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					                            THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE NEWS
                                  Monday 4 June, 2007



                         UNEP and the Executive Director in the News

     UN agency honours children for artwork on climate change (UN News Centre)
     World Environment Day celebrated in Tromsoe (Norway Post)
     Melting ice in focus on World Environment Day (ABC Online)
     La fonte des glaces accentue le réchauffement climatique, selon un rapport (Le Monde)
     Célébration de la journée de l‘environnement (Liberte Algerie)
     La fonte des glaces au centre de la Journée l'environnement (Cyberpresse)
     El cambio climático ¿un tema candente? (Guadalajaradosmil.es)
     Barnas blikk på klimaendringer (Universitetet i Tromsø)
     UN warning over global ice loss (BBC)
     'Ignoring global warming is a sin' (IOL)
     Holland prepares for meeting protecting world species (Earth Times)
     Melting ice, snow to hit livelihoods worldwide-UN (Reuters)
     ADB will continue to fund climate change (Critics)
     World focus on melting ice for big day (The Standard)
     Further warning on climate change UN report (REUTERS)
     171 pays au secours des espèces menacées (RTI)
     Es wird verdrängt, was nicht gefällt (Tagesspiegel)
     UN urges protection of animals from climate change (Reuters)


                                     Other Environment News


     Climate debate heats up G-8 (Christian Science Monitor)
     Blair calls for climate change action (The Independent)
     Brazil rejects Bush move on climate change talks (The Guardian)
     China unveils climate change plan (BBC)
     Earth‘s Climate Approaches Dangerous Tipping Point (Environment News Service)
     Bush Climate Plan "The Classic US Line" – EU (Reuters)
     Brazilian president rejects US climate change plans (AFP)
     UN Urges Protection of Animals From Climate Change (Reuters)
     Indonesia`s forests threatened by logging, palm oil (Antara News)
     Louisiana Lawmakers Approve Historic Hurricane Protection Plan (Environment News
      Service)
     Urban Waste Becomes Urban Fuel (Inter Press Service)
     CITES Permits 60 Tons of Elephant Ivory to Be Sold (Enviroment News Service)




                  Communications and Public Information, P.O. Box 30552, Nairobi, Kenya
    Tel: (254-2) 623292/93, Fax: [254-2] 62 3927/623692, Email:cpiinfo@unep.org, http://www.unep.org
                     Environmental News from the UNEP Regions


     ROA
     ROWA
     ROAP


                                    Other UN News


     UN Daily News of 1 June 2007
     S.G.‘s Spokesman Daily Press Briefing of 1 June 2007




_____________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________




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UN News Centre: UN agency honours children for artwork on climate change

{Press Latina Cuba and AHN}
31 May 2007
 Raising awareness of the dangers posed by climate change, the United Nations environment
agency has recognized three children for their artistic depictions of the phenomenon.
Eleven-year old Charlotte Sullivan of the United Kingdom took first prize in the UN
Environment Programme‘s (UNEP) International Children‘s Painting Competition for her
rendering of the world as an umbrella turned inside out by a powerful storm.
Miss Sullivan will be joined by the joint second prize winners – 12-year old Ekaterina Nishchuk
of Russia and 13-year old Petkova Polina Zdravkova of Bulgaria – at the main World
Environment Day celebrations hosted close to the Arctic circle in the Tromso, Norway.
Miss Nishchuk was chosen for her image of a polar bear standing under a hot sun, peeling off
its white fur down to its trunks while atop a perilously small, wasted ice-berg. Miss
Zdravkova‘s painting is of a melting world, apparently dripping tears into the abyss of space.
―I would urge political leaders to see the world through the brush, pen strokes and paintings of
these gifted children to ensure that these young peoples‘ fears are not realized and their hopes
fulfilled,‖ said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner, who will meet the contest‘s three
global and six regional winners at the Tromso Museum in Norway early next month.
The competition, which was organized in cooperation with the Japan-based Foundation for
Global Peace and Environment, Bayer AG and the Nikon Corporation, received 14,000 entries
from 104 countries this year.
_____________________________________________________________________________

Norway Post: World Environment Day celebrated in Tromsoe

The main international celebrations of the World Environment Day 2007, June 5th are held in
Norway's northern city of Tromsoe, in cooperation with the UNEP. A range of events, reflecting
the threats from global warming to the people and wildlife across the world, will be staged.
2007 also marks the start of International Polar Year.

The program opened Sunday with an ecumenical ceremony in the church Ishavskatedralen,
where South African bishop Desmond Tutu was the speaker.
World Environment Day, commemorated each year on 5 June, is one of the principal vehicles
through which the United Nations stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and
enhances political attention and action.
The World Environment Day slogan selected for 2007 is Melting Ice – a Hot Topic? In
support of International Polar Year, the WED theme selected for 2007 focuses on the effects
that climate change is having on polar ecosystems and communities, and the ensuing
consequences around the world.
UNEP says it is honoured that the City of Tromsoe will be hosting this United Nations day.
The UNEP goes on to say that the day's agenda is to give a human face to environmental issues;
empower people to become active agents of sustainable and equitable development; promote an



                                                                                                   3
understanding that communities are pivotal to changing attitudes towards environmental issues;
and advocate partnership, which will ensure all nations and peoples enjoy a safer and more
prosperous future
_____________________________________________________________________________

ABC Online: Melting ice in focus on World Environment Day

{Also featured on Agence24}


The melting of the planet's ice due to climate change will be the central theme of World
Environment Day, celebrated annually on June 5 and this year hosted by the Arctic town of
Tromsoe in Norway.
Melting ice offers some of the clearest evidence of global warming, and this year's choice of
host city was no coincidence, with the picturesque Norwegian town nestled in the Arctic, a
region which is heating up twice as fast as the rest of the planet and where the effects are
already visible.
"The Arctic and Antarctica may be the Earth's climate early warning system - feeling the heat
first - but we know it does not end there," the head of the United Nations Environment Program
(UNEP), Achim Steiner, said.
The melting is both a consequence and a cause of global warming: ice reflects heat, as opposed
to water which absorbs it and warms up the climate, thus causing more glaciers and snow to
melt.
The gradual disappearance of ice and snow has already affected the four million inhabitants of
the Arctic region.
With ice sheets gradually receding, Inuits have seen their seal and polar bear hunting grounds
shrink and their traditional way of life threatened.
Accidents are believed to be on the rise among the far north communities as hunters fall through
the once-thick but now thinning ice, and they are increasingly swapping their dogsleds for
motor boats.
Meanwhile, polar bears risk becoming extinct over the next decades as their natural habitat
melts away.
On the positive side, the shrinking ice sheet will open up two new maritime routes between the
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans off Canada and Russia, shortening shipping times considerably.
And for better or worse, the ice melt will also open up the Arctic for oil and gas drilling.
The region is believed to be home to one-quarter of the world's remaining reserves, the US
Geological Survey says, though that could also heighten tensions among bordering countries.
The melting ice will also affect parts of the world much further afield than the polar regions.
"What happens in the Arctic and the Antarctica as a result of climate change is of direct interest
to us all - from someone living in the Congo River Basin, the Australian outback and in rural




                                                                                                  4
China, to suburban dwellers in Berlin, New Delhi, Rio de Janeiro or Washington DC," Mr
Steiner said.
Climate refugees
Canadian researchers say the melting of the Greenland ice cap, the planet's second-largest
source of freshwater after Antarctica, could cause ocean levels to rise by seven metres,
drowning coastal regions and islands, including several countries in the Pacific.
Indonesia alone could lose 2,000 islands by 2030, its Environment Ministry says.
That would lead to tens of millions of "climate refugees," in addition to the masses that would
undoubtedly have to flee droughts and flooding brought on elsewhere by the warming of the
planet.
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says a stabilisation of carbon dioxide (CO2)
concentrations in the atmosphere at today's levels would make it possible to limit the
temperature rise to around two degrees Celsius and would cost only 0.12 per cent of global
gross domestic product.
But despite US President George W Bush's announcement last week of an "initiative" to cap
greenhouse gas emissions, the United States, the biggest CO2 polluter, has refused to commit to
binding targets.
The issue is expected to be one of the main bones of contention between the United States and
its western allies at the G8 summit to open in Germany on Wednesday, the day after World
Environment Day.
A slew of activities are being held around the world to mark World Environment Day.
In the Arctic town of Tromsoe events will last three days, running from June 3 to June 5.
South Africa's former Anglican archbishop Desmond Tutu will hold a religious service on
Sunday, and an international scientific report on melting glaciers will be presented on Monday.
A two-day conference on the melting ice cap will also be held, while the UNEP will launch a
book on sustainable tourism in the polar regions.
On its website, the UNEP has listed 77 suggestions for how to celebrate World Environment
Day, including planting trees, bicycle parades and rickshaw races.
_____________________________________________________________________________

Le Monde: La fonte des glaces accentue le réchauffement climatique, selon un rapport
04.06.07 | 12h21

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La fonte des glaces s'est accélérée ces dernières décennies, un phénomène alarmant qui
témoigne du réchauffement de l'atmosphère et contribue au changement climatique, révèle un
rapport publié lundi par le Programme des Nations unies pour l'environnement (PNUE).

La banquise de l'Arctique a rétréci de 6 à 7% en hiver et de 10 à 12% en été au cours des 30
dernières années, indique le rapport présenté à Tromsoe (nord de la Norvège) à la veille de la
Journée mondiale de l'environnement.


La superficie des surfaces terrestres enneigées a fondu de 7 à 10% dans l'hémisphère Nord dans
la période mars-avril au cours des trois ou quatre dernières décennies, précise le rapport.

Conséquence du réchauffement de l'atmosphère, la fonte des glaces a aussi pour effet d'accélérer
le changement climatique, soulignent les chercheurs.

"La neige et la glace réfléchissent de 70 à 80% de l'énergie solaire tandis que l'eau l'absorbe. Si
la neige et la glace continuent de fondre, cela va amplifier le réchauffement climatique", a
expliqué Paal Prestrud, un des auteurs du rapport, lors d'une conférence de presse.

Selon les chercheurs, environ 40% de la population mondiale pourrait être affectée par le recul
des surfaces enneigées et des glaciers en Asie.

De nombreux cours d'eau trouvant leur source dans l'Himalaya, un amenuisement de la glace
sur cette chaîne montagneuse se traduirait par une diminution des ressources d'eau potable et
d'irrigation.

L'élévation du niveau des océans, liée à la fonte des glaces terrestres, engloutirait aussi des
régions côtières et des îles entières, au Bangladesh et en Indonésie par exemple.

________________________________________________________________________

Liberte (Algerie) : Célébration de la journée de l’environnement
―La fonte des glaces : une question brûlante ?‖

Par : Rédaction de Liberte
Lu : (96 fois)

Comme chaque année, depuis sa proclamation en 1972 par les Nations unies, la communauté
internationale célébrera le 5 juin la Journée mondiale de l‘environnement. On se souvient que
c‘est Alger qui a été choisie par le programme des Nations unies (PNUE) comme capitale pour
abriter les festivités internationales commémoratives de la Journée mondiale de
l‘environnement, le 5 juin 2006, dont le slogan en rapport avec l‘Année internationale des
déserts et de la désertification 2006, était : ―Don‘t desert drylands‖ (―Ne désertez pas les zones
arides‖).
Le thème retenu pour l‘année 2007 est consacré à la préoccupation problématique mondiale des
changements climatiques et du réchauffement de la planète, et se déclinera sous le slogan : ―La
fonte des glaces : une question brûlante ?‖ La Journée mondiale de l‘environnement sera
célébrée ce 5 juin 2007 en Norvège.




                                                                                                      6
Aussi, et à l‘instar des autres pays de la communauté internationale, l‘Algérie et le ministère de
l‘Aménagement du territoire et de l‘Environnement s‘apprêtent à commémorer, comme chaque
année, cette journée mondiale, le 5 juin 2007, à Alger et dans toutes les wilayas, à travers un
programme riche et diversifié (conférences scientifiques, expositions thématiques, rencontres
culturelles, distribution de livres et documents pédagogiques…), qui sera couronné par une
cérémonie officielle de remise du prix national de l‘environnement 2007, pour lequel plus de
100 scientifiques et chercheurs ont concouru.

________________________________________________________________________

Cyberpresse:La fonte des glaces au centre de la Journée l'environnement

Oslo

Porteuse de rares promesses et surtout de risques, la fonte des glaces sera le thème central de la
Journée mondiale de l'environnement, traditionnellement célébrée le 5 juin.

La ville-hôte des principales manifestations sera cette année la cité norvégienne de Tromsoe,
dans l'Arctique, une région qui se réchauffe deux fois plus vite que la planète.

«L'Arctique et l'Antarctique, étant les premiers à éprouver toute évolution thermique, forment le
système d'alerte précoce de la Terre aux phénomènes climatiques», souligne le directeur du
Programme des Nations unies pour l'environnement (PNUE), Achim Steiner.

À la fois cause --la glace réfléchit la chaleur alors que l'eau l'absorbe-- et conséquence du
changement climatique, la disparition progressive des surfaces glacées et enneigées affecte déjà
les 4 millions d'habitants de l'Arctique.

Pour cause de recul de la banquise sur laquelle ils chassent le phoque et l'ours polaire, les Inuits
peinent à perpétuer leur mode de vie traditionnel.

Les accidents mortels dus à l'amenuisement de la couche de glace sont plus fréquents dans ces
communautés du Grand Nord et les chasseurs troquent de plus en plus leurs chiens de traîneaux,
qu'ils doivent parfois abattre faute de pouvoir les nourrir, pour des canots à moteur.

Espèce emblématique de l'Arctique, l'ours polaire est, lui, tout simplement menacé d'extinction
dans les décennies à venir en raison de la disparition de son habitat.

Côté positif, le retrait de la banquise pourrait permettre l'ouverture de deux routes maritimes,
plus courtes que les itinéraires actuels, entre les océans Atlantique et Pacifique le long du
Canada et de la Russie.

Il devrait aussi faciliter aussi l'accès aux gisements d'hydrocarbures de l'Arctique, qui recélerait
un quart des réserves de pétrole et de gaz naturel restant dans le monde, selon l'US Geological
Survey.

Mais la fonte des glaces se fera ressentir bien au-delà des seules régions polaires ou
montagneuses.




                                                                                                       7
«Ce qui arrive dans l'Arctique et l'Antarctique (...) nous concerne tous directement, que l'on soit
un habitant du Bassin du Congo, de l'Outback australien, ou de la Chine rurale, ou même un
citadin de Berlin, de New Delhi, de Rio de Janeiro ou de Washington», affirme M. Steiner.

Selon des chercheurs canadiens, la fonte de la calotte glaciaire du Groenland, seconde réserve
d'eau douce de la planète après l'Antarctique, provoquerait une élévation de sept mètres des
océans, lesquels engloutiraient des îles et des zones côtières, y compris des États du Pacifique.

La seule Indonésie pourrait perdre 2.000 îles d'ici 2030, selon son ministre de l'Environnement.

Un tel phénomène obligerait le déplacement de dizaines de millions de «réfugiés climatiques»
auxquels s'ajouteraient par ailleurs des légions d'hommes et de femmes fuyant sécheresses et
inondations liées au réchauffement de l'atmosphère.

Selon le Giec, la stabilisation des concentrations de dioxyde de carbone (CO2) dans
l'atmosphère permettrait de limiter à environ 2°C l'élévation du thermomètre et ne coûterait que
0,12% de PIB mondial.

Mais, malgré la proposition la semaine dernière par le président George W. Bush d'une
«nouvelle initiative» pour la réduction des gaz à effet de serre, les États-Unis, principaux
émetteurs actuels de CO2, rechignent toujours à prendre des engagements contraignants.

La question devrait être l'objet d'un nouveau bras de fer entre les Américains et leurs alliés
occidentaux au sommet du G8 qui se tiendra au lendemain de la Journée de l'environnement, du
6 au 8 juin, à Heiligendamm en Allemagne.

________________________________________________________________________

Guadalajaradosmil.es:El cambio climático ¿un tema candente?

Este es slogan seleccionado para el Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente 2007 por las Naciones
Unidas
        Cartel de las Naciones Unidas con motivo del Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente
llamando la atención sobre el deshielo como elemento de alerta del cambio climático.
        Cartel de las Naciones Unidas con motivo del Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente
llamando la atención sobre el deshielo como elemento de alerta del cambio climático.
El Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente se conmemora del 5 de junio de cada año, siendo el
vehículo a través del cual las Naciones Unidas estimulan la concientización sobre el ambiente a
nivel mundial, además de promover la atención y acción política.

El slogan seleccionado para El Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente 2007 es El Deshielo - ¿Un
Tema Caliente? En apoyo al Año Polar Internacional, el tema seleccionado para el 2007 se
enfoca en los efectos que el cambio climático esta teniendo en los ecosistemas y comunidades
polares, y las ulteriores consecuencias alrededor del mundo.

Se pretende este año llamar la atención sobre el deshielo que denota las repercusiones que el
cambio climático está teniendo en todas las regiones. Los habitantes de las islas bajas y las
ciudades costeras de todo el mundo se enfrentan al riesgo de inundación creado por la subida
del nivel del mar. Las compañías aseguradoras de todo el mundo pagan cada año más y más
indemnizaciones por los daños causados por inclemencias climáticas extremas.




                                                                                                    8
A medida que retroceden los glaciares, aumenta la preocupación de los gobiernos con respecto
al futuro del suministro de agua. Además, para el tercio de la población mundial que vive en
zonas áridas, especialmente de África, las perturbaciones asociadas al cambio climático
amenazan con exacerbar la desertificación, la sequía y la inseguridad alimentaria.

Con la celebración de este día se pretende sensibilizar y educar a la población en un tema tan
importante como el Cambio Climático para poder accionar antes que sea demaciado tarde.

También se les incita a promover la premisa de que las comunidades son un detonante para el
cambio de actitudes hacia temas ambientales. Se busca una sociedad que pretenda que todas las
naciones y personas disfruten de un futuro más prospero y seguro. El Día Mundial del Medio
Ambiente es un evento en que participa la sociedad con actividades coloridas como paseos
callejeros, desfiles de bicicletas, conciertos ambientalistas, charlas informativas en escuelas,
plantaciones de árboles así como campañas de reciclaje .

El Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente está pensado también como un evento intelectual, lo que
genera la oportunidad de realizar seminarios, talleres y simposios sobre la preservación de la
salud ambiental de nuestro planeta en beneficio de lasfuturas generaciones.

¿Cuándo comenzó todo?

El Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente fue establecido por la Asamblea General de las Naciones
Unidas en 1972, con motivo de la apertura de la Conferencia de Estocolmo sobre Medio
Ambiente Humano, y su celebración fue encomendada al Programa de las Naciones Unidas para
el Medio Ambiente (PNUMA) con sede en Nairobi, Kenya..

El Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente es el evento ambiental más importante de la Organización
de las Naciones Unidas y se celebra el 5 de junio de cada año en más de 100 países alrededor
del mundo.

El propósito del Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente es enfocar la atención mundial hacia la
importancia del medio ambiente y estimular acciones políticas acordes.

El evento intenta dar un rostro humano a los problemas ambientales; alentar a las personas a
convertirse en agentes activos del desarrollo sostenible y equitativo; promover la idea de que las
comunidades son los pivotes del cambio de actitud con respecto a los temas ambientales, y
propiciar asociaciones que aseguren que todos los pueblos y naciones disfruten de un futuro más
próspero y seguro.

Cada año se escoge una ciudad diferente como sede principal de la celebración mundial. El
gobierno y/o la ciudad anfitriones, en cooperación con el PNUMA, identifican las
características que tendrá el evento. Se selecciona un tema, un eslogan y un logotipo que serán
el foco de atención para todo el material informativo y las actividades de promoción alrededor
del mundo.

El interés en el Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente crece cada año, como lo muestra el número de
países que apoyan esta importante celebración, la cada vez más extensa lista de
municipalidades, empresas y comunidades que participan, y los cientos de miles de personas
que visitan la página web del Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente del PNUMA.




                                                                                                   9
Mensaje del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas Ban Ki-moon

Las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero derivadas de las actividades humanas están
ocasionando el calentamiento del planeta. La concentración de dióxido de carbono en la
atmósfera es superior a la de cualquier otro momento de los últimos 600.000 años y aumenta a
un ritmo cada vez mayor.

La prueba más elocuente del cambio climático se halla en las regiones polares. El Ártico se está
calentando a un ritmo dos veces superior a la media mundial. La extensión y el grosor del hielo
marino perpetuo del Ártico están disminuyendo, zonas de permafrost que estaban congeladas
desde hace siglos se están deshelando y los casquetes polares de Groenlandia y la Antártida se
están derritiendo con una rapidez que nadie había previsto.

Ello tiene profundas consecuencias para la población y los ecosistemas del Ártico. Al menguar
el hielo marino, se reduce el hábitat de las especies árticas vulnerables. Los cambios también
afectarán a las comunidades indígenas del Ártico, para las cuales el medio natural es no sólo
fuente de alimentos, sino también la base de su identidad cultural.

Sin embargo, no se trata de un problema que afecta únicamente a las regiones polares. El lema
elegido para el Día Mundial del Medio Ambiente de 2007 —―Melting Ice: A Hot Topic!‖ (El
deshielo: un asunto candente)— denota las repercusiones que el cambio climático está teniendo
en todas las regiones.

Los habitantes de las islas bajas y las ciudades costeras de todo el mundo se enfrentan al riesgo
de inundación creado por la subida del nivel del mar. Las compañías aseguradoras de todo el
mundo pagan cada año más y más indemnizaciones por los daños causados por inclemencias
climáticas extremas. A medida que retroceden los glaciares, aumenta la preocupación de los
gobiernos con respecto al futuro del suministro de agua. Además, para el tercio de la población
mundial que vive en zonas áridas, especialmente de África, las perturbaciones asociadas al
cambio climático amenazan con exacerbar la desertificación, la sequía y la inseguridad
alimentaria.

La dependencia de la sociedad del uso de combustibles fósiles hace peligrar el progreso
económico y social y nuestra seguridad futura. Afortunadamente, tenemos numerosos
instrumentos de política y tecnológicos a nuestro alcance para evitar la crisis que se avecina,
pero necesitamos más voluntad política.

Ny skrekkrapport fra FN om klimaet:
- Vil få konsekvenser for flere hundre millioner mennesker

TROMSØ/OSLO (VG Nett) FNs nye klimarapport viser at flere hundre millioner mennesker
verden over vil bli direkte påvirket av nedsmeltingen av verdens snø og isområder.
Av ANNE VINDING, MORTEN ULEKLEIV ENG

LA FRAM RAPPORTEN: UNEP-direktør Achim Steiner, Pål Prestrud i CICERO,
miljøvernminister Helen Bjørnøy og utviklingsminister Erik Solheim. Foto: Morten Ulekleiv
Eng
VG Nett følger:




                                                                                                  10
________________________________________________________________________

Universitetet i Tromsø :Barnas blikk på klimaendringer

En enestående kunstutstilling ved Tromsø Museum, Universitetsmuseet ble i søndag åpnet av
Kronprins Haakon. Utstillingen viser hvordan verdens barn ser på klimaendringer og
miljøkatastrofe.

Kronprins Haakon med vinnere
Kronprins Haakon med noen av vinnerne av den internasjonale tegnekonkurransen om miljø.
Barna kom fra alle verdensdeler med sine fremstillinger av klimaendringer. Foto: Maja Sojtaric
Den internasjonale malerkonkurransen for barn om miljøet arrangeres hvert år av United
Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Årets konkurranse er den sekstende i rekken og av
mer enn 14.000 innsendte bidrag fra hele verden er 64 tegninger valgt ut til en utstilling. FN har
bestemt at denne utstillingen skal vises på Tromsø Museum, Universitetsmuseet (TMU). Denne
æren faller sammen med at Tromsø er arena for den globale markeringa av Verdens
Miljøverndag tirsdag 5. juni.

Tre globale vinnere og seks vinnere som representerte hver sin verdensregion ble høytidelig
premiert av blant annet UNEP, Kronprins Håkon og miljøvernminister Helen Bjørnøy.

– Det er interessant at mens vi fortsatt debatterte om klimaendringer er virkelige satt disse barna
og tegnet sine bekymringer for fremtiden. De viste hva verdensledere ikke ville anerkjenne, sa
Achim Steiner administrerende direktør ved UNEP på prisutdelingen i Tromsø.

En vrengt paraply og isbjørn i bikini
Kronprins Haakon og Charlotte Sullivan
Kronprins Haakon og vinneren Charlotte Sullivan. Foto: Maja Sojtaric
Det var tydelig opprømte vinnere som fikk møte Kronprins Haakon 3.juni. Blant dem var den
globale vinneren Charlotte Sullivan fra Storbritannia. Hennes bilde av verden som en vrengt
paraply som holdes av en skyggeaktig figur mens sterke klimavinder holder på å rive den vekk
viste en modenhet som er spesiell for en liten jente på 11 år.

– I bakgrunnen representerer det røde, oransje og gule de fossile brennstoffene og
oppvarmingen av planeten, mens de som kunne ha gjort noe, holder paraplyen til å gjemme seg
bak, sier Charlotte.

Hun selv ble presentert som iherdig gjenvinner som ofte tok ponnien sin til skolen, for å spare
på utslipp fra familiens bil.

Selv om mange bilder viste triste fremtidsvisjoner for verden var det likevel plass for et og
annet smil. Med et spesiell sans for humor viste russiske Ekatarina Nishchuk hvordan isbjørn
tilpasser seg klimaendringer. Tolvåringen tegnet en isbjørn som står på en smeltende isflak,
mens han tar av seg pelsen og står der i en rød bikini. Hun vant andre prisen i konkurransen.


Utstillingen kan du se på Tromsø Museum, Universitetsmuseet frem til søndag 2. september.




                                                                                                  11
_____________________________________________________________________________
BBC: UN warning over global ice loss

Hundreds of millions of livelihoods will be affected by declining snow and ice cover as a result
of global warming, a UN report has warned.
The risks facing people included losing access to drinking water, and rising sea levels, the study
concluded.
The findings were published by the UN's Environment Programme (Unep).
Unep chief Achim Steiner said the report showed that time was running out for political leaders
to reach a global agreement on curbing emissions.
Mr Steiner made his call for action at the launch of the UN Global Outlook for Ice and Snow
report, which was being held in Tromso, Norway.
"The report underlines that the fate of the world's snowy and icy places in a climatically
challenged world should be cause for concern in every ministry, boardroom and living room
across the world," he said.
"The missing link is universal political action. Today's report should empower the public to take
their leaders to task [and] should empower them to ask how much hotter it has to get before we
act."

'Feedback' fears
The study warns of a range of threats that could destabilise ecosystems around the world, with
potentially devastating consequences for hundreds of millions of people.
Melting glaciers in Asia's mountains could affect an estimated 40% of the world's population,
who rely on ice melt for crop irrigation and drinking water.
It added that rising temperatures were already resulting in the thawing of permafrost in places
such as Serbia. This was leading to the release into the atmosphere of methane, a potent
greenhouse gas.
The fate of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, which hold almost all of the planet's
freshwater ice, needed to be better understood, the UN publication urged.
It said that if emissions of greenhouse gases continued unabated, the massive ice sheets were
likely to become unstable as the world continued to warm.
Without taking measures to mitigate sea level rise, an estimated 145 million people, primarily in
Asia, would be exposed to the risk of flooding.
The UN said that the International Polar Year, a 24-month global scientific study of the polar
regions, would help shed light on how climate change is altering the ice dynamics in these
regions.
The authors also warned that less ice and snow cover was leading to more of the Sun's energy
being absorbed by the land and the sea, rather than being reflected back into space.




                                                                                                  12
They said this "positive feedback" could accelerate global warming and result in more abrupt
shifts in the climate.
Norway's Environment Minister, Helen Bjoernoey, said the comprehensive study into the state
of the world's snow and ice presented a bleak prognosis.
"To me, it is particularly alarming to realise climate change can be a reinforcing process - global
warming results in further global warming," the minister observed.
"As documented in the report, melting of snow and ice will in itself have severe consequences
on nature and society."


________________________________________________________________________

IOL: 'Ignoring global warming is a sin'
World leaders who continued to ignore the reality of human-induced climate change were
committing a sin against the children of the world, Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu warned
on Sunday.

Delivering a special sermon in the Arctic Cathedral in the Norwegian city of Tromso on the eve
of World Environment Day, Tutu said all religious leaders and communities had to send a clear
signal to their political leaders that the world had to make the crucial choice between the present
path of "wanton destructiveness" - or the morally responsible path of compassion and respect
for life.

"We must act now and wake up to our moral obligations. Ignoring global warming is a sin, and
the future of our beautiful planet is in our hands," he said.

Tutu did not refer to President George Bush's United States administration by name, but said
that all political leaders had to provide firm dates and targets for reducing their carbon
emissions in terms of the Kyoto climate change treaty.

The archbishop said the poor and vulnerable people would be most severely affected by
droughts, high temperatures, the flooding of coastal cities and more severe and unpredictable
weather events resulting from climate change.

Citing biblical scriptures, Tutu said that after God had created birds, fish and animals he had
created humans to be his viceroys and to act "compassionately and gently" towards all forms of
life.

Instead, humanity had behaved wantonly and recklessly.

Significantly, several other religious faiths were also represented at yesterday's sermon,
including members of the Muslim and Jewish faiths, a representative from the Vatican and the
general secretary of the World Council of Churches.

Massoumeh Ebdekar, former Iranian minister of environment, said all religions emphasised
similar values and continued to urge their followers to refrain from injustice.




                                                                                                 13
She said the world could not continue with life as usual, and the melting of ice and glaciers in
many parts of the world was a visible sign of the disrespect for life shown in many nations.

A huge block of ice was shipped in from the polar island of Svalbard (Spitzbergen) and
mounted inside the cathedral and dripped away steadily to emphasise the theme of this year's
World Environment Day - "Melting Ice - A Hot Topic".

After the sermon, Tutu walked down to the banks of the Tromso Fjord to bless the waters, along
with Bishop Sofie Petersen of Greenland, Bishop Per Oskar Kjolas of Nord Halogaland and
Archbishop Simon of Murmansk from the Russian Orthodox Church.

United Nations Environment Programme chief Achim Steiner said the tragedy of global
warming was that the world was still divided by nation states and economies, whereas all of
humanity had a common interest in safeguarding the future of the world.

Norway is also hosting a major climate change conference, which begins tomorrow. The event
will be opened by Gro Harlem Brundtland, the United Nations' special envoy on climate
change.

Other speakers include Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg and his Environment
Minister, Helen Bjornoy, the chairperson of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Change, Rajendra Pachauri, and several leading climate change scientists.

Meanwhile, Tutu, patron of Team Shosholoza, is to be honoured for his contribution to the
democratic transition of South Africa at the America's Cup next week in Spain.

Tutu will attend a dinner in his honour hosted by Louis Vuitton in Valencia on Saturday.

The dinner will raise funds for the development of the Tygerberg Children's Hospital near Cape
Town, of which Tutu and his wife are patrons.
________________________________________________________________________

Earth Times: Holland prepares for meeting protecting world species

Amsterdam - The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of Wild
Fauna and Flora will meet for the first time ever in a European Union country when it convenes
Sunday in The Hague, with ivory trade expected to be a major debating point. CITES,
established in 1973, has some 30,000 species of wild animals and plants listed for protection,
making it the world's biggest tool for biodiversity conservation.

A new feature this year is that a special ministerial meeting takes place June 13, an initiative by
the conference host, the Dutch Minister of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality.

Holland is one of the largest importers and exporters of flora, fauna and derivative products.

The 171 member states will discuss some 40 new proposals presented by participating
governments. Many reflect growing international concern about the accelerating destruction of
the world's marine and forest resources through overfishing and excessive logging.




                                                                                                   14
Others seek to advance the protection or sustainable use of diverse plants, reptiles, birds and
mammals.

"For over 30 years CITES has played an important role in ensuring that the wildlife trade is
managed sustainably and does not threaten the survival of any species," said Executive Director
Achim Steiner of the United Nations Environment Programme, which administers the CITES
secretariat.

"The acute challenges of the 21st century make CITES more relevant today than ever before,"
he added.

The debate about ivory trade is expected to dominate at the conference.

CITES banned international commercial ivory trade in 1989 but in 1997, recognizing that some
southern African elephant populations were healthy and well managed, it permitted Botswana,
Namibia and Zimbabwe to make a one-time sale of a stock of ivory to Japan totalling 50 tonnes.
The sales took place in 1999, earning some 5 million dollars.

In 2002, CITES agreed in principle to allow a second sale from Botswana (20 tonnes), Namibia
(10 tonnes) and South Africa (30 tonnes). But in 2004 a request that CITES authorize annual
quotas was not agreed.

The one-time sales were made conditional on the ability of the MIKE (Monitoring of Illegal
Killing of Elephants) programme to establish up-to-date and comprehensive baseline data on
elephant poaching and population levels. MIKE provided an objective assessment of what
impact ivory sales had on elephant populations and poaching.

This year Botswana and Namibia jointly submitted a proposal to maintain the elephant
populations while easing conditions for permitting future sales of ivory.

Kenya and Mali simultaneously proposed a 20-year ivory trade ban. They argue that allowing
any trade in ivory will increase the poaching of elephants.

Andreas Dinkelmeijer of the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), one of lobbyists at
CITES, told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa his organisation supports the Kenya-Mali proposal.

"If you allow limited ivory sale, you still enhance illegal sale. One cannot discern legally from
illegally ivory once the elephant is killed," he said, while noting that ivory sales are so
controversial because they are so profitable.

"One kilogram costs 850 dollars. It is mostly processed in souvenirs or hangers. Most
consumers don't know you need to kill elephants to harvest the ivory. Many also don't know the
product they buy contains ivory. And in Japan, people buy ivory because it is a status symbol,
like diamonds," Dinkelmeijer said.

Legislator Esther Ouwehand of the Animal Party (PvdD) told dpa she is "disappointed" Gerda
Verburg, Dutch minister of Agriculture, refused to express Holland's position on the ivory ban
proposal.




                                                                                                    15
"No EU ministers express their position until the African continent has. This shows a lack of
courage," she said.

Ouwehand and three other Dutch legislators participate in CITES. Ouwehand calls the
conference "very important" but doubts important steps will be taken.

"It is too big a body to expect any concrete results that will improve the situation for animals
and plants," she said.
_____________________________________________________________________________

Reuters: Melting ice, snow to hit livelihoods worldwide-UN

04 Jun 2007 08:20:59 GMT

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent

OSLO, June 4 (Reuters) - Global warming that is melting ice and snow will affect hundreds of
millions of people around the globe by disrupting rivers in Asia, thawing Arctic ice and raising
ocean levels, a U.N. report said on Monday.
Glaciers from the Himalayas to the Alps are in retreat, permafrost from Alaska to Siberia is
warming and snowfalls are becoming unreliable in many regions, according to a "Global
Outlook for Ice and Snow" written by more than 70 experts.
And it said the changes, widely blamed on greenhouse gases released by mankind's use of fossil
fuels, would be felt far from polar regions or high mountain areas.
"Fate of the world's snowy and icy places as a result of climate change should be cause for
concern in every ministry, boardroom and living room across the world," said Achim Steiner,
head of U.N. Environment Programme of the 238-page report.
He said the findings were relevant "from Berlin to Brasilia, and Beijing to Boston".
The report said that about 40 percent of the world's 6.5 billion population would be affected by
retreating glaciers in Asia -- snow and ice in the Himalayas, for instance, help regulate river
flows and irrigation from China to India.

And a one metre (3 ft 3 in) rise in world sea levels, linked to expansion of the oceans as they
warm and melt from glaciers, could cause almost $950 billion in damage and expose 145
million people to flooding, it said.
Oceans rose by almost 20 cms last century and U.N. studies project a further rise of 18-59 cms
by 2100. Asia would be hard hit by rising seas, especially low-lying Bangladesh, it said.
ENVIRONMENT DAY
The snow and ice report was released on the eve of World Environment Day, and two days
before a June 6-8 summit by the leaders of the world's top eight industrial powers in Germany.
"The world cannot afford simply to discuss climate change. It has to act," Steiner said.
The report said there were big uncertainties about the fate of ice on Greenland and Antarctica,
the world's main stores of fresh water. Greenland contains enough ice to raise sea levels by 7
metres, bigger Antarctica by about 60 metres.

And less snow is falling in many areas, with a 1.3 percent decline per decade since the 1960s in
the northern hemisphere.
A one degree Celsius (1.8 Fahrenheit) temperature rise would raise the snow line in the Alps by
150 metres, for instance, damaging ski resorts and tourism.




                                                                                                16
And lifestyles were already changing. Hunters in Qeqertarsuaq in western Greenland were
turning to use motorboats rather than dogsleds because the sea ice was no longer solid. Polar
bears are among animals under threat from shrinking ice.

The report said the rise in temperatures "has not yet resulted in widespread permafrost thawing."
Even so, the report said the quantity of methane being released from permafrost in Siberia may
already be five times more than previously supposed. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas
stored in vast quantities in permafrost.
Among benefits from melting ice, a northern sea route along the coast of Russia could be open
for 120 days a year by 2100 against 30 now.
And the report pointed to dangers of abrupt floods linked to a melting of glaciers that have
blocked lakes. In 1998 a so-called glacier lake outburst flood killed more than 100 people in
Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.

________________________________________________________________________

Critics: ADB will continue to fund climate change
MANILA, Philippines — ―The Asian Development Bank will continue to fund climate change.
The Bank will still invest in coal power plants inspite of its recognition that coal projects have
serious environmental and health implications,‖ said Hemantha Withanage, executive director
of NGO Forum on ADB.


In its draft energy strategy, which was released last 29 May to the public for commenting, the
ADB stated that it will continue to support fossil fuel-based energy generation project, including
coal-based power plants. Ironically, the Bank recognizes that coal projects generate greenhouse
gas (GHG) and a number of other pollutants such as sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and
heavy metals.
According to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), continuous burning of
fossil fuels contributes to increases in atmospheric concentration of GHG which lead to climate
change. Asia and the Pacific will be the ones hardly hit by climate change as manifested lately
by more intense tropical storms, more frequent flooding and rises in sea level, among others.
In addition, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states that if atmospheric
carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration were to double, increasing global warming by 2 to 4.5°C as
a result, developing countries will experience losses of 1-5% of its GDP.
Safe Technology?
In its draft strategy, the ADB insisted that it will adopt available cleaner technologies to
mitigate the negative environmental harm and health hazards caused by coal projects. However,
experiences in the past show that such mechanisms implored by the Bank have been proven
futile.
In the Philippines, inspite of the preventive measures that were applied to the ADB-funded
Masinloc Coal-Fired Power Plant, significant levels of mercury and fly ash particles were still
found able to escape pollution control devices. Likewise, sample ashes from the Mae Moh Coal
Power Plant in Thailand has continued to contain lead, mercury and other heavy metals inspite
the installation of the ADB-endorsed flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and ionizing wet scrubber
technologies.




                                                                                                17
Carbon Market Initiative
As an ongoing program, the ADB will also continue to implement its Carbon Market Initiative
(CMI). According to the Bank, CMI aims to support sustainable development goals of its
developing member countries (DMCs), address global climate change concerns and assist
developed countries meet their emissions reduction commitments to the Kyoto Protocol.
Under the CMI, countries that are exceeding their required carbon emissions buy carbon credits
from other countries who have unused them – also known as carbon trading – by providing
funds for forest plantation and/or maintenance. Such plantations are assumed to absorb the
excess carbon emissions of the buying country.
However, studies show that CMIs of the World Bank and European countries did not deliver the
expected results. Most credit firms instead implement carbon-sequestering projects such as
monoculture forest plantations rather than reducing GHGs which is the source of climate
change. Critics say that this ―lower hanging fruit‖ (convenient) approach has not reduced GHG
in reality but has only given way to creative accounting and profit making.
Under its draft energy strategy, the ADB forecasts that coal and oil will still be the dominating
energy sources even until 2030. Renewable energy will pay a very minimal role. According to
the International Energy Agency, renewable energy only accounts to 9.6 percent of the total
supply of energy. ―If the ADB expects to efficiently and effectively use its carbon credits
initiative to promote energy efficiency and renewables, and help reduce GHG emissions, the
ADB should increase its investment in renewables. If it wants to help prevent the worsening
climate change, the ADB should instead help increase renewables‘ contribution to global
electricity production,‖ Withanage said.
Privatization of the power industry
Meanwhile on ADB‘s privatization program of the energy sector, Ana Maria Nemenzo,
president of Freedom from Debt Coalitions said, ―A dark future awaits the people under the
ADB‘s restructuring and privatization of the power industry. ADB‘s lending policy on the
power sector is accompanied by aggressive promotion of private sector involvement.‖
Nemenzo said, ―While ADB claims that its power sector restructuring and privatization
program is towards reducing poverty in the region, the opposite has been the result.‖ In the
Philippines, privatization of the power industry has led to increasing power rates and increasing
government debt, leading to further impoverishment of the poor. Moreover, many lost their jobs
due to privatization. ―Poverty has increased in countries where privatization has taken place,
while the big corporate sector has been continuously amassing huge profit,‖ she added.
________________________________________________________________________

The Standard: World focus on melting ice for big day

Monday, June 04, 2007

The melting of the planet's ice due to climate change will be the central theme of World
Environment Day tomorrow, this year hosted by the Arctic town of Tromsoe in Norway.
Melting ice offers some of the clearest evidence of global warming, and this year's choice of
host city was no coincidence, with the picturesque Norwegian town nestled in the Arctic, a




                                                                                                    18
region which is heating up twice as fast as the rest of the planet and where the effects are
already visible.
"The Arctic and Antarctica may be the Earth's climate early warning system - feeling the heat
first - but we know it does not end there," said Achim Steiner, head of the United Nations
Environment Program.
The melting is both a consequence and a cause of global warming: ice reflects heat, as opposed
to water which absorbs it and warms up the climate, thus causing more glaciers and snow to
melt.
The gradual disappearance of ice and snow has already affected the four million inhabitants of
the Arctic region.
With ice sheets gradually receding, Inuits have seen their seal and polar bear hunting grounds
shrink and their traditional way of life threatened.
Accidents are believed to be on the rise among the Far North communities as hunters fall
through thinning ice, and they are increasingly swapping their dogsleds for motor boats.
Polar bears meanwhile risk becoming extinct over the next decades as their natural habitat melts
away.
On the positive side, the shrinking ice sheet will open up two new maritime routes between the
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans off Canada and Russia, shortening shipping times considerably.
The ice melt will also open up the Arctic for oil and gas drilling.
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
________________________________________________________________________

REUTERS: Further warning on climate change UN report
4th June 2007, 17:00 WST

Global warming that is melting ice and snow will affect hundreds of millions of people around
the globe by disrupting rivers in Asia, thawing Arctic ice and raising ocean levels, a United
Nations report said today.
Glaciers from the Himalayas to the Alps are in retreat, permafrost from Alaska to Siberia is
warming and snowfalls are becoming unreliable in many regions, according to a Global Outlook
for Ice and Snow written by more than 70 experts.
The changes, widely blamed on greenhouse gases released by mankind‘s use of fossil fuels,
would be felt far from polar regions or high mountain areas, the report states.
"Fate of the world‘s snowy and icy places as a result of climate change should be cause for
concern in every ministry, boardroom and living room across the world," head of UN
Environment Program, Achim Steiner, said today.
The findings were relevant from Berlin to Brasilia and Beijing to Boston, he said.
The report states that about 40 per cent of the world‘s 6.5 billion population would be affected
by retreating glaciers in Asia - snow and ice in the Himalayas, for instance, help regulate river
flows and irrigation from China to India.




                                                                                                    19
And a one-metre rise in world sea levels, linked to expansion of the oceans as they warm and
melt from glaciers, could cause almost $AUD1.15 trillion in damage and expose 145 million
people to flooding, it said.
Oceans rose by almost 20cm last century and UN studies project a further rise of 18-59cm by
2100.
Asia would be hard hit by rising seas, especially low-lying Bangladesh, the report said.
The snow and ice report was released on the eve of World Environment Day and two days
before a June 6-8 summit by the leaders of the world‘s top eight industrial powers in Germany.
"The world cannot afford simply to discuss climate change. It has to act," Mr Steiner said.
The report also said there were big uncertainties about the fate of ice on Greenland and
Antarctica, the world‘s main stores of fresh water.


_____________________________________________________________________________

RTI: 171 pays au secours des espèces menacées

Mise en ligne le 4-6-2007 4:41

               Sondage: PS et CD&V en tête de chaque côté du pays
               Justine a rendez-vous avec Serena en quarts de finale
               La gare provisoire des Guillemins ouvre ses quais à Liège
               7.112 appels à la ligne info du PS
               La Russie menace l'Europe avec ses missiles


[Verburg] La conférence de la Convention sur le commerce international des espèces de faune
et de flore sauvages menacées d'extinction (CITES) s'est ouverte dimanche à La Haye, aux
Pays-Bas, en présence de quelque 2.500 représentants de 171 pays.

"Les enjeux sont importants. Nos décisions affecteront nos enfants et nos petits enfants partout
dans le monde", a averti lors de la cérémonie d'ouverture Gerda Verburg, ministre néerlandaise
de l'agriculture. Car "si le commerce international des espèces sauvages se fait de façon
irresponsable et illicite, cela pourrait avoir des conséquences dramatiques", a-t-elle ajouté.

[requin] Cette 14e conférence triennale, qui se tient pour la première fois dans un pays
européen, intervient "au bon moment", a-t-elle estimé, soulignant que "l'environnement et la
biodiversité étaient actuellement placées très haut dans l'agenda international".

Elle a lancé un appel au renforcement du soutien politique et financier international à la CITES
en soulignant que pour la première fois, une conférence ministérielle (des ministres de
l'environnement principalement) était prévue dans le cadre d'une conférence des Etats parties de
la CITES, le 13 juin.

"De nombreux défis doivent être relevés", a indiqué de son côté, Shafgat Kakaklhel, directeur
exécutif adjoint du Programme des Nations unies pour l'environnement (PNUE), évoquant




                                                                                                20
notamment le changement climatique. Car si la CITES n'est pas le forum d'un débat sur le
changement climatique, ce phénomène a un impact sur les espèces sauvages", a-t-il fait
remarquer.

[elephant] "J'espère que les gouvernements donneront à la CITES un soutien sans réserve et que
le secteur privé s'acquittera de ses responsabilités" dans la sauvegarde la biodiversité, a-t-il
lancé.

Au cours de cette conférence triennale prévue jusqu'au 15 juin, les délégués auront notamment à
examiner une quarantaine de propositions des Etats parties, destinées à améliorer les règles du
commerce international des espèces sauvages, éléphants, requins, orchidées et bois rares.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Tagesspiegel:Es wird verdrängt, was nicht gefällt

Der Klimawandel überfordert viele Menschen. Die Apokalypse ist langweilig geworden. Spott
statt Schock ist die Devise.

Von Dagmar Dehmer
Der Klimawandel ist eine Nummer zu groß für unseren Kopf. Deshalb wollen wir in
regelmäßigen Abständen hören, dass das Problem gar nicht so groß ist – und es schon nicht so
schlimm kommen wird. Die abenteuerlichen Thesen der Klimaskeptiker auf einem Titelblatt
dienen der seelischen Entlastung. Mit dem Bewusstsein einer großen Gefahr, die weltweite
Folgen hat, lässt es sich eben nicht gut leben. Das gilt vor allem dann, wenn unser Lebensstil
und unser Wohlstand eine wesentliche Ursache für diese globale Krise sind.

Aber der Klimawandel stellt nicht nur unsere Lebensweise in- frage. Er ist zunächst einmal ein
schwer zu lösendes intellektuelles Problem. Der Folgekette – mehr Kohlendioxid (CO2) in der
Atmosphäre führt zu einer steigenden globalen Durchschnittstemperatur – können die meisten
Menschen noch folgen. Seit dem Beginn der Industrialisierung verbrennen die Industrienationen
fossile Brennstoffe wie Erdöl, Kohle oder Erdgas. Dabei entsteht CO2. Die Konzentration des
Kohlendioxids in der Atmosphäre stieg von 280 Teilchen pro einer Million Teilchen (ppm) auf
370 ppm. Das ist mehr CO2 in der Atmosphäre als in den vergangenen 600 000 Jahren. So
lange lässt sich der CO2-Gehalt durch die Untersuchung von Eisbohrkernen zurückverfolgen.


Zum Thema
Karte: Die Folgen der globalen Erwärmung Fotostrecke: Klimawandel Dossier: Klima im
Wandel
Allerdings steigt nicht das gesamte CO2 in die Atmosphäre auf und entfaltet dort eine Wirkung
wie im Treibhaus. Beträchtliche Mengen CO2 werden durch Wälder und vor allem Ozeane
gebunden. Doch wie groß deren Aufnahmefähigkeit ist, lässt sich nur schwer abschätzen.
Wahrscheinlich werden die Meere auf längere Sicht zu einer neuen CO2-Quelle. Und dabei ist
noch nicht einmal die Wirkung von Aerosolen in der Atmosphäre – tendenziell kühlend – oder
von CO2 im Ozean – versauernd – berücksichtigt.

Das Klimageschehen in seiner ganzen Komplexität durchschaut kaum ein Einzelner. Selbst die
Klimaforscher tun sich mit einer solchen Gesamtschau schwer. Dazu kommt, dass es um
Handlungen geht, die weit in die Zukunft hineinreichen. Der Kasseler Professor für




                                                                                                 21
Umweltpsychologie, Andreas Ernst, schreibt: „Der Umgang mit beidem (Komplexität und
Zukunftswirkung) ist weder besonders erfolgreicher natürlicher Bestandteil menschlicher
Intelligenz noch schulischer Lehrpläne.― Also selbst wenn wir guten Willens sind: Es ist
schwer, den Klimawandel und seine Folgen zu verstehen.

Außerdem sind die meisten Prognosen, die sich aus den Klimamodellen ableiten lassen, eher
ungemütlich. Steigende Meeresspiegel könnten dazu führen, dass Millionenstädte wie etwa
Lagos in Nigeria einfach absaufen. Doch selbst für Hamburg wird damit gerechnet, dass einige
Stadtgebiete aufgegeben werden müssen, weil sie zu vertretbaren Kosten nicht zu sichern sein
werden. Ganze Inselstaaten im Pazifik könnten im Meer versinken, werden aber vermutlich
schon vorher unbewohnbar sein. Je höher der Meeresspiegel steigt, desto größer ist das Risiko,
dass die Süßwasserquellen versalzen, was spätestens dann passiert, wenn sie immer wieder vom
Meer überspült werden. Und ohne Wasser gibt es kein Leben – oder nur ein sehr teures, das sich
aus den jeweiligen Ökonomien wohl kaum dauerhaft finanzieren lässt.

Je ungemütlicher Orte wie die Malediven werden, desto geringer dürften die Einnahmen aus
dem Tourismus ausfallen. Andere Inselstaaten, wie etwa Tuvalu, verfügen noch nicht einmal
über diese Einkommensquelle. In den Alpen schmelzen die Gletscher in
Rekordgeschwindigkeit. Damit steigen die Risiken für die nahe gelegenen Bergdörfer. Bildet
sich ein Gletschersee aus dem Schmelzwasser, führt das nicht nur zu einem noch schnelleren
Abtauen, weil das dunkle Wasser die Sonnenstrahlen „schluckt― und nicht mehr in den
Weltraum reflektiert.

Bricht ein solcher Gletschersee, kann ein ganzes Dorf unter den Wasser- und Schlammmassen
begraben werden. Grund zum Optimismus haben nur wenige, womöglich die Seebäder an der
Ostsee, die davon träumen dürfen, die neue Riviera zu werden. Doch alles in allem sind die
Aussichten eher unerfreulich. Menschen können aber nicht dauerhaft mit einem solchen
Menetekel vor Augen leben. Sie müssen die Gefahren verdrängen. Manche verleugnen sie der
Einfachheit halber.

Es ist kein Wunder, dass nach der Veröffentlichung der drei Berichte des Weltklimarats (IPCC)
nun wieder die Stunde der „Skeptiker― – oder genauer gesagt: der Leugner – schlägt. Der IPCC
ist ein Wissenschaftlergremium, das vom Umweltprogramm der Vereinten Nationen (Unep)
und der Welt-Meteorologie-Organisation (WMO) gemeinsam gebildet wurde. Alle sechs bis
sieben Jahre legen die knapp 3000 Wissenschaftler eine Zusammenschau des aktuellen
Forschungsstands vor. Das ist in diesem Frühjahr passiert. Ihr Fazit: Es gibt keinen vernünftigen
Zweifel mehr daran, dass die gegenwärtige globale Erwärmung auf menschliches Handeln
zurückzuführen ist. Die Folgen werden ungerechterweise gerade da am verheerendsten sein, wo
das Problem nicht verursacht wurde, nämlich in den Entwicklungsländern.

Die IPCC-Autoren gehen davon aus, dass der Menschheit noch ein Zeitfenster von zehn bis
zwanzig Jahren bleibt, um umzusteuern und den Ausstoß an Treibhausgasen, vor allem CO2,
drastisch zu senken. Dann könnte der Anstieg der globalen Durchschnittstemperatur auf zwei
Grad im Vergleich zum Beginn der Industrialisierung (1750) begrenzt und damit in einem
vermutlich noch beherrschbaren Rahmen gehalten werden.

Dieser Konsens allerdings langweilt auch die Medien. Wenn sich alle einig sind, muss es doch
irgendwo eine Gegenposition geben. Und dann muss eben ein Magazintitel so zurechtgebogen
werden, dass die „Klimagewinner― im Mittelpunkt stehen oder mit hahnebüchenen Argumenten
die „Klimalüge― gegeißelt werden kann. Das hat neben der Provokation den Vorteil, dass man




                                                                                               22
es den Gutmenschen vom „linken Mainstream― mal wieder zeigen kann.

Hinzu kommt, dass Thesen dieser Art das Grundgefühl bedienen, dass die Apokalypse doch nun
schon seit Jahrzehnten vor der Tür steht, aber nie stattgefunden hat. Dass gerade wegen dieser
Warnungen ein Teil der Vorhersagen nicht eingetreten ist, weil rechtzeitig politische
Entscheidungen getroffen werden konnten und wurden – etwa beim Ozonloch – wird dabei
gerne vergessen. Andere Warnungen, wie etwa die des „Club of Rome―, dass wir an die
Grenzen des Wachstums stoßen, sind dagegen längst eingetroffen, werden aber noch nicht
unmittelbar im Alltag bemerkt. Außerdem ist es für Journalisten tatsächlich ein mühsames
Geschäft, die Windungen der internationalen Klimadiplomatie verständlich zu machen. Oftmals
ist der einzige Erfolg, dass die Staaten überhaupt noch miteinander sprechen. Das sieht nach
Papierstapeln aus, riecht nach Staub und schmeckt nach Graubrot.

Dabei ist der Befund eindeutig, inzwischen kaum noch umstritten, und er verlangt schnelles
Handeln. Doch gerade deshalb steigt die Neigung wegzusehen oder sich den Thesen der
Klimaskeptiker anzuschließen. Sie versprechen seelische Entlastung in einer nahezu
aussichtslosen Situation.

Wenn der Klimawandel als „Hysterie― abgetan werden kann, wird es wohl nicht so schlimm
kommen, denken sich viele. Dabei argumentieren sie wie der Umweltpsychologe Detlef W.
Timp aus Gelsenkirchen-Buer. Schließlich, meint er, stammen diese Prognosen doch alle aus
„irgendwelchen Modellen―. Er hat zudem den Eindruck, dass die Klimadebatte „deshalb so
hochgekocht wird, weil von anderem abgelenkt werden soll―. Verschwörungstheorien eignen
sich hervorragend zur psychischen Entlastung, weil sie stets geschlossene Systeme sind, deshalb
immer stimmen und einem selbst jede Verantwortung abnehmen. Außerdem meint Timp: „Die
Umwelt verändert sich doch ständig.― Das sei nichts Neues.

Der Leiter des Potsdam-Instituts für Klimafolgenforschung und Klimaberater von
Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel, Hans-Joachim Schellnhuber, ahnt, wohin diese Diskussion
führt: Nachdem es inzwischen eine intellektuelle Schande sei, noch zu behaupten, der Mensch
habe mit dem Klimawandel nichts zu tun, veränderten die Skeptiker einfach ihren Fokus. Sie
geben zu, dass der Mensch beim Klimawandel seine Hand im Spiel hat, bezweifeln aber, dass
das ernste Folgen haben könnte. Wenn die „Auswirkungs-Skeptiker― in vermutlich gar nicht so
ferner Zukunft konzedieren, dass sie auch die schwerwiegenden Folgen nicht mehr leugnen
können, werden sie schließlich zu „Maßnahmen-Skeptikern― mutieren, vermutet Schellnhuber.
„Dann wird es heißen: Jetzt ist es viel zu spät – und natürlich auch zu teuer –, um noch
drastische Maßnahmen zur Minderung der Treibhausgase einzuleiten.― Oder wie Detlef W.
Timp das formuliert: „Wenn es wirklich nur noch 20 Jahre sind, dann ist der Zug abgefahren.―

Der Umweltpsychologe Andreas Ernst meint, dass „Überoptimismus und Kontrollillusion
vermutlich zu den wichtigen psychohygienischen Ausstattungsmerkmalen psychisch Gesunder―
zählen. „Je komplizierter es wird, desto mehr neigen wir aus Selbstschutz dazu, die Dinge
einfach sehen zu wollen.― Genau deshalb ist die Argumentation der Klimaskeptiker destruktiv.
„Jeder mühsame Überzeugungsprozess kostet uns ein Jahrzehnt. Und irgendwann ist es
tatsächlich zu spät für wirksamen Klimaschutz―, sagt Schellnhuber. Ernst meint: „Wenn die
besten Klimaforscher der Welt einen Konsens in der Beurteilung finden, hat das doch ein
gewisses Gewicht.―

Warum dennoch nicht überall die Notwendigkeit erkannt wird zu handeln, beschreibt Ernst so:
Die Kosten und der Nutzen sind ungleich über Personengruppen oder auch Staatengruppen




                                                                                             23
verteilt. Wenn Ressourcen, wie Erdöl, genutzt werden, bringt das einen unmittelbaren
wirtschaftlichen Nutzen. Den wirtschaftlichen Schaden durch das sich ändernde Klima hat aber
eine andere, womöglich weit entfernte Region. Auf den ersten Blick ist es also günstiger, sich
weiterhin klimaschädlich zu verhalten. Zumal dann nicht darüber diskutiert werden muss, ob
der westliche Lebensstil nicht die Ressourcen der Erde dramatisch übernutzt – was noch dazu
ungerecht gegenüber den Menschen in Entwicklungsländern ist.

Am vehementesten verweigern sich die USA unter ihrem Präsidenten George W. Bush dieser
Diskussion. Und damit blockiert Bush erfolgreich jeden Fortschritt bei den
Klimaverhandlungen, daran ändert auch seine jüngste Initiative nichts. Und wenn der größte
Verursacher des Klimawandels nicht dazu bereit ist, für sein Handeln Verantwortung zu
übernehmen, dann sehen aufstrebende Schwellenländer wie China oder Indien keinerlei
Veranlassung, sich selbst anders zu verhalten.

Doch da der Klimawandel ein globales Problem ist, letztlich also alle treffen wird, sind die
Entwicklungsländer zum ersten Mal in der strategisch günstigen Position, dass ihr
Gerechtigkeitsargument nicht abgetan werden kann. Wenn bei einer Lösung für das
Klimaproblem das Gerechtigkeitsgefälle nicht mit angegangen wird, werden sich die
Entwicklungsländer einfach weigern, ihren Ausstoß an Treibhausgasen zu begrenzen. Dass sie
die Ersten sein werden, die unter den Folgen zu leiden haben, ist zwar richtig. Aber das Gefühl,
endlich einmal Macht über die Industriestaaten zu haben, die ohne sie das Klimaproblem nicht
in den Griff bekommen werden, entschädigt womöglich für vieles.

Andreas Ernst sagt: „Es ist eine absolut vertrackte Situation.― Zum ersten Mal stimmt die
Diagnose, dass wir in einem globalen Dorf leben und alle voneinander abhängig sind, wirklich.
Diese Überkomplexität der Verhandlungen macht es erst recht schwierig, im verbleibenden
Handlungsfenster die Entscheidungen zu treffen, die nötig sind. Das wird nur möglich sein,
wenn die Staatschefs ihre kurzfristigen Interessen beiseite legen und einen Blick auf das große
Ganze werfen. Allerdings besteht die Gefahr, dass das große Ganze schlicht zu groß ist für die
Köpfe der derzeit Herrschenden. Es ist das erste Mal in der Geschichte der Menschheit, dass
eine Generation eine Lösung für ein globales Problem finden muss, das Folgen für jeden
Einzelnen haben kann. Dazu braucht es ein hohes Maß an intellektueller Redlichkeit,
menschlicher Größe und die Bereitschaft, Verantwortung zu übernehmen. Es wäre ein Wunder,
wenn wir ein solches Schauspiel schon beim Gipfel der sieben wichtigsten Industrienationen
und Russland (G 8) in Heiligendamm erleben dürften.
____________________________________________________________________________

Reuters: UN urges protection of animals from climate change

03 Jun 2007 17:14:01 GMT
Source: Reuters
By Anna Mudeva

THE HAGUE, June 3 (Reuters) - A senior United Nations official urged a 171-nation U.N.
wildlife forum on Sunday to take action to help protect animals from climate change.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will also discuss
measures at its two week-week meeting to help commercially valuable animal and tree species
threatened by over-use.




                                                                                               24
A U.N. report has said human activities were wiping out three animal or plant species every
hour and has urged the world to do more to slow the worst spate of extinctions since the
dinosaurs by 2010.

Global warming, blamed mainly on human use of fossil fuels, is widely expected to add to
existing threats and wreck habitats like the Amazon rain forest.

"CITES is not a forum for discussing climate change but decisions taken here do have an impact
on species in a climatically challenged world," Shafgat Kakaklhel, deputy head of the U.N.
Environment Programme, told the opening session.

"We will need robust species populations if they are to survive rising temperatures and more
extremes," he said.

RAPID DEPLETION

Many of the 37 proposals to be discussed at the meeting in The Hague reflect growing concern
about rapid depletion of marine and forest resources.

Commercially valuable species like the spiny dogfish, the porbeagle shark and the European eel
-- all threatened by over-use -- feature high on the agenda.

The focus will also be on coral jewellery, wooden musical instruments and furniture.
Threatened species like pink or red coral and rosewood and cedar trees are facing tighter trade
regulations.

Elephants are expected to trigger heated debate. African countries are split over the protection
of the elephant, with some saying elephant populations have grown at an unsustainable rate.

CITES is widely credited with stemming the slaughter of the African elephant by imposing a
ban on the international ivory trade in 1989.

But scientists say the killing of elephants for their tusks, mainly in central Africa, has reached
levels not seen since 1989 because of Asian-run crime syndicates.

The talks will also help shape the future of CITES, which has banned trade in 530 animal
species and more than 300 plant species.

CITES also regulates trade in 4,460 animal species and 28,000 plant species.




===================================================================




                                                                                                     25
                                   Other Environment News

____________________________________________________________________________

Christian Science Monitor: Climate debate heats up G-8


President Bush's new global warming plan greeted with skepticism at this week's world summit
in Germany.
By Peter N. Spotts | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor
and Mariah Blake | Contributor to The Christian Science Monitor

This week's meeting of the world's eight top economic powers is set to become a battle over
whether future efforts to combat global warming will continue to require binding international
commitments or turn the clock back to 1992, when nations agreed to a less rigorous approach
that the international community has long since rejected as ineffective.

The choice came into stark relief with President Bush's May 31 call to build a new international
framework for action on global warming. The framework would shape efforts to reduce
greenhouse-gas emissions after 2012, when the 1997 Kyoto Protocol's first five-year
commitment period ends.

Under Mr. Bush's plan, the United States would gather leaders of 15 developed and developing
nations that are the leading emitters of heat-trapping gases and the largest consumers of energy.
Their objective: Develop a long-term emissions-reduction goal that, according to administration
officials, is "aspirational" rather than binding. Countries would then develop their own sets of
internal programs to achieve the overall goal.

Bush unveiled the plan on the eve of this year's Group of 8 summit, set to start Wednesday in
Heiligendamm, Germany. German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who will chair the meeting, has
put out drafts of a final communiqué that commit G-8 members to doing their "fair share" to
reach specific emissions goals by 2050.

Her effort is driven in no small part by three recent reports on global warming, its effects, and
strategies for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases – mainly carbon dioxide from burning
fossil fuel. The reports, which aim to inform policymakers as they craft ways to reduce human
influence on climate, were issued earlier this year by the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

During the run-up to the G-8 meeting, the Bush administration has come under intense criticism
from environmental groups and some European officials. The White House rejected the
wording of large sections of the draft's climate provisions. It argued that the offending elements
run counter to Bush's policy on dealing with global warming.

For example, Washington's proposed changes to the draft G-8 document virtually wipe out any
reference to various emissions-reduction goals by 2050 or an objective of trying to hold global
average temperature increases to about 2 degrees C. These are based on IPCC projections of
possible emissions trends and approaches that could avoid what the UN agreements refer to as
"dangerous human-made influence on climate."




                                                                                                    26
It would now appear that the White House may have been trying to adjust the draft communiqué
text in ways that brought it into closer conformity with the plan Washington was preparing to
announce. The White House has long rejected mandatory targets and timetables.

Fewer friends in US's corner

Either way, some analysts say, the Bush plan is merely trying to defuse the barrage of criticism
aimed its way.

"This is a transparent effort to divert attention from the president's refusal to accept any
emissions-reductions proposals at [the] G-8 summit," says Philip Clapp, head of the National
Environmental Trust in Washington. "The White House is just trying to hide the fact that the
president is completely isolated among the G-8 leaders by calling vaguely for some agreement
next year, right before he leaves office."

As if to underscore that isolation, long-time Bush ally on climate, Australian Prime Minister
John Howard, announced over the weekend that his country would set an emissions target next
year and set up a carbon-trading system by 2012 to help achieve it. Both approaches have been
anathema to the White House.

Others suggest the White House is attempting an end-run around any United Nations-based
process for dealing with climate. Sigmar Gabriel, the German environment minister, said Friday
that the G-8 should not allow the Bush plan to become "a Trojan horse to get past
Heiligendamm and basically torpedo the international climate-protection process."

Some, though, say Washington's approach in the end may help prod a ponderous UN process.
While setting an "aspirational" goal might seem out of touch with calls for binding
commitments, environmental treaties often set a broad goal, which is turned into action through
each country's process of ratification and enacting enabling legislation, said James
Connaughton, head of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, at a May 31 press
briefing. Citing fisheries agreements as an example, he noted that, "You agree on goals in the
international process [and] you implement them through national strategies that include binding
measures."

Such an approach could be attractive to rapidly growing countries such as India and China,
which say binding commitments could unfairly place a drag on their economic growth. Both the
Kyoto Protocol and its parent document, the 1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change,
acknowledge that developed countries have a responsibility to move first on global warming.
Since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, the cumulative emissions these countries have
pumped into the air are responsible for rising global average temperatures, scientists say.

But all parties agree that for emissions controls to be truly effective, countries such as China,
India, and Brazil must be brought into the process. Beijing is slated to release on Monday its
own climate-change strategy in advance of attending the G-8 meeting as an observer.

"The acid test of Heiligendamm will be getting the unconstrained powers to commit" beyond
2012, says John Kirton, director of the G-8 Research Group at the University of Toronto. "They
don't have to define the nature of the post-Kyoto regime, but it is fundamentally important that
they agree to do something."

The flexibility of the US proposal, he suggests, "is more to bring the unconstrained on board."




                                                                                                    27
Some US specifics

While some have complained that the US plan is vague, it has one very specific target – the 18-
month time frame for coming up with provisions that are more specific, Mr. Kirton says. This is
key because Bush will still be president then, he says. In his view Bush is not, as some
observers see it, stalling until he is out of office.

The Bush administration is not alone in its thinking. In 2005, the nonpartisan Pew Center on
Global Climate Change published recommendations for making progress toward a post-Kyoto
2012 agreement. The report was based on discussions the group had with government and
business representatives from 15 countries, including the leading emitters.

Among the options the group outlined: setting up an informal dialogue to develop a consensus
on what to do beyond 2012 and allowing countries to take different tacks to meeting binding
commitments. Both are reflected in the Bush plan.

But the plan also differs in at least two key aspects, notes Elliot Diringer, Pew's director of
international strategies. Unlike the Bush strategy, he says, diverse approaches must be part of "a
system of commitments" through an overarching international agreement. "You allow for
different types of commitments, but they need to be commitments," he says. The Bush plan, at
least in its current form, remains only a voluntary one where it matters most, he continues.
"We've tried the voluntary approach here at home and internationally, and it hasn't worked," he
says.And while the president's proposal focuses on medium- and long-term goals, near-term
goals are vital, too, Mr. Diringer says. "For this administration, this new plan is a step forward.
But it falls well short of what's needed." Still, some European analysts see reason for hope in the
Bush plan."There was a stalemate just a few days ago because Bush was saying, 'I can't agree to
most of the terms of the proposal on the table.' Now he is acknowledging that there is a need for
long-term targets, that he takes the whole climate problem seriously, and that he is willing to
work with other countries do something about it," says Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, director of
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and a key adviser to Chancellor Merkel on
environmental issues. "We are all in the run-up to a really new regime, and if that regime is
tailored by the Americans, that would be most welcome."

_____________________________________________________________________________


The Independent: Blair calls for climate change action

By Colin Brown, Deputy Political Editor
Published: 04 June 2007
Tony Blair told leaders attending the G8 in Germany that time was slipping away for a deal on
climate change, warning: "Now is the time to act."
The Prime Minister said he remained "hopeful of progress" at the G8 but senior British sources
fear the call by President Bush to hold a separate conference in 2008 will leave the world on
hold until then.
Barely concealing his frustration at the failure to gain a deal to replace Kyoto agreement before
he steps down from office, Mr Blair put the best gloss on the summit but admitted the world
leaders needed to "go further" in agreeing targets for cutting harmful CO2 emissions by 2050.




                                                                                                28
After flying to Berlin for last-minute talks with Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, Mr
Blair said: "I think it is good the United States is committed to being part of a global agreement,
and has committed to the goal of a substantial reduction in emissions.
"These are commitments that have not been made before. However, we need to go further. We
need to make sure we set a clear global target." He said the G8 needed to make sure they could
follow that with a global agreement within the UN framework and set out how they would meet
the target.
"Yes, there is still a long way to go but, three or four years ago, we were not anywhere near this
stage. As ever in politics, we have to say it is good there has been progress and then challenge
for further progress."
Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth accused President Bush of wrecking the G8 summit by his
call on 15 of the world's biggest polluting countries, including China and India, to agree on a
target for reducing greenhouse gases by the end of 2008. Mr Blair is keen to avoid a rift with the
White House but British ministers are growing increasingly critical about the Bush
administration's refusal to co-operate with the G8 next week in setting targets for tackling
climate change.
In a speech to the Globe organisation in the Bundestag parliament building in Berlin, Mr Blair
said there was now an "overwhelming consensus" that human activity was altering the world's
climate.
And he warned: "We have to make quicker and bolder progress if we are to respond to the scale
of the threat we face and the consequences if we fail to act. The science tells us time is running
out...
"Given the evidence, given the scale of the disaster should that evidence be correct, it would be
grossly, unforgivably irresponsible not to act.We now must move quickly."
Mr Blair also briefed Mrs Merkel on his four-day visit to Africa last week, when he heard
appeals from the continent's leaders for the rich world to make good on promises to double aid
and write off debts made at the G8 summit at Gleneagles in 2005.
________________________________________________________________________

The Guardian :Brazil rejects Bush move on climate change talks

John Vidal and Julian Borger
Monday June 4, 2007

 Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, has flatly rejected President Bush's proposals for
parallel global negotiations to combat climate change, insisting that countries come to
agreement at the United Nations, and not under US leadership.

In a rare interview with a British newspaper, President Lula told the Guardian that Brazil, a fast
developing country whose support is critical to a global deal on emission cuts, had not even
been informed that Mr Bush was contemplating a new negotiating framework, before the US
president made his announcement last Thursday.
"The Brazilian position is clear cut," Mr Lula said. "I cannot accept the idea that we have to
build another group to discuss the same issues that were discussed in Kyoto and not fulfilled.




                                                                                                    29
"If you have a multilateral forum [the UN] that makes a democratic decision ... then we should
work to abide by those rules [rather than] simply to say that I do not agree with Kyoto and that I
will develop another institution," said Mr Lula, who was in London to watch Friday's England-
Brazil international football friendly.
The Bush administration has sought to cultivate President Lula as an ally, seeing the former
trade unionist as a centre-left alternative in Latin America to the more radical anti-American
socialism espoused by Cuba's Fidel Castro and Venezuela's Hugo Chavez. Presidents Bush and
Lula also share an enthusiasm for the potential for "bio-fuels" made from plants as a substitute
for fossil fuels.
However, on overall climate change policy, President Lula was dismissive of the Bush
approach, calling it "voluntarism", meaning a reliance on "coalitions of the willing" rather than
establish global institutions and the pursuit of voluntary goals rather than binding commitments.
"We cannot let voluntarism override multilateralism," he said.
President Bush said last week that he wanted Brazil and other rapidly developing countries to
join rich nations in what he called a "new framework" to curb greenhouse gas emissions as an
alternative to the planned UN process. He said that later this year he would convene a series of
meetings of the 15 nations that produced most greenhouse gas emissions.
But Mr Lula, Brazil's president since 2003, rebuked Mr Bush for seemingly sidestepping the
UN and not taking its global responsibilities seriously. "I am open-minded about talking to
President Bush ... I will never refuse to discuss any idea, but we should respect the decisions
made in the multilateral forums. It is the only thing we have all agreed on in a democratic way,"
he said. "If the US is the country that most contributes with greenhouse gases, in the world, it
should assume more responsibility to reduce emissions."
The German hosts of this week's G8 summit at Heiligendamm have also flatly rejected the idea
of creating a separate process to deal with climate change. Chancellor Angela Merkel called it
"non-negotiable". Tony Blair has been a lonely voice on the world stage, hailing the Bush plan
as an "important step forward".
President Lula will be one of five leaders of rapidly developing countries to join the G8 leaders
in Germany, where he will champion Brazil's global leadership in the use of plant-derived
ethanol for fuel.
His promotion of bio-fuels has brought criticism from Mr Chavez, the continent's leading oil
producer and Castro, who has argued that growing bio-fuels is equivalent to taking food crops
from the mouths of the poor and putting it in the petrol tanks of the wealthy.
Mr Lula picked his words on his fellow presidents carefully. "Its normal that those countries
that have oil feel a bit strange about this idea of bio-fuels," he said, but he suggested it was time
for the Latin American left to move beyond its instinctive anti-Americanism. "A long time ago I
learned not to put the blame for backwardness in Brazil on the US," he said. "We have to blame
ourselves. Our backwardness is caused by an elite which for a century didn't think about the
majority and subordinated itself to foreign interests."
Asked about the global legacy left by the Tony Blair, who has highlighted his own efforts to
improve aid and trade conditions for developing countries, President Lula had little to say. "I
didn't have much contact with prime minister Tony Blair," he noted.




                                                                                                   30
President Lula said the decisive moment in the current "Doha round" of talks would come in the
next few weeks, with the G8 summit at a trade ministers' meeting due in mid-June.
"I think that this month something has to happen. If nothing happens, we will go into history as
a generation of politicians that failed humanity, especially the poor," the president said. "If there
is no agreement on Doha round, it's useless to talk about fighting terrorism, its useless to fight
organised crime because poverty is the principal seed for the growth of terrorism."
The only more important issue in the world than trade, President Lula said, is climate change,
and both are nearing a potential turning point.
"In the Doha round, I want to solve the issues of today and tomorrow," the Brazilian leader said.
"On the climate issue I have to solve the problem of planet earth, the only one we know of on
which we can survive ... So for God's sake, let's take care of planet earth."
_____________________________________________________________________________

BBC: China unveils climate change plan

China has unveiled its first national plan for climate change, saying it is intent on tackling the
problem but not at the expense of economic development.
The 62-page report reiterated China's aim to reduce energy use by a fifth before 2010 and
increase the amount of renewable energy it produces.
But it also repeated Beijing's view that responsibility for climate change rests with rich
westernised countries.
The report comes ahead of a G8 meeting that will focus on global warming.
Germany, which is hosting the meeting of industrialised nations, is calling for a new UN
protocol on climate change to replace the Kyoto pact when it expires in 2012.
China's role in the debate is crucial, as it is expected to overtake the US this year as the world's
biggest emitter of greenhouse gases.

'Trailblazer'
China's new national plan on climate change offered few new targets on reducing greenhouse
gas emissions, but outlined how it intended to meet the goals it has already set, analysts say.
This includes the use of more wind, nuclear and hydro power as well as making coal-fired
plants more efficient, the document outlined.
But it also stressed that the country's first priority remained "sustainable development and
poverty eradication".
"China is a developing country. Although we do not have the obligation to cut emissions, it does
not mean we do not want to shoulder our share of responsibilities," Ma Kai, chairman of China's
National Development and Reform Commission, said.
"We must reconcile the need for development with the need for environmental protection," he
said, adding that China wanted to "blaze a new path to industrialisation".




                                                                                                     31
He said rich countries were responsible for most of the greenhouse gases produced over the past
century, and had an "unshirkable responsibility" to do more to tackle the problem.
"The international community should respect the developing countries' right to develop," he
added.
The plan is a strong declaration of intentions, but so far China has missed almost every
environmental target it has set itself, the BBC's Quentin Sommerville in Shanghai says.

Political debate
Climate change is expected to be fiercely debated when China's President Hu Jintao and other
industrialised leaders meet in Germany for the G8 on Wednesday.
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has urged them to agree firm targets for cutting polluting
emissions.
In a BBC interview, he said it was now up to the richest countries to show leadership on the
issue.
"It will be tragic if we don't take any action," he said. "My main message is that to galvanise
this political will at the leaders level so that we can take necessary action."
The UN secretary-general has made tackling climate change one of his top priorities, and called
for a meeting of world leaders on the subject in September.
He wants the UN to be in the lead when it comes to agreeing what should replace the Kyoto
Protocol, the current agreement curbing greenhouse gases, when it expires in 2012.
US President George W Bush - whose country is the only industrialised nation apart from
Australia not to ratify the protocol - has proposed uniting a group of big emitters who would set
non-binding targets by the end of next year.
But some analysts say this has been interpreted as a way of undercutting other initiatives - for
example by the G8 or United Nations.
_____________________________________________________________________________

Environment News Service: Earth’s Climate Approaches Dangerous Tipping Point
NEW YORK, New York, June 1, 2007 (ENS) - A stern warning that global warming is
nearing an irreversible tipping point was issued today by the climate scientist who the Bush
administration has tried to muzzle.
James Hansen, director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, today
published a study showing that greenhouse gases emitted by human activities have brought the
Earth‘s climate close to critical tipping points, with potentially dangerous consequences for the
planet.
"If global emissions of carbon dioxide continue to rise at the rate of the past decade," said Dr.
Hansen, "this research shows that there will be disastrous effects, including increasingly rapid
sea level rise, increased frequency of droughts and floods, and increased stress on wildlife and
plants due to rapidly shifting climate zones."




                                                                                                    32
Tipping points can occur during climate change when the climate reaches a state such that
strong amplifying feedbacks are activated by only moderate additional warming.

Dr. Hansen has said in the past that a global tipping point will be reached by 2016 if levels of
greenhouse gases like methane and carbon dioxide are not reduced.
This study finds that global warming of 0.6ºC in the past 30 years has been driven mainly by
increasing greenhouse gases and only moderate additional climate forcing is likely to set in
motion disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet and Arctic sea ice.
Amplifying feedbacks include increased absorption of sunlight as melting exposes darker
surfaces and speedup of iceberg discharge as the warming ocean melts ice shelves that
otherwise inhibit ice flow.
The research appears in the current issue of "Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics."
In January 2006, Dr. Hansen said that officials at NASA headquarters had ordered the public
affairs staff to review his coming lectures, papers, postings on the Goddard website and requests
for interviews from journalists.
Dr. Hansen said he would decline to adhere to the restrictions. NASA officials said its scientists
were free to discuss science but not policy issues.
In March 2007, Hansen told the House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and
Government Reform, "The effect of the filtering of climate change science during the current
administration has been to make the reality of climate change less certain than the facts indicate,
and to reduce concern about the relation of climate change to human-made greenhouse gas
emissions."
From a combination of climate models, satellite data, and paleoclimate records, Hansen and co-
author Makiko Sato of Columbia‘s Earth Institute, conclude that the West Antarctic ice sheet,
Arctic ice cover, and regions providing fresh water sources and species habitat are threatened
from continued global warming.

The researchers used data on earlier warm periods in Earth‘s history to estimate climate impacts
as a function of global temperature,
They used climate models to simulate global warming, and satellite data to verify ongoing
changes.
The researchers also investigated what would be needed to avert large climate change, thus
helping define practical implications of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change.
That treaty, signed in 1992 by the United States and almost all nations of the world, aims to
stabilize atmospheric greenhouse gases "at a level that prevents dangerous human-made
interference with the climate system."
Based on climate model studies and the history of the Earth, the Hansen and Sato conclude that
additional global warming of about 1ºC (1.8ºF) or more, above global temperature in 2000, is
likely to be dangerous.




                                                                                                   33
In turn, the temperature limit has implications for atmospheric carbon dioxide, CO2, which has
already increased from the pre-industrial level of 280 parts per million, ppm, to 383 ppm today
and is rising by about two ppm per year.
Sato said, "The temperature limit implies that CO2 exceeding 450 ppm is almost surely
dangerous, and the ceiling may be even lower."
The study also shows that the reduction of non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases such as
methane and black soot can offset some of the increase in carbon dioxide, but only to a limited
extent.
Hansen today urged immediate action to limit climate change. "We probably need a full court
press on both CO2 emission rates and non-CO2 forcings, to avoid tipping points and save Arctic
sea ice and the West Antarctic ice sheet," he said.

In climate science, radiative forcing is loosely defined as the difference between the incoming
radiation energy and the outgoing radiation energy in a given climate system.
A positive forcing, with more incoming energy, tends to warm the system, while a negative
forcing, with more outgoing energy, tends to cool it.
A computer model developed by the Goddard Institute was used to simulate climate from 1880
through today. The model included a more comprehensive set of natural and human-made
climate forcings than previous studies, including changes in solar radiation, volcanic particles,
human-made greenhouse gases, fine particles such as soot, the effect of the particles on clouds
and land use.
Extensive evaluation of the model‘s ability to simulate climate change is contained in a
companion paper to be published in the journal "Climate Dynamics."
The authors use the model for climate simulations of the 21st century using both ‗business-as-
usual‘ growth of greenhouse gas emissions and an alternative scenario in which emissions
decrease slowly in the next few decades and then rapidly to achieve stabilization of atmospheric
CO2 amount by the end of the century.
Climate changes are so large with the business-as-usual scenario, that Hansen concludes
"business-as-usual would be a guarantee of global and regional disasters."
The business-as-usual scenario specifies additional global warming of 2 to 3ºC (3.6 to 5.4ºF).
But the study finds one-quarter to one-third less severe climate change when greenhouse gas
emissions follow the alternative scenario.
"Climate effects may still be substantial in the alternative scenario, but there is a better chance
to adapt to the changes and find other ways to further reduce the climate change,‖ said Sato.
While the scientists say it is still possible to achieve the alternative scenario, they warn that
significant actions will be required to do so.
Emissions must begin to slow soon. "With another decade of business-as-usual," says Hansen,
"it becomes impractical to achieve the alternative scenario because of the energy infrastructure
that would be in place."
Dr. Hansen, 65, is a physicist who joined NASA in 1967. Since the 1970s he has worked on
computer simulations of the Earth‘s climate in a effort to understand humanity‘s impact upon it.




                                                                                                      34
________________________________________________________________________

Reuters: Bush Climate Plan "The Classic US Line" - EU

BELGIUM: June 4, 2007

BRUSSELS - President George W. Bush's plan to tackle climate change merely restates US
policy which has been ineffective in the past in cutting emissions blamed for global warming,
the EU's environment chief said on Friday.

"The declaration by President Bush basically restates the US classic line on climate change -- no
mandatory reductions, no carbon trading and vaguely expressed objectives," EU Environment
Commissioner Stavros Dimas said, according to his spokeswoman.
"The US approach has proven to be ineffective in reducing emissions," Dimas added of Bush's
call on Thursday for 15 major countries to agree by 2008 on a long-term goal for cutting
emissions.
European Commission President Jose Manual Barroso and German Chancellor Angela Merkel
had emphasised that Bush's announcement did at least create more opportunities for dialogue,
he said, adding that there was growing bipartisan support within the United States for a cap-and-
trade system.
"Mandatory reductions, carbon trading and specific commitment and timetables have allowed
the EU to reduce its emissions by 1.5 percent in 2005 under the 1990 levels, while the US has
increased them by more than 16 percent in the same period," Dimas had said.
He expected a "tight and lively European trading market to continue beyond 2012", Dimas'
spokeswoman quoted him as saying.

REUTERS NEWS SERVICE
_____________________________________________________________________________

AFP: Brazilian president rejects US climate change plans


Mon Jun 4, 12:21 AM ET
LONDON (AFP) - Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva rejected the call by his US
counterpart George W. Bush for countries to sign up to US-led proposals on climate change, in
an interview published Monday.


Though Brazil is considered a key American partner in South America -- with Lula a centre-left
counterweight to the anti-American socialism espoused by President Hugo Chavez in
neighbouring Venezuela -- Lula said Brasilia was not informed that Washington was
considering a new negotiating framework ahead of Bush's announcement Thursday.
"The Brazilian position is clear cut," Lula told the daily.




                                                                                                35
"I cannot accept the idea that we have to build another group to discuss the same issues that
were discussed in Kyoto and not fulfilled.
"If you have a multilateral forum (the UN) that makes a democratic decision... then we should
work to abide by those rules (rather than) simply to say that I do not agree with Kyoto and that I
will develop another institution."
He branded Bush's approach as "voluntarism," relying on "coalitions of the willing" pursuing
voluntary goals rather than binding commitments hammered out in global institutions.
"We cannot let voluntarism override multilateralism," he said.
Bush said Thursday he will urge major industrial nations at the G8 summit to join a new global
framework for fighting climate change once the Kyoto Protocol lapses.
The three-day summit of the Group of Eight powers, in Heiligendamm on the German Baltic
coast, kicks off Wednesday.
It brings together the leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia and the
United States. Five rapidly developing major economies -- Brazil, China, India, Mexico and
South Africa -- are also invited as part of a wider grouping.
Lula rebuked Bush for seemingly sidestepping the UN and not taking its global responsibilities
more seriously.
But he insisted he remained open-minded about talking to Bush.
"I will never refuse to discuss any idea, but we should respect the decisions made in the
multilateral forums. It is the only thing we have all agreed on in a democratic way," Lula said.
"If the US is the country that most contributes with greenhouse gases, in the world, it should
assume more responsibility to reduce emissions.
Meanwhile, on world trade talks, Lula said the Doha round of discussions were coming to a
head.
"I think that this month something has to happen. If nothing happens, we will go into history as
a generation of politicians that failed humanity, especially the poor," he said.
"If there is no agreement on (the) Doha round, it's useless to talk about fighting terrorism, its
useless to fight organised crime because poverty is the principal seed for the growth of
terrorism."

_____________________________________________________________________________

Reuters: UN Urges Protection of Animals From Climate Change

NETHERLANDS: June 4, 2007


THE HAGUE - A senior United Nations official urged a 171-nation UN wildlife forum on
Sunday to take action to help protect animals from climate change.




                                                                                                    36
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will also discuss
measures at its two week-week meeting to help commercially valuable animal and tree species
threatened by over-use.

A UN report has said human activities were wiping out three animal or plant species every hour
and has urged the world to do more to slow the worst spate of extinctions since the dinosaurs by
2010.

Global warming, blamed mainly on human use of fossil fuels, is widely expected to add to
existing threats and wreck habitats like the Amazon rain forest.

"CITES is not a forum for discussing climate change but decisions taken here do have an impact
on species in a climatically challenged world," Shafgat Kakaklhel, deputy head of the UN
Environment Programme, told the opening session.

"We will need robust species populations if they are to survive rising temperatures and more
extremes," he said.


RAPID DEPLETION

Many of the 37 proposals to be discussed at the meeting in The Hague reflect growing concern
about rapid depletion of marine and forest resources.

Commercially valuable species like the spiny dogfish, the porbeagle shark and the European eel
-- all threatened by over-use -- feature high on the agenda.

The focus will also be on coral jewellery, wooden musical instruments and furniture.
Threatened species like pink or red coral and rosewood and cedar trees are facing tighter trade
regulations.

Elephants are expected to trigger heated debate. African countries are split over the protection
of the elephant, with some saying elephant populations have grown at an unsustainable rate.

CITES is widely credited with stemming the slaughter of the African elephant by imposing a
ban on the international ivory trade in 1989.

But scientists say the killing of elephants for their tusks, mainly in central Africa, has reached
levels not seen since 1989 because of Asian-run crime syndicates.

The talks will also help shape the future of CITES, which has banned trade in 530 animal
species and more than 300 plant species.

CITES also regulates trade in 4,460 animal species and 28,000 plant species.


Story by Anna Mudeva
________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                                     37
Antara News:Indonesia`s forests threatened by logging, palm oil

Jakarta (ANTARA News) - It's one of the few countries that still has vast swathes of tropical
rainforests left.

But conservationists say maybe not for long.

Indonesia's rainforests -- especially those on Borneo island -- are being stripped so rapidly
because of illegal logging and palm oil plantations for bio-fuels, they could be wiped out
altogether within the next 15 years, some environmentalists say.

"Sixty percent of the protected and conservation areas are already badly damaged due to illegal
logging and palm oil plantations," Rully Sumada, a forestry expert with Indonesian
environmental group Walhi, told Reuters.

"The deforestation speed is 2.8 million hectares a year. At this rate, by 2012 the forests in
Sumatra, Borneo and Sulawesi will be gone, only the forests in Papua will be left. And if cutting
of trees carries on, no forest will be left by 2022."

Indonesia has a total forest area of more than 225 million acres (91 million hectares), or about
10 percent of the world's remaining tropical forest, according to Rainforestweb.org, a portal on
rainforests (www.rainforestweb.org).

But the tropical Southeast Asian country -- whose forests are a treasure trove of plant and
animal species including the endangered orangutans -- has already lost an estimated 72 percent
of its original frontier forest.

The biggest threat to the forests of Borneo, and also Aceh on the northernmost tip of Sumatra
island, is from illegal logging.

A recent report by the Environmental Investigation Agency and Indonesia-based Telapak said
that Malaysia and China were major recipients of stolen Indonesian timber and that shipping
companies from Singapore carried such wood overseas.


China industry complicit

Greenpeace's China office said China's timber industry was complicit in the illegal felling of
Indonesia and Papua New Guinea's merbau trees, with logs then smuggled to China and
processed and exported as floorboards and high-end furnishings to the United States, Canada,
Australia and Europe.

Merbau is a resilient red hardwood, one of the most valuable in Southeast Asia.

China's Foreign Ministry brushed away accusations that the country's demand for timber was
hastening the destruction of Southeast Asian forests, saying it had a strict system of supervision
and management of timber and timber product
imports."




                                                                                                 38
"The effects of deforestation are crystal clear.

Bio-diversity will be destroyed," Masnellyarti Hilman, a deputy minister in Indonesia's
environment ministry, told Reuters.

"Not to mention floods, landslides. We see them as a result of massive deforestation by people
who do not care about its impact. Although they actually know that one of the conditions to
fulfil before cutting trees down is to re-plant, some do,
some don't."


Orangutans in peril

Environmentalists say Indonesia has also lost vast amounts of forest land to feed growing global
demand for bio-fuels as an alternative source of energy.

The world's second largest palm oil producer already has around 5 million hectares of land
planted with oil palm and the government aims to develop between 2-3 million hectares more of
oil plantations nationwide by 2010.

Environmentalists say the slash-and-burn technique used to speed up the clearing of land for
plantations sends huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and is also destroying
several endangered species such as the orangutan and the Sumatran tiger.

According to a recent U.N report compiled using new satellite images and Indonesian
government data, orangutan habitat is being lost 30 percent quicker than was previously feared.

It was estimated in 2002 about 60,000 of the shaggy ginger primates were left in the jungles of
Borneo and Sumatra. Some ecologists say the number has now been halved and others say the
species could be extinct in 20 years.

Indonesia says government policy is to preserve virgin forest and expand palm plantations on
degraded and abandoned land that has already been cleared.

Indonesia's government has deployed the military on at least three occasions in recent years to
confiscate timber and chase loggers out of its parks -- and has begun training quick response
ranger teams to police protected areas.

But experts say the new units remain crippled by a lack of funds, vehicles, weapons and
equipment, and face a huge threat from ruthless loggers.

"We allow people to open palm oil plantations as long as they replant. Palm oil plantations open
a wide range of jobs but they must not do that in conservation areas," Hilman said.

The palm oil industry defends itself and its methods.

"If there are some endangered species in the area or an area is of high conservation value, then it
will not be opened for plantations," Derom Bangun, executive chairman of the Indonesian Palm
Oil Producers Association, told Reuters.




                                                                                                  39
"The government has classified areas and has rules and we obey them. It is not what people
from outside think that we burn." (*)
________________________________________________________________________
Environment News Service: Louisiana Lawmakers Approve Historic Hurricane
Protection Plan
BATON ROUGE, Louisiana, June 1, 2007 (ENS) - The Louisiana Legislature has
unanimously approved the state's first comprehensive master plan for coastal restoration and
hurricane protection. Passed Wednesday, just ahead of an Atlantic hurricane season forecast to
be unusually active, the plan is designed to guide all coastal protection and wetland restoration
projects in Louisiana over the next several decades.
Entitled, "Integrated Ecosystem Restoration and Hurricane Protection: Louisiana's
Comprehensive Master Plan for a Sustainable Coast," the plan is the result of more than 18
months of extensive research, writing, planning and public discussion.

"As we begin the 2007 Hurricane Season, this first master plan stands as a testament to our
resolve, incorporating hurricane protection and coastal restoration for the first time in our state's
history," said Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco, who steered her state through the
devastating 2005 hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
"This comprehensive master plan will have a lasting impact on the safety of our citizens and the
welfare of our state," the governor said.
Now that the plan is in place, Blanco today called on the Legislature put at least $200 million of
the state's surplus funds in a coastal fund and in addition, allow the state to secure the Tobacco
Settlement, of which 20 percent was constitutionally dedicated to the fund by a statewide
referendum.
In addition to adopting the master plan, the Legislature also unanimously approved the Fiscal
Year 2008 Annual Plan, which identifies projects within the master plan that will be planned or
constructed during the next three years and the approximate costs of each project.

"I am pleased the legislature has acted swiftly to put this plan in place," Blanco said. "With the
passage of the [funding] resolutions, Louisiana can make immediate use of state dollars and the
federal revenue stream to follow."
Federal funding comes to Louisiana in part through the the Coastal Impact Assistance Plan,
CIAP. The program provides the seven states that host onshore oil and gas infrastructure with
money to mitigate the impacts of petroleum production on the Outer Continental Shelf.
Louisiana's share will be $510 million over the next four years, with the state receiving 65
percent and the coastal parishes 35 percent.
Governor Blanco today formally submitted a plan to the U.S. Department of the Interior's
Minerals Management Service for the allocation of more than $500 million dollars in CIAP
money to fund the first phase of Louisiana's Master Plan.
The governor said today that CIAP projects are consistent with the new Master Plan and
represent the first phase for implementing its larger vision.




                                                                                                   40
More than 30 meetings with civic groups, coastal scientists, concerned citizens and various
stakeholders were conducted since the summer of 2006 to gather input and introduce the public
to some of the concepts and potential projects in the plan.

Integrating coastal restoration with hurricane protection in a system-wide approach, the Master
Plan will be the overarching framework for all ongoing and future coastal restoration and
protection efforts in the state, such as the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and
Restoration Act and the Louisiana Coastal Area Ecosystem Restoration.
It recommends strategies, including rebuilding and sustaining coastal marshes by restoring the
natural freshwater flows and sediment deposits that were originally responsible for building the
wetlands along Louisiana's coast.
Barrier island restoration, beneficial use of dredged materials to build marsh, shoreline
stabilization of coastal lakes and bays, and coastal forest and ridge habitat restoration, are
identified in the plan as well.
The plan suggests a multi-faceted approach to hurricane protection.
In addition to the building of new levee systems and strengthening existing levees, the plan
addresses the need to build elevated houses and businesses in flood-prone areas, enforcement of
stricter building codes, planning for wiser land use and implementing more refined evacuation
plans.
"Louisiana finds itself in the unexpected position of leading the Corps of Engineers, instead of
following," said Sidney Coffee, chair of the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority,
CPRA, which guided the creation of the master plan.

Created by law in December 2005 after hurricanes Katrina and Rita, CPRA's mandate is to be
the single state entity with authority to articulate a clear statement of priorities and develop,
implement and enforce a comprehensive coastal protection and restoration master plan.
"Because of the steps we've now taken and the commitments we've made, we also find
ourselves with the credibility to ask Congress to do what we're doing; change the way they go
about the business of large scale ecosystem restoration efforts by prioritizing projects and
streamlining the interminable federal processes that impede urgent efforts like ours," Coffee
said.
The state is working closely with the Army Corps of Engineers as it develops its
Congressionally-mandated Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Plan, LaCPR, which is
due to Congress in December. According to Corps of Engineers' officials, LaCPR will use the
state's Master Plan as the vision for its efforts.
Engineer Karen Durham-Aguilera, Director of Task Force Hope, part of the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers‘ Mississippi Valley Division, said a draft of the technical report of the LaCPR
should be complete by the end of the summer and will be followed by a public comment period.
The Corps is on schedule to meet the Congressionally-mandated deadline to have a draft of the
report complete for Congressional review, Aguilera said. A final report similar to the state plan
will be complete by July 2008.
________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                                    41
Inter Press Service: Urban Waste Becomes Urban Fuel

Jérôme Bigirimana

BUJUMBURA, Jun 1 (IPS) - Several months ago, residents of the Burundian capital,
Bujumbura, were struggling with disposal of household waste. The Municipal Technical
Services (Services techniques municipaux, SETEMU) weren't able to deal with all the refuse --
and health conditions in the city were deteriorating.

Fast forward to June 2007, and matters have taken a turn for the better -- thanks to a waste
management process imported from neighbouring Rwanda, and put into effect by the recently-
created Association for Development and the Fight Against Poverty (Association pour le
développement et la lutte contre la pauvreté, ADLP).

This organisation stepped forward after authorities decided to open the collection and treatment
of household refuse to outside contractors, becoming the first privately-owned organisation to
get involved in waste management in the city.

Alidi Hakizimana, a resident of the Nyakabiga community in the centre of Bujumbura -- where
the ADLP is most extensively involved -- notes that health conditions "have clearly improved
since the organisation took responsibility for waste" in the area.

But, ADLP doesn't only collect waste -- it also transforms it into fuel.

Refuse composed mainly of vegetable and fruit peels, and plastic goods, is gathered by the
association; spread out to dry; then compacted in a mill to produce grey-coloured blocks, or
briquettes.

The first of the blocks were produced in August last year, and have since received a firm
endorsement from people who have started using them in place of charcoal.

Josée Ndayisenga, a housewife in Bujumbura, says the briquettes are easy to light and do not
die out in the course of cooking. This is fuel "to recommend to the poor, as it is not expensive,"
she notes.

According to ADLP, a household of 32 people that spends four dollars a day on wood charcoal
would only spend two dollars if it started using fuel made from recovered waste. Figures from
the 2006 Human Development Report, produced by the United Nations Development
Programme, indicate that almost 55 percent of Burundians live on less than a dollar a day.

The initiative has also succeeded in creating employment for some of the poorest residents of
Bujumbura, such as widows, the youth, and former combatants who fought in the civil strife
that has plagued Burundi over recent years. About 80 people in the city now make a living from
the collection, transport and recovery of waste.

In addition, replacing charcoal with the new briquettes holds out the promise of environmental
benefits.

Pierre Barampanze, director of energy in the Ministry of Energy and Mines, notes that Burundi
uses wood to meet 96.6 percent of its energy requirements. However, the process of




                                                                                                 42
transforming wood into the charcoal needed for cooking and the like is inefficient: at present, 10
kilogrammes of wood are required to produce just one kilogramme of charcoal.

This translates into loss of forest cover: Astère Bararwandika, director of forests, says that 2,160
hectares of forests are destroyed each year through the cutting down of trees for charcoal.
Sustained use of the briquettes could help prevent deforestation, and the land degradation this
tends to result in.

In the midst of enthusiasm for the multiple benefits of the ADLP waste processing strategy,
SETEMU technical director Célestin Musavyi sounds a note of caution.

"The ADLP has only displaced the problem (of refuse)," he claims, "since it collects all the
waste -- but does not treat it all. So, where is the rest going to? This will result in new,
uncontrolled waste."

But, Bikorimana has a ready response for this concern. "Machines that will enable us to
transform the rest of the waste into organic fertilizer will soon arrive. While waiting, we are
sorting through it (the residual waste) and putting it to one side. All the waste will be recycled.
It's a question of means…the technique, we're mastering it."

He notes that the blocks have attracted the attention of the national police, amongst the biggest
consumers of wood in this Central African nation.

Even the head of state has expressed interest.

Pierre Nkurunziza paid a visit to the association in March, buying a local cooker and several
kilogrammes of the briquettes to try them out. (END/2007)
_____________________________________________________________________________
Enviroment News Service: CITES Permits 60 Tons of Elephant Ivory to Be Sold
THE HAGUE, The Netherlands, June 4, 2007 (ENS) - The Convention on International Trade
in Endangered Species, CITES, Saturday approved exports of 60 tons of elephant ivory from
Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa to Japan. The approval comes over the objections of
many African elephant range states and conservation groups who say legal trade will give cover
to ivory poachers.
The CITES Standing Committee approved the sales ahead of this week‘s triennial CITES
conference, which opened officially on Sunday.


Botswana will be permitted to sell 20 metric tons of ivory, Namibia will sell 10 tons, and South
Africa will sell 30 tons.
The stockpiles of ivory to be sold were gathered from elephants that died as a result of natural
causes or were killed because they caused problems to human beings.
The exports from these three countries were agreed in principle in 2002 but were made
conditional on the establishment of up-to-date and comprehensive baseline data on elephant
poaching and population levels.




                                                                                                   43
The CITES Standing Committee determined that this condition has been satisfied and that the
exports may proceed.
"The CITES Secretariat will closely supervise these new exports and monitor future trends in
elephant poaching and population levels throughout Africa," said CITES Secretary-General
Willem Wijnstekers.
"By basing future decisions on reliable field data, CITES can develop an approach to elephant
ivory that benefits states relying on elephants for tourism as well as those seeking income from
elephant products in order to finance wildlife conservation," he said.
Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa have committed to, and are required by CITES to use the
revenue derived from the sale exclusively for elephant conservation and community
development programmes.
"Although we agree Japan has met the necessary requirements, we caution that the sale should
be closely monitored. This would include an annual report to the CITES parties on levels of
ivory going through the system in Japan to ensure early detection of potential problems or
trends,‖ said Dr. Susan Lieberman, director of the WWF Global Species Programme.
But an investigative report into Japan's domestic ivory trade controls released last week by the
International Fund for Animal Welfare details loopholes in the Japanese system that allow
illegal ivory from elephants poached in the wild to be laundered in astronomical sums into the
legal domestic ivory market.
"This decision is a disgrace in light of evidence that Japan clearly fails to meet the bar set by the
CITES framework for such sales," said Peter Pueschel, program manager for IFAW's Protection
of Wildlife from Commercial Trade program.
"The Standing Committee is disregarding this evidence just as it ignores that the 2.8 ton seizure
of contraband ivory in Osaka in August of last year as if it never happened. This is slap in the
face to CITES Parties who comply with CITES obligations."
CITES banned the international commercial ivory trade in 1989. Then, in 1997, recognizing that
some southern African elephant populations were healthy and well managed; it permitted
Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe to make a one-time sale of ivory to Japan totalling 50 tons.
This sale took place in 1999 and brought in US$5 million.
In 2004, requests by several southern African States for annual ivory quotas were not accepted
by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention.
Today the elephant populations of southern Africa are listed in Appendix II of the Convention,
which allows trade through a permit system, while all other elephant populations are listed in
Appendix I, which prohibits all imports for commercial purposes.
The long-running global debate over elephants has focused on the benefits that income from
ivory sales may bring to conservation and to local communities living side-by-side with large
and sometimes dangerous animals, weighed against concerns that such sales may increase
poaching.
Between August 2005 and August 2006, more than 26 metric tons of ivory were seized, and
customs officials estimate that 90 percent of contraband products pass over borders undetected.




                                                                                                   44
Pueschel says the financial incentive to poach is the driving force behind the slaughter of at
least 20,000 elephants annually, a situation that stands to impact on the balance of local
ecosystems and communities' ability to survive.
"Europe, and Germany in particular given its seat as current EU President, must now take
responsibility for the inevitable increase in the killing of both elephants and the humans charged
to protect them," said Pueschel. "They should now be prepared to cover the expenses of
enhanced enforcement that will be critical to responding to increases in poaching."
On Sunday, the day after the Standing Committee meeting, the 14th triennal Conference of the
Parties the CITES Convention opened in The Hague.
The meeting will continue until June 15, and during that time delegates will consider 37
proposals to amend the CITES appendices.
Proposals deal with limitations on trade in elephants, cetaceans, Asian big cats, sharks and
sturgeons.
There are proposals to list marine species such as the porbeagle shark, the European eel, and red
and pink corals, as well as timber species such as cedar and rosewood.
"These proposals on lucrative marine and timber species mark a shift from purely commercial
interests to recognizing conservation concerns," said Dr. Sue Mainka, head of the delegation of
the IUCN-World Conservation Union to the CITES conference.
The IUCN publishes the Red List of Threatened Species, considered the world's most
comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species.
"With growing recognition that resources are decreasing, the big fish and timber industries are
faced with including conservation concerns in their calculations," Mainka said.
Pau Brasil, Caesalpinia echinata, a slow growing wood species with striking blood-red
heartwood is the national tree of Brazil. Initially used as a source of dye, it is now being
harvested for manufacturing professional bows for violins, violas, cellos and double-bases. A
single violin bow is estimated to cost up to US$5,000, using one kilogram (2.2 pounds) of
wood.
International trade and habitat loss have severely depleted this species, which is now found only
in the Brazilian Atlantic Coastal Forest, a forest area now covering less than eight percent of its
original extent.
Pau Brazil is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
Brazil's proposal to include Pau Brazil in Appendix II of the CITES Convention would mean
that all its derivates including musical instruments would become subject to CITES regulation,
requiring musicians or orchestras to travel with CITES permits when they go on trips abroad.
"This beautiful timber is valued and used worldwide. No comparable substitute is known for the
making of bows for string instruments and therefore demand is likely to remain high
internationally," says Jane Smart, Head of the IUCN Species Programme.

The CITES Appendices
Appendix I - Species that are the most endangered are listed on Appendix I. They are
threatened with extinction and CITES prohibits international trade in specimens of these species




                                                                                                  45
except when the purpose of the import is not commercial. In these exceptional cases, such as for
scientific research, trade may take place provided it is authorized by the granting of both an
import permit and an export permit.
Appendix II lists species that are not necessarily now threatened with extinction but that may
become so unless trade is closely controlled.
Appendix III is a list of species included at the request of a Party that already regulates trade in
the species and that needs the cooperation of other countries to prevent unsustainable or illegal
exploitation.




                     REGIONAL OFFICE FOR AFRICA - NEWS UPDATE

                                                                                    4 June 2007

                                  General Environment News

Uganda: East Worst in Environment Abuse

New Vision (Kampala): Eastern Uganda has the highest environmental degradation in the
country, according to a study by the National Environment management Authority (NEMA).
Almost three-quarters of all forests and wetlands in the eastern region have been degraded. The
central region is second with 10% of the forests and wetlands destroyed. Mukono, Rakai and
Luweero districts scored the worst in wetland destruction in the region. Dr. Aryamanya
Mugisha, the NEMA executive director, revealed these shocking statistics during a press




                                                                                                  46
conference         yesterday     at    the     organisation's      offices      in      Kampala.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200705310208.html

Ethiopia: Nominees Selected for 2nd National Green Award

Daily Monitor (Addis Ababa): Forum for Environment, an indigenous association of individuals
working towards environmental literacy, said on Tuesday this year's environmental heroes-
individuals and organizations-to be honored with the national green award at the upcoming
world's environment Day, July 5, 2007. In a press conference held at the National Hotel
yesterday, the forum disclosed winners of the second Green Award have already been selected
from various categories both at the regional level and National level. The names of winners in
each category are not to be disclosed, though," till the final day at the National Palace where
president Girma will give certificates and trophies to winners, according to Forum Coordinator
Nigussu Aklilu. Civil Society Organizations, Youth group and Private sector were the
categories for regional level and individuals, outstanding green leadership award were
incorporated in the national category in addition to those stated at the regional categories.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200705310420.html

Ghana: Scientist Tasks Ghanaians to Stop Unfriendly Environmental Activities

Ghanaian Chronicle (Accra): An environmental Scientist, Mr. Agyeman Bonsu, has observed
that the recent climatic changes taking place and affecting human lives are the result of
unfriendly environmental activities that took place many centuries ago. So to avert further crisis
due to climatic changes in the future, he advised the general public to stay away from unfriendly
environmental activities from now on. Mr. Bonsu gave the advice when making a presentation
at a two-day seminar on climatic change organized by the Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) at Koforidua. He held that if "we are able to manage the waste we produce everyday very
well, we can tap the gas they produce to generate enough energy for homes".
http://allafrica.com/stories/200705310538.html

Liberia: British Firm Assists Govt in Street Beautification

The Analyst (Monrovia): A British firm, G4 Group, has completed the first phase of a major
voluntary exercise as part of efforts to assist the Liberian government in the streets'
Beautification Project. G4 Group completed the voluntary clean-up and beautification exercises
last week on the Congo Town back road, with special attention at the intersection of the Congo
Town back road. The voluntary exercise was initiated by a Liberian residing in the United
States, Madam Corina Johnson, who happens to be a cousin to President Johnson-Sirleaf. A
representative of G4 Group, Nathan Pearson said the initiative was intended to assist the
government and people of Liberia. He said it was the organization's own contribution to the
rebuilding of the country. Mr. Pearson said the Group is prepared to contribute to the
rehabilitation of projects across the country. http://allafrica.com/stories/200705310870.html




South Africa: Environment Event Hangs in the Balance

Cape Argus (Cape Town): The planned civil servants' strike is playing havoc with the
organisation of the City of Cape Town's annual Youth Environmental School (YES)




                                                                                               47
programme. The programme starts on Monday and is being officially launched on World
Environment Day the following day by Mayor Helen Zille and her Stellenbosch counterpart,
Lauretta Maree, at a "green" event at the Spier wine estate.
But because of the planned strike by teachers many of the schools will not be able to send pupils
to the YES event. Lindie Buirski, the city's environmental education co-coordinator, said
yesterday: "We're involved in negotiations between presenters and schools now, but we'll only
know the consequences on Monday." http://allafrica.com/stories/200706010370.html

Namibia: Boosting Environmental Reporting

New Era (Windhoek): Namibia Breweries Limited has teamed up with Eco Awards Namibia to
form the Eco Media Awards Namibia that will honour outstanding achievements by journalists
and media houses that contribute to the advancement of environmental reporting. For this
purpose, the two, who have formed Eco Media Awards Alliance, aim at promoting
environmental protection in all areas of Namibian society, as well as environmentally friendly
practices. NBL Manager: Corporate Affairs Gideon Shilongo said at the launch of the award on
Wednesday that it was important to sustain the environment and its natural resources for future
generations. "What we use today, we must use it in such a way that we have something for
future generations to enjoy," Shilongo said. http://allafrica.com/stories/200706010575.html

Rwanda: Bazivamo Urges Leaders to Maintain Trees

New Times (Kigali): The Lands and Environment minister Christopher Bazivamo has advised
leaders to give special attention to trees. He said that his ministry will take tough action against
those who do not do all that is necessary to ensure the growth of newly planted trees. He
particularly made reference to local leaders in the Eastern Province's districts of Nyagatare,
Gatsibo, Kayonza, Kirehe, Rwamagana and Ngoma, where reports say that planted trees were
destroyed. "We can't afford a situation where leaders just sit in offices and never get bothered
with the state of trees. Tree planting exercises in that province should be taken seriously and so
should be the growth of these trees," said the minister. He said leaders in those districts should
have       time     to     move       out     of      offices     and      inspect     the    trees.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200706010963.html

Kenya: EU Releases Sh48 Million for Conservation of River Basin

East African Standard (Nairobi): The European Union has released Sh46 million to a project
that will protect and conserve River Nzoia's basin and catchment area - the Cherangani Hills
Forest. If successful, the project is hoped to avert perennial flooding in Budalangi. The project
will benefit people living in the area involved in nature-based enterprises, EU-Community
Development Trust Fund (CDTF) Representative Mr Solomon Ngari has said. The funds will be
spent on restoring vegetation, re-afforestation, energy conservation, educating the communities
on better farming methods, promoting good environmental governance and supporting nature-
based enterprises. Sh23 million was allocated to Cherengani Hills Forest because of its
significance in the river basin. http://allafrica.com/stories/200706040031.html



====================================================================




                                                                                                 48
                                  ROWA Brief: 4 June 2007

                                            Bahrain

                                     Green drive takes root
PEOPLE throughout Bahrain are being urged to support a royal initiative to plant 9,000 saplings
across the country tomorrow.To participate in the largest tree planting campaign, people should
collect their free sapling from a designated centre in each of the governorates.
The project, under the patronage of His Majesty King Hamad, is being conducted by the Public
Commission for the Protection of Marine Resources, Environment and Wildlife to mark World
Environment Day.
The slogan for this year, Melting Ice - a Hot Topic?, was selected to focus on the effect climate
change is having on polar ecosystems and communities and the ensuing consequences around
the world.




                                                                                                49
Ordered by His Majesty, the tree planting initiative aims to create awareness about climate
change and encourage individuals to take action to halt global warming and reduce carbon
dioxide.
"Each governorate will have 1,800 fruit and nut saplings to give away to people to plant in their
homes," Public Commission public relations and environment media director Zakariya Khunji
told the GDN.
"The saplings are from Bahrain, so they will be able to withstand the harsh climate.
"We are doing this to mark World Environment Day. This year they speak about climate change
and planting saplings can help because they absorb carbon dioxide and give out oxygen.
"The message is we have an environment problem around the world and each of us can make a
difference.
"If each country follows this they can halt climate change."
Members of the public can collect their saplings from 4pm tomorrow at any of the following
locations: King Faisal Corniche; Muharraq Grand Garden; Abu Subae Causeway, Budaiya; Al
Estiqlal Highway walking circuit, Sanad; and East Riffa Club.
Through World Environment Day, which falls each year on June 5, the United Nations
stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and action.
It was established by the UN General Assembly in 1972 to mark the opening of the Stockholm
Conference on the Human Environment.
Another resolution, adopted by the General Assembly the same day, led to the creation of UN
Environment Programme.
becky@gdn.com.bh
   http://www.gulf-daily-news.com/Story.asp?Article=184033&Sn=BNEW&IssueID=30076

                        Whale may have reached safe waters say experts
A WHALE that caught the public's attention after it found its way into Bahrain's territorial
waters a month go is now thought to have headed back to deeper seas, say environmentalists.
Environment Friends Society (EFS) president Khawla Al Muhannadi said no sightings had been
reported to them for more than two weeks and it was hoped the whale had found its way back to
its natural habitat.
The 22-metre whale caused a stir among environmentalists around the world last month, when it
was feared it could be in danger of dying in Bahrain's shallow waters.
"No-one has seen the whale, not even fishermen, and we hope it has left Bahrain and gone back
to its natural habitat," Ms Al Muhannadi said.
"But this need not be the case because we learned it spent some time in Saudi waters.
"We have contacted non-governmental organisations there and they have promised to give us
infirmation, but so far they don't know anything about it."




                                                                                               50
Anyone wishing to contact the EFS about the whale, or any other environmental issue, should
call 39433228 or e-mail mangrove@batelco.com.bh.
                                  http://www.gulf-daily-
          news.com/arc_Articles.asp?Article=184025&Sn=BNEW&IssueID=30076


                                            Oman
                                  Environ semniar tomorrow
MUSCAT — The Ministry of Regional Municipalities, Environment and Water Resources
(MRMEWR) and the international company, atea Environmental Group (ATEA), will jointly
hold a seminar tomorrow to mark this year‘s International Environmental Day. Key speakers
from major local organisations such as Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) and the Ministry
of Oil and Gas, as well as ATEA‘s experts from Germany, the United States and China will
highlight the importance of a safe environment for future generations.
Oman‘s leading corporate leaders and senior government officials will attend the seminar, to be
held at the Human Resource Development Centre (opposite Seeb International Airport).
Christoph Engel, Director of atea Environmental Technology Pte Ltd, said the world needed a
common stand to promote a safer environment by providing effective solutions.
―Taking an active role in protecting the environment makes good business sense. Not only is the
organisation fulfilling social obligations to act responsibly but good environmental protection
policies can have a positive impact on a company‘s bottom line,‖ said Engel, who is also one of
the seminar's keynote speakers.
http://www.theworldpress.com/press/worldpress/omanpress/omandailyobserver.htm

====================================================================




                                                                                              51
                                ROAP MEDIA UPDATE
                           THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE NEWS
                                 Monday, 04 June, 2007


                                   UN or UNEP in the news

      The Standard : World focus on melting ice for big day
      Indian Express : Sea Change
      ABC Online – Australia: Melting ice in focus on World Environment Day
      Scoop : Communities taking action on climate change
      Davao Today : Critics: ADB will continue to fund climate change



General Environment News

    NEWS.com.au : Air taxes 'not the way' for long-haul travel By Melissa Maugeri

                                    UN or UNEP in the news

The Standard, Hong Kong : World focus on melting ice for big day

Monday, June 04, 2007

The melting of the planet's ice due to climate change will be the central theme of World
Environment Day tomorrow, this year hosted by the Arctic town of Tromsoe in Norway.
Melting ice offers some of the clearest evidence of global warming, and this year's choice of
host city was no coincidence, with the picturesque Norwegian town nestled in the Arctic, a
region which is heating up twice as fast as the rest of the planet and where the effects are
already visible.

"The Arctic and Antarctica may be the Earth's climate early warning system - feeling the heat
first - but we know it does not end there," said Achim Steiner, head of the United Nations
Environment Program.

The melting is both a consequence and a cause of global warming: ice reflects heat, as opposed
to water which absorbs it and warms up the climate, thus causing more glaciers and snow to
melt.

The gradual disappearance of ice and snow has already affected the four million inhabitants of
the Arctic region.

With ice sheets gradually receding, Inuits have seen their seal and polar bear hunting grounds
shrink and their traditional way of life threatened.

Accidents are believed to be on the rise among the Far North communities as hunters fall
through thinning ice, and they are increasingly swapping their dogsleds for motor boats.




                                                                                                 52
Polar bears meanwhile risk becoming extinct over the next decades as their natural habitat melts
away.

On the positive side, the shrinking ice sheet will open up two new maritime routes between the
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans off Canada and Russia, shortening shipping times considerably.
The ice melt will also open up the Arctic for oil and gas drilling.
http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?pp_cat=17&art_id=45930&sid=13903326&co
n_type=1
……………………………………….
Indian Express : Sea Change
Sonu JainPosted online: Sunday, June 03, 2007 at 0000 hrs

Two days after the new moon, Purostama Raut packed his belongings from his mud hut home in
Kanhupur.
With his wife and three children and bicycle loaded with pots and pans, he journeyed through
the long strip of land with mangroves on either side to a new settlement several kilometers
away. On the new moon day, the sea entered his house for the first time. He knows it is a matter
of days before it comes and gobbles the house, the way it has buried the rest of the houses in its
wake.

Unaware of the debates on climate change raging around the world, engaging the interests of
leaders from George Bush to Shinzo Abe, he only knows that it means he has to rethink his life
completely.

The Satabhaya region, once a cluster of seven villages, is 25 km from the port of Paradip, at the
confluence of the Mahanadi and Brahmani rivers, metres away from the Bhitarkanika National
Park.

Over the years, the sea has come dangerously close to the villages, swallowing half the number
of houses there and forcing people to migrate to higher ground. The houses that still remain
literally at the edge of the sea belong to people too poor to find an alternative accommodation.
While 500 people have migrated, there are 1,000 left who are forced to shift periodically to
higher ground keeping pace with the rising waters. The erosion has been going on for several
years but in the past four-five years, the sea‘s ingress has been quick and dramatic.

The result is that each high tide is anticipated with dread, especially in the period that straddles
the months from May to September. Raut is still in the process of moving his belongings from
his old house when The Indian Express caught up with him. ―We kept hoping that our house
would be spared, but on the last new moon night, the water came right into my house. That is
when I decided it was time to move to another place,‖ says Raut.

The group of villages are a good 10 km away from the nearest roadhead at Okilpara. The drive
is through a narrow strip of mud embankment with mangroves on either side. Raut has to cross
a narrow but crocodile-infested river that meanders desultorily through the mangroves before it
meets the sea. The only means of crossing the river is a small wooden boat that doesn‘t look too
sturdy. Now the distance between the sea and the bank of the river is fast narrowing.

Raut as well as others of his age remember the long trek they used to make to reach the sea
when they were younger. ―I used to accompany my father and it took us a good six hours to
reach the sea through thick mangroves,‖ remembers Raut.




                                                                                                   53
To the youngsters at the village, this sounds incredulous. The sea washes right up to the village
on a normal day. At high tide, most of the other houses are also inundated. A rice mill, some
houses and the local school are islanded in the sea.

In spite of the inaccessibility, the villages at the edge of the coast were worth living in because
of the fertile land that gave them a decent rice harvest. Today, most of the fields are now lost to
erosion or are covered with a layer of saline water. Growing rice is no longer possible. That is
why Raut has to look for other means of livelihood.

―I have been going to Bangalore for the last two years to work as a rajmistri (mason),‖ he says.

These hardships suffered by the villagers are yet to spur the local authorities into action. On the
other hand, people like Raut still pay land tax to the government even after the have ceased to
be productive landholders, their plots having been either submerged or turned inarable due to
salinity.

The locals have their own theories on the phenomenon, some of which corroborate what the
scientists say. Richard Mahapatra, a researcher who has written extensively on this issue
interviewed 70 residents of Satabhaya and Kanhapur villages. They spoke of the local climate
changing, the sea getting warmer and the number of cyclones increasing each year.

Scientifically, the link between the increase in sea surface temperature and a corresponding
increase in cyclone intensity has been established. Recent studies suggest a possible increase in
cyclone intensity of 10-20 per cent for a rise in sea surface temperature of 2-4 degrees Celsius.

Warmer seas also trigger a phenomenon called thermal expansion. When the liquid heats up, its
volume expands. In the case of the sea—which is after all a massive store of liquid—rising
surface temperatures lead to expansion of the mass, thus causing sea levels to rise.

Warmer climate is not only manifest in warmer seas. An linkage is also to glaciers. They
melting faster, adding more water to the rivers that empty out into the seas.

India is one of the 27 countries most vulnerable to rising sea levels, according to a 1989 United
Nations Environment Programme assessment. Despite this warning, very few scientists have
studied the Indian coasts to find the exact impact of rising sea levels.

One of the first studies was carried out by the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, in 1993,
in which the consequences of a one metre rise in sea level were evaluated. The study concluded
that, in the absence of protection, approximately seven million people would be displaced and
5,764 sq km of land and 4,200 km of roads and highways would be lost. A subsequent study by
the Tata Energy Research Institute (1996) explored the relative vulnerability of various coastal
regions including the Orissa coast, the effects of adaptive responses to the impact of rising sea
levels, and the value of coastal protection for selected regions.

Among other things, the studies concluded that low-lying areas (like Satabhaya) near the coast
were particularly vulnerable. Various factors can come together to make the impact very
dramatic—as in Orissa‘s coastal villages. Most scientists, when contacted said that there is a
need to study this phenomenon in Satabhaya and see what it means for India‘s 7,500 km long
coastline. The issue is certainly getting hot.




                                                                                                  54
An omen for the future
Why is the Indian coastline vulnerable?
The Indian coastline stretching 7,500 km is facing a lot of pressure, overexploitation of marine
resources, dumping of industrial waste and over-population. Scientists agree that there will be
temperature increase in the coming years. Sea-level rises due to thermal expansion of near
surface-water. It hits the extensive low-lying, densely populated coastal zone the hardest. India
has been identified as one among the 27 countries most vulnerable to the impacts of accelerated
sea level rise by UNEP. One of the main reasons is that most people living on the coast are
dependent on it for their livelihoods.

What do we already know about sea-level rise?
According to a study by IIT Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, observations suggest that sea
level has risen at the rate of 2.5 mm per year since the 1950s. A mean sea level rise of between
15 and 38 cms is projected by mid-21st century along India‘s coast. A 15 per cent projected
increase in intensity of tropical cyclones would increase vulnerability of populations living in
coastal regions.

What impact would this have?
Global warming leads to increase in sea surface temperature that results in change in intensity
of cyclones. Sea level rise may increase the loss of cultivable lands due to inundation, salt water
intrusions into coastal ecosystem and loss of biodiversity.
According to the IIT study, a total area of 5,763 sq km along the coastal states of India could be
inundated and 4.6 per cent of coastal population could be affected. Vulnerability is assessed also
in terms of level of socio-economic development like population, density, land uses and level of
infrastructure.
According to the study, from the physical point of view, Gujarat and West Bengal would be
worst affected since they stand to lose the maximum land to one metre sea level rise In terms of
population, West Bengal, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu could be worst affected.

What do scientists say about what‘s happening at Satayabhaya in Orissa?
Dr Murari Lal, coordinating lead author of the Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change
(IPCC), a global body of scientists studying climate change: ―This phenomenon may well be the
preliminary impact of global warming-induced sea-level rise. Given Orissa‘s geographical
location at the head of the Bay of Bengal, a landlocked sea, and the state‘s deltaic plain
character, Orissa‘s coast is extremely vulnerable to rises in sea level.‖
http://www.indianexpress.com/iep/sunday/story/32545._.html
…………………………………
ABC Online – Australia: Melting ice in focus on World Environment Day

The melting of the planet's ice due to climate change will be the central theme of World
Environment Day, celebrated annually on June 5 and this year hosted by the Arctic town of
Tromsoe in Norway.

Melting ice offers some of the clearest evidence of global warming, and this year's choice of
host city was no coincidence, with the picturesque Norwegian town nestled in the Arctic, a
region which is heating up twice as fast as the rest of the planet and where the effects are
already visible.




                                                                                                55
"The Arctic and Antarctica may be the Earth's climate early warning system - feeling the heat
first - but we know it does not end there," the head of the United Nations Environment Program
(UNEP), Achim Steiner, said.

The melting is both a consequence and a cause of global warming: ice reflects heat, as opposed
to water which absorbs it and warms up the climate, thus causing more glaciers and snow to
melt.

The gradual disappearance of ice and snow has already affected the four million inhabitants of
the Arctic region.

With ice sheets gradually receding, Inuits have seen their seal and polar bear hunting grounds
shrink and their traditional way of life threatened.

Accidents are believed to be on the rise among the far north communities as hunters fall through
the once-thick but now thinning ice, and they are increasingly swapping their dogsleds for
motor boats.

Meanwhile, polar bears risk becoming extinct over the next decades as their natural habitat
melts away.

On the positive side, the shrinking ice sheet will open up two new maritime routes between the
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans off Canada and Russia, shortening shipping times considerably.

And for better or worse, the ice melt will also open up the Arctic for oil and gas drilling.

The region is believed to be home to one-quarter of the world's remaining reserves, the US
Geological Survey says, though that could also heighten tensions among bordering countries.

The melting ice will also affect parts of the world much further afield than the polar regions.

"What happens in the Arctic and the Antarctica as a result of climate change is of direct interest
to us all - from someone living in the Congo River Basin, the Australian outback and in rural
China, to suburban dwellers in Berlin, New Delhi, Rio de Janeiro or Washington DC," Mr
Steiner said.

Climate refugees

Canadian researchers say the melting of the Greenland ice cap, the planet's second-largest
source of freshwater after Antarctica, could cause ocean levels to rise by seven metres,
drowning coastal regions and islands, including several countries in the Pacific.

Indonesia alone could lose 2,000 islands by 2030, its Environment Ministry says.

That would lead to tens of millions of "climate refugees," in addition to the masses that would
undoubtedly have to flee droughts and flooding brought on elsewhere by the warming of the
planet.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says a stabilisation of carbon dioxide (CO2)
concentrations in the atmosphere at today's levels would make it possible to limit the




                                                                                                  56
temperature rise to around two degrees Celsius and would cost only 0.12 per cent of global
gross domestic product.

But despite US President George W Bush's announcement last week of an "initiative" to cap
greenhouse gas emissions, the United States, the biggest CO2 polluter, has refused to commit to
binding targets.

The issue is expected to be one of the main bones of contention between the United States and
its western allies at the G8 summit to open in Germany on Wednesday, the day after World
Environment Day.

A slew of activities are being held around the world to mark World Environment Day.

In the Arctic town of Tromsoe events will last three days, running from June 3 to June 5.

South Africa's former Anglican archbishop Desmond Tutu will hold a religious service on
Sunday, and an international scientific report on melting glaciers will be presented on Monday.

A two-day conference on the melting ice cap will also be held, while the UNEP will launch a
book on sustainable tourism in the polar regions.

On its website, the UNEP has listed 77 suggestions for how to celebrate World Environment
Day, including planting trees, bicycle parades and rickshaw races. - AFP
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200706/s1941043.htm
.....................................................
Scoop, New Zealand : Communities taking action on climate change
Saturday, 2 June 2007, 4:55 pm
Press Release: Clean Up The World Campaign
Communities taking action on climate change on World Environment Day

 Sydney, Australia: Clean Up the World - a unique Australian idea helping communities around
the world take action to improve their environment and limit the impacts of climate change will
be an important part of the United Nations‘ World Environment Day 2007 on 5 June.

Protecting water sources, tree planting, waste reduction and energy conservation are just some
of the actions members of Clean Up the World will focus on as part of World Environment Day
to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect against the impacts of climate change.

An estimated 35 million people in more than 120 countries will take part in Clean Up the
World, one of the World‘s largest environmental campaigns.
Details of activities being undertaken by Clean Up the World members for World Environment
Day can be found at http://www.cleanuptheworld.org/.

The theme of World Environment Day 2007 is ‗Melting Ice – A Hot Topic?‘ which reflects one
of the greatest challenges facing our generation – climate change – and Clean Up the World
members will continue to take action through to the Clean Up the World Weekend on 14-16
September.

The Sydney, Australia-based Chairman of Clean Up the World, Ian Kiernan AO said
communities around the world already face water shortages, more frequent and intense storms




                                                                                                57
and drought, a greater spread of tropical diseases and food insecurity as a result of climate
change.

―Clean Up the World is a practical and immediate way for communities to reduce some of the
causes of climate change. This is a challenge for our generation and the next. The environment
must be a priority for us,‖ said Mr Kiernan.

 ―With the help of the United Nations Environment Programme around the world, members of
Clean Up the World will receive a range of support materials to help drive local projects and
assist with implementation of environmental activities in local communities.‖

Working with all communities to clean up, fix up and conserve our environment.
http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO0706/S00026.htm
.....................................................
Davao Today, Philippines : Critics: ADB will continue to fund climate change

MANILA, Philippines — ―The Asian Development Bank will continue to fund climate change.
The Bank will still invest in coal power plants inspite of its recognition that coal projects have
serious environmental and health implications,‖ said Hemantha Withanage, executive director
of NGO Forum on ADB.


In its draft energy strategy, which was released last 29 May to the public for commenting, the
ADB stated that it will continue to support fossil fuel-based energy generation project, including
coal-based power plants. Ironically, the Bank recognizes that coal projects generate greenhouse
gas (GHG) and a number of other pollutants such as sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and
heavy metals.

According to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), continuous burning of
fossil fuels contributes to increases in atmospheric concentration of GHG which lead to climate
change. Asia and the Pacific will be the ones hardly hit by climate change as manifested lately
by more intense tropical storms, more frequent flooding and rises in sea level, among others.

In addition, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states that if atmospheric
carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration were to double, increasing global warming by 2 to 4.5°C as
a result, developing countries will experience losses of 1-5% of its GDP.

Safe Technology?

In its draft strategy, the ADB insisted that it will adopt available cleaner technologies to
mitigate the negative environmental harm and health hazards caused by coal projects. However,
experiences in the past show that such mechanisms implored by the Bank have been proven
futile.

In the Philippines, inspite of the preventive measures that were applied to the ADB-funded
Masinloc Coal-Fired Power Plant, significant levels of mercury and fly ash particles were still
found able to escape pollution control devices. Likewise, sample ashes from the Mae Moh Coal
Power Plant in Thailand has continued to contain lead, mercury and other heavy metals inspite
the installation of the ADB-endorsed flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and ionizing wet scrubber
technologies.




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Carbon Market Initiative

As an ongoing program, the ADB will also continue to implement its Carbon Market Initiative
(CMI). According to the Bank, CMI aims to support sustainable development goals of its
developing member countries (DMCs), address global climate change concerns and assist
developed countries meet their emissions reduction commitments to the Kyoto Protocol.

Under the CMI, countries that are exceeding their required carbon emissions buy carbon credits
from other countries who have unused them – also known as carbon trading – by providing
funds for forest plantation and/or maintenance. Such plantations are assumed to absorb the
excess carbon emissions of the buying country.

However, studies show that CMIs of the World Bank and European countries did not deliver the
expected results. Most credit firms instead implement carbon-sequestering projects such as
monoculture forest plantations rather than reducing GHGs which is the source of climate
change. Critics say that this ―lower hanging fruit‖ (convenient) approach has not reduced GHG
in reality but has only given way to creative accounting and profit making.

Under its draft energy strategy, the ADB forecasts that coal and oil will still be the dominating
energy sources even until 2030. Renewable energy will pay a very minimal role. According to
the International Energy Agency, renewable energy only accounts to 9.6 percent of the total
supply of energy. ―If the ADB expects to efficiently and effectively use its carbon credits
initiative to promote energy efficiency and renewables, and help reduce GHG emissions, the
ADB should increase its investment in renewables. If it wants to help prevent the worsening
climate change, the ADB should instead help increase renewables‘ contribution to global
electricity production,‖ Withanage said.

Privatization of the power industry

Meanwhile on ADB‘s privatization program of the energy sector, Ana Maria Nemenzo,
president of Freedom from Debt Coalitions said, ―A dark future awaits the people under the
ADB‘s restructuring and privatization of the power industry. ADB‘s lending policy on the
power sector is accompanied by aggressive promotion of private sector involvement.‖

Nemenzo said, ―While ADB claims that its power sector restructuring and privatization
program is towards reducing poverty in the region, the opposite has been the result.‖ In the
Philippines, privatization of the power industry has led to increasing power rates and increasing
government debt, leading to further impoverishment of the poor. Moreover, many lost their jobs
due to privatization. ―Poverty has increased in countries where privatization has taken place,
while the big corporate sector has been continuously amassing huge profit,‖ she added.

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http://davaotoday.com/2007/06/02/critics-adb-will-continue-to-fund-climate-change/




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                                   General Environment News

NEWS.com.au, Australia : Air taxes 'not the way' for long-haul travelBy Melissa Maugeri

SETTING a realistic target to make Australian tourism carbon neutral may be one way to fight a
growing backlash against long haul travel, according to industry figure Matthew Hingerty.

The chief executive officer of the Australian Tourism Export Council said putting taxes on air
travel was not the way to go.

Travel industry leaders are preparing to tackle the issue of guilt-tripping surrounding long-haul
travel at the next World Tourism Organisation meeting on climate change to be held in
Switzerland.

As European sentiment around travel and its effect on carbon emissions continues to grow,
Australian and New Zealand industry players are determined tourism would not be made the
scapegoat for climate change.

"Worldwide there is a movement that says travel is bad," Mr Hingerty said. "It is the biggest
issue facing the industry and we need a united front to tackle it.

"You won't save Kakadu and the Great Barrier Reef by telling people not to come here."

According to EC3 Global chief executive officer Stewart Moore, Australia needed to show
international visitors the country could measure and monitor its environmental performance.

He recently spoke at the inaugural B4E business summit hosted by the United Nations
Environment Program in Singapore. Mr Moore said if travellers felt their trip could impact
negatively on the environment, they could reconsider their options and choose to holiday at a
destination closer to home.

"They need to feel comfortable that there are carbon offset measures to minimise the impact of
their trip," he said.

"The tourism industry as a whole needs to take the lead and create a vision and platform for its
own sense of responsibility."

Federal Tourism Minister Fran Bailey is encouraging more input from industry on the issue
ahead of a tourism ministers' council later in the year.

She said there are some positives to come out of Australia regarding eco-tourism and climate
change.

"A lot of Australia has a good story to tell," Ms Bailey said. "We are well placed and have the
opportunity to take leadership in this issue."

Home and away guilt free

Carbon emissions biggest issue facing travel industry
Tourists need to feel comfortable there are carbon offsets to minimise the impact of their trip




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Operators urged to make submissions to government action plan
http://www.news.com.au/travel/story/0,23483,21844456-27977,00.html




                                                                     61
                           UNITED NATIONS NEWS SERVICE
                                   DAILY NEWS
4 June 2007
====================================================================

Ban Ki-moon briefs Security Council on tense Middle East situation

1 June - The situation in the Middle East remains volatile and tense, Secretary-General Ban Ki-
moon warned the Security Council today, with fresh clashes between Israelis and Palestinians in
the Gaza Strip and the resumption of fighting at a Palestinian refugee camp in northern
Lebanon.
Briefing Council members in a closed-door session after returning from Berlin, where he took
part in a meeting of the principals of the diplomatic Quartet on the Middle East, Mr. Ban said he
has spoken to several regional leaders to try to help alleviate the situation.
He noted that the Quartet voiced support for the ongoing bilateral talks between Israeli Prime
Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, as well as regional efforts –
particularly the Arab Peace Initiative – to find a solution to the conflict.
The Quartet, which comprises the UN, the European Union, Russia and the United States,
decided to meet at an undetermined location in the Middle East on 26 June or the day after to
continue the momentum of international peace efforts, Mr. Ban‘s spokesperson Michele Montas
told reporters.

Quartet members will meet with Israelis and Palestinians and will then hold a separate meeting
with members of the Arab League to follow up on the Arab Peace Initiative, Ms. Montas added.
In northern Lebanon, fighting has again resumed between Lebanese army forces and Fatah al-
Islam gunmen entrenched in the Nahr el-Bared refugee camp near the city of Tripoli. The
shelling today has been heavier than on previous days, the UN Relief and Works Agency for
Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) reported, and it has meant the agency is unable
to obtain first-hand information on the latest conditions for civilians living in the camp.

UNRWA estimates that about 5,000 people remain at Nahr el-Bared, less than two weeks after
the deadly clashes erupted in a camp that was home to about 31,000 people. Most refugees fled
to Tripoli or the nearby camp of Beddawi during lulls in the fighting.

DPR Korea: Ban Ki-moon says audit finds no large-scale diversion of funds
1 June - An external audit of the United Nations‘ activities in the Democratic People‘s
Republic of Korea (DPRK) has found there has been no large-scale or systematic diversion of
UN funds provided by the world body‘s agencies to help in humanitarian relief efforts,
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said today.

In a statement released by his spokesperson, Mr. Ban said the report by the independent UN
Board of Auditors ―does point to some of the difficulties‖ that UN agencies have had in
operating in the DPRK.
―On independence of staff hiring, foreign currency transactions and access to local projects, the
report identifies practices not in keeping with how the UN operates elsewhere in the world,‖ the
statement said, adding however that the allegations of large-scale diversion of funds by the
Pyongyang Government were not confirmed.
The Board‘s report has been sent to Mr. Ban – who requested such a review after allegations of
wrongdoing emerged in




                                                                                               62
January – and to the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions
(ACABQ), a UN budget watchdog. The statement from Mr. Ban‘s spokesperson stressed that
the Secretary-General expects the agencies involved – the UN
Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Children‘s Fund (UNICEF), the UN Population
Fund (UNFPA) and the UN Office for Projects Services (UNOPS) – ―to act upon the findings in
the audit as quickly and as transparently as possible.‖
He also believed several areas require follow-up in a subsequent audit phase, and he plans to
write to the Chairman of the
ACABQ to ask that the committee consider requesting the Board of Auditors continue its work,
including by visiting the DPRK.

This audit was triggered by press reports alleging that UNDP‘s own internal audits raised
concerns about payments being channelled improperly to the Government of the DPRK,
including to its nuclear programme.
After the issue came to light, Mr. Ban promised an external, system-wide probe of UN activities
in the field, calling first for a review of all UN activities, ranging from staff hiring to hard
currency, in the DPRK from 1998 to the present.
―Today‘s report represents the first results of this ongoing effort‖ to systematically probe the
world body‘s activities in the field, the spokesperson‘s statement said.
Also responding today, UNDP said that in spite of the challenging conditions posed by the
DPRK, the agency did not violate its own rules or regulations.

―Overall, we believe that the audit report confirms what we have said all along, namely that
UNDP had a relatively small programme in DPRK and certainly much smaller than the huge
figures that have been circulating,‖ with a budget of only $2 million to $3 million annually as
opposed to the hundreds of millions that have been reported, the agency‘s Director of
Communications, David Morrison, told journalists in New York.
He said that over the past decade, UNDP funds have added up to less than 2 per cent of all
development assistance that has gone into DPRK and only approximately 0.1 per cent of foreign
currency inflows into the country.

Mr. Morrison also stressed that any international operation in the DPRK involves payment
either in hard currency or in local currency. UN agencies, international non-governmental
organizations (NGOs), foreign diplomatic missions and tourists must pay in either hard
currency or the DPRK won, in which case hard currency must be converted at a bank in the
country, with currency entering the country either way.
Although the audit report contained findings suggesting that UDNP had made certain payments
directly in hard currency instead of converting it at the local bank and using DPRK currency,
Mr. Morrison pointed out that there are no restrictions on utilization of foreign money in the
agency‘s financial rules and regulations.

Another topic in the Board‘s purview was the hiring of Pyongyang Government employees on
secondment from national ministries as local staff, which, in the DPRK, has ―always been of an
exceptional nature‖ and not in strict adherence with its policies in other countries, Mr. Morrison
said.
But these hiring practices have been in use for the almost three decades the UNDP has been
operational in the DPRK and thus the agency‘s board was well aware of it. Other UN agencies,
international NGOs and foreign diplomatic missions in the
DPRK employed the same hiring procedures.




                                                                                                63
Mr. Morrison also underscored how UNDP proactively undertook to reform their hiring and
currency practices prior to today‘s audit report. In January, the agency‘s Executive Board
adopted conditions to be implemented, including ending all hard currency payments and
discontinuing the sub-contracting of national staff via Government recruitment as of 1 March.

When the DPRK, which has been subject to Security Council sanctions since October following
its proclaimed nuclear test, failed to meet these conditions, UNDP suspended its operations in
the country on 2 March.
―We are continuing to review the report and we‘ll focus in particular on the useful suggestions
for where our rules and procedures could be strengthened,‖ Mr. Morrison said, pledging
UNDP‘s continued cooperation with the Board. ―This will be especially useful in clarifying the
basis for our operations in complex situations like in DPRK.‖

United States call for climate change summit ‘positive’ – Ban Ki-moon

1 June - Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today praised a call by the United States for a summit
of the countries that have the world‘s biggest emissions of greenhouse gases to discuss the
growing threat posed by climate change. Responding to a question about the call from US
President George W. Bush for such a gathering, Mr. Ban told journalists at UN Headquarters in
New York that he considered the summit request to be ―a positive statement‖ that shows Mr.
Bush ―has realized the urgency and importance of climate change.

―I hope such an effort by the United States will be mutually reinforcing the international
community‘s efforts, particularly led by the United Nations,‖ he said. ―I hope all such init
iatives, together with the efforts of the international community, will be discussed within the
UN framework.‖
Meanwhile, Mr. Ban heads tomorrow to Panama City, Panama, for a two-day visit highlighted
by his attendance at the opening of the Organization of American States (OAS) General
Assembly.
The Secretary-General is scheduled to meet OAS Chairman and Panamanian President Martín
Torrijos Espino and other Latin American officials in Panama City, before heading to Madrid
for the second leg of his three-country trip.
While in the Spanish capital, Mr. Ban will meet King Juan Carlos, Prime Minister José Luís
Rodriguez Zapatero and seniorofficials, and he will also visit the headquarters of the World
Tourism Organization.
The last leg of Mr. Ban‘s trip will be in Germany, where he will attend the summit of the Group
of Eight (G8) nations at
Heiligendamm and hold a series of bilateral meetings during his two-day visit next Thursday
and Friday.

War crimes trial of former Liberian leader at UN-backed tribunal to start Monday

1 June - The war crimes trial of Charles Taylor, the notorious former Liberian president, begins
on Monday with opening arguments in The Hague before the United Nations-backed Special
Court for Sierra
Leone (SCSL). Mr. Taylor faces 11 counts of war crimes, crimes against humanity and other
serious violations of international humanitarian law, including mass murder, mutilations, rape,
sexual slavery and the use of child soldiers, for his role in the decade-long civil war that
engulfed Sierra Leone, which borders Liberia.




                                                                                                64
The trial is expected to last until December 2008, with a judgement likely by mid-2009.
Prosecutors have indicated they plan to call up to 139 core witnesses.

A year ago the Security Council authorized the staging of Mr. Taylor‘s trial at The Hague in the
Netherlands, citing reasons of security and expediency. Although the trial will be held at the
premises of the International Criminal Court (ICC), it will remain under the exclusive
jurisdiction of the SCSL. The Special Court was established on 16 January 2002 by an
agreement between the Government of Sierra Leone and the
UN and is mandated to try ―those who bear greatest responsibility‖ for war crimes and crimes
against community committed in the country after 30 November 1996. So far 11 people have
been indicted.

UN refugee agency to aid newly arrived Sudanese in Central African Republic

1 June - The United Nations refugee agency has announced plans to delivery emergency aid to
Sudanese refugees who have recently fled attacks in the Darfur region and crossed into the
Central African
Republic (CAR). The flow of refugees, which over the pas t two weeks has seen at least 1,500
Sudanese arrive in Sam Ouandja, is continuing, according to the UN High Commissioner for
Refugees (UNHCR), which commissioned a registration team to travel to the area.

The team will take down names and other details of new arrivals at a special site set aside by
local authorities for the refugees, the agency said in a news release.
UNHCR is preparing a first delivery of some 600 rolls of plastic sheeting – enough for 3,000
people – which the refugees will use to prepare temporary shelters. Other UN agencies are
arranging the delivery of food, water and sanitation supplies.
On Monday, a team of UNHCR staff and representatives of other UN agencies and non-
governmental organizations (NGOs) reported from Sam Ouandja that most new arrivals were
women and children who had walked for 10 days from the town of Dafak in Darfur – a distance
of some 200 kilometres. They had used paths which are accessible only on foot or by donkey.
―I was touched by what I saw in Sam Ouandja,‖ said Bruno Geddo, UNHCR‘s representative in
CAR and leader of the inter-agency mission. ―Women were collecting mangoes and the men
were working on nearby farms to make some money.
Many families had begun building makeshift houses. There was a spontaneous settlement
coming up,‖ he said, adding that some refugees were selling their livestock.
Sudanese refugees
Mr. Geddo said the refugees had described how their homes had been bombarded by an
Antonov aircraft and helic opters and attacked on the ground by armed assailants whom they
alleged were Arab janjaweed militiamen. The attacks, which took place between 12 and 18
May, drove people from Dafak, a town of some 15,000 inhabitants. The refugees said there
were more air attacks as they fled.
Despite reports about the presence of armed groups among the refugees, ―The joint mission did
not find evidence of the presence of armed or otherwise suspicious elements in the group,‖ said
Mr. Geddo. UNHCR has pledged to continue to monitor the situation closely.

The refugees said they would not return to Darfur until their safety could be guaranteed,
according to the agency. Many expressed fear of further attacks and asked the CAR authorities
to provide added protection in Sam Ouandja, which was attacked earlier this year by CAR
rebels. The town suffers from a shortage of food and medical supplies. Schools are closed as
many of the teachers fled last year.




                                                                                              65
CAR hosts some 8,200 refugees, mainly from the Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo
and Chad. There are also more than 200,000 internally displaced people in the country, UNHCR
said.

Meanwhile in Geneva, Elizabeth Byrs of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian
Affairs (OCHA) said the
CAR is one of the most forgotten countries in the world and its humanitarian crisis seemed to be
ignored by donor countries.
The Economy Minister of the Central African Republic, Sylvain Maliko, and the Humanitarian
Coordinator and Resident Coordinator, Toby Lanzer, are touring a number of European capitals
to draw the attention of officials to the situation.
On 30 per cent of the $80 million sought in the 2007 UN Appeal has been covered, Ms. Byrs
said. Later this month, development partners will meet to address the situation ahead of a
pledging conference planned for October.

Nearly one quarter of Somalis fleeing Mogadishu violence have returned – UN

1 June - The United Nations refugee agency today said that nearly a quarter of the hundreds of
thousands of people who fled deadly fighting in the Somali capital Mogadishu since this
February have gone back but insecurity is preventing more returns.
Of the approximately 391,000 people who left the city, up to 90,000 have returned so far,
primarily from the Shabelle and Bay regions in the war-torn country‘s south and centre.
―Living conditions in Mogadishu however remain difficult for returnees as for those who stayed
in the capital throughout the conflict,‖ the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
spokesperson Jennifer Pagonis told reporters in Geneva.
Garbage which has not been collected is piling up in many of Mogadishu‘s neighbourhoods,
and numerous schools have remained shuttered as well.

Additionally, people have complained that they have lost their livelihoods. Roadside traders, for
example, have complained that their businesses have been torn down by authorities who say
that the traders‘ structures pose a security threat.
UNHCR‘s partners describe the returns to the capital as a trickle, with most of those coming
back to Mogadishu mainly going to areas such as Waberi, Xamar, Jab-Jab and Medina districts
which were not affected by rounds of hostilities between insurgents and the Transitional Federal
Government (TFG) backed by Ethiopian troops.
Although some have been trickling back to Mogadishu, many others are reluctant to return due
to the security situation.
Others who were previously displaced in the capital and living in public build ings for over a
decade cannot return as their previous abodes have been taken over by the Government.

Some of those who have expressed a desire to go back to Mogadishu cannot afford the
transportation. Others have been further displaced since the Shabelle river has overflowed,
destroying homes and crops.
Earlier this week, a team comprising staff from UNHCR, the UN Office of the Coordination of
Humanitarian Affairs
(OCHA), the UN Children‘s Fund (UNICEF), the UN World Health Organization (WHO) and
UN Security visited Mogadishu to assess options for distributing more aid in the city. The team
met with the TFG, civil society and other partners on the ground to determine methods on
reaching 300,000 people as a one-time package to assist the needy.




                                                                                               66
OCHA announced yesterday that aid has been distributed to more than 90 per cent of those who
fled the capital, but voiced particular concern over the prevalence of acute watery diarrhoea,
which has killed nearly a thousand people, and the fact that some areas affected by the outbreak
remain inaccessible.

This April, UNCHR provided supplies to 50,000 displaced Somalis taking refuge in Afgoye and
other areas surrounding
Mogadishu. In concert with other organizations, the shelter and basic household supplies needs
for almost 70 per cent of those who fled the capital have been met.

Timor-Leste: UN official predicts peaceful poll, need for coalition

1 June - The head of the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (UNMIT) today
voiced optimism that upcoming parliamentary elections there will be as peaceful as the recent
presidential ballot, and predicted the possible need for a coalition government.
―They went much better than any one of us could have expected,‖ UNMIT chief Atul Khare
told reporters in New York today, referring to the two rounds of the presidential election in
April and May, which led to the swearing in of President José Ramos-Horta just weeks ago.
The biggest challenge following the upcoming parliamentary elections, Mr. Khare said, would
be the process of forming a government in the country.
―It is abundantly clear to me that with 14 political parties in the fray, possibilities of forming a
coalition government would have to be examined very carefully. It appears as practically
unlikely that that any political party would get a clear
majority,‖ he stated.
He pointed to the need to strengthen the security sector, taking into consideration of the future
role of the army and police.
Justice, governance and development will also require attention, he said.
―We trust that the new government, the new leaders, would be in a position to address these
challenges, supported by the United Nations, as they have been over the past several years,‖ Mr.
Khare said.

He said agreements recently signed by the parties will facilitate the upcoming polls.
The Political Party Accord covers basic principles of governance after the elections, committing
all parties to a constructive and inclusive democratic process for the new Government and
opposition.
The Code of Conduct signed by all political parties commits them, their candidates, their
representatives and supporters to accept the results, or to challenge them only in competent
courts, and to campaign positively through programmes of action not personal criticism of other
candidates.

Mr. Khare said the Accord ―bodes well for [the] development of a genuine multi-party, liberal
democracy‖ in Timor-Leste.
The UN Mission, deployed following an outbreak of deadly violence last year, is helping with
all aspects of the 2007 electoral processes, including technical and logistical support, electoral
policy advice and verification.

UN says 10 suspects held following cocaine seizure in Haiti

1 June - Working with the Haitian National Police, officers from the United Nations mission in
the country have helped to seize 420 kilogrammes of cocaine and take in 10 suspects. Five




                                                                                                     67
Haitian policemen, three civilians and two Colombians were taken by UN military escort to a
central judicial office in Port-au-Prince, the capital, during yesterday‘s operation, according to
the UN Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH).
Fourteen packages holding 420 kilogrammes of cocaine were taken from three vehicles headed
to the capital from Petit Goâve, said MINUSTAH in a news release, adding that the substance
will be sent to the United States Drug Enforcement Administration.
The operation was carried out in the framework of fighting the illicit drug trade in Haiti, which
has become a significant transit point, the mission said.

Bosnian Serb indicted on genocide charges handed over to UN tribunal

1 June - A Bosnian Serb ex-army officer and aide to the notorious army chief Ratko Mladic
was today handed over to the United Nations war crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslavia to
face genocide charges over the massacre of more than 7,000 Muslim men and boys at
Srebrenica. Zdravko Tolimir, 48, was transferred to the custody of the International Criminal
Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague in the Netherlands after being
detained by authorities yesterday in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Mr. Tolimir had been on the run
for two years before his arrest.
Mr. Tolimir, who served as Assistant Commander for Intelligence and Security of the Main
Staff of the Bosnian Serb army and reported directly to Mr. Mladic, faces charges of genocide,
conspiracy to commit genocide and numerous crimes against humanity, including
extermination, persecutions on political, racial or religious grounds, forcible transfer and
deportation.
His arrest and transfer means only the ICTY‘s two most wanted men, Mr. Mladic and former
Bosnian Serb president
Radovan Karadzic, remain fugitives from justice for crimes committed in Srebrenica. In total,
only five people of the 161 indicted by the Tribunal since it was set up in 1993 are still at large.

Prosecutors allege Mr. Tolimir has responsibility for the murder of thousands of Muslims at
Srebrenica in July 1995, when the town was supposed to be a UN-protected area. The
indictment also accuses him of making life unbearable for the civilian residents of Srebrenica
and Žepa and forcing them to leave the UN-protected areas.
Mr. Tolimir was involved in the murder of Bosnian Muslim prisoners being held in temporary
locations around eastern
Bosnia in 1995, the indictment states, including the summary execution of more than 1,700 men
and boys by an army detachment at the Branjevo Military Farm and the Pilica Cultural Centre.
The ICTY said today that Mr. Tolimir is scheduled to make his first appearance before the
Tribunal‘s trial chamber on Monday.

Millions suffering from mental illness need better care, says UN health agency

1 June - The United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) today called on countries to
provide a network of community health services to alleviate the hardships faced by the nearly
54 million people around the world suffering from mental disorders as well as those caring for
them.
―Not only are community health services more accessible to people living with severe mental
disabilities, these are also more effective in taking care of their needs compared to mental
hospitals,‖ stated Benedetto
Saraceno, WHO‘s Director of Mental Health and Substance Abuse.




                                                                                                   68
―Community mental health services are also likely to have less possibilities for neglect and
violations of human rights, which are too often encountered in mental hospitals,‖ he added.
The call for community mental health services came during WHO‘s Global Forum for
Community Mental Health, which concluded in Geneva yesterday and which, for the first time,
included the participation of people living with mental disorders. In addition to the nearly 54
million people suffering severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar affective
disorder, WHO estimates that 154 million suffer from depression.
―This topic should matter to everyone, because far too many people with mental disorders do
not receive any care,‖ said Catherine Le Galès-Camus, Assistant Director-General of WHO‘s
cluster on Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental
Health. According to WHO, mental disorders are increasingly prevalent in developing
countries, the consequence of persistent poverty-driven conditions, the demographic transition,
conflicts in fragile States and natural disasters. At the same time, more than 50 per cent of
developing countries do not provide any care for persons with mental disorders in the
community.
―The challenge is to enhance systems of care by taking effective local models and disseminating
them throughout a country.
[The Forum] was about showcasing models which are proving effective in delivering mental
health care in resourcechallenged situations,‖ added Dr. Le Galès-Camus.

Oscar-winning actress helps UN launch global race for safe water

1 June - Two-time Academy Award winner Hilary Swank today helped kick off a race to bring
safe drinking water to 20 million people by 2015 at a United Nations Headquarters ceremony
that included live world music and students that have raised funds for water and sanitation
projects.
―We‘re gathered here to acknowledge that for over one billion people on this planet, safe
drinking water is simply not available,‖ the Hollywood actress said at the launch in New York
of the first-ever around-the-world relay race to raise funds and spread awareness about the need
for safe drinking water.
Applauding the men and women taking part in the race – known as the Blue Planet Run – Ms.
Swank said, ―Because of your efforts on behalf of the one billion people who struggle daily to
get the water they need to stay alive, I know I‘ll never take a glass of water for granted again.‖

The UN Works Programme and the UN Fund for International Partnerships (UNFIP) organized
today‘s launch to send off the international team of 20 runners who will run 24 hours a day in
10-mile individual relay segments for 95 days.
Starting today in New York, the team will run along a route that includes the United States,
Ireland, the United Kingdom,
France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, Belarus,
Russia, Mongolia, China, Japan and Canada. Each runner will sprint 10 miles a day and batons
will be passed at over 1,500 exchange points. The Run will end back in New York on 4
September.

Blue Planet Run Foundation has already funded 135 projects in 13 countries and provided safe
drinking water to 100,000 people. The Run will take place every two years, alternating between
the northern and southern hemispheres.

UN refugee agency hails crews saving lives at sea, urges coastal States to do more




                                                                                                69
1 June - Spotlighting the plight of people in distress trying to reach Europe by sea, the United
Nations refugee agency today hailed the humanitarian response of some crews while urging
Mediterranean States to respond more to calls for help.
The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) ―understands the challenges posed by the
repeated arrivals of mixed groups of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees in various
Mediterranean countries but emphasizes that the need for assistance to people in distress at sea
should remain the first priority,‖ agency Jennifer Pagonis told reporters in Geneva.
She called attention to the plight of at least 53 people of mostly Eritrean origin who went
missing more than a week ago between Libya and Malta. The group – including 28 women and
6 children – was last seen by the Maltese armed forces aboard a boat off the south coast of
Malta on 21 May.
UNHCR recently received indications that the group might be in Libya and contacted the
country‘s authorities, but so far has had no success in finding the missing.
Ms. Pagonis hailed the efforts of Italian and Spanish crews who responded to distress calls.
While searching for the missing
53, the Italian crew located another group of 27 sub-Saharan nationals who had been clinging to
fishing nets attached to a
Maltese fishing boat for ―three excruciatingly hot days and freezing nights,‖ she said.
The group had received limited water and fruit from the fishing boat‘s crew, but was not
allowed access to the vessel. The Italian Navy later rescued them and took them to Lampedusa,
where they received assistance and would have access to national screening procedures, the
agency said.

In a separate incident on 25 May, the Italian coast guard picked up another group of 52
individuals, including a child and seven women, who had been spotted by a Maltese aircraft but
did not send out a distress call, according to UNHCR.
A day later, a Spanish fishing boat rescued 26 people – mainly from Côte d‘Ivoire – on a
sinking boat about 100 nautical miles from both Libya and Malta and provided them with water,
food, blankets and assistance. After their efforts to disembark in Libya and Malta were blocked,
they were accepted for disembarkation in Spain, Ms. Pagonis said.

―UNHCR is grateful for the prompt humanitarian response by the Italian and Spanish crews
who made the saving of lives their priority and in this context calls on all coastal States to fulfil
their international obligation in respect of the law of the sea,‖ she said, appealing ―to
governments to strengthen coordination and cooperation in rescue operations to ensure that such
incidents do not occur again.‖

45 sites nominated this year for inclusion on UNESCO World Heritage List

1 June - The committee that oversees requests for inscription on the United Nations
Educational,
Scientific and Cultural Organization‘s World Heritage List will have 45 nominated sites to
choose from when it meets for its annual session next month in New Zealand, UNESCO has
announced.
The nominated sites this year include 11 natural sites (one of which is an extension to a site
already listed), 32 cultural sites and two mixed sites, according to a press release issued by
UNESCO yesterday.
Some 39 countries are presenting sites for inscription, while two of the nominated sites cross
national boundaries.




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The 21-member World Heritage Committee, comprised of representatives of the 184 States
Parties to UNESCO‘s 1972
Convention on the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage, is holding its annual
session in Christchurch from
23 June to 2 July.
Each year the committee adds new sites to the World Heritage List, and there are now 830 sites
of ―outstanding universal value‖ that have been inscribed – including 644 cultural sites, 162
natural sites and 24 mixed sites.
Under the nominating process, States Parties propose sites, and their applications are reviewed
by either the International Council on Monuments and Sites or the World Conservation Union
before the committee decides whether to inscribe the sites on the World Heritage List.

This year‘s nominated sites come from the following countries: Albania, Argentina, Australia,
Austria, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Canada, China, Czech Republic,
Finland, France, Gabon, Germany, Greece, India, Iraq, Israel,
Italy, Japan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Mexico, Namibia, Philippines, Poland, Republic
of Korea, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan,
Turkmenistan, Ukraine, the United Kingdom and Viet Nam.
During the session in Christchurch, the committee will examine the state of conservation of 31
World Heritage sites which have been inscribed on a separate list of World Heritage in Danger
because of threats from natural disasters, pillaging, pollution, poorly managed mass tourism or
other problems.

That list includes the cultural landscape and archaeological remains of the Bamiyan Valley in
Afghanistan and the Okapi Wildlife Reserve in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the
Congo (DRC).
A working session will be devoted to the state of conservation of the Old City of Jerusalem and
its Walls, UNESCO said, adding the session would focus in particular on the recent
archaeological excavations at the Mughrabi ascent.
The committee will also examine a strategy to reduce the risks to World Heritage sites posed by
disasters, the impact of climate change and the definition of the concept of ―outstanding
universal value,‖ which serves as the basis for inscription on the list.

Te Wahipounamu (New Zealand) UN refugee agency mobilizes lawyers to address
statelessness in Montenegro
1 June - Over one hundred people in Montenegro have recently received assistance from
lawyers mobilized by the United Nations refugee agency as part of stepped-up efforts to fight
statelessness in the Balkans country.
The UN High Commissioner for Refugees‘ (UNHCR) legal aid implementing partners have
assisted thousands of displaced persons in Montenegro since 1998, the agency said in a news
release. ―They are focusing increasingly on the issue of statelessness and, since November last
year, have helped 146 people in Montenegro obtain proof of birth and/or nationality.‖

The agency said it is working to better assess the number of people at risk of statelessness in
Montenegro in order to develop a comprehensive and lasting solution to the problem. By some
estimates, up to 6,500 members of the Roma, Ashkaelia, and
Egyptian population may be at risk due to lack of documents.
―Without proof of citizenship, people slip through the cracks in society and they are cut off
from important rights,‖ said




                                                                                                  71
Maja Lazic, coordinator for UNHCR‘s regional legal aid project. ―Conversely, without
registered, documented inhabitants,
States are unable to effectively govern their populations.‖
The agency said solving the problem will require continued legal assistance and outreach
campaigns, as well as advocacy for a more active, open and transparent approach by the State
bodies responsible for birth registration.
It also called for improved access for displaced persons to documentation in Serbia.

====================================================================




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  DAILY PRESS BRIEFING BY THE OFFICE OF THE SPOKESPERSON FOR THE
                        SECRETARY-GENERAL
1 June 2007
==================================================================

      The following is a near-verbatim transcript of today‘s noon briefing by Michèle Montas,
Spokesperson for the Secretary-General.

       Good afternoon all.

       **Guest at Noon

       The guest at the briefing today is Atul Khare, Special Representative of the Secretary-
General for Timor-Leste and Head of the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste.
He will be briefing you on the situation in that country.

       **Security Council

        Today is the first day of the Belgian presidency of the Security Council. The Secretary-
General briefed the Security Council a short while ago, expressing concern at the volatile and
tense situation in the Middle East as evidenced by the intra-Palestinian violence in Gaza and
violence between the Israelis and Palestinians.

        In northern Lebanon, the Secretary-General noted that heavy fighting resumed this
morning. He expressed his concern about the threat posed to Lebanese sovereignty and stability
as a result of these clashes. He said he had spoken to several regional leaders to help alleviate
the situation. He then briefed on the Quartet‘s meeting, the fourth he attended since taking
office. You have seen the Quartet‘s communiqué.

        The Secretary-General said the Quartet also addressed the bilateral and regional tracks.
The Quartet, he said, expressed support for the ongoing bilateral meetings between President
Abbas and Prime Minister Olmert. In order to continue the momentum, the Quartet decided to
meet on 26 and 27 June in the region, and take the important steps of meeting with Israelis and
Palestinians and then to hold a separate meeting with members of the Arab League to continue
to follow up on the Arab Peace Initiative. The Secretary-General is now engaging in a
question-and-answer session.

       On Monday morning, Belgian Ambassador Johan Verbeke will chair the Council‘s
closed-door consultation on the programme of work for the month of June. And we expect him
to come to this room soon after, at about 12:30, to brief you on that programme.

       ** Lebanon

        The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East
(UNRWA) has confirmed that the fighting has resumed between the Lebanese Army and
Islamist fighters entrenched in the UN-run Nahr al-Bared camp for Palestinian refugees, near
Tripoli in northern Lebanon. UNRWA says that the shelling today has been heavier than on
previous days, and some 5,000 refugees are believed to still be in the camp.




                                                                                                 73
         Because of the heavy fighting, UNRWA has been unable to obtain first-hand
information on developments inside the camp and to assess conditions for civilians. As soon as
information is available, we will update you on what UNRWA and other agencies are doing to
assist the beleaguered civilians in the camp.

       **Secretary-General Travels

        The Secretary-General will depart this Saturday for Panama City, Panama, where he will
attend the opening of the Organization of American States (OAS) General Assembly. During
his two day stay in Panama, the Secretary General will meet with the President of Panama and
current chairman of the OAS, Martín Torrijos Espino, and other Latin American officials.

       The Secretary General will be in Madrid next Tuesday for an official visit. He will have
an audience with His Majesty the King of Spain, and meet with the Prime Minister José Luís
Rodríguez Zapatero, as well as other Spanish officials. The Secretary-General will also visit the
headquarters of the World Tourism Organization in Madrid.

       On the 7th and 8th, the Secretary-General will attend the G-8 Summit at Heiligendamm
and will hold a number of bilateral meetings during his two day stay in Germany. The
Secretary-General will be back at Headquarters next weekend.

       **Statement on Democratic People‘s Republic of Korea

       I have a statement attributable to the Spokesperson for the Secretary-General:

      The UN Board of Auditors have handed in their report on the activities of the UN
Development Programme, the UN Children‘s Fund and the UN Population Fund in the
Democratic People‘s Republic of Korea. The Secretary-General has also received a copy.

        The report does point to some of the difficulties UN funds and programmes have had in
operating in the DPRK. On independence of staff hiring, foreign currency transactions and
access to local projects, the report identifies practices not in keeping with how the UN operates
elsewhere in the world. It should be noted that the report does not indicate that large-scale UN
funding has been systematically diverted, as has been alleged. However, the Secretary-General
does expect the agencies to act upon the findings in the audit as quickly and transparently as
possible.

        As the report also indicates, there are a number of areas that the Secretary-General feels
would require follow-up in a subsequent audit phase. The Secretary-General will write to the
Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ)
asking that the Committee consider requesting the Board of Auditors to continue their work,
including a visit to the DPRK.

         The Secretary-General had called for this audit in January 2007 as the top priority in a
systematic worldwide probe of United Nations activities in the field. Today‘s report represents
the first results of this ongoing effort.

       For your information, I am told that UNDP will submit its management response to the
ACABQ, and David Morrison of UNDP will be here at 1 o‘clock to give the highlights of that
response.




                                                                                                 74
       **Charles Taylor

       On Monday, the Special Court for Sierra Leone will open the trial of former Liberian
President Charles Taylor in a courtroom at the International Criminal Court in The Hague.

        Taylor was indicted in March 2003 in a 17-count indictment for crimes against
humanity, war crimes and other serious violations of international humanitarian law. The
indictment was ordered kept under seal until June 2003. Then, in March 2006, the Special Court
approved an amended indictment reducing the number of counts to 11, including acts of
terrorism, unlawful killings, looting and pillaging, sexual slavery and the use of child soldiers.

      The Special Court has prepared fact sheets and background materials on the case, and
we have some copies available upstairs in my Office.

       ** Haiti

       The UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) says that Haitian police, working
with UN Police, yesterday seized some 420 kilograms of cocaine and detained 10 suspected drug
smugglers and traffickers. Among those detained are 5 Haitian police officers and 2 Colombian
and 2 Haitian nationals.

       The Mission says that the cocaine shipment was en route to the capital Port-au-prince from
the town of Petite Goave. It was handed over to the US Drug Enforcement Agency while the
detained individuals were rendered into the custody of the Haitian police in Port-au-Prince.

       ** Central African Republic

        In the Central African Republic, a team from the UN High Commissioner for Refugees has
arrived in the town of Sam Ouandja to begin registering roughly 1,500 Sudanese refugees. They fled
on foot from their village in Sudan, some 200 kilometres away, following attacks there. UNHCR is
preparing to deliver 600 rolls of plastic sheeting for temporary shelters, while other agencies are
arranging the delivery of food, water and sanitation supplies.

       ** Somalia

        Meanwhile, in Somalia, UNHCR says roughly one quarter of the nearly
400,000 Somalis displaced from Mogadishu have now returned. Living conditions in the
capital, however, remain difficult, with no electricity or running water and sanitation a major
concern, UNHCR says. There is more information in UNHCR‘s briefing notes upstairs.

       **World Environment Day

        This morning, the Secretary-General addressed the annual student observance of World
Environment Day -- which is next Tuesday. Speaking to those gathered in the Dag Hammarskjöld
Library Auditorium, as well as students video linked from around the world, the Secretary-General
stressed that the world cannot continue with ―business as usual‖ when it comes to the grave and
growing effects of climate change.




                                                                                                  75
        He urged developed countries to do much more to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to
support clean development in fast-growing economies and to help countries facing the greatest
threats from climate change. We have the full text of his remarks upstairs.

       That is all I have for you. I also have the ―Week Ahead‖ for you. Any questions?

       **Questions and Answers

       Question: We had a story from Amsterdam saying that the families of the victims of the
Srebrenica massacre are suing the Netherlands and the United Nations in a civil suit in the
Netherlands for allowing the killings to happen. Is there any reaction to that? And then I‘ll go
on to Sudan.

       Spokesperson: We have no reaction yet. We are aware of it and, certainly, this will be
followed very closely.

        Question: On Sudan, the African Union has not, repeat not, approved the hybrid plan
and, in fact, has some changes despite all the talk that it is going to Sudan, and so forth. Do you
have a comment on it, or do you know why it has not been approved and is it going to affect the
commanding control structure, which is important to the UN, to get funding from the General
Assembly?

       Spokesperson: Since you wrote your story, which I read, there has been some
agreement on some textural changes and these should be brought shortly. It seems to be going
forward.

       Question: Agreement by whom?

       Spokesperson: Between the UN and the AU about some of the wordings.

       Question: Have they submitted a new text?

       Spokesperson: I would not say it is a new text. There are some changes.

       Question: They still have to look at it now?

       Spokesperson: Yes, they still have to discuss it.

       Question: On climate change, how does the Secretary-General view the plan outlined by
President Bush yesterday?

       Spokesperson: The Secretary-General welcomes the positive engagement by President
Bush. This is perhaps, he thinks, the defining issue of our time. We need the positive
engagement of all leaders, which is why the Secretary-General also welcomes recent
announcements by leaders around the globe, including the European Union, the United
Kingdom, Japan and Mexico and the declared intentions by leaders in China and India to come
forward with their own strategies. This is the kind of high-level mobilization that we need to
see.




                                                                                                 76
        Question: When you say ―we are aware of‖ regarding the question of the possible suit
by the -- actually it is already going on -- by the ―Mothers of Srebrenica‖, that is how they call
themselves, what does it mean actually that you are aware? Are you preparing a battery of
lawyers? You are aware that you are going with a kind of political statement?

       Spokesperson: We are waiting for this to be introduced into a court, and then we will be
following the court process, the judicial process.

        Question: How seriously is that accepted at the UN here, since it seems to me that,
before, it was going on at various levels and then it was evaporating somehow from the map of
engagement?

       Spokesperson: If it is introduced in the court, it will not evaporate.

       Question: They will sue the United Nations?

       Spokesperson: This is what I will have to find out from the Legal Office.

         Question: I have two questions on two different subjects. First, on Charles Taylor. Do
we have any sense about the level of preparations of the defence team, because oftentimes we
hear these stories from the point of view of the Court? Do we have any sense of what is
happening with the defence team? And then also, can we have an idea of the witness list? Then
the second question is about the Office of the Special Adviser on Africa. It is now one month
that the Under-Secretary-General has left and there is no replacement. This is beginning to draw
a little bit of apprehension among the African delegations. The question is, when is the
Secretary-General going to appoint another Under-Secretary-General for that office?

        Spokesperson: Your second question, right now, there is an examination of a number of
posts, as you know, and interviews are being done and the post of Special Adviser for Africa is
being discussed like other posts. There is going to be the wider picture first, all the different
candidates from different regions, with different merits. The process is being pursued. This is
definitely one element which is going to be examined.

        On your first question, on Charles Taylor, we have upstairs all the information you need
about the court proceedings, and you can have that also on the website. And the defence had the
possibility -- and that is why we are at the point. That we have 11 counts now instead of the
original counts against Charles Taylor. You can certainly get all the arguments from all sides on
the web and in our Office.

        Question: I have two questions on different subjects. The first one is not yet on North
Korea. It has to do with an event that took place outside today on the North Lawn -- Blue Planet
Run, Dow Chemicals and this UN Office of Partnerships. I guess my question is, there was a
protest. People pulled out a banner criticizing Dow Chemical‘s environmental record. They were
escorted off by guards. I followed to cover it and was told I couldn‘t go back and cover the event.
So I am wondering -- I don‘t think it was the guards‘ fault -- but I am wondering if the UN has a
policy on allowing press access if there are in fact non-violent protests of either events on UN
properties

        Spokesperson: Well, I am not aware of the incidents you are mentioning, and I will
certainly try to find out.




                                                                                                     77
        Question: But more exactly on the policy. They say, go back and cover the event, and I
say, well if you are detaining people from protesting. And I guess if the UN could say, whether
in partnering with Dow Chemical in this event, there was any issue raised about either Dow
Chemical‘s environmental records or existing... Amnesty International has an action against
them for…

       Spokesperson: I will find out what the incident was. I was not aware of it.

       Question: Very good. And the other thing about it, and I understand that we will have
David Morrison in here, so I want to ask you about non-UNDP issues. It seems -- just speed-
reading the recommendations -- it says among other things that there were no internal audits
done by the UNOPS organization and that UNICEF… that there were two recommendations
that were not acted upon. Are we going to have any briefing by UNOPS or UNICEF?

        Spokesperson: Well, I‘ll first say one thing, I don‘t know if you will have any briefing
or not, I will say that I will not comment on the report that is in the hands of the ACABQ at the
moment. I will not make any more comments on this.

       Correspondent: I just wanted to see to procedural issues.

       Spokesperson: We‘ll see.

        Question: And another thing is that it doesn‘t mention the WFP, but WFP obviously is
active in North Korea and they said they were arranging for an audit through their own separate
mechanism.

       Spokesperson: It is a separate audit.

       Question: Will that be released here? Will that also go to ACABQ?

       Spokesperson: Well, if it is going to be released, it is going to be released by the WFP.

       Question: Right, but does it go to ACABQ here in New York?

       Spokesperson: I will try to find out for you what process this specific audit will follow,
but you can ask questions about UNDP to David Morrison. He will be here at 1 o‘clock.

        Question: As you know, Norway has started to direct aid to the Palestinian Government
led by Hamas. Since the UN is a part of the Quartet and has a policy, how does it view the
action taken by Norway?

       Spokesperson: I think it is a decision taken by Norway, and it is an independent
decision. We don‘t have any specific comments on it.

      Question: Would it have an impact on the United Nations attitude towards the Hamas
Government?




                                                                                                78
        Spokesperson: Well, the United Nations has always been helping the Palestinian
Authority in a number of ways, so that does not affect in any way the way we deal with the
Palestinian Authority.

                                            * *** *




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