service you are connecting to) may also need to be
         aware of your new public IP (WAN IP) so as to allow the VPN connection from
         your PC (VPN service provider access lists may need to be updated to show
         your new WAN IP). You may need to contact your VPN service provider for
         clarification
     - Other VPN users, who may have VPN connection to you, need to know your new
         public IP (subnet IP on your PC)




     VPN
    Service
    Provider



                                                                VPN User
                             Router holds your            PC holds a Subnet IP (public)
                           PPPoE WAN IP (public)

 Possible           Possible
other VPN          other VPN
  users              users




                                                                              6
   If you are the VPN service provider

   If you are the VPN service provider and were operating on an IP that has now changed
   to a new Layer 2 PPPoE IP:
       - You need to make sure all VPN users know about your new IP address so as
          they can connect to the correct VPN service provider




       VPN
      Service
      Provider




The VPN Service Provider                                    PC communicates with VPN
     IP Changes                                                  Service Provider




                                           Support Information
                                           For further assistance, please call TPG Technical
                                           Support on 1300 360 855
                                           Technical Support Opening Hours
                                           Monday to Friday             8am – midnight
                                           Saturday and Sunday          9am – 9pm
                                           Public Holidays              9am – 6pm




                                                                                  7

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Tags: Private
Stats:
views:22
posted:4/9/2011
language:English
pages:7
Description: Private IP is the IP on the local LAN is a corresponding public IP (the Internet IP). With the development of private IP networks, savings can be allocated for the registration of IP addresses, IP addresses are a group of devoted out In the private IP network, known as private IP addresses.