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					6th Grade Science




                    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   Cite: http://revolution.3-cities.com/~dunigan/moving_car.gif
                     Unit 1
               Matter and Motion
Chapter 2: The Properties of Matter
Section 1: What Is Matter?
Section 2: Describing Matter

Chapter 3: States of Matter
Review the States of Matter

Chapter 4: Matter in Motion
Section 1: Measuring Motion
Section 2: What is Force?
Section 3: Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion
Section 4: Gravity: A Force of Attraction
                      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                         What is Matter?

•   Cite: http://www.magicaweb.com/alienplaces/ice/ice4.jpg




                                                               Cite: http://www.bridgebuilder.plus.com/galleries/html02/images/Plasma-gems.jpg


Chapter 2 Section 1                                    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?
                          Chapter 2 Section 1


                      What Do You Think?


                      What is matter?




Chapter 2 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?

    Matter is
    everything that
    has mass and
    volume.




Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?


    Matter takes up space. This is
    known as volume.
    No item can take up the space of
    another object.



Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?

    Activity


  Let’s prove that no object can take up the space of
  another object.
  1. Crumple a piece of paper and tightly fit it in the
  bottom of a clear plastic cup.
  2. Turn the cup upside down and lower the cup in a
  bucket of water.
  3. Why didn’t the paper get wet?


Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for lab.
                      What is Matter?

    Liters and milliliters
    express volume of
    liquids.
    Use a graduated
    cylinder to measure
    volume.
    Measure the
    meniscus or the
    bottom of the curve.

Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                        Cite: http://www.morrisonlabs.com/images/volumexamples/662meniscus.jpg
                      What is Matter?

   Activity


    To practice finding volume go to the
    following website:
    http://www2.newpaltz.edu/~gaines79/pow
    erpoint_files/frame.htm



Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                      See speak note for lab.
                      What is Matter?

    Solid Volume is
    expressed in
    cubic units- cm3
                                                         1cm

    Volume= length                                             1 cm

    x width x height.                                 1 cm




Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?
Measuring the Volume of Solids
    Follow the step to find the volume of a solid.

    1. Record your volume of liquid in a graduated
    cylinder.
    2. Drop in a solid object.
    3. The water level will rise.
    4. Record new level of water.
    5. Find the difference between the old water level
    and the new water level.
    6. Record the volume of the solid in units cubed.
    7. This is known as displacement.

Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?




Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?

    Mass is the amount
    of matter that
    something is made
    of.
    Mass is expressed in
    units of grams (g)
    and milligrams (mg).



Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                      Cite: http://www.arborsci.com/images/Triple_beam.jpg
                      What is Matter?


Mass is the matter an object is made up of.
Mass is constant.
Mass is found using a balance.
Mass is measured in mg, g, kg.




Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Matter?


Weight is due to gravitational force.
Weight varies in relationship to the Earth.
Weight is found using a spring scale.
Weigh is measured in newtons.




Chapter 2 Section 1      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Let’s Review


                      1. What is matter?




Chapter 2 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer


 Matter is anything that has volume
              and mass.




Chapter 2 Section 1   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                        Let’s Review



 2. How               is volume measured? How
                       is mass measured?



Chapter 2 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer


      Volume of a liquid is measured using a
                graduated cylinder.
      Volume of a solid can be measured by
         • l x w x h or by displacement.
     Mass of an object is measured by using a
                      balance.

Chapter 2 Section 1   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Describing Matter




Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
    How Can Matter Be Measured and
         Describing Matter
             Compared?
                      What Do You Think?

      If you had to describe an orange to
   someone who had never seen an orange,
         what would you tell the person?




Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Describing Matter

   Physical properties of matter can
   be observed or measured without
   changing the identity of the matter.




                       Cite: http://www.chem4kids.com/files/art/matter_states1.jpg


Chapter 2 Section 2                   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
      Describing Matter
Examples of Physical Properties

    Color               Ductility
    Odor                Malleability
    Thermal Conductivity
    Density             Solubility
    State
    Touch
Chapter 2 Section 2   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                   See speaker notes for more examples.
                      Describing Matter

      Density is the
      amount of matter in
      a given space.
                                                       Golf Ball
      Density =
      Mass/Volume
                                                            Ping Pong Ball

Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                               See speaker notes for lab.
                      Describing Matter

           Activity


   In a graduated cylinder,
   pour in different liquids.
   See which one goes to
   the top and which sinks to
   the bottom.
Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                       See speaker notes for materials.
                      Describing Matter

    Chemical
    properties
    describe matter
    based on its
    ability to change
    into new matter
    with different                         Cite: http://www.woodstone-corp.com/images/animation_fire_window.gif




    properties.
Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Describing Matter


      Flammability is
      the ability to burn.

      Oxidation is the
      reaction with
      oxygen to form
      rust.
Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Describing Matter

    Physical Changes effect one or more
    physical properties of a substance.
    Examples:
    Freezing water to ice
    Sanding a piece of wood
    Cutting your hair
    Doesn’t change the identity of the matter.


Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Describing Matter

   Chemical change happens when
   two or more substances are
   changed into one or more new
   substances with different
   properties.
                       Drop some effervescent
                        tables in water. How is
   Activity            this a chemical change?



Chapter 2 Section 2            Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                    Cite: http://www.ipl.be/private/Chimie/a_voir/archives/cestavoir1/Images/effervescent%20tablets.jpg
                      Describing Matter


   Change of color
   Heat
   Fizzing or foaming
   Production light or sound



                                                       See speaker notes for Core Lab.
Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Describing Matter


    Practice some examples of physical and
    chemical properties:

        http://www.quia.com/jg/320858.html




Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Pre-AP Extension

    Density is mass/volume.
    Determine the density of an
    unknown substance and use a
    graphing calculator to analyze
    data taken in a laboratory.


Chapter 2 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for lab.
                       Let’s Review


 1. Classify each of the following
  properties as either physical or
    chemical: reacts with water,
dissolves in oil, is blue, and doesn’t
       react with hydrogen.

 Chapter 2 Section 2     Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer

    Reacts with water- chemical
    Dissolves in oil- physical
    Is blue- physical
    Doesn’t react with hydrogen- chemical




Chapter 2 Section 2   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Let’s Review

     2. Hydrogen gas and oxygen gas can
    chemically combine to make water. How
    do the physical and chemical properties of
      the original substances (hydrogen and
       oxygen) differ from those of the new
                substance (water)?



Chapter 2 Section 2     Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer

       Hydrogen and oxygen are colorless
         gases and are not very dense.
       Hydrogen is flammable and oxygen
          enables substances to burn.
       Water is a liquid, is denser than the
        two gases, and is not flammable.


Chapter 2 Section 2   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Let’s Review

      3. Using one physical property,
      classify the following substance
       as a group: water, oil, mercury,
                 and alcohol.



Chapter 2 Section 2     Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer

     Accept any reasonable answer:
    All are liquid at room temperature.




Chapter 2 Section 2   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                         States of Matter




                  Cite: http://public.lanl.gov/alp/plasma/graphics.states/4states2.jpg


Chapter 3 Review Only                   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
          States States of
    What Are Threeof MatterMatter?

                        What Do You Think?
         What are the four states of matter?




Chapter 3 Review Only       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                        States of Matter


    The four states of matter are solid,
    liquid, gas, and plasma.
    Click here to review the four states of matter
    and their properties.
    Develop a concept map with the four
    states of matter and their properties.

Chapter 3 Review Only      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                    Pre-AP Extension


   Describe the characteristics of the
   primary three states of matter and
   observe matter moving from one
   state to another.


Chapter 3 Review Only   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for lab.
                      Measuring Motion




Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
          Measuring Motion
     What Are Three States of Matter?

                        What Do You Think?
                      How is motion measured?




Chapter 4 Section 1          Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion

    The object that
    appears to stay in
    place is a reference.
    When the object
    changes position in
    relation to a reference
    point over a period of
    time, the object is in
    motion.

Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion


    Earth surface
    Buildings
    Trees
    Mountains

Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion


    The rate at which an object moves is
    speed. Speed depends on distance and
    time.

    Units used for speed= m/s, km/h,
                         s= d/t
Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for Core Lab
                      Measuring Motion

    Velocity is the
    speed of an object
    in a particular
    direction.
    5km/h north
    Velocity = Speed
    + direction
    How does speed
    and velocity
    differ??
Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion

    Constant Velocity is if the speed and
    direction don’t change. It will follow a
    straight line.

    Change in velocity will occur if the
    speed or direction change= 5km/h
    south to 10 km/h south.
Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion

    Resultant Velocity is combining two
    velocities.

    When two velocities are moving in the same
    direction- add them together.
    When two velocities are moving in different
    directions- subtract.



Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for examples.
                      Measuring Motion

    Acceleration is
    the rate at which
    velocity changes.
    Increase in speed=
    positive
    acceleration
    Decrease in speed
    = deceleration                         Slow down

Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Measuring Motion

  The formula for average
  acceleration is

                      Acceleration= Final Velocity – Starting Velocity
                                     Time it takes to change velocity




Chapter 4 Section 1                Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion




                Cite: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5d/Acceleration.png




Chapter 4 Section 1                     Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion

    You are always
    moving because
    the Earth is always
    moving.
    Centripetal
    acceleration is
    acceleration that
    occurs in circular
    motion.
Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion
                                     Explain the potential and kinetic energy
    Energy is the                              in the picture below.
    ability to work.
    Potential Energy
    is the energy an
    object has because
    of its shape or
    position.
    Kinetic energy is
    energy in motion.
Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Measuring Motion



 Let’s practice some with speed and
 acceleration
 Click here




Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Pre-AP Extension


    A graph is a mathematical
    representation of a real life situation.
    Using the graphing calculator, explore
    the concepts of distance, time and
    velocity through physical motion.


Chapter 4 Section 1       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for lab.
                      Let’s Review



             1. What is a reference point?




Chapter 4 Section 1     Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer



    A reference point is an object that appears
     to stay in place relative to another object
       that is being observed, and is used to
     determine if the object being observed is
                      in motion.


Chapter 4 Section 1   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                            Let’s review

     Graph 1 represents speed                                                    Graph 2 represents speed
         or acceleration?                                                            or acceleration?




 Cite: http://www.halls41.freeserve.co.uk/quiz/GIF/graph6.gif       Cite: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5d/Acceleration.png




Chapter 4 Section 1                                 Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer


              Graph 1 shows speed
            Graph 2 shows acceleration




Chapter 4 Section 1   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Let’s review


   3. What is the difference between
          speed and velocity?




Chapter 4 Section 1    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer


     Speed does not include direction,
           while velocity does.




Chapter 4 Section 1   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Force?




Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Force?

                      What Do You Think?
      Where do you see force happening in
             the room around you.




Chapter 4 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Force?

Force is simply a push or a pull on an
object.




Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Force?


                      Scientists express force
                      using Newton (N)




Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Force?


    Motion doesn’t need to occur to exert
    a force on an object.
    For example: you sitting in a chair.




Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                      (Chair)
                      What is Force?

   More than one force can act on
   an object.
   Net force is the force that
   results from combining all the
   forces exerted on an object.
   For example : moving a piano.

Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                 See speaker notes for examples.
                      What is Force?

When the net force is greater than zero -
unbalanced force.
Unbalanced forces produce a change in
motion.
Soccer - what moves the ball? What
causes the piano to move?


Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      What is Force?

  When the net force is zero the
  object doesn’t move.
  –Light hanging from ceiling
  –birds nest in a tree
  –hat resting on your head


Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       What is Force?

What can force do?
 1. change the position of an object
 2. change the speed of an object
 3. change the direction of an object.



 Chapter 4 Section 2      Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                        What is Force?


Click here            and look at the following situations and
                      try to work out what would happen with
                      the balanced and unbalanced forces.




Chapter 4 Section 2           Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Pre-AP Extension


    The acceleration of an object
    depends on its mass and the
    initial force applied to it. Test the
    strength of different materials by
    applying compressive, tensile,
    and sheer force.
Chapter 4 Section 2       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for lab.
                      Let’s Review


1. Explain the differences between balanced
   and unbalanced forces, and explain how
  each force affects the motion of an object?




Chapter 4 Section 2     Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer


      Unbalanced Forces occur when the net
        force on an object is not zero, while
     balanced forces occur when the net force
     equals to zero. Unbalanced forces cause
       a change in an object’s motion, while
         balanced forces cause no change.


Chapter 4 Section 2   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Let’s Review

    2. In the picture, two
    dogs are playing tug
    of war. The arrow
    shows the direction in
    which the two dogs
    are moving. Describe
    how the speed,
    direction of motion,
    and position of the
    dog on the left is                    Cite: http://blogranger.typepad.com/photos/family_photos/tug_of_war.jpg
    changed by the other
    dog.
Chapter 4 Section 2     Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Answer


         The speed of the dog on the left is
       increasing because more force is being
          applied by the dog on the left. The
      direction of motion is to the left. The dog
         on the right is moving to the left also.



Chapter 4 Section 2   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion




 Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion

                       What Do You Think?

      Why are there signs everywhere at
      the pool that say “NO RUNNING”?




 Chapter 4 Section 3       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion

     Friction is a force that
     opposes motion between
     two surfaces that are
     touching.
     What is the force that stops
     this ball?
 Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion

     Friction occurs because the                                                         Surface of glass

     surface of any object is
     rough.
     Hills and valleys of one
     surface stick to the hills and
     valleys of another.

 Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Cite: http://grove.ufl.edu/~bratt/Manatee%20and%20Researches/Fractals/rough%20surface%20of%20%20a%20glass.jpg
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion

     Rougher surfaces
     create more friction-
     more hills and valleys                               Baseball on the grass

     Greater force creates
     more friction.
                                                    Bowling Ball on the grass.




 Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion


1. Sliding Friction - two objects are sliding       Sliding Friction
   across each other.
2. Rolling Friction- object rolling over a
                                                    Rolling Friction
   surface.
3. Fluid Friction- involves fluids and gases.
4. Static Friction- holds object in place
   until greater force is applied to move the       Fluid Friction

   object.
 Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                                       Static Friction
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion

       How can friction be harmful or
       helpful in a car?
                       Tires push against the
                       road to move car.


                          Friction
                          between
                          engine parts
                          wear down
                          parts faster.


 Chapter 4 Section 3           Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion


      – To reduce friction use lubricants such
        as motor oil, wax or grease.
      – Use rolling friction instead of sliding
        friction to make a job easier.
      – Make the surface smoother.

 Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
Friction: A Force That Opposes Motion



       1. Make the surfaces
       rougher.
       2. Increase the force-                       Push down on scrubber
                                                    to increase friction thus
       push the surfaces                            cleaning better.


       together.
 Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD    See speaker notes for lab.
                      Pre-AP Extension

    Friction is a force the resists
    motion. Study the effects of
    surface smoothness and the
    nature of materials in contact on
    sliding friction.


Chapter 4 Section 3       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for lab.
                      Let’s Review



       1. How can friction change the
            speed of an object?




Chapter 4 Section 3    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Answer



      Friction can speed objects up or
      slow objects down by increasing
            or decreasing friction.



Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Let’s Review



  2. Name three common items you
     might use to increase friction.




Chapter 4 Section 3    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Answer


                      Sticky tape
                         Sand
                      Work gloves



Chapter 4 Section 3    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Let’s Review



         3. List the type of friction and
                   explain each.




Chapter 4 Section 3    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Answer

    Sliding Friction - two objects are sliding
    across each other.
    Rolling Friction- object rolling over a
    surface.
    Fluid Friction- involves fluids and gases.
    Static Friction- holds object in place until
    greater force is applied to move the
    object.
Chapter 4 Section 3   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction




Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction

                      What Do You Think?

      Why is leaping on the moon easier
           than leaping on Earth?




Chapter 4 Section 4       Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction


Gravity is the force of attraction between
objects that is due to their masses.

Gravity can effect the position of an
object or the direction of an object.
                                     Property of NASA

Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction

All matter is affected by gravity because
all matter has mass.
Gravitational force pulls objects toward
each other.
Earth’s gravitational force is large thus
you must apply force to overcome its
gravity.
Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction

    There's a big gravity low off the coast of
    India, where there are thought to be the
    remains of some old mantle features
    associated with the plate tectonics of India
    that led it to collide with the Himalayas.
    There's a big gravity high in the South
    Pacific, also thought to be due to mantle
    structures. Click here to see an image of
    the Bumpy Earth, an exaggerated map of
    Earth's gravity field.
Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction




Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                                             Cite: http://www.spacedaily.com/images/gravity-earth-map-bg.jpg
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction

    The Law of Universal Gravitation
    states the unbalanced forces are needed
    to move objects and there is a
    relationship between gravitation
    force, mass, and distance.


Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
             Gravity: A Force of Attraction


       1. Gravitational                           2. Gravitational
       force increases as                         force decreases as
       mass increases.                            distance increases.




                                                     Sun has a huge
                                                     gravitational pull.
Small Mass        Large Mass
   Chapter 4 Section 4         Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction

    Weight is a measure of the
    gravitational force exerted
    on an object.

    100 grams = 1N

Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction



    Mass                                 Weight
    –Amount of                           –Changes when
     matter in an                         gravitational
     object doesn’t                       force changes.
     change.

Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
         Gravity: A Force of Attraction


      Activity

    Measure the mass and weight of
    several objects to verify the
    relationship between mass and
    weight on the surface of the
    Earth.
Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD   See speaker notes for lab.
                      Let’s Review



1. How does gravity affect the path
   of the a ball when you throw it?




Chapter 4 Section 4    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Answer



      Gravity pulls the ball downward
      after the ball leaves your hand.
     So the ball travels along a curved
                     path.


Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                      Let’s Review


 2. How does the distance between
  objects affect the gravity between
                them?



Chapter 4 Section 4    Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD
                       Answer



    As the distance between objects
    increases, the gravitational force
     between them decrease. As the
        distance between objects
    decreases, the gravitational force
        between them increases.
Chapter 4 Section 4   Fall 2005 Pflugerville ISD

				
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