STUDENT HANDBOOK OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL of YORK UNIVERSITY

Document Sample
STUDENT HANDBOOK OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL of YORK UNIVERSITY Powered By Docstoc
					   STUDENT HANDBOOK




OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL
                 of

    YORK UNIVERSITY
      Office of Student Services
             Fifth Edition
           September, 2000
PREFACE: OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL STUDENT HANDBOOK

Rules, procedures and institutions are perhaps inevitable in a community which revolves
around the study of law. In a legal community like Osgoode Hall Law School, with its
tradition of and commitment to a process of broadly based, participatory decision making,
the range of formalized standards and structures often appears daunting. This Handbook
is an attempt to bring together and organize the key guiding principles of life at the Law
School and to introduce the facilities which are most important to students attending
Osgoode.

Perhaps the most significant recent evolution in our rule making has been the creation of
norms and structures to promote genuine social inclusiveness. The Handbook details our
commitment to equality and the procedures in place to prevent discrimination and
harassment from impeding efforts to build a tolerant and multifaceted community at
Osgoode.

In addition to these core policies, the Handbook goes on to describe the many student
activities at Osgoode, which represent an extraordinary source of genuine affinity and
understanding within the Faculty. Also included is an introduction to the Law Library and
to the resources and services available at Osgoode Hall Law School, as well as York
University.

Please take the time to familiarize yourself with the Handbook. While rules and formal
structures will never alone ensure the continued well-being of our community, they
nonetheless represent a basis upon which to build toward ever-enhanced common
understanding and mutual respect.

                                                                       Office of the Dean




Student Handbook                          i                            September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK

WHO TO CONTACT WHEN YOU NEED ASSISTANCE WITH .....

 Issue                       Contact                     Location & Telephone #
 Equality Concerns, inside   Associate Dean              Room 222F; 736-5031
 and outside the classroom
 Examination Deferrals       Assistant Dean of Student   Office of Student Services;
                             Services                    736-5887
 Petitions and Grade         Records Coordinator         Office of Student Services;
 Reappraisals                                            650-8182
 Complaints about Non-       Associate Dean              Room 222F; 736-5031
 Academic Conduct
                             York University Complaint   103 Central Square;
                             Centre                      736-5144
 Academic and Non-           Student - Faculty           Student Chair of the
 Academic Concerns           Relations Committee         Committee (contact
 regarding the Quality of                                information available
 Legal Education                                         through the Legal and
                                                         Literary Society at 736-
                                                         5027)
 Race Relations              Associate Dean              Room 222F; 736-5031

                             York’s Centre for Race      108 Central Square;
                             and Ethnic Relations        736-5682
 Sexual Harassment           Associate Dean              Room 222F; 736-5031

                             York’s Sexual Harassment    108 Central Square;
                             Education and Complaint     736-5500
                             Centre

                             Sexual Assault Survivors    info: 736-2100, ext 40345
                             Support Line                crisis: 650-8056
 Disabilities                Office for Persons with     109 Central Square;
                             Disabilities                736-5140, TTY: 736-5263
 Counselling                 Counselling and             Behavioural Sciences
                             Development Centre          Building, Room 145;
                                                         736-5297




Student Handbook                        ii                         September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                             TABLE OF CONTENTS - OVERVIEW

       Preface .............................................................................................................. I

       Who to Contact When You Need Assistance ................................................... ii

       Table of Contents - Overview ........................................................................... iii

       Table of Contents - Detailed ............................................................................. iv

I:     Rights and Responsibilities of All Members of the Osgoode Community .......... I.1

II:    Academic Rules of Osgoode Hall Law School ................................................ II.1

III:   Policies and Regulations of York University ................................................... III.1

IV:    Student Government, Clubs and Activities .................................................... IV.1

V:     Osgoode Hall Law School Centres and Services ........................................... V.1

VI:    York University Centres and Services ........................................................... VI.1




Student Handbook                                            iii                                 September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                            TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

      Preface .............................................................................................................. i

      Who to Contact When You Need Assistance ................................................ ii

      Table of Contents - Overview ......................................................................... iii

      Table of Contents - Detailed ........................................................................... iv

I:    RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE OSGOODE
      COMMUNITY

      A.       Osgoode Hall Law School Equality Resolution ....................................                           I.1
               1.   Equality Resolution ....................................................................              I.1
               2.   Affirmation ...................................................................................       I.1
               3.   Teaching and Learning ...............................................................                 I.1

      B.       Osgoode Hall Law School Equality Procedures ...................................                            I.2
               1.   Academic Procedures .................................................................                 I.2
                    1.1    Standards of Conduct - General Principles ......................                               I.2
                    1.2    Procedures Regarding Equality Complaints in
                           Teaching and Curriculum .................................................                      I.2
               2.   Non-Academic Procedures .........................................................                     I.5
                    2.1    Standards of Student Conduct .........................................                         I.5
               3.   Complaints Procedure ................................................................                 I.5
               4.   Dispute Resolution Mechanisms for Student Complaints ...........                                      I.5
                    4.1    External Mechanisms ......................................................                     I.5
                    4.2    Internal Mechanisms .......................................................                    I.7

II:   ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL

      A.       Academic Credit ...................................................................................       II.1
               1.   Course and Hour Credit ............................................................                  II.1
               2.   First Year ..................................................................................        II.1
               3.   Perspective Options .................................................................                II.2
               4.   Second and Third Year ..............................................................                 II.2
               5.   Alternative Ways to Obtain Academic Credit ............................                              II.3
                    5.1    Law Journal ......................................................................            II.3
                    5.2    Legal Aid ..........................................................................          II.3



Student Handbook                                       iv                                          September 15, 2000
SECTION I:             RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                       OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY

A.     OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL EQUALITY RESOLUTION

1.     Equality Resolution

In furtherance of Osgoode Hall Law School's long-standing commitment to social justice and
equality in legal education, the legal profession, and the law generally, Faculty Council approved
the following Equality Resolution.

2.     Affirmation

Osgoode Hall Law School, its staff, students and faculty, subscribe to the public policy enunciated
in the preamble to the Ontario Human Rights Code*, and state expressly that they seek to do
everything possible to enhance that policy within the Law School community. To this end the Law
School affirms that every member of the community has a right to equal treatment without
discrimination, and in particular, without regard to race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic
origin, citizenship, creed, political orientation, sex, age, marital status, sexual orientation, family
status, or handicap.

*      The preamble to the Human Rights Code reads in part as follows:

       "Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of
       all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in
       the world and is in accord with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as
       proclaimed by the United Nations;

       And whereas it is public policy in Ontario to recognize the dignity and worth of every
       person and to provide for equal rights and opportunities without discrimination that
       is contrary to law..."

3.     Teaching and Learning

The faculty and students, in order to continue and expand efforts to promote freedom from
discrimination both within the Law School and in society at large, undertake to consider the
following measures in relation to teaching and learning:

a.     inclusion in teaching materials of works or references to works that demonstrate the impact
       of law on groups that are or have been subjected to discrimination, or inclusion in teaching
       materials of explanations for the omission of such works or references;

b.     placement of teaching materials that support or exhibit discrimination within a context that
       identifies their discriminatory nature and that invites open and critical comment on it;

c.     use of language in the classroom, in written materials, and in examinations that is free from
       discriminatory stereotypes and references;
d.     use of other measures, such as holding seminars about non-discriminatory teaching
       materials and methods, which demonstrate continuing sensitivity to the problems faced by



Student Handbook                               Page I.1                          September 15, 2000
SECTION II:            ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


A.    ACADEMIC CREDIT

1.    Course and Hour Credit

      1.1      Every course and seminar shall be assigned a value of 2, 3 or 4 credit hours,
      reflecting the time spent in formal class meeting or supervised research over one semester
      lasting approximately 14 weeks. (It should be noted that some intensive programs and
      research courses do have more than 4 credit hours. Please consult the Syllabus for a
      listing of the courses associated with the intensive programs and for the regulations
      concerning credit for research courses.)

      1.2   The method of evaluation in a course shall be such as to test a comprehensive
      knowledge of the subject matter in the course.

2.    First Year

      2.1     Every first-year student shall successfully complete the following prescribed courses:

      Fall Semester:

      Contracts                              4.5 credit hours
      Criminal Law                           4.5 credit hours
      Torts                                  4.5 credit hours
      Legal Dimensions                       0.0 credit hours
      Legal Research and Writing             taken over two semesters

      Winter Semester:

      Civil Procedure                        4.5 credit hours
      Constitutional Law                     4.5 credit hours
      Property Law                           4.5 credit hours
      Legal Dimensions                       0.0 credit hours
      Perspective Option                     2 or 3 credit hours
      Legal Research and Writing             4 credit hours

      2.2    In each semester, at least one course in each First Year section (other than Legal
      Research and Writing and the Perspective Option) shall be taught in a format that includes
      weekly small-group meetings with the course instructor.

      2.3     In each semester one instructor in the First Year section (other than the instructors
      in the Legal Research and Writing program and the Perspective Option) shall be
      designated the section coordinator. The section coordinator will help facilitate cooperation
      and coordination among the section instructors, help ensure an evenly balanced work-load
      in the section, coordinate with the Legal Research and Writing program and generally take
      an interest in the overall welfare of the section. The section coordinator will normally be the
      instructor responsible for the small-group program in that section.




Student Handbook                             Page II.1                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:            POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

A.      ACADEMIC HONESTY

A. Introduction:

Conduct that violates the ethical or legal standards of the University community or of one's
programme or specialization may result in serious consequences. The Policy on Academic Honesty
is a reaffirmation and clarification for members of the University of the general obligation to
maintain the highest standards of academic honesty. It outlines the general responsibility of faculty
to foster acceptable standards of academic conduct and of the student to be mindful of and abide
by such standards.

B. The Role of Faculty Members and Students:

A clear sense of academic honesty and responsibility is fundamental to good scholarship. Faculty
members should include consideration of academic honesty in both courses and research settings.
Such guidance is particularly important for students who assume independent roles as course
assistants or begin to conduct their own original work. Every student has a responsibility to abide
by these standards and, when in doubt, to consult with faculty members in order to determine a
proper course of action.

C. Pressures That May Lead to Academic Misconduct:

University education includes demands that might tempt some to violate standards of academic
honesty. There are pressures on students to achieve high grades, obtain financial support, meet
research or publication deadlines, gain recognition from the scholarly community, and secure
employment. Although faculty members can help students to maintain academic honesty despite
these pressures, each student has final responsibility for her or his academic honesty.

D. Serious Offences Against the Standards of Academic Honesty:

Note: This summary is not exhaustive. In some cases the University regulations on non-academic
discipline may apply. Some academic offences constitute offences under the Criminal Code of
Canada; a student charged under University regulations may also be subject to criminal charges.
Charges may also be laid against York University students for matters which arise at other
educational institutions.

Cheating: Cheating is the attempt to gain an improper advantage in an academic evaluation.
Among the forms this kind of dishonesty can take are: obtaining a copy of an examination before
it is officially available or learning an examination question before it is officially available; copying
another person's answer to an examination question; consulting an unauthorized source during an
examination; obtaining assistance by means of documentary, electronic or other aids which are
not approved by the instructor; or changing a score or a record of an examination result.

It is also improper to submit the work one has done for one class or project to a second class, or
as a second project, without getting the informed consent of the relevant instructors. Acceptance
of one piece of work that is submitted for two classes must be arranged beforehand. It is
understood that students may wish to build on previous research in the preparation of a paper but



Student Handbook                                Page III.1                        September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:            STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES


A.     STUDENT GOVERNMENT

1.     Legal and Literary Society

The Legal and Literary Society is the primary student government of Osgoode Hall Law School.
“Legal and Lit” was founded in 1876 and today is responsible for coordinating and funding the
numerous professional, athletic, social and extracurricular activities within the Law School. As well,
the Legal and Literary Society provides many student services which help to make our Law School
more than just a "mere classroom and casebook experience.”

The nine member executive of the Society is elected annually and represents Osgoode student
interests to the administration, York University and beyond. Students from each of the three years
of the LL.B. Program are represented on the executive and, as all students in the LL.B. Program
are members of the Society, all are encouraged to participate and become involved.

2.     Student Caucus of Faculty Council

Students are represented on the Faculty Council of Osgoode Hall Law School by sixteen student
representatives. As members of the Faculty Council, these student representatives enjoy the same
rights and powers as any faculty member and participate fully in all deliberations of Faculty Council
committees in addressing issues of an academic nature.

The mandate of the student representatives is to promote the welfare and interests of the students
of Osgoode Hall by representing their views as follows:

       a.      to generate for Council's consideration programs for the overall direction and
               development of the School;

       b.      to press for the enhancement of the quality of education and academic life in
               general at the School;

       c.      to participate fully and actively in the Law School community by exercising all rights
               and responsibilities delegated or granted by the School;

       d.      to safeguard the rights of individuals in the community (present and future) from any
               and all forms of discrimination;

       e.      to inform students of the School of the proceedings of Faculty Council; and

       f.      to stimulate student interest in the affairs of Faculty Council.

Student Caucus was created by the Legal and Literary Society in 1972. Currently, Student Caucus
is funded by the Legal and Literary Society and both the President and one other Council member
of the Society are voting members on Student Caucus.

B.     CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES



Student Handbook                               Page IV.1                          September 15, 2000
SECTION V:             OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES

A.     OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES

The Office of Student Services is responsible for student records, student programs, career
services and financial assistance. The Office of Student Services coordinates all aspects of a
student’s academic program, from admissions until convocation.

The Records Coordinator provides information and assistance with registration, student fees,
student records, transcripts and grade reports, examination grading numbers, averages and
academic standing, grade petitions, convocation eligibility, in-course scholarship, awards and
prizes. The Records Coordinator can be reached by telephone at (416) 650-8182.

The Programs Coordinator provides information and assistance with timetables, student programs
of study, student academic advising, course lottery and enrolments, course changes, and wait lists.
The Programs Coordinator can be reached by telephone at (416) 650-8183.


B.     LIBRARY

1.     General

The Law Library, with its collection of approximately 450,000 volumes (including microform) on five
floors, is the largest in the Commonwealth. Materials are selected to support the instructional and
research programs of the Law School as well as the rest of the University. The Law Library has
extensive holdings of both primary and secondary sources in the legal literature of Canada, Great
Britain, and other common law countries. There is also a wide selection of law journals, a
reference section of dictionaries, legal bibliographies, law lists, and directories, as well as all the
essential finding tools used for locating the relevant legal materials. The Law Library also has a
number of CD ROMs which can be reviewed at specified workstations near the Reference Desk.

The Library has an Electronic Research Centre where assistance by appointment is offered for
computer-assisted legal research. Access is available to Canadian, American, British and
Commonwealth legal and research databases such as Quicklaw, Westlaw and Lexis-Nexis as well
as to the CD ROMs.

2.     Borrowing Privileges

Library cards may be obtained by bringing your current York Sessional Identification Card to the
Circulation Desk in the Library. Registration at the Law Library Circulation Desk provides borrowing
privileges at all York University libraries. Fines are applied according the York University Libraries
fines schedule.

Regular Loan: Books and other materials designated for regular loan normally may be borrowed
for 14 days. Unless requested by another borrower, these materials may be renewed to a
maximum of three renewals by York University borrowers and once by external borrowers. Items
with more than one hold are loaned for 7 days only and are not renewable.




Student Handbook                               Page V.1                        September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

A.     ATHLETIC FACILITIES

The athletic facilities at York University are among the best at Canadian universities. The multi-
purpose Tait McKenzie Physical Education Centre on the York campus accommodates the majority
of popular sports in its two gymnasia, 25-metre swimming pool, eight squash courts and weight-
training, judo and wrestling rooms. Additional facilities on campus include an ice arena, 10 playing
fields, 19 tennis courts and a track and field centre.

The highlight of York's tennis facilities is the National Tennis Centre, a complex of 10 courts built
to international standards by Tennis Canada as the home of the Canadian Open Championships.
These courts are available to York students under a time-sharing agreement.

The Track and Field Centre, built jointly with the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto, is a world-
class complex. The field house features a four-lane, 200-metre banked synthetic track and a fully
equipped sports medicine clinic. Outdoor facilities include an eight-lane, 400-metre synthetic track
plus separate jumping and throwing areas.


B.     BOOKSTORE

The York University Bookstore is conveniently located in York Lanes. Over 50,000 titles of general
interest and new and used texts prescribed for courses are stocked. Books are priced at the
Canadian publishers’ or distributor’s recommended list prices, or their equivalents. Discounts and
special sale prices are frequently offered. The York University Bookstore also carries a wide
variety of stationery, insignia items and electronics.


C.     CHILDCARE CENTRE

The Co-operative Childcare Centre, located in Atkinson Residence on the York campus, is licensed
to serve 119 children between the ages of 6 weeks and 10 years.

The Centre has a subsidy agreement with Metro Toronto Social Services for parents in need.
Information concerning fees and the one hour participation per child per week may be obtained by
contacting the Childcare Centre:

       Address:        90 Atkinson Road, Apartment 128, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 2S5
       Telephone:      736-5190
       Fax:            736-5291
       E-mail:         daycare@yorku.ca


D.     COMPUTING SERVICES

In addition to the facilities in the Smalley-Baker Lab at Osgoode Hall Law School, two 24-hour-a-
day PC/MAC labs, located at Steacie Science Library Building, are also available to Osgoode
students. Short non-credit seminars are offered at the beginning of the academic year to provide



Student Handbook                              Page VI.1                        September 15, 2000
                               Osgoode Hall Law School
                                   York University

Additions and Corrections to the Student Handbook, Fifth Edition, September 2000
                              Issued September 2001

The following additions to the Academic Rules and the LL.B. Program of Osgoode Hall Law School
have been been approved by Faculty Council since the publication of the Fifth Edition of the Student
Handbook.

The headings and numbers in bold type are not part of the rules, but are provided for ease of use.

1. Admissions Mature Students

       That the minimum age requirement for mature student applicants who have
       completed at least two years of university education be increased from 26 to 30.

2. Upper Year Research and Writing Requirement

The following italicized provisions are to be inserted in the Academic Rules of Osgoode Hall Law School,
Part A: Academic Credit, as Rules 4.4.e and 4.6, respectively.

4.2    Prior to the end of May, each first and second year student shall prepare and file a plan of study for
       the next academic year.
                                             ... ... ... ... ... ... ..

4.4     Plans of study submitted for the second and third year shall comprise a program which:

                a.      lasts two semesters;
                b.      has an aggregate value of at least 60 credit hours (over the two years);
                c.      has a minimum value of 13 credit hours in each semester;
                d.      has a maximum value of 17 credit hours in each semester; and
                e.      includes a seminar, course or other option satisfying the Upper Year Research
                        Requirement in Rule 4.6 (in either year).

                                             ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

4.6     Upper Year Research Requirement

       a.       In either second or third year, each student shall successfully complete one of the following:

                i.      a seminar or designated course in which the student writes a research paper as the
                        primary mode of evaluation;
                ii.     a research paper under Rule 5.4;
                 iii.    a Research Program under Rule 5.5; or
                 iv.     a major writing requirement in a Joint Program involving Osgoode Hall Law
                         School and another faculty or department of the University.

        b.       For the purposes of this Rule:

                 i.      “seminar” includes a seminar taken in another faculty or department of the
                         University under Rule 5.9 or, with the permission of the Assistant Dean (Student
                         Services) or the Associate Dean, in another University;
                 ii.     “designated course” means a course or Intensive Programme designated by the
                         Assistant Dean (Student Services) or the Associate Dean;
                 iii.    a research paper constitutes the “primary mode of evaluation” when at least 60%
                         (or the equivalent) of the final grade in the seminar or course is based on the
                         research paper;
                 iv.     a “research paper” means a paper at least 8,000 words in length, excluding notes,
                         bibliography and appendices.

        c.       Prior to filing of plans of study under Rule 4.2, the Office of Student Services shall publish
                 a list of seminars and designated courses offered at Osgoode Hall Law School in the next
                 academic year.

The application of these rules are to be governed by the following transitional provision:

Rules 4.4.e and 4.6 shall apply to all students who commence their second year of the LL.B. program in the
Fall Semester of the Academic Year 2001-2002 but not to students who commenced their second year of the
LL.B. program prior to this time.

Explanatory Notes

Rule 4.6.a requires that the writing requirement be completed in the course of the second or third year. A
research paper completed during the student’s first year does not satisfy the requirement. The underlying
policy is that students should do a certain amount of research and writing at an advanced level, after they
have completed the basic groundwork in their first year.

Rule 4.6.b.ii specifies that “designated course” means a course designated by the Assistant Dean (Student
Services) or the Associate Dean. The purpose of this provision is to permit the Assistant and Associate
Deans to designate certain courses as qualifying for the purposes of the provision, where (for example) those
courses emphasize research and writing or have a sufficiently small enrollment to allow for adequate
supervision.

In Rule 4.6.b.iii, the phrase “or the equivalent” is intended to cover cases where a second mode of evaluation
exists but is not calculated as a percentage of the final grade; as, for example, where the final grade is based
both on a research paper and class participation, but class participation is only taken into account when it is
“Unsatisfactory”, in which case it lowers the final grade by one letter grade.




                                                       2
3. Policy on Curricular Streams

Establishment of Programs

1.     Faculty Council approves in principle the establishment of a number of curricular streams which will
       be described as “programs” in specific areas of study. Program streams will be recommended for
       initial approval to Faculty Council, in response to proposals from faculty groups. Their mandate will
       be renewed by Faculty Council every four years. However, incremental adjustments to the program
       of each stream, consistent with the mandate, may be made with the approval of the Academic Policy
       Committee (APC), without reference to Faculty Council.

2.     In general terms, and with due allowance for different approaches in different fields, these programs
       should possess the following characteristics:

               a)      they should involve a relatively broad, but related, array of courses, seminars and
                       other academic experiences
               b)      they should be deliberately structured to provide a variety of pedagogic and
                       intellectual experiences, arranged in ascending order of sophistication
               c)      they should provide doctrinal, theoretical, interdisciplinary, policy-focussed and
                       skills-related challenges for students, designed to enhance their analytical,
                       integrative, interpretative and presentational capacities
               d)      they should include an requirement for students to engage in an independent
                       research and writing project, the form of which may have differ according to the
                       organizing principle of each program
               e)      they should utilize existing courses and seminars where appropriate
               f)      they should require a minimum of 20 and a maximum of 30 credit hours for
                       successful completion, including credit which may be given for designated first year
                       subjects, partial credit for relevant non-stream courses and credit earned through
                       participation in intensive programs, practicum, internships, study abroad,
                       independent research and cross-registration in courses offered in other faculties;
                       faculty groups may propose, and APC will consider, amendments or exceptions to
                       existing rules limiting such participation.

3.     APC does not envisage that in the near future all faculty groups will produce streaming proposals
       or that all students will be required to enrol in a stream. APC will monitor enrolments to ensure that
       established streams attract a critical mass of students, and to ensure that streams do not proliferate
       to the point where the professorial complement is insufficient to sustain the balance of the
       curriculum.

Student Access to Programs

4.     Students may be admitted to a program as early as the beginning of the second semester of first year,
       and no later than the beginning of the second semester of second year. In the event of a surplus of
       applicants over available places, selection shall be by lottery or on the basis of stipulated
       prerequisites or some combination of the two. Students may transfer into the program if they have
       accumulated an appropriate profile of course credits, and may exit the program without prejudice if


                                                     3
        they do not wish to continue to meet its requirements.

Credit for Students Completing Program Requirements

5.      Successful completion of the requirements of a curriculum stream shall be noted on a student’s
        transcript.


Administration of Programs

6.      All faculty members teaching relevant courses and seminars are welcome to participate in
        discussions concerning the initial establishment and ongoing administration of the stream.

7.      Faculty groups proposing a new curriculum stream should assume that for the most part, teaching
        will have to be done by the existing professorial complement. APC will not approve a curriculum
        stream which, in its opinion, lacks sufficient faculty resources to sustain it, unless recruitment of
        faculty in the area has been accepted as a priority by the Faculty Recruitment Advisory Committee
        and endorsed by Council. Faculty groups are encouraged to contribute to the planning of faculty
        recruitment by making the case for additional personnel in their particular curriculum stream.

8.      Responsibility for each stream shall be assumed by a Convenor appointed by the Associate Dean
        after consultation with participating faculty members. The Convenor will consult closely with the
        Associate Dean on behalf of participating faculty members to ensure the efficiency and high quality
        of the program. This will include arrangements concerning time tabling, identification of
        recruitment needs, course assignments for participating faculty members and other issues such as the
        application or waiver of academic regulations and the amount of credit within the stream to be
        awarded students for fulfilling various requirements.

Publicity

9.      The law school should actively and immediately publicize the new streaming approach, as one of
        Osgoode’s distinctive contributions to legal education.




4. Regulations on Curricular Streams

a. International, Comparative & Transnational (ICT) Law Program Curriculum Stream

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits to satisfy the requirements for the ICT Stream,
including:

     1. LW 2008 3.0 (Globalization & the Law);

     2. At least 8 credits from LW 2004 4.0 (Comparative Law); LW 2040 4.0 (Conflict of Laws);
        and LW 2340 4.0 (Public International Law);

                                                     4
   3. LW 5008 3.0 (ICT Colloquium);

   4. At least 16 credits from:

           ·   LW 2004 4.0 (Comparative Law) *
           ·   LW 2040 4.0 (Conflict of Laws) *
           ·   LW 2210 4.0 (Civil Law)
           ·   LW 2340 4.0 (Public International Law) *
           ·   LW 2440 3.0 (International Criminal Law)
           ·   LW 2470 3.0 (Refugee Law)
           ·   LW 2890 3.0 (International Business Transactions)
           ·   LW 3007 3.0 (International Dispute Resolution)
           ·   LW 3040B 3.0 (Comparative Law: Modern Constitutionalism in Comparative
               Perspective)
           ·   LW 3040F 3.0 (Comparative Law: Law, the Individual & Community – A Cross-
               Cultural Dialogue)
           ·   LW 3040G 3.0 (Comparative Law: Comparative Constitutional & Foreign Relations)
           ·   LW 3350 3.0 (Canada/US/Mexico Business & Economic Relations)
           ·   LW 3440 3.0 (International Human Rights)
           ·   LW 3810 3.0 (Aerospace Law)
           ·   LW 4150 4.0 (International Taxation)
           ·   LW 4880 3.0 (International Environmental Law)
           ·   LW 5050 3.0 (International Banking)
           ·   LW 5310 3.0 (Labour Law, Globalization & NAFTA)
           ·   LW 5800 3.0 (Transnational Governance)
           ·   LW 5930 3.0 (Advanced Public International Law)
           ·   LW 5930A 3.0 (Advanced Public International Law: International Common Spaces)
           ·   LW 7008 3.0 (International Research & Placements)

* If this course is used to satisfy the requirements of #2, then it may not be used in #4.
    2. Included in the required minimum 30 credits, students must include at least 3 credits that
        satisfy the Law School’s Upper Year Research requirement.

   3. As part of the required minimum 30 credits, in consultation with the ICT convener, students
      must pursue a least one of the following opportunities. Students will be permitted to use up
      to a maximum of 10 credits from any one of these opportunities as credit towards the ICT
      Curriculum Stream.

           ·   Study at another law school as part of an exchange program;
           ·   Study at another law school on a Letter of Permission;
           ·   Enrol in an Intensive Program;
           ·   Enrol in a “global classroom” course;


                                               5
          ·   Enrol in a Summer Study Program;
          ·   Internship;
          ·   Work/Study Practicum;
          ·   Supervised Research.


B. Litigation, Dispute Resolution and the Administration of Justice (LDA) Program
Curriculum Stream

Students must complete a minimum of 25 credits to satisfy the requirements for the LDA Stream,
including:

   1. LW 2490 4.0 (Evidence);

   2. LW 5007 3.0 (LDA Colloquium);

   3. At least one of the following:

          ·   LW 3960 2.0 and LW 3961 2.0 (Lawyer as Negotiator)
          ·   LW 3980 3.0 (Dispute Settlement)
          ·   LW 5070 3.0 (Labour Arbitration) *
          ·   LW 5960 4.0 (Theory & Practice of Mediation)

   2. At least one of the following:

          ·   LW 6020 3.0 (Mooting)
          ·   LW 2140 3.0 (Legal Drafting)
          ·   LW 3630 3.0 (Constitutional Litigation)
          ·   LW 5070 3.0 (Labour Arbitration) **
          ·   LW 5270 4.0 (Trial Practice Seminar)
          ·   LW 7140 3.0 (Innocence Project – Fall Term)
          ·   LW 7140 6.0 (Innocence Project – Winter Term)
          ·   LW 8000 3.0 (Community & Legal Aid Services Program)

   2. At least one of the following:

          ·   LW 2040 3.0 (Conflict of Laws)
          ·   LW 2120 3.0 (Legal Profession)
          ·   LW 2230 3.0 (Civil Procedures II)
          ·   LW 2240E 3.0 (Criminal Law II)
          ·   LW 2690 4.0 (Criminal Procedures)
          ·   LW 3007 3.0 (International Dispute Resolution)
          ·   LW 3010 3.0 (Administration of Civil Justice: Class Action)


                                              6
           ·   LW 4090 3.0 (Litigating the Insurance Claim)
           ·   LW 5010A 3.0 (Administration of Criminal Justice)
           ·   LW 5450 3.0 (Advanced Evidence Problems)

* If this course is used to satisfy the requirements of #2, then it may not be used to satisfy the
requirement in #3.

** If this course is used to satisfy the requirements of #3, then it may not be used to satisfy the
requirement in #2.

   3. Students must take a sufficient number of credits from any of the courses listed above to
      satisfy the LDA Curriculum Stream’s minimum 25-credit requirement provided that the
      course(s) have not been previously taken to satisfy requirement #2, #3 or #4.


C. Tax Law Program Curriculum Stream

Students must complete a minimum of 27 credits to satisfy the requirements for the Tax Stream,
including:

   1. LW 3320 3.0 (Tax Lawyering);

   2. LW 2080 4.0 (Tax I);

   3. LW 4100 4.0 (Taxation of Business Enterprises);

   4. LW 5006 3.0 (Tax & Policy Colloquium);

   5. Three credits from either LW 3006 3.0 (Tax Law as an Instrument of Economic & Social
      Policy) or LW 5220 3.0 (Tax Policy);

   6. Three credits from either LW 5100 3.0 (Advanced Corporate Tax) or LW 5110 3.0
      (Advanced Estate Planning);

   7. A minimum of 7 additional credits from the following courses. Note: courses used to satisfy
      one of the requirements listed above (#5 or #6) cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.

               ·   LW 3006 3.0 (Tax Law as an Instrument of Economic & Social Policy)
               ·   LW 3080 3.0 (Internet Commerce & Taxation)
               ·   LW 4080 4.0 (Taxation of Wealth Transfers)
               ·   LW 4150 4.0 (International Tax)
               ·   LW 5100 3.0 (Advanced Corporate Tax)
               ·   LW 5110 3.0 (Advanced Estate Planning)


                                                7
              ·   LW 5220 3.0 (Tax Policy)
              ·   LW 5320 3.0 (Tax Planning)




The following additional resource information should be included in SECTION V: OSGOODE
HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES:

Part C, Page V.2: CAREER SERVICES OFFICE

Please note that there are now two full-time professionals that students may contact: Wendy
Griesdorf, Director (416-736-5103 or wgriesdorf@osgoode.yorku.ca) and Chantal Morton (416-736-
5482 or cmorton@osgoode.yorku.ca). You can also visit the Career Services Website at:
http://www.yorku.ca/osgoode/careers/.




                                               8
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

basic computer literacy skills to new students, as well as the use of various available packages.
Electronic mail accounts are issued to all law students which will remain active until graduation from
the Law School.

Student with special computing requirements will be provided with access to appropriate York
University computing resources. Some of the computing resources may be accessed from various
computer rooms across the campus or via dial-up facilities from off campus.


E.     COUNSELLING AND DEVELOPMENT CENTRE

The Counselling and Development Centre (CDC) helps students to realize, develop and fulfill their
personal and academic potential through an assortment of diverse programmes.

The CDC’s reception area is in Room 145, Behavioural Sciences Building. The CDC is open
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday to Friday. Their telephone number is 736-5297.

1.     Personal Counselling

Members of the York Community are invited to discuss their personal concerns with a counsellor.
Please contact the CDC to make an appointment All interviews are confidential.

2.     Group Programs

The CDC offers groups and workshops with a variety of focuses and themes, including academic
performance enhancement, assertiveness training, avoiding procrastination, effective presentation
skills, relaxation training and stress management among others. Most groups are offered during
both the Fall and Winter terms depending on enrolment.

3.     Learning Skills

Through individual consultation, small group seminars and workshop series, students can work at
improving reading, listening, note-taking, memory, and time management, exam preparation, and
essay writing skills.

4.     Learning Disabilities Program

The Learning Disabilities Program provides a range of specialized services to students with
learning disabilities, including advice on courses and academic programs; orientation to campus
facilities and services; diagnostic assessment of psychological and educational profiles; learning
skills counselling; life skills counselling; and advocacy and ombudsman services regarding
evaluation and examinations.



5.     Psychiatric Disabilities Program




Student Handbook                               Page VI.2                        September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:           YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

Educational support service is geared to students with on-going mental health needs. Services
include: orientation to campus resources and facilities, counselling regarding academic studies,
psychiatric consultation as needed, weekly peer support group, advocacy and strategies for self-
advocacy, and linkages to community resources.

6.     Community Mental Health Consultation

The staff of the CDC will consult with any member of the York community with regard to any aspect
of campus social planning and development, and will design programs tailored to the community
needs.


F.     HEALTH SERVICES

1.     York Lanes Health Centre

York Lanes Health Centre is a privately owned centre that offers medical services for students,
faculty, and the surrounding community. Other services include dental, laboratory, registered
massage therapy, chiropractic, optical, dermatologist, and pharmaceutical services.

The health centre is open from Monday to Thursday, (9 a.m. to 7 p.m.), Fridays (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
and Saturdays (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.). While appointments are advised, walk-ins are welcome.

York Lanes Health Centre can be contacted by telephone (736-5525) or by fax (736-5523).

2.     Health Education and Promotion Office

The goal of the Health Education and Promotion Office is to involve the York University community
in their own health care. An individual can help make major contributions to their own well being
by becoming informed about general health, health risks, and the importance of daily habits and
lifestyle.

The Nurse Educator will provide confidential counselling, information/referrals, on contraception,
HIV/AIDS, STDs, alcohol/substance abuse, smoking cessation, nutrition and exercise, eating
disorders, and stress management. The Peer Education Program offers workshops by trained
student volunteers on HIV/AIDS, STDs, alcohol awareness, date rape, birth control, stress and
management.

The office has a large selection of articles, books, pamphlets and videos on various health issues.
Information can be found on the website at www.yorku.ca/admin/healthed/index.htm. This site
makes a wide variety of resources accessible to students and staff. Articles, books and videos may
be borrowed on a sign-out basis.

The Health Education and Promotion Office is located in 102 Central Square. They can be
contacted by telephone at 736-5196.

G.     HOUSING



Student Handbook                             Page VI.3                        September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES


On the York campus only, accommodation in the York Apartments is offered to eligible graduate
and law students. A limited number of York Apartments are set aside annually for undergraduate
single parents and undergraduate students with physical disabilities. In addition, when available,
York apartments may be offered to undergraduates who are married or mature (over 23 years of
age).

The apartments consist of furnished and unfurnished bachelor, one bedroom and two bedroom
apartments. Only spouses and/or children may be included on the application form. According to
the North York Board of Health regulations, the York Apartments are not suitable for a couple with
more than two children.

Eligible applicants must be accepted into a full-time program of study prior to completing an
application. Information and applications may be obtained from the following address:

       Student Housing Services
       York University
       4700 Keele Street
       Toronto, Ontario
       M3J 1P3

       Telephone: 736-5152.


H.     HUMAN RIGHTS AND EQUITY CENTRE

The Centre for Human Rights and Equity is responsible to the president for the co-ordination and
supervision of the University’s employment equity activities, for the operations of the Centre for
Race and Ethnic Relations, and the Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre, for the
general co-ordination and liaison with academic, staff and student relations administrators and with
the University counsel regarding equity issues

1.     Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations

The Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations (CRER) was established in 1988, to advise the
University on policy relating to race and ethnic relations, and to provide anti-racism education for
the entire community, as well as, support and services to York’s multi-ethno-racial community, so
that working, studying and living at York will be a harmonious and rewarding experience for all.

The CRER works in cooperation with several campus groups and associations active in the area
of human rights, anti-racism and employment equity. The advisors at the Centre are available to
give workshops on anti-racism and related issues to all sectors of the University. The Centre offers
public education programmes and a small resource library to increase awareness and action
around issues of equality.

The Centre is also a Complaint Centre which provides a confidential place in which members of
the York community can seek information regarding racial harassment and discrimination. The



Student Handbook                              Page VI.4                       September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

advisors outline the many options (both informal and formal) available to students, faculty and staff
and discuss ways of handling the situation.

The Centre also works collaboratively with the University Complaints Centre and local complaints
officers in the colleges and Faculties. The advisors aim to ensure that concerns expressed by all
members of the community are addressed with sensitivity and fairness.

The Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations is located in the Centre for Human Rights and Equality,
108 Central Square. Appointments can be made at 736-5682.

2.     Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre

The Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre (SHEACC) serves all members of the
York community, students, faculty and staff. Anyone who is experiencing sexual harassment, or
anyone who thinks what they are experiencing could be sexual harassment based on their gender
or sexual orientation, should consult with the Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre.
The Centre offers advice, ensures confidentiality, and provides a supportive atmosphere. No action
will be taken unless the complainant requests it. The two advisors at the Sexual Harassment
Education and Complaint Centre are available to give workshops on sexual harassment and related
issues to colleges, residences and Faculties. There is a small library which students, staff and
faculty are welcome to draw upon.

An ongoing project of SHEACC’s is the Sexual Assault Survivors Support Line (SASSL). SASSL
is a peer support telephone line, which provides referrals and support to callers on a 24 hour basis.
The crisis line number is 650-8056 and the information line is 736-2100 extension 40345. The line
is closed on University Holidays with a message providing alternative crisis line numbers. SASSL
is in the process of developing into a service for the York Community in its own right.

The Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre is located in the Centre for Human Rights
and Equity, 108 Central Square (next to south exit doors of Central Square) and is open from 9:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday or in the evening by appointment. The Centre can be reached
by telephone at 736-5500. When the Centre is closed, messages may be left at this number.


I.     LIBRARIES

There are five libraries within York University. The Law Library is administratively separate from
the other libraries and is governed by the Law School. The other libraries at York are: the Scott
Library, the Business and Government Publications Library, the Steacie Science Library and the
Leslie Frost Library at Glendon Collage.

All materials including online databases, CD ROMs, microform, maps, films, videos, and archives
are selected to support the instructional and research programs of the University. The stacks in
each library are open to all members of the academic community and, under certain circumstances,
to the public. Individual study carrels are available. Reference services are offered in all University
libraries. These include instruction and aid in using the collections, developing research skills,
inter-library borrowing, YORKLINE, CD ROM services, and online reference database searches.



Student Handbook                               Page VI.5                         September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

Information on all the University’s’s holdings may be obtained from YORKLINE, York University
Libraries’ online information system.


J.     LOST AND FOUND

A Lost and Found Office is maintained on the York campus at N101, Ross Building, extension
33369, which is open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Friday, and from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Wednesday and Thursday. Any items turned into this office are retained for 30 days only.

The University regrets that it cannot be responsible for items of personal property left unattended
on the grounds or within buildings.


K.     OFFICE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

York University strives to provide an environment for students with disabilities, that combines both
architectural accessibility and academic flexibility. The Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD)
provides information, support and advocacy on behalf of students staff and faculty with physical
and sensory disabilities as well as medical conditions. Some of the services provided by the office
include: pre-university advising, assistance with course selection, mobility orientation, advising on
financial, academic and legal materials, referral to the Ontario March of Dimes - York University
Attendant Services program as well as other York services and community resources in the
Toronto area. The office also runs a volunteer program, entitled: FEELS SOOO GOOD ... TO
VOLUNTEER. Volunteers are able to assist students with reading (one-on-one), note-taking, and
reading and/or writing tests and exams.

The Office for Persons with Disabilities is open Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The office
is located in 109 Central Square. They can be reached by telephone at 736-5140, or TTY 736-
5263, or by fax at 650-8068.


L.     ONTARIO MARCH OF DIMES - YORK UNIVERSITY ATTENDANT SERVICES

The Ontario March of Dimes - York University Attendant Service program provides non-medical
assistance to students, staff and faculty of York University, who have a permanent physical
disability. Attendant services are available, as required, on a 24 hour basis for assistance with
person hygiene, rising and retiring routines, meal preparation, light housekeeping, laundry, mobility
and general daily activities.

Admission is open to students, staff and faculty who have a permanent physical disability on the
York University Campus. Applicants must be willing to organize and direct their own attendant care
services. All applications are considered for eligibility by the Ontario March of Dimes - York
University Program Specific Committee. The service is free to all users.

For more information, please call the Ontario March of Dimes - York University Attendant services
Office (located in Central Square, Room 107, 736-5167), or York University’s Office for Persons



Student Handbook                              Page VI.6                        September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

with Disabilities (736-5140).


M.     PARKING SERVICES

All faculty, staff, and students who park on university property are required to buy an annual or
sessional parking decal or to pay a daily parking fee, and to abide by the Parking and Traffic
Regulations of the University.

Applications forms for decals, and copies of the regulations, are available at the Parking Office,
Room D37, East Office Building, on the York campus, and at the Security and Parking Office,
Glendon Greenhouse on the Glendon campus.

Parking is permitted only in clearly designated parking areas. If no sign is posted, no parking is
permitted.


N.     POSTAL SERVICES

A Canada Post franchise operation is located in York Lanes. In addition, inter-departmental and
inter-campus mail delivery systems are maintained by the University, with University mail boxes
positioned throughout both campuses.


O.     SCOTT RELIGIOUS CENTRE

The Scott Religious Centre is a meeting place for the many religious groups active on the York
campus. A list of the groups is posted at the entrance door of the Centre in Central Square. Some
groups are served by chaplains, and most have office space allocated to them.

The Inter-faith Council, which is comprised of representatives from all the religious groups, is
charged with running the Centre and advises the University, through the Director of Student Affairs,
of matters relating to the Centre and religious affairs and activities on campus. The Chair and
other members of the Inter-faith Council may be contacted through the Office of Student Affairs,
103 Central Square, 736-5144.

The Scott Religious Centre has a non-denominational chapel, a meditation room, and some offices.
The chapel may be booked on a regular basis or for a single religious event through the Office of
Student Affairs (736-5144) from September 1 through April 30 and Hospitality York (736-5020)
from May 1 through August 31. The Scott Religious Centre has entrances on the ground floor in
Central Square and on the outside on the second floor between the Scott Library and the Ross
Building.


P.     SECURITY CONTROL CENTRE




Student Handbook                              Page VI.7                       September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

Operated by York Security Services, the Security Control Centre (SCC) is staffed twenty-four hours
a day throughout the year to provide a means of rapid communication between members of the
York community and emergency and other security services available on and off campus. The
SCC’s specially-trained desk officers are equipped to obtain the required help in the shortest
possible time, arranging, where necessary, to meet emergency vehicles (police, fire, ambulance)
at the main entrance to campus, and to escort them directly to the scene of the emergency.

To enable SCC to dispatch assistance in an effective and timely manner, it is important that they
be informed in the first instance of all emergency situations on campus. To obtain help in an
emergency, call 33333 or 736-5333, or simply pick up the receiver of any Emergency Blue Light
Telephone or elevator emergency telephone. The latter connect directly to SCC. No money is
required when calling Security at 736-5333 from any Campus pay phone.


Q.     SHOPPING SERVICES

York is home to the only shopping centre in Canada designed specifically for a university market.
It is open seven days a week, although the hours of the various retailers and services vary.

Services include the University bookstore, a drugstore, a record store, a convenience store, a copy
store, a medical centre, clothing stores, a barber/hairdressing shop, a travel service, a full service
Bank of Montreal, a variety of food services and a credit union.

York Lanes Management Office may be reached by telephone 736-5788 or by fax 736-5845.


R.     STUDENT SECURITY ESCORT SERVICE

Why walk alone? The primary role of York’s Student Security Escort Service is to provide safer
movement for campus students, faculty and staff. Student Security Officers will meet you at
campus bus stops, parking lots, buildings and residences; escort you to your campus destination;
wait with you for buses, cabs, or until your vehicle starts. All requests will be accommodated either
by foot, bicycle, and/or van escorts. The Escort Service operates daily during the academic year
(April to September) from 6:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m., and during the summer months from 8:00 p.m.
to 2:00 a.m. For more information, please call the Student Security Office at 736-5454.
S.     TRANSPORTATION

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) operates several bus services to the York Campus. Details
concerning the designated routes and holiday service can be obtained from TTC Information at
393-4636. TTC route maps and transit schedules are available from subway ticket booths, and the
Office of Student Affairs, 103 Central Square.


T.     UNIVERSITY COMPLAINT CENTRE

The University Complaint Centre receives complaints concerning all aspects of student non-



Student Handbook                               Page VI.8                        September 15, 2000
SECTION VI:            YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

academic conduct, including those matters for which special procedures have been provided, shall
advise complainants of the alternative forms of redress which may be available to them and shall
assist them in pursuing the form of redress preferred. The Complaint Centre shall also be a
"complaints officer" within the meaning of that term in Presidential Regulation Number 2 and as
such may itself process complaints.

For more information, contact: York University Complaint Centre, 103 Central Square; telephone
736-5144.


U.     WOMEN’S CENTRE

Established in 1975, the York University Women’s Centre became the first University-based
Women’s Centre in Canada. It continues to thrive as York’s women-only space and offers a wide
variety of activities and services to the York community, which includes undergraduate and
graduate students, as well as faculty.

Recognizing that the Women’s community on campus has diverse needs, it is our mandate to try
to fulfill them. We offer peer counselling, referral services, library and other resources, and above
all, a safe, comfortable environment. The Centre also acts as a base for the provision of support
and resource for social activities and education. We also sponsor/co-sponsor a wide variety of
events including panel discussions, reading, entertainment events, self-defence classes and more.

The York Women’s Centre is located in 328 Student Centre. For further information call 736-2100,
extension 33484.




Student Handbook                              Page VI.9                        September 15, 2000
SECTION V:             OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES

Reserve Loan: Reserve items kept behind the Circulation Desk normally may be loaned for a
period of three hours. If the item is checked out within three hours of the library closing, the item
normally may be borrowed overnight.

Non-Circulating Items: Law reports, statutes, bound periodicals and encyclopaedias do not
circulate.

3.     Reference

The Reference staff is available to assist you in finding library resources for your study and
research. Please contact one of us if we can be of help to you in a search for catalogue
information, reference and other forms of bibliographical information. YORKLINE, the York
University Libraries’ online catalogue includes Law Library materials and can be searched on the
Internet at www.library.yorku.ca. As well, the libraries’ website includes access to over 200
Periodical Indexes, CD ROMs and databases, and more than 3500 journals in full text electronic
format.

4.     Inter-Library Loans

This service obtains materials for your use which are not available in any of the York University
libraries. We will be able to process your Inter-Library Loan requests more rapidly if you can give
us as much bibliographic information as possible, including the source of your reference.

5.     Microform Collection

The microfilm and microfiche collections are located in the south-eastern area of the Reading
Room, with holdings included in YORKLINE. Microform readers are available in the same area.
Printing can be done on the available reader-printer with use of a copycard only.

6.     Orientation

The Reference staff gives introductory tours early in the semester for all interested students, and
offers research instruction for courses with term papers. The reference librarians and research
assistants provide training for students during regularly scheduled times or by appointment.


C.     CAREER SERVICES OFFICE

Osgoode Hall Law School encourages its students to give careful attention to career planning and
preparation and presents programs and services throughout the year to assist students in defining
and achieving their short-term and long-term career goals.

The Career Services Office was expanded in 1997 and is now staffed by a full-time Director of
Career Services, with the assistance of students working part-time. The Office provides individual
career counseling, programs and workshops and resource and reference materials.




Student Handbook                              Page V.2                        September 15, 2000
SECTION V:             OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES

The programs and workshops arranged by the Office introduce students to the range of possible
career opportunities for which a legal education prepares them to be effective and helps students
maximize their skills, knowledge and strengths. Programs include self-assessment, job searching,
résumé writing, interview skills, the articling process, clerkships at various courts, opportunities for
graduate study, the nature of law practice in various fields of specialization, alternatives to legal
practice, working effectively with supervising lawyers, staff and clients, understanding how law firms
work and reviewing research skills in preparation for employment.

Students interested in public interest work can also research opportunities and participate in three
programs administered by the Office: the Summer Public Interest Advocacy Program, the Centre
for Innovation Law and Policy, and the Pro Bono Students Canada Program.

Provincial Law Societies in Canada require that law graduates work under the supervision of a
lawyer (“articling") for up to 12 months as part of the process for qualifying to be called to the bar.
The Office provides students with assistance in their search for both summer and articling
positions. The Career Development Office annually hosts a Summer Job Fair and an Articling Day,
which enable students to gather information and meet with representatives of prospective
employers, primarily from Ontario law firms and government agencies. In addition, the Office jointly
hosts with other Ontario law schools Western/Eastern Firm Week, which enables representatives
of Canadian firms outside Ontario to meet and interview prospective candidates for summer and
articling positions. As well, the Office administers the on-campus interviews of Toronto and foreign
firms.

The Office maintains job postings of part-time, full-time, summer, articling and internship positions.
These postings are available both in hard copy and on-line. In addition, the Office has information
about law firms, government offices, corporate legal departments and other legal and other
employers of law graduates. Information is also available about Bar Admission requirements in
Ontario, other Canadian jurisdictions and internationally.


D.      FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE OFFICE

1.     General

Osgoode Hall Law School continues to expand and strengthen its financial assistance for students.
Our aim is to ensure that all students who are admitted to the Law School have the necessary
support systems in place to complete their studies. A primary objective, therefore, is to offer
financial assistance programs which are designed to alleviate the effects of increasing tuition fees
and debt load, and in so doing, increase the School's financial support for students.



2.     Student Financial Assistance Officer

Osgoode employs a full-time Student Financial Assistance Officer who is responsible for
developing and administering Osgoode's Student Financial Assistance Program. The Student




Student Handbook                               Page V.3                         September 15, 2000
SECTION V:             OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES

Financial Assistance Officer is available to meet with Osgoode students and advise them of their
individual options. The Student Financial Assistance Officer is located in the Office of Student
Services, Room 131C at Osgoode, and can be reached by telephone at (416) 650-8178.

3.     Fund Raising Efforts

The Dean and members of faculty and staff are committed to ongoing and successful fund raising
efforts on behalf of the Law School. Osgoode has appointed a Director of Development who, with
the Dean, is actively soliciting the Osgoode alumni, the external legal community and the University
for new sources of funding for students. Since May 1996, law firms, corporations, individuals and
alumni, buoyed by the Ontario Government’s matching gift program, donated more than $11.6
million to Osgoode’s scholarship and award endowment.

4.     Partnership with Royal Bank

The Law School is pleased that it enjoys a partnership with the Royal Bank, offering a loan program
tailored to Osgoode students. The loan program offers students a full range of banking services
including: favourable interest rates on a student line-of-credit up to $30,000; and consultation with
professional banking representatives to assist with financial planning and loan consolidation
opportunities. The Royal Bank provides professional financial counseling services and is available
to offer on-site advice and service at Osgoode for the first two weeks of term for students with
financial concerns and continuous service when required throughout the academic year.

The student line-of-credit works in conjunction with Osgoode Hall Law School's Bursary Program.
For students with documented financial need, Osgoode will provide bursaries to assist with interest
on this student line-of-credit, creating "interest-free" loans while students complete their education
at Osgoode.

5.     On-site OSAP Assistance

Osgoode recognizes the importance of all provincial government student loan programs and offers
the release of OSAP documents at the beginning of the academic year on-site at the Law School.
As well, the School offers guidance and assistance to students with OSAP and other government
student loan problems.

6.     Out-of-Province Students

Osgoode Hall Law School prides itself on being a national law school. We encourage students from
other parts of Canada and abroad to make application. While many of our awards and bursaries
are designated for residents, substantial funds are available to assist students who are from
out-of-province.

7.     Bursary Program

Bursaries are non-repayable, and application forms will be made available to all Osgoode students
at Registration.




Student Handbook                               Page V.4                        September 15, 2000
SECTION V:            OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES

Osgoode's Bursary Program has three components:

7.1    Tuition Rebate

       To be eligible for a tuition rebate, financial need will be determined by a student's
       application to a government student loan program which identifies "unmet need", and by
       application for an Osgoode Bursary.

       If assessment of a student’s bursary application demonstrates financial need, she/he may
       be eligible for bursary funding representing a tuition rebate for tuition and ancillary fees
       above $4,500. This amount will form a portion of the total bursary allocation, and will be
       applied to the individual's Student Account at York University.

7.2    Osgoode/Royal Bank Student Financial Options Program

       If assessment of a student’s bursary application demonstrates financial need, she/he may
       be eligible for bursary funding. This funding will be in the form of interest payments on the
       amount of the student line-of-credit up to a specified limit and on an annual basis.

       Interest payments on the student line-of-credit will be applied directly to the Royal Bank or
       other financial institution.

7.3    Osgoode Bursaries

       Additional bursaries will be awarded to students on the basis of documented financial need.
       Decisions will also be made on the basis of a variety of individual circumstances, including
       total debt load, interest payments, dependents, and medical.

       To be eligible for an Osgoode Hall Law School Bursary:

       a.     Osgoode requires that all students requesting financial assistance have applied to
              the Federal and Provincial Student Loan Programs in the same year that application
              is made for a bursary.

       b.     Osgoode requires that all students have applied for a student line-of-credit in the
              same year that application is made for an Osgoode bursary. The intention is to
              ensure that students with financial need have considered all available financial
              options.

Bursary application forms are available at Osgoode's Registration at the beginning of the Law
School year. Bursaries are normally allocated at the beginning of November. Students must
document a shortfall with respect to resources and expenses for the eight-month period September
to April. All bursary funding will be applied directly to a Student's Account at York University.


8.     Emergency Loan Program




Student Handbook                             Page V.5                        September 15, 2000
SECTION V:            OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES


As a last resort, Osgoode maintains an emergency loan fund to support students who experience
short-term cash flow problems. The loans are interest-free and must be repaid to the Faculty before
the end of the term in which the loan was given. As the name suggests, this funding is for
emergency situations only.


E.     INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

1.     General

Osgoode Information Technology Services (ITS) provides Helpdesk and support services that
enable students, faculty and staff to use technology effectively, including computer accounts,
software/hardware troubleshooting, software installation, Internet access etc.

Computing facilities for Osgoode students are located in the Smalley-Baker Room of the Law
Library. Students may apply for computer lab accounts which will remain active until graduation
from the Law School. The Computer Lab may be used for editing assignments, term papers and
course summaries, as well as developing specialized course-related materials.

Various specialized computer systems and packages are available to law students to
accommodate specific academic requirements. Access to QuickLaw, WestLaw and Lexis-Nexis,
Online Library System, and Internet is also available in the computer lab. Students may access
various legal databases such as Bankruptcy, Tax, Civil Procedure and Federal Statues, via a
CDROM server.

2.     The Osgoode Helpdesk

The Osgoode Helpdesk, located on the ground floor close to the Materials Distribution Centre,
provides technical support services for faculty, staff and students.

If you experience computer problems, you can contact the Helpdesk Tracking Centre by e-mail at
help@osgoode.yorku.ca. This system is designed to facilitate communication between computer
users and the ITS department, and to track all requests to ensure that they are followed up in an
efficient manner.

If you are unable to send your requests by e-mail, you can reach the Helpdesk by telephone at
extension 55401 (on campus) or at (416) 736-5401 (off campus).
F.     TUTORING PROGRAM

First-year students who experience academic difficulties, particularly with reading, (both volume
and comprehension), time management, studying and exam-writing may obtain assistance from
one-to-one tutoring by volunteer upper-year law students, who are supported in these efforts by
the York Counselling and Development Centre. In addition to arranging individual tutors this
program also offers supportive seminars on such subjects as law school exam writing skills.




Student Handbook                             Page V.6                       September 15, 2000
SECTION V:             OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES

Second- and third-year students who are willing to devote not more than two hours a week to
tutoring a first-year student and any first-year students who would like to take advantage of this
tutoring, should contact the Office of Student Services. Additional information and applications are
available on the Tutoring Program.


G.     MATERIALS DISTRIBUTION CENTRE

The Materials Distibution Centre (MDC) is the teaching material distribution centre at Osgoode Hall
Law School. All materials used in law courses are sold here. The MDC and its sales office are
located on the ground floor of the Law School.


H.     OLD BAILEE BOOKSTORE

The Old Bailee Bookstore is Osgoode Hall Law School's used book operation offering a variety of
law books at discounted prices. It is operated by the Legal and Literary Society, and is located
across the hall from the Materials Distribution Centre.


I.     MAIL ROOM

The mail room for the Law School is located on the main floor at the switchboard/reception desk.
Mail for outside delivery is picked up at 9:30 am daily.


J.     CAFETERIA

The Osgoode Cafeteria offers hot entrees as well as hot soups, a salad bar, fresh sandwiches and
a variety of pastries, muffins, fruit and, of course, coffee. The YorkCard, the campus one-card
identify/debit card, may be used in the Osgoode Cafeteria.




Student Handbook                              Page V.7                       September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:            STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

1.     Asian Cultural Association

The Asian Cultural Association was revived in the 1996/97 year with a renewed focus. In addition
to the promotion of Asian cultures, the Association seeks to heighten awareness of the issues
between Canada and the Asia Pacific Region. The Association aims to engage all students of the
Osgoode community to promote a better understanding of Asian cultures and to contribute to
stronger links between Canada and the Asia Pacific region through networking, social and
educational events.

2.     Athletics Council

The Osgoode Athletics Council organizes sporting and recreational activities for Osgoode students
and their partners. It is a fantastic opportunity to have fun playing sports with students in other
sections and years. The Athletics Council is responsible for fielding over a dozen men's, women's
and coed athletic teams in various York University intercollegiate leagues. Osgoode Hall Law
School teams have captured championships in hockey, basketball, squash and softball. The
Athletics Council oversees the Osgoode Touch Football League, the Golf Tournament, the Ball
Hockey Tournament, and coordinates the Osgoode contingent attending the annual Law Games.
In addition to the structured programs, the Athletics Council also organizes teams to play in games
or tournaments sponsored by law firms.

3.     The Black Law Students Association

The objectives of the Association are to assist law students of African descent to deal with the
challenges of Law School, to provide a forum for unity, encouragement and progressive action
which will lead to the empowerment of the Black/African community and to strive for an atmosphere
free of racism.

4.     Osgoode Business Clinic (OBC)

The Osgoode Business Clinic was established in 1996 and provides an opportunity for 25 students
to obtain clinical legal experience in the field of business law. Students work under the supervision
of lawyers from the law firm of Stikeman, Elliott and provide basic legal assistance to individuals
starting small enterprises, who lack the financial means to obtain legal services through regular
market channels.

5.     Business Law Society

The purpose of Osgoode's Business Law Society is to plan and administer activities and events
for students interested in business law. This broad area of the law includes such topics as
corporate finance, securities regulation, commercial law, and the role of corporate counsel. A
further objective is to promote Osgoode's business law program to members of the legal
community.

6.     Canadian Bar Association (CBA)

The CBA is the professional association of Canadian lawyers. It has numerous sections with which



Student Handbook                              Page IV.2                        September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:            STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

any member can affiliate according to his or her interests. They include such diverse topics as civil
liberties, civil litigation, commercial law, and space law. Student members are welcome to attend
these section meetings. Membership includes a subscription to the Canadian Bar Review, the
Code of Professional Conduct, the monthly "National" newspaper, hotel and car rental discounts,
and section meeting notices.

7.     Christian Legal Fellowship

Osgoode Christian Legal Fellowship is NOT first and foremost a club. We are a group of law
students at Osgoode who desire to know and serve our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. We
recognize that having the support of one another is important in our effort to live out this calling
within the law school environment. As law school provides unique challenges to our faith, the
primary functions of the Fellowship are to support one another in our relationship with God, in our
witness to our friends, and in the study of the law and God’s Word.

8.     Community and Legal Aid Services Program (C.L.A.S.P.)

C.L.A.S.P. is a student-run organization that operates in Osgoode Hall Law School. C.L.A.S.P.
provides legal assistance to York University students and people of low income in Metropolitan
Toronto. In addition, C.L.A.S.P. works with community groups in legal areas and actively
participates in legal research for the purpose of law reform. By serving the public, members of
C.L.A.S.P. are given the opportunity to do practical legal work as an alternative to the theoretical
and academic life of the classroom. Students are crucial to C.L.A.S.P.'s existence, and as such,
all students are urged to get involved in casework, in satellite clinics, in research for law reform,
and as duty counsel. All C.L.A.S.P.ers are supervised by a full-time counsel who oversee the
operation of the program.

9.     Debate Society

The Osgoode Hall Debate Society is the only law school debate club in Canada, and along with
schools such as Harvard and Yale, is one of the only law school debate clubs in North America.
The society meets weekly to offer students a fun and relaxing opportunity to hone their oral
advocacy skills. The society participates in several tournaments and holds two in-house
tournaments over the course of the year.

10.    Entertainment and Sports Law Association

The Entertainment and Sports Law Association (E.L.S.A.) has numerous guest lectures pertaining
to both legal and business related issues from within the entertainment and sports industries.
Some of the speakers to date have included: Garth Drabinsky (Livent Entertainment), Gord Ash
(Toronto Blue Jays) and Ken Baugartner (Boston Bruins). E.L.S.A. also organizes outings to
conferences, public lectures and meetings within the sphere of law.

11.    Environmental Law Society

The Environmental Law Society is a club for students who would like to find out more about the
career possibilities in this continuously expanding field or who simply have a general interest in the



Student Handbook                               Page IV.3                        September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:            STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

environment. The Society plans many events, one of the highlights being our annual symposium
where noted members of the environmental community come to Osgoode and have a panel
discussion on chosen issues. As a member, you will be able to attend firm tours to explore the
many career opportunities in environmental law, listen to guest speakers discussing current legal
issues, and get involved in campus-based environmental concerns. All students are invited to join
and take part in any or all the events.

12.    First Nations Law Students Association

The First Nations Law Students Association attempts to rectify the lack of representation of the
First Nations peoples and the Inuit of Canada among the ranks of the legal profession, through
activities that promote indigenous peoples toward careers in the legal profession. The Association
also educates Osgoode Hall Law School and the York University community on the subject of
native affairs.

13.    Health Law Association

The mandate of the Health Law Association is to increase awareness of health-related legal issues
and to expose students to the multiplicity of career opportunities in this field. The Association’s
events include guest speakers, a panel discussion, firm tours and the focal point of the year, the
Annual Wine and Cheese Opportunity Night.

14.    International Law Society

The Osgoode International Law Society was founded in 1980 to encourage and promote interest,
study and participation in the rational development of international law; to develop an awareness
of the important role that an effective rule of law should play in providing a peaceful world order;
and to promote respect for and observance of fundamental human rights and freedoms, and the
dignity and worth of the human person. The Society, in fulfilling the above objectives, is mandated
to conduct colloquia, conferences and panel discussions; to publish communiques, papers and the
International Law Journal; to award research grants; and to create commissions, committees and
working groups to further the study of international law.

15.    Italian Cultural Society

The Osgoode Hall Italian Cultural Society is an advocacy group which promotes Italian culture and
tradition through educational and social activities. One of the Society's many purposes is to
celebrate and foster an awareness of Italian Canadian contribution to Canada, as well as to reflect
Canada's multicultural reality in the school setting. The Society's intentions are in keeping with the
distinctly Canadian tradition of the pre-existing and founding nations of Canada who treasure with
pride their heritages and gain moral and spiritual support from their traditions. The Society's
membership is open to all and one of its overriding aims is to enhance collective dialogue with other
groups and organizations who may share similar concerns. Apart from sponsoring many symposia,
the Society has lent its support to many worthwhile causes and its members have participated in
public forums both within the University and in the community at large. The Society has reported
on its activities and openly expressed its concerns and opinions through various media outlets. In
so doing, its members hope to actively participate in Osgoode Hall Law School's commitment to



Student Handbook                               Page IV.4                        September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:             STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

access to justice for all.

16.     Jewish Students Association

The Osgoode Hall Jewish Students Association, with a membership of more than 200 law students
of various religions and backgrounds, has quickly become one of the largest and most dynamic
clubs at Osgoode. The Association addresses issues of interest to the Jewish and legal
communities, fosters Jewish legal education by featuring lawyers, jurists and other personalities,
and promotes the social and cultural environment at Osgoode Hall Law School. To this end, the
Association hosts programs on issues such as hate literature, Zionism, charity, Nazi war criminals,
human rights and Canada-Israel relations. The Association also holds a variety of parties featuring
great food and music. The annual Law Bash, for instance, attracts close to 1,000 students for an
evening of great fun. In addition, members participate in conventions at law schools in such places
as Harvard and Philadelphia. Membership in the Association is open to all Osgoode students.

17.     John White Society

The John White Society, a committee appointed by the Legal and Literary Society, invites guest
lecturers to address the students and faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School on a variety of topics.
Formed some 30 years ago and named after Upper Canada's first Attorney General, the John
White Society hosts speakers who are prominent in Canadian and International affairs. Lectures
are generally held Wednesdays during Legal and Literary hours, and are open to the Osgoode and
York communities, as well as to the general public.

18.     Law Games

Law Games are the most fun you can have as a law student. Law Games consist of athletic and
not-so-athletic competition between all of the law schools throughout Canada. It is held during the
first week of school after the December break and the Osgoode team will likely leave on the
Wednesday and come back on the Sunday. It doesn’t matter if you don’t like sports, as Law
Games is a great way to meet people and make friends both at Osgoode and other law schools.
The social aspect of the Games far outweighs the athletic. If you do like sports, then you can
participate in touch football, hockey, volleyball, basketball, soccer, etc. Don’t miss out on the
opportunity to participate in the best event at law school!

19.     Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Collective

Osgoode's Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Collective exists to provide a social, educational and
political forum for lesbians, gay men, and bisexual women and men. The Collective’s aims include
providing a support network at the School, challenging discrimination against lesbians, gay men
and bisexual men and women, organizing educational activities, and raising awareness about
homophobia and heterosexism.

20.     Mature Student’s Association

The Mature Student’s Association is an active association for all those who come in under the
mature student category, as well as those who do not but are “mature” - i.e. usually those over 25,



Student Handbook                             Page IV.5                        September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:            STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

but we welcome anyone who wants to participate. We try to provide a tight support group for each
other.

21.    M.B.A./LL.B. Students Association

The M.B.A./LL.B. Students Association, with a membership of over 60 students, and 200 alumni,
exists as a vehicle through which students can communicate their experience in undertaking this
combined degree education. The Association organizes several events throughout the year where
students can interact with the legal and business communities. The Alumni Mixer provides an
occasion where alumni can share, with cohorts and current students, their experiences about
where their combined degrees has taken them. The Conference has become the Association’s
flagship event, attracting an audience of about 100 persons annually over the last few years. This
educational forum allows participants to hear the views of legal and business leaders on leading
edge topics. The Association also organizes firm tours and speaking engagements to provide
combined students with a wide breadth of information on various potential career avenues. The
Association invites students of all academic disciplines to participate in its events.

22.    Mock Trial

Mock Trial is Osgoode’s annual comedy show. It is performed over 3 nights during the second
week of February, and always draws large to sellout audiences. Mock Trial is an acting, singing
and dancing extravaganza that mercilessly pokes fun a law school life and the legal profession.
It is produced, directed and written by students, and stars both students and faculty members. The
show has two purposes: to provide comic relief for the Osgoode community (including alumni)
immediately before the winter exam crunch, and to raise money for various charities. Auditions
occur during the third week of November. Anyone who tries out will receive at least a small part.
Talent is not necessary. Over the years, Mock Trial participants continuously express one recurring
sentiment: taking part in the show was the most fun they had at Osgoode.

23.    Mooting Society

Mooting competitions provide a learning experience in which students are encouraged to develop
their oral advocacy skills. Anyone who is interested in developing his or her ability to argue
persuasively legal issues, is strongly urged to become involved in at least one of the many mooting
activities offered each year.

For first-year students, the Mooting Society offers a demonstration moot early in the fall semester.
First-year students can try out for one of the two external first-year competitive moots: The
Goodman & Carr Moot and the Fasken Martineau DuMoulin International Law Moot. For second-
and third-year students, an in-school competition is staged early in the fall semester. The top
mooters in this run-off competition go on to form the teams which represent Osgoode Hall Law
School in the interschool, national and international competitions held during the winter semester.
In addition, all those interested can participate in the internal Lerner’s Cup competition held
annually.

24.    Obiter Dicta




Student Handbook                              Page IV.6                       September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:             STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

The Obiter Dicta is Osgoode’s student newspaper and the only Canadian law school student
newspaper that publishes weekly. The paper is completely student-run and provides news and
feature articles on events and issues affecting the Osgoode community. Students, faculty and staff
are also encouraged to share their thoughts and ideas through the paper. Putting the paper
together every week is an exciting and challenging project, not to mention a great opportunity to
learn about publishing, editing and writing. New writers are always welcome.

25.     Osgoode Hall Law Journal

One of Canada’s leading law journals, the Osgoode Hall Law Journal was founded by students in
1958 to promote an understanding of the law through the publication of scholarly writings. The
Journal is an interdisciplinary forum for the exchange and expression of original and provocative
ideas about law. The Journal aims to publish articles that present new theoretical generalizations,
report empirical findings or address the impact of legal developments on wider issues of social,
political or economic concern.

Student editors, under the direction of a faculty editor-in-chief, are responsible for all aspects of
publishing the Journal, including setting editorial policies, selecting articles for publication, editing
manuscripts, verifying citations and developing the Journal’s online presence. The Journal offers
a rewarding and collegial learning and working environment. Moreover, it’s fun.

26.     Osgoode Pub: The Junior Common Room (J.C.R.)

Located on the lower level, the J.C.R. is always open for relaxation between classes and as a place
to eat, shoot pool, play foozball, etc. Although pub services are not available during the day, the
J.C.R. more than makes up for it on Thursday night Pub Nights. Be sure not to miss this great
weekly event - an opportunity to socialize with your friends and classmates. Whether it be a theme
night or just a good ‘ole pub night, the Osgoode pub is consistently a good time with a great D.J.,
dancing and lots of cheap drinks and refreshments.

27.     Phi Delta Phi

The Osgoode Inn of the International Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi consists of both male and
female students of the Law School. The Fraternity is devoted to the promotion of a higher standard
of professional ethics and culture through the presentation of guest speakers from the legal
community. Phi Delta Phi also serves the important function of allowing students from all three
years to meet in a social setting. In past years, the Fraternity's social activities have included Blue
Jays games, pre-pub parties, barbecues and the annual St. Patrick's Day bash. Phi Delta Phi has
also made excursions to such places as Boston, where the Osgoode Inn has met with the Inns
from other law schools. The highlight of the year is the Initiation and Reunion Banquet where
present members of the Inn have the opportunity to meet with past graduates.

28.     Radio Show: BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT, “The Voice of Osgoode Hall”

Have you ever thought about becoming a popular radio D.J.? Need to work on your public
speaking but want to avoid standing in front of a large crowd? Well here’s your chance to be heard
and not seen. BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT is an on-air radio talk show created and run by



Student Handbook                                Page IV.7                         September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:             STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

Osgoode students to respond to the needs of the legal community. Don’t miss out on a great
opportunity to boost your career while becoming a celebrity on campus.

29.     Science and Technology Law Association

The Science and Technology Law Association (SATLA) aims to assist students in exploring the
many opportunities available in fields where law, science and technology intersect. These range
from the traditional domain of Intellectual Property Law to those related to Biotechnology,
Computers and Information Technology. Many law firms have recognized the importance of these
areas and are devoting resources towards developing their technology practices. In previous
years, SATLA has organized visits to several leading firms. Through such experiences, members
have been able to learn about current issues, establish valuable personal contacts, and gain
valuable insight into the realities of legal practice in these areas.

30.     Share the Warmth

In Ontario, low-income families and relief shelters must do more with less. In the midst of a cold,
bitter winter, it is clear that something must be done. Share the Warmth (S.T.W.) is an alternative
charity concept which focuses on practical, community-based givings. S.T.W. emphasises needs-
relief over traditional, financial relief. Its role is to convert public donations into warmth through the
relevant utilities to relief agencies and, on a needs basis, to relief shelters and families living at or
near the poverty level. Like the wood-bearing pioneers of old carrying fuel to less fortunate
neighbours, the public is being encouraged to address the actual needs of your community during
the winter. As a cashless charity, S.T.W. does not give money. Through participating in utilities,
S.T.W. converts 100% of all donations from the public to recipients in need. We believe that
S.T.W. encourages a charitable response that is common to all those who have endured a
Canadian winter.

The Osgoode chapter of the S.T.W. Society exists to provide a volunteer base for S.T.W.
Osgoode students are given an opportunity to apply their skills to assist the organization in
achieving its mandate. The S.T.W. Society also provides Osgoode students with an opportunity
to meet members of the legal and business community from such organizations as Fasken
Campbell Godfrey, National Trust and Enbridge Consumers Gas.

31.     South Asian Law Students Association - SALSA

The South Asian Law Students Association was established by a triad of first year students in 1997.
While adding colourful splashes to the vibrant Osgoode facade through events celebrating major
South Asian festivals, SALSA also aims to create awareness of issues affecting South Asians at
the law school and in a broader context. Although SALSA’s focus rests on the South Asian
Community, we are a non-denominational, non-political club that welcomes diversity - both in club
membership and participation at events.

32.     Student Research Foundation

The Osgoode Hall Law School Student Research Foundation is a student-run, non-profit
corporation that has been in operation since the fall of 1979. It provides legal research activities



Student Handbook                                Page IV.8                          September 15, 2000
SECTION IV:           STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

for lawyers and applied research education for students.

33.    Women's Caucus

The Osgoode Hall Law School Women's Caucus was established in 1974 to provide a focus for
staff and students interested in issues of women and the law. The Caucus is a member of the
National Association of Women and the Law. The Caucus works with other feminist and equality
seeking groups within the Osgoode, York University broader communities to network, present
guest speakers, panels and workshops, and host special events.

Caucus members organize and participate in events depending on the need for advocacy and
education in specific areas and the interests of its members. Some of the Caucus’s annual events
include participation in Take Back the Night March in September, organization of a December 6th
Montreal Massacre Memorial service, attendance at L.E.A.F.’s annual Person’s Day Breakfast and
Lecture, and the staging of the Flaming Feminist Cabaret in March. The Caucus also hosts several
social events during the year and provides a supportive environment for women at Osgoode. All
women are encouraged and welcome to attend some or all of our meetings and events.




Student Handbook                            Page IV.9                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:            POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

students must also be aware that such a practice may run afoul of the intention of the assignment.
In all such cases the student must discuss the matter with the instructors and receive written
permission beforehand.

Impersonation: It is a breach of academic honesty to have someone impersonate one's self in
class, in a test or examination, or in connection with any other type of assignment in a course. Both
the impersonator and the individual impersonated may be charged.

Plagiarism and other misappropriation of the work of another: Plagiarism is the representation of
another person's ideas or writing as one's own. The most obvious form of this kind of dishonesty
is the presentation of all or part of another person's published work as something one has written.
However, paraphrasing another's writing without proper acknowledgement may also be considered
plagiarism. It is also a violation of academic honesty to represent another's artistic or technical work
or creation as one's own. Just as there are standards to which one must adhere in the preparation
and publication of written works, there are standards to which one must adhere in the creation and
presentation of music, drawings, designs, dance, photography and other artistic and technical
works. In different forms, these constitute a theft of someone else's work. This is not to say that
students should not use the work of others with the proper acknowledgement.

Improper research practices: Many academic activities may involve the collecting, analyzing,
interpreting, and publishing of information or data obtained in the scientific laboratory or in the field.
Opportunities to deviate from acceptable standards may be more numerous in research than in the
classroom, as research activities may be supervised less closely. Forms of improper research
practices include the dishonest reporting of investigative results either through fabrication or
falsification, taking or using the research results of others without permission or due
acknowledgment, misrepresentation of research results or the methods used, the selective
reporting or omission of conflicting information or data to support a particular notion or hypothesis.
Furthermore, all researchers have a responsibility to refrain from practices that may unfairly inhibit
the research of others now or later. This responsibility extends to York University students in other
institutions or countries.

Dishonesty in publication: In most instances the objective of scholarly research is the
dissemination of information, usually in the form of a written and published work. Indeed, in many
disciplines career advancement is often based largely on the number and quality of an individual's
publications. It is a violation of academic honesty to knowingly publish information that will mislead
or deceive readers. This includes the falsification or fabrication of data or information, as well as
the failure to give credit to collaborators as joint authors or the listing as authors of others who have
not contributed to the work. Plagiarism is also considered a form of dishonesty in publication.

Premature oral or written dissemination of information: Information or experimental data that was
collected with a member of the faculty or another student, and other works that involved the
participation of a faculty member or another student should not be submitted for publication
prematurely, without appropriate permission.

Abuse of confidentiality: A student may be asked to help in the evaluation of confidential grant
proposals, award applications, or manuscripts that will be or may have been submitted for possible
funding or publication. Taking or releasing the ideas or data of others that were given with the



Student Handbook                                Page III.2                         September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

expectation that they are confidential is inappropriate. Unless one is authorized to do so, it is
improper to obtain a password assigned to another or to copy or modify a data file or program
belonging to someone else. Proper authorization means being granted permission either by the
owner or originator of that material, or by a faculty member, or an appropriate administrator.
Similarly, one should not violate the integrity of a computer system to harass another user or
operator, damage software or hardware or evade appropriate monetary charges.

Falsification or unauthorized modification of an academic record: It is a breach of academic
honesty to falsify, fabricate or in any other way modify a

C      student examination
C      transcript
C      grade
C      letter of recommendation or
C      related document.

Other breaches of academic honesty include:

C      making false claims or statements
C      submitting false information
C      altering official documents or records
C      attempting or causing others to do or attempt any of the above with intent to mislead an:
       i.      instructor
       ii.     an academic unit
       iii.    programme
       iv.     office or
       v.      committee
       as to a student's academic status, qualifications, actions or preparation.

Failure to divulge previous attendance at another post-secondary institution on an admissions
application is also a violation.

Obstruction of the academic activities of another: It is a violation of academic honesty to interfere
with the scholarly activities of another in order to harass or gain unfair academic advantage. This
includes interference or tampering with experimental data, with a human or animal subject, with a
written or other creation (e.g., a painting, sculpture or film), with a chemical used for scientific
study, or with any other object of study.

Aiding or abetting academic misconduct: Knowingly aiding or abetting anyone in a breach of
academic honesty shall itself be considered misconduct. This may include assisting others in the
preparation of work submitted for appraisal or offering for sale essays or other assignments with
the intention that these works would be submitted for appraisal.


E. Sanctions for Academic Misconduct:

When verified, a violation of academic honesty may lead to the following penalties:



Student Handbook                              Page III.3                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       a.      oral or written disciplinary warning or reprimand;
       b.      a make-up assignment or examination
       c.      lower grade or failure on assignment or examination
       d.      failure in the course;
       e.      suspension from the University for a definite period (1);
       f.      notation on transcript (2);
       g.      withholding or rescinding a York degree, diploma or certificate (3);
       h.      retroactive withdrawal of a graduate student from a course with a transcript notation
               of the reason for the withdrawal.

1.     "Suspension" is defined as a penalty of a variable but limited period during which the
       student may not register in the University, imposed for serious academic offenses such as
       plagiarism and cheating. This penalty may be awarded only by a Faculty-level committee
       which has received authority to do so from a Faculty Council.

2.     A student may petition to the Senate Appeals Committee to have the notation removed
       after a period of five years from the date at which the notation was entered.

3.     Where a Faculty decides to rescind a degree, diploma or certificate, the decision, with
       supporting documentation, must be forwarded to the Senate Appeals Committee for
       approval on behalf of Senate.

A permanent record of the offence will be placed in the student's academic file. This record is for
internal academic purposes only.

Penalty Guidelines:

It is in the interest of all concerned that students who are being penalized for a breach of academic
honesty receive equitable and consistent treatment across the University. To this end, a range of
penalties for each offence has been developed which reflects an appropriate realm of sanctions
for the variations of each offence. The range has been developed to guide faculties in imposing
penalties, and is a reflection of the distinction and limitations of certain Faculties' academic
regulations. Senate does not expect the exact penalty to be imposed for the same offence on each
and every occasion around the University, as it is recognized that many factors come into play in
each individual case. It is necessary, however, that all students found to have committed a specific
offence be faced with the same penalty options in the first instance. It is not the intention of these
guidelines to restrict the authority or flexibility of faculty committees in imposing the sanctions as
listed above in Section E; faculties will, in each case, exercise their discretion, taking into
consideration the relevant factors, as outlined below. For the benefit of students, however, faculty
committees which impose a sanction outside of the range of penalties (but still within the options
outlined above) are encouraged to provide a thorough explanation in their written decision as to
why it was deemed warranted.

Factors To Be Considered In Imposing Penalties:

Although similar infractions are commonly committed by students University-wide, the
circumstances surrounding each may vary to a significant degree. The penalty imposed should



Student Handbook                               Page III.4                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

reflect, reasonably, these circumstances. Important factors to be considered by committees in
imposing penalties or reviewing penalty recommendations are:

1.     Extent of violation: The actions which constitute specific offenses of academic honesty (i.e.
       plagiarism, cheating) vary in terms of severity. Some instances of academic dishonesty
       constitute only minor infractions while others represent the most extreme form of violation.
       Penalties should correspond to the nature of the offence.

2.     Basic considerations:
       a.     The level of the student's academic experience is important in determining the
              degree to which they should be penalized.
       b.     Extenuating circumstances which a student faced at the time in question may help
              explain the action taken on their part, and due weight should be attached to those
              circumstances.
       c.     If the student admits guilt, accepts responsibility for their action, and is amenable
              to educative remedies, committees may find it justified to levy a less severe penalty.

3.     Prior/multiple incidents: If the offence is a second (or subsequent) one for the student
       and/or is in combination with another offence, then a severe penalty should be considered.

Note: penalties may be imposed singularly or in combination for any offence

The Range Of Penalties By Offence:

A.     Cheating:

       Examples of cheating include:

       i.      cheating on examination or test, or providing unauthorized assistance to another
       ii.     obtaining test or examination questions in advance
       iii.    attempting to or purchasing an essay for submission as own work
       iv.     submission of a single piece of work to two courses without permission
       v.      unauthorized collaboration on assignments

       Range of penalties:

       C       written reprimand to student
       C       rewrite work subject to grade penalty
       C       grade on work, or section/question, reduced (may be down to "0")
       C       final grade in course lowered
       C       retroactive withdrawal from the course
       C       grade of "F" in the course
       C       suspension
       C       transcript notation

B.     Plagiarism:




Student Handbook                             Page III.5                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

      Examples of plagiarism include:

      i.       submission of another's work as own, in part or whole
      ii.      paraphrasing/reproducing another's work without proper acknowledgement

      Range of penalties:

      C        written reprimand to student
      C        rewrite work subject to grade penalty
      C        grade on work, or section/question, reduced (may be down to "0")
      C        final grade in course lowered
      C        retroactive withdrawal from the course (1)
      C        grade of "F" in the course
      C        suspension
      C        transcript notation

      1.       penalty applicable only to students in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, and imposed
               only in conjunction with a transcript notation.

C.    Falsification Or Unauthorized Modification Of An Academic Document /Record:

      Examples of documents/records include:

      i.       transcripts
      ii.      examination/test
      iii.     letter of recommendation, or related document
      iv.      degree
      v.       physician's letter/form

      Also includes failure to divulge previous attendance at another post secondary educational
      institution.

      Range of penalties:

      C        written reprimand to student
      C        reduced grade on work, or section/question [may be down to "0"] (1)
      C        final grade in course lowered (1)
      C        grade of "F" in the course (1)
      C        suspension
      C        transcript notation

      1.       if specific course involved

D.    Impersonation:

      It is a violation of academic honesty to have someone impersonate a student in:




Student Handbook                             Page III.6                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

      i.       a class
      ii.      test or examination
      iii.     connection with any other course assignment

      Range of penalties:

      C        grade of "F" in the course
      C        suspension
      C        transcript notation

E.    Improper Research Practices:

      Examples include:

      i.       dishonest reporting of investigative results either through fabrication or falsification
      ii.      taking or using the research results of others without permission or
               acknowledgement
      iii.     misrepresentation of research results or the methods used
      iv.      selective reporting or omission of conflicting information or data to support a
               particular notion or hypothesis

      Range of penalties:

      C        written reprimand to student
      C        failure on work (if applicable)
      C        failure in the course (if applicable)
      C        suspension
      C        transcript notation
      C        withhold or rescind degree, diploma or certificate

F.    Dishonesty in Publication:

      It is a violation of academic honesty to knowingly publish information that will mislead or
      deceive readers; this includes:

      i.       falsification or fabrication of data or information
      ii.      failure to give credit to collaborators as joint authors or the listing as authors of
               others who have not contributed to the work

      Range of penalties:

      C        written reprimand to student
      C        failure on work (if applicable)
      C        failure in the course (if applicable)
      C        suspension
      C        transcript notation
      C        withhold or rescind degree, diploma or certificate



Student Handbook                               Page III.7                        September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


G.    Premature Oral Or Written Dissemination Of Information:

      Information, data or other information collected with another student or faculty member
      should not be submitted for publication prematurely without permission.

      Range of penalties:

      C        written reprimand to student
      C        failure on work (if applicable)
      C        failure in the course (if applicable)
      C        suspension
      C        transcript notation
      C        withhold or rescind degree, diploma or certificate

H.    Abuse of Confidentiality:

      Examples include:

      i.       taking or releasing the confidential ideas or data of others
      ii.      obtaining a computer password assigned to another
      iii.     copying or modifying a data file or computer programme belonging to another
      iv.      violating the integrity of a computer system to harass another, damage software or
               hardware or evade appropriate monetary charges

      Range of penalties:

      C        written reprimand to student
      C        failure on work (if applicable)
      C        failure in the course (if applicable)
      C        suspension
      C        transcript notation
      C        withhold or rescind degree, diploma or certificate

I.    Obstruction of the Academic Activities of Another:

      Examples include interference or tampering with:

      i.       experimental data
      ii.      human or animal subject
      iii.     written or other creation (painting, sculpture, film)
      iv.      a chemical used for scientific study
      v.       any other object of study

      Range of Penalties:

      C        written reprimand to student



Student Handbook                              Page III.8                    September 15, 2000
SECTION III:            POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       C       reduced grade on work [may be down to "0"] (if applicable)
       C       failure in the course
       C       suspension
       C       transcript notation
       C       withhold or rescind degree, diploma, or certificate

J.     Aiding or Abetting Academic Misconduct:

       Examples include:

       i.       knowingly assisting others in the preparation of work submitted for appraisal
       ii.      offering for sale essays or assignments

       Range of penalties:

       C       written reprimand to student
       C       failure on work (if applicable)
       C       failure in the course (if applicable)
       C       suspension
       C       transcript notation

Procedures Governing Breach of Academic Honesty:

Each Faculty must ensure that its procedures are consistent with the following standards. Faculty
procedures must be approved by the Senate Appeals Committee, published in the Calendar and
available at the appropriate Faculty offices.

A.     Purpose:

These procedures are available when a York student, a York graduate, a former York student, or
a student who is applying to take, is taking or has taken a York course is accused of violating the
Senate Policy on Academic Honesty. (Hereafter, "student" includes all of the above-noted
categories.) Students and faculty are encouraged to discuss and, where possible, resolve their
differences informally. However, a breach of academic honesty is one of the most serious offences
within the University. It would be impossible to think of any greater insult to the integrity of an
academic institution or to an academic community than that of dishonesty whether it is called
intellectual dishonesty or fraud. One can therefore sympathize with the desire to uncover it and
treat it with the condemnation it deserves when it is thought to exist. This gives rise to an obligation
to refrain from concluding that it exists lightly. It creates a concomitant duty to give a person
accused of dishonesty the benefit of reasonable safeguards to enable him or her to meet the
serious accusations that it entails. (Krever, J., (1985) 11 OAC 72). The following procedures are
provided by the Senate Appeals Committee for investigating and resolving cases of alleged
violations of the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty.

B.      Jurisdiction:

Allegations of Breach of Academic Honesty in respect of courses are dealt with by the Faculty



Student Handbook                                Page III.9                        September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

offering the course. The student's home Faculty has observer status at a hearing and may make
submissions as to penalty. Any other breaches of academic honesty which occur with respect to
University affairs will be reported by the administrator or committee to the appropriate Faculty.
Should a matter arise for which there appears to be no clear Faculty jurisdiction, the Senate
Appeals Committee may exercise its jurisdiction and make appropriate arrangements.

C.     Making A Complaint:

1.     A complaint alleging violation of the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty shall be submitted
       in writing to the appropriate office as soon as is reasonably possible. The complaint shall
       contain a full, but concise, statement of the facts as perceived by the complainant.

2.     The responsibility for detecting potential academic dishonesty on assignments, term
       papers, essays, etc. lies with the person evaluating the material. The evaluator, if other than
       the course director, shall retain possession of the suspect material and shall provide a
       written report, together with the confiscated material, to the course director.

3.     The responsibility for detecting potential academic dishonesty in an examination lies with
       the invigilator who is normally the course director or delegate. In cases of suspected
       impersonation, the invigilator shall ask the student concerned to remain after the
       examination and shall request appropriate University identification or shall otherwise
       attempt to identify the student. In other cases of suspected breach of academic honesty
       the invigilator shall confiscate any suspect material. In all cases, the student will be allowed
       to complete the examination, and the invigilator, if other than the course director, shall give
       a full report, together with any confiscated material, to the course director.

D.     Faculty Member Handling of An Alleged Violation:

1.     It is the responsibility of faculty members to instruct students as to appropriate academic
       behaviour and to maintain the academic integrity of their relationship with students.
       However, faculty members should not be called upon to prosecute students, determine guilt
       or innocence of students or to impose punishment on students, whether that punishment
       is mild or severe.

       While a faculty member in a course, or having or sharing responsibility for a student's
       research, examination, or dissertation preparation, becomes aware of a possible violation
       of academic honesty, the faculty member should investigate the matter and, if there are
       reasonable and probable grounds for the laying of a charge, do so by contacting the
       appropriate Faculty office. If the faculty member is not the Course Director, the Course
       Director shall be informed as soon as possible and shall take charge of the matter.
       Faculties may empower a Faculty official to take charge of the investigation of an allegation
       received from a faculty member.

2.     It is the responsibility of the faculty member to collect or assist in the collection of the
       necessary information and to be prepared to act as a witness in the matter. It is the
       responsibility of the Faculty official to present the case to the committee hearing the charge.
       It is the responsibility of the committee hearing the matter to determine guilt or innocence



Student Handbook                               Page III.10                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       and, if necessary, settle on a penalty after hearing submissions from both parties.

3.     In determining whether or not there are reasonable and probable grounds to proceed with
       a charge of breach of academic honesty the faculty member may arrange an informal
       meeting with the student to discuss the matter. At this meeting the student may be
       accompanied by a representative and the faculty member may have another person
       present. During any such investigation, the faculty member should proceed quickly but, if
       interviewing a student, should give the student at least seven calendar days notice of such
       a meeting.

       a.      If the action was clearly unintentional, the faculty member may take informal
               remedial steps so that the student may correct the mistake and avoid its recurrence.
               In such instances, no official response is required and no record should be kept.

       b.      If the student wishes to admit to a breach of academic honesty, a document signed
               by the student and the faculty member which includes the admission, a summary
               of the matter and a joint submission as to penalty may be forwarded to the
               committee which deals with allegations of breach of academic honesty. In such
               cases, the agreed-upon penalty may not exceed failure in the course. The
               committee receiving such a joint submission will normally impose the penalty
               suggested but if it is of the opinion that some other penalty would be more
               appropriate it must arrange for a hearing of the matter.

4.     If the charge relates to work already presented for evaluation the faculty member may elect
       to defer the evaluation of the work until after the matter has been dealt with. Normally, any
       evaluation of a work which relates to a charge will not be entered into the student's record
       until after the matter is concluded.

E.     Faculty Initiation of A Hearing:

In dealing with allegations of breach of academic honesty, Faculties shall follow the guidelines
indicated below.

1.     A Faculty may wish to delegate authority to hear allegations of breach of academic honesty
       to a department, division or programme committee or have such allegations heard by a
       Faculty-level committee. All committees must proceed according to the procedures
       contained in this document.
2.     If the committee which first hears allegations of breach of academic honesty is a
       department, division or programme committee, Faculty procedures must specify that
       appeals against decisions of that committee are considered by a Faculty appeal committee
       which must proceed according to the Senate Appeals Committee Procedures for hearing
       appeals (Senate, October 1985). Any appeals of decisions of a Faculty-level appeal
       committee are considered by the Senate Appeals Committee.

3.     If the committee which first hears allegations of breach of academic honesty is a
       Faculty-level committee, Faculty procedures may specify either that appeals against
       decisions of that committee are considered by a Faculty appeal committee or by the Senate



Student Handbook                             Page III.11                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:         POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

      Appeals Committee.

4.    Once an investigation begins, a student may not drop or be deregistered from the course
      for any reason until a final decision is reached.

5.    Transcripts will not be released to a student until a decision is made. A request by a student
      for a transcript to be sent to another institution or to a potential employer will be processed,
      but, if the student is found guilty of a breach of academic honesty, the recipients of the
      transcript will be so informed.

6.    A student who is suspended and is eligible to graduate may not apply to graduate until a
      suspension expires or is lifted.

7.    The Faculty shall give each party a written copy of the charge, a copy of the materials
      submitted by the faculty member which includes a summary of the evidence, a copy of the
      procedures to be followed and not less than twenty-one calendar days' notification of the
      time and location of the hearing. If the student wishes to file a written response to the
      charge it must be received within fourteen calendar days of the date of the sending of the
      information, and response must be forwarded to the faculty member. Both parties must
      inform the committee of their intention to call witnesses and file names of these witnesses
      at least two business days prior to the hearing.

8.    A student who acknowledges the accuracy of the charges may waive the right to a hearing
      by submitting a written statement that both admits guilt and waives the right to a hearing.
      In this statement, the student may make submissions as to appropriate penalty and give
      reasons.

9.    All hearings are subject to the requirements of natural justice. Only the committee
      members, a recording secretary, the complainant, the accused, each party's advisor(s)
      (who may be lawyers), and the witnesses may be present. Witnesses (unless parties) shall
      be present at the hearing only while testifying. Exceptions to this policy may be made at the
      discretion of the committee. The committee shall arrange for a recording secretary to take
      notes of the hearing. A record prepared from these notes will constitute the official record
      of the proceedings. Parties may, if they wish, arrange for their own written record of the
      hearing to be taken. The Chair of the committee has full authority to assure an orderly and
      expeditious hearing. Any person who disrupts a hearing, or who fails to adhere to the
      rulings of the committee may be asked to leave.

10.   The committee shall consider the facts and circumstances of the case and determine guilt
      or innocence. A student who is accused of a breach of academic honesty shall be
      presumed innocent until guilt, based upon clear and compelling evidence, has been
      determined by the committee. If guilt is determined, the committee shall hear submissions
      as to the appropriate penalty and then decide the penalty.

11.   If a party fails to appear at a hearing after proper notice, the hearing may proceed, a
      decision may be made and sanctions may be imposed, unless the party can establish, in
      advance of the hearing and to the satisfaction of the committee, that there are



Student Handbook                              Page III.12                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       circumstances beyond her or his control which make an appearance impossible or
       burdensome. Except as noted here, no evidence shall be presented unless the accused
       student is present.

12.    Parties must be allowed a full and fair opportunity to present their evidence and to
       contradict the evidence presented against them. Parties are allowed to cross-examine each
       other in matters related to the charge. The committee has the discretion to make rulings as
       to admissibility of evidence or the suitability of cross-examination. The committee is not
       bound by formal rules of evidence applicable in courts of law.

13.    When there is no further relevant testimony to be presented by either party or their
       witnesses, each party may present a final argument. Following this the parties shall be
       excused without further discussion. The committee shall then enter into closed session and
       each member shall vote on the question of guilt or innocence. A 'guilty" verdict requires a
       simple majority vote.

14.    Following a "guilty" verdict, the committee shall next allow both parties to make a
       presentation as to suitable penalty. Normally, it is only at this point that the committee may
       be made aware of other academic offenses in the student's file. The committee will again
       enter into closed session and decide upon the sanction. A motion to impose a particular
       penalty, as outlined in Section E of the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty, shall require
       a simple majority vote. The decision of the committee, as described in F.8, must be
       communicated to the parties in writing, delivered by hand or by mail.

15.    If the student is found to have committed a breach of academic honesty in work related to
       a funded research project, the Vice President (Academic Affairs) shall be notified and the
       Vice President or a designee shall determine whether to notify the granting agency.

F.     The Order of the Hearing:

The following indicates the order in which a committee should proceed when hearing a charge of
breach of academic honesty. The committee may alter the order in the interests of fairness.

1.     The Chair shall:

       a.      introduce the parties and members of the committee;
       b.      identify the nature of the case and evidence before the committee.

2.     The Presenter shall:

       a.      briefly describe the case to be presented, in an opening statement;
       b.      present support for the charge through oral testimony of complainant and
               witnesses, and through documentary evidence;
       c.      Committee members normally ask questions at the end of each person's testimony
               but may interrupt if clarity is required;
       d.      The student or representative may ask questions of each witness at the close of
               that person's testimony.



Student Handbook                              Page III.13                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


3.    The Student or representative shall:

      a.       briefly reply and indicate main arguments in an opening statement;
      b.       present support for her/his case through oral testimony of student and witnesses as
               well as documentary evidence;
      c.       Committee members normally ask questions at the end of each person's testimony
               but may interrupt if clarity is required;
      d.       The Presenter may ask questions of each witness at the close of that person's
               testimony.

4.    The Presenter shall be allowed to present testimony or other evidence in reply to new
      issues raised in the student's case which were not raised in the original presentation.

5.    At any time the committee may require other witnesses or the production of other written
      or documentary evidence and may, if it sees fit, adjourn the hearing after allowing both
      parties the opportunity to speak to the adjournment.

6.    Following the presentation of evidence, the parties are entitled to make closing arguments
      and to summarize briefly the main points of their cases, but no new arguments or evidence
      may be introduced. This will proceed in the following order: the Student followed by the
      Presenter.

7.    The committee will move into closed sessions for deliberations and decision. If there is a
      finding of guilt, the committee will then consider submissions as to appropriate penalty, then
      return to closed sessions and decide on the appropriate penalty.

8.    The written decision of the committee shall include:

      a.       the names of committee members and all who appeared;
      b.       a summary of the cases of the parties;
      c.       the committee's findings of fact, decision and reasons;
      d.       the route of appeal.

B.    ACADEMIC IMPLICATIONS OF DISRUPTIONS OR CESSATIONS OF
      UNIVERSITY BUSINESS DUE TO LABOUR DISPUTES OR OTHER CAUSES

1.    Definitions:

1.1   For the purpose of this policy, a Disruption occurs when academic activities are
      substantially interrupted or impeded as a result of strikes, lockouts, demonstrations, natural
      disasters, or other like causes.

1.2   The term "academic activity" includes any work subject to evaluation or necessary for a
      student to meet the requirements of a course or programme of study.

1.3   In determining whether an interruption or an impediment is substantial, the following factors



Student Handbook                             Page III.14                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

        shall be considered:

        1.3.1   the duration and point in the term or session in which the Disruption occurred;

        1.3.2   the availability of physical and instructional resources;

        1.3.3   the impact on the attendance of students, instructors, and other necessary
                participants;

        1.3.4   the impact of timing and sequence of evaluations such as examinations, practica,
                assignments and presentations etc.

2.      Policy:

The governing principles of this policy are: Academic Integrity, Fairness to Students, and Timely
Information.

2.1     Academic Integrity:

In the event of a Disruption, the primary obligation of Senate is to ensure the academic integrity
of all programmes. No dilution of standards normally expected of students should be permitted and
there should be as little diminution as possible in the instructional or supervisory support given to
students.

2.2     Fairness to Students:

2.2.1   Students who do not participate in academic activities because:

        a.      they are unable to do so owing to a Disruption, or

        b.      they choose not to participate in academic activities owing to a strike or lock-out on
                campus
        are entitled to immunity from penalty, to reasonable alternative access to materials covered
        in their absence, to reasonable extensions of deadlines and to such other remedy as
        Senate deems necessary and consistent with the principle of academic integrity.

2.2.2   Such remedies shall not alter the academic standards associated with the missed activity,
        nor shall it relieve the student of the responsibility for mastering materials covered.

2.2.3   The availability of a remedy under this policy does not guarantee students the same
        learning experience that they would have received in the absence of a Disruption.

2.3     Timely Information:

Students, staff and faculty have a right to be informed in a timely manner of changed requirements,
rescheduled academic activities, and procedures to be in effect at the conclusion of the Disruption.




Student Handbook                               Page III.15                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

3.      Procedures:

3.1     Communication and Dissemination of Information:

3.1.1   When a Disruption appears imminent:

        3.1.1.1)The Senate Executive Committee shall ensure that the normal informational
        channels, including Senate's webpage, are alerted so that Senate policies and decisions
        will be reported widely and accurately.

        3.1.1.2) The Senate Executive Committee shall post an appropriate notice to remind or
        notify students, staff, faculty, Faculty Councils, Unit Chairs, Graduate Directors, and Deans
        of their respective roles in giving effect to Senate policy and shall ensure that this
        information is disseminated speedily.

        3.1.1.3) A notice shall be posted by the Senate Executive Committee regarding the
        possibility of rescheduling following a Disruption and of term extension following the
        conclusion of a Disruption.

        3.1.1.4) A précis of this policy shall be prepared which can be circulated widely and posted
        on the University's website in the event of a Disruption.

3.1.2   When a Disruption occurs, the Senate Executive Committee shall declare so and request
        that:

        3.1.2.1) The Registrar use best efforts to inform and update relevant external bodies about
        the Disruption.

        3.1.2.2) University officers use best efforts to have externally imposed deadlines extended,
        especially where the lack of transcripts or the unavailability of letters of recommendation
        would impose a hardship on current students.

        3.1.2.3) The University Librarian disseminate information about the impact of a Disruption
        on access to collections and services as early and as frequently as possible via print
        notices, messages on websites, and other means;

        3.1.2.4) Any adjustment of deadlines be announced widely, including on Senate's webpage;

        3.1.2.5) The University provide a telephone information service to make known relevant
        information about academic activities.

3.1.3   When a Disruption ends, the Senate Executive Committee shall declare so and shall give
        notice to students and course directors of the procedures then in effect under this policy.

3.2     Short Disruptions:

3.2.1   Disruptions of academic activities of six or fewer days will be governed by normal academic



Student Handbook                              Page III.16                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:            POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

        regulations.

3.2.2   In the case of such brief Disruptions, individual faculty are in the best situation to determine,
        in the first instance, the extent to which their courses, seminars, graduate supervision, labs,
        practica, etc., have been affected by a Disruption and what remedial action is required.

3.2.3   If, in the opinion of a course director, remedial action ought to include rescheduling in order
        to preserve course integrity, in consultation with the Office of the Registrar he/she shall take
        actions consistent with the principles of academic integrity, fairness to students, and timely
        information as stated above.

3.3     Long Disruptions:

3.3.1   Whereas the Senate Executive Committee has been monitoring the situation at the outset
        of a Disruption, on the seventh day of a Disruption it shall receive reports from Faculty
        Councils and the Vice-President (Academic Affairs) on the impact of the Disruption.

3.3.2   In the event a Disruption continues for seven or more days, the Chairs of CCAS and SAC
        shall be added to the membership of the Senate Executive Committee as voting members
        for Disruption related issues and shall remain members for the duration of the Disruption.

3.3.3   If two or more weeks of instructional time are lost in full-year courses or equivalent (or one
        week or more in half-year courses or equivalent, or in one term full courses or equivalent),
        the Senate Executive Committee shall presume the need for a modification of the teaching
        term with any concomitant changes in examination scheduling.

3.3.4   The Senate Executive Committee shall oversee the process of directing and implementing
        the necessary remedial action. In cases where substantial amounts of instructional time
        have been lost due to a Disruption, the Senate Executive Committee shall:

        3.3.4.1) On the seventh day of a Disruption, the Senate Executive Committee shall
        announce that all quarter and half courses will require substantial remedial action and shall
        notify Unit Chairs and administrative staff, Deans, Graduate Directors and Faculty Councils.
        On the 14th day of a Disruption, a similar notification regarding full year courses shall be
        issued.

        3.3.4.2) call a meeting of Senate no later that the 14th day of a Disruption. Thereafter, the
        Senate Executive Committee shall consult with Senate as it continues to discharge its
        mandate under this policy, and as soon as possible after the end of the Disruption.

        3.3.4.3) have the power to implement and disseminate any existing Senate policies and
        regulations necessary to fulfill its mandate under this policy.

        3.3.4.4) have authority to extend a term and to authorize the rescheduling of examinations
        which have been disrupted, in order to preserve academic integrity. The Senate Executive
        Committee may also reduce the length of term by not more than 7 days in the case of half
        courses and by not more than 14 days in the case of full-year courses. Implementation of



Student Handbook                                Page III.17                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       changes to the academic term will be organized centrally. Appropriate central offices, such
       as the Office of the Registrar, will be consulted prior to the decision and asked to assist in
       any rescheduling.

       3.3.4.5) resolve conflicts between the principles of academic integrity and fairness to
       students. In particular and without limiting the generality of the forgoing, the Senate
       Executive Committee may anticipate and apply remedies which would otherwise be
       available by petition and shall do so in light of University precedent and practice.

       3.3.4.6) If a Disruption continues to a point where no feasible remedy consistent with the
       principle of academic integrity is available, then, Senate Executive Committee shall after
       consultation recommend to Senate that credit not be given for the course(s).

3.4. Petitions and Appeals:

Normal petition and appeal procedures shall apply to deal with academic issues arising from a
Disruption which lasts less than seven days. Where a Disruption occurred for seven days or longer,
SAC shall monitor petitions and appeals to ensure fairness and reasonable consistency of
outcomes.


C.     CAMPUS ALCOHOL

1.     York University is committed to promoting the health and well-being of its members.

2.     All of its members and guests have an obligation to make responsible decisions concerning
       the use of alcohol.

3.     York University manages the sale and use of the alcohol on its premises in accordance with
       the foregoing and the terms of its licences from the Liquor Licence Board of Ontario and
       other legal requirements.

4.     Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, York University restricts the use of alcohol
       on its campuses to persons 19 years of age or older and limits the consumption to certain
       areas of campus.

5.     This policy is applicable to all members of York University, including students, faculty, staff,
       tenants, visitors and guests. Violations of the policy could lead to legal or disciplinary action,
       including but not limited to the withdrawal of University privileges.

Pursuant to this policy, the Vice-President (Campus Relations/Student Affairs) is responsible for
establishing regulations and guidelines to be in effect on York campuses from time to time.


D.     COMPUTING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FACILITIES




Student Handbook                               Page III.18                        September 15, 2000
SECTION III:         POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

Policy Statement:

1.    York University's computing and information technology facilities are made available to
      students in support of their academic objectives and requirements; to faculty in support of
      their teaching, research and administrative activities; to staff in support of their assigned
      responsibilities; and to other authorized users. Such facilities may include computers and
      associated peripherals, the communication infrastructure and related equipment, facsimile
      machines, scanners, copiers, telephone, video and other multimedia devices and forms of
      software.

2.    Computing and information technology facilities may be used only in a manner which does
      not contravene York University's relevant policies, codes, agreements, and network
      protocols, and provincial and federal laws.

3.    Access to computing and information technology facilities is a privilege. Users who
      contravene the relevant policies and laws may be subject to immediate withdrawal of the
      privilege and/or disciplinary procedures. Illegal acts involving computing and information
      technology facilities may also be subject to criminal prosecution or other legal action.

Guidelines for Users of Computing and Information Technology Facilities:

Users shall:

1.    Be responsible for using these facilities in an effective, ethical and lawful manner.
2.    Respect the rights and interests of others.
3.    Respect the property of others, including intellectual property.
4.    Respect the copyrights of the owners of all software and data they use.
5.    Respect the licensing agreements entered into by the University.
6.    Respect privacy and confidentiality.
7.    Use only those facilities for which they have authorization, whether these facilities are at
      York University or at any other location.
8.    Use facilities and services only for their intended purposes.
9.    Take all reasonable steps to protect the integrity and security of the facilities including
      software and data.
10.   Properly identify themselves in any electronic correspondence and provide valid, traceable
      identification if required by applications or servers within the University's facilities or in
      establishing connections with the facilities.

Users shall not:

1.    Access systems or data without authorization.
2.    Alter systems, software and/or data without authorization.
3.    Copy software and/or data without authorization.
4.    Destroy or remove software and/or data without authorization.
5.    Disclose data without authorization.
6.    Interfere with the processing of a system, such as deliberately overextending the resources
      of a system.



Student Handbook                             Page III.19                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:         POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

7.    Misrepresent themselves as another user.
8.    Disclose confidential passwords, access codes, account numbers or other authorization
      assigned to them.
9.    Change another person's password without authorization.
10.   Use the University facilities and resources for unauthorized purposes, including
      unauthorized commercial purposes.

Procedures for Allegations of Student Misconduct in the Use of York's Computing
and Information Technology Facilities:

1.    Each computer lab/network/service available for student use shall identify to the Senate
      Committee on Academic Computing an appropriate individual associated with the
      lab/network/service who agrees to serve as a local Computer-Complaints Officer in regard
      to offences related to the use of computer systems.

2.    Each computer lab/network/service available for student use shall identify to the Senate
      Committee on Academic Computing an appropriate faculty member associated with the
      lab/network/service who agrees to serve as a local Computer-Hearing Officer in regard to
      offences related to the use of computer systems.

3.    Each computer lab/system/service available for student use shall adopt the Senate
      Committee on Academic Computing's (SCAC's) Guidelines.

4.    The Guidelines shall be posted on each door into the labs and/or broadcast at the point of
      access to the system. By entering the lab and/or signing onto the system, the user agrees
      to abide by these Guidelines.
5.    Students violating the Guidelines may lose the privilege of computer access in a hearing
      before the local Computer-Hearing Officer. This procedure shall normally be initiated by or
      through the Computer-Complaints Officer.

6.    The Computer-Complaints Officer shall preserve any evidence, including electronic
      evidence of abuse, for the consideration of the local Computer-Hearing Officer.

7.    The local Computer-Hearing Officer shall hear the case as expeditiously as possible and
      may impose a term of suspension and/or set conditions of access to the local
      lab/network/service. The local Computer-Hearing Officer may also recommend to the
      Associate VP (Technological Services & Registrar) that access to all of York's computer
      labs/networks/services be suspended. The Associate VP (Technological Services &
      Registrar) may impose a university-wide restriction on the privilege of computer-access.

8.    The Computer-Complaints Officer may, on the basis of prima facie evidence of serious
      abuse and/or the potential for serious harm, immediately impose a temporary suspension
      of a student's local computer access pending a hearing. This temporary suspension shall
      be reviewed by the Associate VP (Technological Services & Registrar) or Chair of SCAC
      or designates, normally within 1 working day. The Associate VP (Technological Services
      & Registrar) or Chair of SCAC or designates may reverse the suspension, uphold the
      suspension, or make the suspension university-wide pending a hearing.



Student Handbook                           Page III.20                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


9.     The penalty of suspension of computer-access is in addition to penalties which may apply
       under other codes and laws such as The Senate Policy on Misconduct in Academic
       Research, The Senate Policy on Academic Honesty, the civil law of Ontario, The Copyright
       Act and The Criminal Code of Canada.

10.    In cases where computer access is essential to the course work of a student who has had
       computer access suspended, the student may appeal the penalty only, and not the finding
       of abuse, to SCAC. The Committee will assess the consequences of the penalty and may
       choose to grant reinstatement of the student's privileges or conditional/limited reinstatement
       for the completion of the course work in question. SCAC may recommend to the relevant
       Faculty's Petition Committee late withdrawal without academic penalty from the course/s
       in question. SCAC may also deny the appeal.


E.     DISRUPTIVE AND/OR HARASSING BEHAVIOUR BY STUDENTS IN ACADEMIC
       SITUATIONS

Policy:

Students and instructors are expected to maintain a professional relationship characterized by
courtesy and mutual respect and to refrain from actions disruptive to such a relationship. Moreover,
it is the responsibility of the instructor to maintain an appropriate academic atmosphere in the
classroom and the responsibility of the student to cooperate in that endeavour. Further, the
instructor is the best person to decide, in first instance, whether such an atmosphere is present in
the class.

Procedures:

For clarification, "instructor" means the teacher in the classroom at the relevant time, i.e., the
course director or the tutorial leader, as appropriate; "Department Chairperson" means the
Department Chairperson or equivalent.

Since these procedures are intended to be remedial in nature, rather than punitive, each case
should be handled as expeditiously as possible given the particular circumstances.

1.     If, in the opinion of the instructor, the class is disrupted by a student(s), the instructor
       should first indicate to the student(s) that the behaviour is disruptive and shall normally
       provide an opportunity for the individual(s) to conform to the expected standards in that
       class. It is presumed that, in the great majority of instances, the matter would be resolved
       in this initial, informal manner.

2.     Where the disruption continues in that class or a later class, the instructor shall normally
       ask the student(s) to leave the classroom. Where a student(s) refuse to leave on request,
       the instructor may direct the student(s) to leave and, if refusal continues, Security & Safety
       shall be called to assist the instructor in ejecting the student(s).



Student Handbook                              Page III.21                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:         POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


      If the instructor considers that he/she is in immediate danger or is reasonably apprehensive
      for his/her safety, he/she shall contact Security & Safety (736-2100 ext. 3333) which shall
      provide an appropriate response to the immediate concern. For example, where an
      instructor is teaching in the evening, Security and Safety could provide an escort to the
      instructor's vehicle or until public transportation arrived. If the danger or apprehended
      danger is expected to be or becomes of longer duration, the instructor shall seek a more
      permanent resolution of the matter, following the procedures in 10 below, and/or seek
      assistance from the regular law enforcement agencies and the courts in the most serious
      instances.

3.    Where a student(s) has been asked to leave the class, the instructor shall routinely notify
      the Course Director (where applicable), the Department Chairperson and the Associate
      Dean of the Faculty of the incident in writing.

4.    The Department Chairperson, on receipt of the notice, shall forward a copy to the student(s)
      involved [and copies to the Course director, where applicable, and the Associate Dean] with
      a covering letter stating that the notice shall remain on file in the Departmental Office and
      the Associate Dean's office until the student(s) named graduates from the Faculty. The
      student(s) shall also be informed that, if the statements in the notice are disputed, the
      student(s) may submit written comments to the Department Chairperson on the instructor's
      account of the matter. The Department Chairperson shall forward a copy of any written
      comments to the instructor, the Course Director, where applicable, and the Associate Dean.

5.    If, after a student(s) has been asked or instructed to leave the class, the disruption
      continues or is repeated in subsequent classes or class-related situations (e.g., the
      instructor's office) or the student(s) otherwise disrupts the expected professional
      relationship of student and instructor, the instructor may request the Department
      Chairperson, in writing and copied to the Associate Dean [and Course Director, if
      applicable] to review the matter and resolve the problem in an appropriate fashion. The
      instructor may propose a resolution which seems appropriate in his/her view.

6.    In conducting that review, the Department Chairperson shall discuss the matter with the
      Student(s) involved, inform the student(s) of the instructor's proposed resolution (where
      such a proposal has been made) and invite the student(s) to respond. The Department
      Chairperson shall then resolve the problem in the manner which seems most appropriate,
      in his/her view, given the circumstances. Examples of resolutions include: changing the
      tutorial group to which the student(s) is assigned; permitting the student to continue to
      attend classes with an undertaking to conform with the expected standards of behaviours;
      prohibiting the student from attending further or specific tutorial groups and/or lectures,
      provided alternate arrangements are made for the student(s), but not proceeding to seek
      suspension from the course. These suggested resolutions are not intended to constitute
      an exhaustive list given that the particular circumstances could vary considerably from case
      to case. Further, the resolutions could be applied in combination or additional conditions
      attached depending on the circumstances. The Department Chairperson shall inform the
      student(s) in writing of his/her decision, with copies to the instructor, the Course Director
      (where applicable) and the Associate Dean. Upon notification of the Department



Student Handbook                            Page III.22                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       Chairperson's decision, the student(s) may request that the Dean review the Department
       Chairperson's resolution of the matter and the Dean shall so review the Department
       Chairperson's decision.

7.     While the Department Chairperson has considerable discretion as per 7 above in fashioning
       an appropriate resolution of the matter, it is understood that the Department Chairperson
       cannot impose, as a sanction, suspension from a course or Faculty. If the Department
       Chairperson considers that such sanctions are appropriate, the Department Chairperson
       shall forward the matter to the President (or his delegate) for a determination according to
       the usual procedures governing student discipline under the President's authority in 13.2
       ( c) of the York Act. The Department Chairperson shall inform the student(s), the instructor,
       the Course Director (where applicable) and the Associate Dean of his/her decision to
       proceed in this manner.

8.     In dealing with disruptive student behaviours, instructors and Department Chairpersons
       should consider whether the behaviour might be more appropriately addressed through an
       alternative mechanism, such as, referral of the student(s) to counselling services, mediation
       by an individual acceptable to the instructor and student(s), other informal or formal
       meetings with faculty members in the Department or the Faculty, etc.

9.     It is expected that the procedures in 6, 7, 8 and 9 would be the appropriate route for dealing
       with many instances of disruptive student behaviour. However, where the instructor
       considers that the disruptive behaviours constitutes a serious theat to him/herself and/or
       to the other students in the class, the instructor shall request the Associate Dean, in writing
       and copied to the Department Chairperson and Course Director (where applicable), to
       review to matter and resolve the problem expeditiously and in an appropriate fashion. The
       instructor may propose a resolution which seems appropriate in his/her view. Further, the
       instructor may request appropriate security arrangements pending the Associate Dean's
       review, whereupon the Associate Dean shall discuss the matter with the instructor without
       delay to provide such appropriate interim security.

10.    The authority of the Associate Dean and the procedures, including review by the Dean,
       shall parallel the authority of the Department Chairperson and the procedures set out in 7,
       8 and 9 above.


F.     FIREARMS AND WEAPONS

Policy:

No one shall be permitted to have or use firearms, weapons, ammunition or explosive substances
on lands or in premises which are leased, owned, operated or otherwise controlled by York
University, unless specifically granted such permission by the University.

Explosive substances stored in accordance with University requirements and used in the ordinary
course in University supervised laboratories for the purposes of conducting research and teaching
shall not be included in the ambit of this policy while being used for the purposes intended.



Student Handbook                              Page III.23                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

Peace officers and members of the Canadian Armed forces attending on University premises in
the course of their duty, shall not be required to obtain permission to carry duty weapons.

Anyone found to have contravened the restrictions set out herein, shall be disciplined and/or
prosecuted and all offending firearms, weapons, ammunition or exploding substances may be
confiscated.

Definitions:

The terms Firearms, Weapons, Ammunition and Explosive Substances shall have the meanings
given to them under the Criminal Code of Canada from time to time.


G.     MISCONDUCT IN ACADEMIC RESEARCH

Policy:

1.     York University affirms that all members of the University have the obligation to maintain
       the highest standards of academic honesty. It is the responsibility of members of faculty
       and staff to follow acceptable standards of academic conduct and to foster it in others, and
       of students to be mindful of and abide by such standards.

2.     The University incorporates by reference the regulations on scholarly conduct established
       by national and international agencies, which include but are not limited to the Social
       Science and Humanities Research Council, the Natural Sciences and Engineering
       Research Council, the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Council on
       Animal Care, and the policies of Senate and the relevant sections of the Collective
       Agreements between the University and its employees, as they exist from time to time.

3.     "Misconduct in Academic Research" is defined as:

       a.      any conscious act of fabrication or plagiarism associated with the proposing,
               conducting or reporting or publication of research, but does not include differences
               in opinion, honest error or honest differences in interpretation or assessment of data
               or research results:

       b.      material failure to comply with federal or provincial regulations for the protection of
               researchers, human subjects or the public, or for the welfare of laboratory animals
               or material failure to meet other federal or provincial requirements that relate to the
               conduct of research;

       c.      failure to reveal to the sponsors any material conflict of interest which might be
               expected, on reasonable grounds, to be unknown to the sponsors and which might
               influence the sponsor's decisions on whether the researcher should be asked to
               undertake reviews of research, grant applications or to test products or services for
               sale or distribution to the public;




Student Handbook                              Page III.24                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:            POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       d.      failure to reveal to the University any material financial interest in a business that
               contracts with the University to undertake research, particularly research involving
               business products, or to provide research related material or services. Material
               financial interest includes ownership, partnership, substantial investment whether
               equity or debt, a directorship, significant honoraria or consulting fees but does not
               include minor share holding in publicly traded corporations.

4.     A finding of misconduct in academic research may lead to a variety of sanctions, ranging
       from warning or reprimand to dismissal as is appropriate to the circumstances, Senate
       procedures governing student academic misconduct, and the terms of any applicable
       collective agreements.

5.     Information concerning a finding of misconduct will be communicated to relevant research
       funding agencies or councils in accordance with their requirements.




Procedures for Determining Misconduct in Academic Research:

1.     Applicability (This section pending further consultation and amendment):

These procedures govern the determination of misconduct in academic research by all University
employees, and person employed under research grants by the University or by its faculty
members, including persons who are also students at the University. However, students who have
been alleged to have engaged in misconduct in academic research solely in their capacity as
students, and in respect only to work related to the completion of their degree requirements, shall
be governed by Faculty procedures for dealing with academic misconduct, and by the underlying
Senate policy and procedures on which such Faculty procedures are based. In cases where a
conflict of jurisdiction arises, the Dean of the Faculty in which a student is registered may elect
which procedures to follow.

2.     Initiating an Inquiry:

2.1    An allegation of misconduct in academic research shall be in writing and directed to the
       President. Within 10 days of the receipt of an allegation in writing, the President shall notify
       the individuals named therein with a copy of the document containing the allegation. The
       President shall decide whether the circumstances warrant an investigation.

2.2    The President's authority hereunder may be delegated.

3.     Investigation:

3.1    Within 30 days of determining that an investigation is warranted, the President shall, in
       writing, so notify the persons involved and shall within 30 days of such notification,
       designate and convene an ad hoc committee of no fewer than 3 persons to conduct the
       investigation (the Committee). Some but not all of the members of the Committee shall be
       from the same discipline as the person under investigation.



Student Handbook                               Page III.25                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

3.2    The Committee shall have the discretion to establish in each case, a procedure suitable to
       the circumstances, provided that in every case, its discretion will be exercised with the
       following parameters:

       a.      before any determination is made, the person against whom the allegations are
               made shall have full disclosure of the allegations and evidence and an opportunity
               to answer in full;

       b.      time is of the essence;

       c.      the proceedings will remain confidential to the extent possible, with a view to
               protecting from persons not party to or witness in the proceeding the identity of the
               persons making the allegations and the person against whom the allegations are
               made.

3.3    In every case, the detailed procedures of the investigation shall be in accordance with the
       provisions of the applicable collective agreement and Faculty regulations.

4.     Determination:

4.1    At the conclusion of its investigation, the Committee shall report to the President, in writing,
       with its findings as to whether or not misconduct has occurred. Upon receipt of the
       Committee's report, the President shall make a formal determination as to whether there
       has been misconduct.

4.2    If the determination is that the allegations should be dismissed, the file shall be closed.

4.3    If the determination is that the allegations disclose that there has been misconduct, the
       President shall determine an appropriate penalty.

4.4    In every case, the imposition of a sanction shall be in accordance with the provisions of the
       applicable collective agreement and Faculty regulations in force at the time of the imposition
       of the sanction.

5.     Records:

5.1    Written records shall be kept of the inquiry and investigation and these records shall be kept
       as confidential files, for a minimum of 3 years following the finding of misconduct or
       dismissal of the allegation.


H.     PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS

It is the policy of York University to endeavour to create and maintain a learning environment
characterized by equitable conditions for all students. In order to further that goal and to ensure the
continuing integrity of academic standards, it is expected that instructors who have a close personal
relationship with a student who desires to enrol in their course will, in consultation with their Chair



Student Handbook                               Page III.26                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:            POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

and/or Dean (or designate), make appropriate alternative arrangements for the evaluation of that
student. If no appropriate alternative arrangements for evaluation can be agreed upon, the student
may not enrol in the course.

Without limiting the generality of the relationships in question; these include the following:

        a.      where the instructor is the parent (or child) of the student
        b.      where the instructor is the spouse or spousal equivalent of the student

Should a relationship such as the one described in (b) above arise during the course and before
completion of evaluation of the student, the instructor shall consult with the Chair and/or Dean (or
designate) as to an appropriate evaluation procedure.

It is incumbent upon the instructor to exercise professional responsibility and to declare a potential
or apparent conflict of interest where it exists. If the instructor fails to do so, the Chair and/or Dean
(or designate) shall make the appropriate alternative arrangements for the evaluation of the
student.

I.      PHYSICAL ACCESSIBILITY OF UNIVERSITY FACILITIES

Policy:

York University is committed to working towards ensuring that its facilities are as accessible as
possible to persons with disabilities.

To that end, the University will create a process by which persons with disabilities may make known
the difficulties they are experiencing in gaining access to and use of existing facilities and shall
continue with its program of renovating existing facilities to achieve greater accessibility.

The University is committed to ensuring that new building projects are designed with an awareness
of the needs and requirements of persons with physical disabilities and with a view to achieving the
goals set out herein.

Procedure:

1.      Persons with disabilities who are experiencing difficulties accessing facilities may bring their
        concerns (in the case of students) to the Office for Persons with Disabilities or (in the case
        of employees) to the Department of Occupational Health and Safety.

2.      If the difficulty is such that accommodation of an individual is required, the matter will be
        referred to and arrangements or referrals made by the aforenoted offices.

3.      If the difficulty is such that the access to a facility for a group of individuals is impaired and
        substantial renovation or alteration of the University's facilities is required, it will be referred
        to the Department of Facilities and Business Operations and addressed in accordance with
        the priorities for renovation of the University's facilities set by the Access York
        SubCommittee on Physical Access.



Student Handbook                                 Page III.27                         September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY



J.     PRESIDENTIAL REGULATION NUMBER 2 : REGULATION GOVERNING THE
       CONDUCT OF STUDENTS

I.     The Authority and Jurisdiction of the University:

By registering in any programme of the University, a student agrees to be bound by all of its rules
and regulations. Such regulations apply to all conduct, whether on or off campus, which may be
said to be related to the individual's behaviour as a member of the University. Apart from any
agreement to be bound by this manner, all students are subject to presidential regulatory authority.

Under the York University Act, 1965, the President "has the power to formulate and implement
regulations governing students and student activities." Various rules, regulations and practices of
the University relating to students and student activities have been enacted by or under presidential
authority. These were consolidated, modified and approved by Presidential Regulation Number 1
(September 25, 1985), which is available in the Office of the Secretary of the University. Regulation
Number 2 amends Regulation Number 1, to the extent of any inconsistency.

II.    Matters Covered by this Regulation:

a.     This regulation applies to "student conduct", i.e., conduct which is associated with student
       membership in the University community, and which is subject to presidential authority
       under section 13(c ) of the York University Act.

b.     This regulation does not apply to conduct:

       i.      under the exclusive authority of Senate, or of academic units acting under its
               mandate (e.g., academic offences);
       ii.     under the exclusive authority of the Board of Governors, or of administrative officers
               acting under its mandate (e.g., parking offences); or
       iii.    under presidential or other administrative authority (e.g., noncompliance with
               registration or fee payment procedures); except to the extent that such conduct also
               constitutes "student conduct".

c.     This regulation may be adopted by any competent authority mentioned in paragraph b), and
       its procedural provisions shall thereafter apply to such conduct.

d.     Where more than one complaints officer or local hearing officer or tribunal has jurisdiction
       in a matter, any such body may exercise jurisdiction.

e.     While an incident may give rise to two or more infractions, each of which lies within the
       jurisdiction of a different complaints officer, local hearing officer or tribunal, and while any
       such body may impose two or more sanctions for each infraction, no complaints officer,
       local hearing officer, or tribunal shall impose a sanction if the offender has already been
       sanctioned for the same infraction by that, or any other body.




Student Handbook                               Page III.28                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

f.     Conduct which violates the rules, customs or standards of any facility, organization, club,
       league or team operating on or from University premises, under University auspices, or with
       funds provided by the University, may also be treated as an infraction of these regulations
       despite the imposition of sanctions by such facility, organization, club, league or team or
       its competent authorities.

g.     The University reserves the right to invoke, in place of or in addition to its own standards
       and procedures, any civil, criminal or other remedies which may be available to it as a
       matter of law.

III.   Standards of Student Conduct:

Students may think, speak, write, create, study, learn, pursue social, cultural and other interests
and associate together for all of these purposes, subject to the requirement that they respect the
rights of members of the University and general communities to pursue these same freedoms and
privileges. This general standard encompasses a number of more specific expectations which
cannot be fully foreseen or exhaustively enumerated. By way of example, and without limiting the
generality of the foregoing, students are expected:

1.     to abide by all federal, provincial and municipal laws, so far as these are relevant to student
       conduct;

2.     to refrain from conduct which harms or threatens harm to:

       C       the proper functioning of University programmes or activities
       C       the rights of members or guests of the University
       C       the safety and well-being of members or guests of the University
       C       the property of the University or of its members or guests;
       C       more specifically, to refrain from:
               C       assault or threat of assault
               C       harassment or discrimination in contravention of the principles articulated in
                       the Ontario Human Rights Code or the Canadian Charter of Rights and
                       Freedoms
               C       theft, defacement or destruction of property
               C       unauthorized entry or trespass;

3.     to abide by the regulations, rules, practices and procedures of the University and its
       academic and administrative units;

4.     to abide by reasonable instructions given orally or in writing by any official of the University
       authorized to secure compliance with such regulations, rules, practices and procedures,
       provided that the official is identified and is acting in an official capacity.

Note: Students seeking further information concerning University regulations, rules, practices or
procedures should contact the University Complaints Centre (located within the Office of Student
Affairs) or the main office of their faculty, department or college. Information may also be obtained
from the Office of the Assistant Vice-President, Student Affairs, the University Secretariat, the



Student Handbook                               Page III.29                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

Associate Vice-President (Technology Services & Registrar), or on the Internet at
HTTP://WWW.YORKU.CA/SECRETARIAT/LEGISLATION/INDEX.HTM

IV.    Structures and Procedures:

A.     Governing Principles:

Disciplinary matters should be resolved speedily, fairly, and if possible informally within the unit of
the University where they arise. Where disciplinary matters have their origin in a dispute between
individuals, an attempt should be made to use mediative procedures to secure an outcome which
is satisfactory to the disputants, as well as consistent with the expectations of the University.
However, all disciplinary matters, whatever their origin, ultimately involve injury to the University's
mission, reputation, interests or communal well-being, and are subject to these procedures for that
reason.

B.     Complaints and Investigation:

1.     A complaint concerning student conduct may be made by any member of the University to
       a 'complaints officer' including:

       i.      Masters, Deans or the Principal of Glendon College, the Director of Libraries, the
               Associate Vice-President (Technological Services & Registrar), or the
               Vice-President (Academic Affairs) and Provost, or a person designated by any of
               these as the 'complaints officer' in a unit under their jurisdiction;
       ii.     the University Complaint Centre (in the Office of Student Affairs); or
       iii.    special complaints centres established to deal with particular concerns, as identified
               from time to time in Appendix A.

2.     a.      Upon receipt of a complaint, a complaints officer shall determine whether or not to
               process it, or to refer it to one of the other complaints officers referred to in
               paragraph 1. In the event that a complaint may be appropriately dealt with by more
               than one complaints officer, the complainant shall be so advised, and afforded a
               choice as to the complaints officer who shall be charged with the matter.

       b.      No complaint shall be deemed to be invalid by reason of having been brought
               initially to, or thereafter dealt with by, the wrong complaints officer, but every effort
               shall be made to assist the complainant to carry the matter forward in the manner
               most convenient and acceptable to the complainant.

       c.      The Provost shall have responsibility for coordinating all complaints procedures and
               officers, and for securing the assistance of the Department of Security and Safety
               Services and other departments, where required.

3.     a.      Upon determining that the complaint is one which can and should be dealt with, the
               complaints officer shall reduce the complaint to writing, and make a preliminary
               investigation of the matter by discussing it with the complainant and making other
               informal enquiries.



Student Handbook                               Page III.30                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


      b.       Where after making a preliminary investigation the complaints officer determines
               that the complaint is patently without merit or is one to which these Regulations do
               not apply, the complaints officer shall so inform the complainant (and, where
               appropriate, the complainee) and, thereafter, take no further action in regard to the
               complaint.

      c.       If the complaint apparently involves a minor infraction, and in serious cases, if the
               complainant, the alleged offender and the Provost consent in writing, the matter
               shall be dealt with informally within the unit in which it occurred by the Master, Dean
               or Principal, Director of Libraries, the Associate Vice-President (Technological
               Services & Registrar), or person designated by them to act as a local hearing
               officer.

      d.       If the matter apparently involves a serious infraction of University regulations, rules
               or practices, the Provost shall be so advised, and the matter shall be dealt with
               through the formal adjudicative process which is described in the Serious Infraction
               section of this Regulation, unless the Provost consents in writing to informal
               disposition under paragraph c.

      e.       The Provost may, on the application of a complaints officer or local hearing officer,
               summarily determine whether a matter involves a minor infraction or a serious
               infraction, and the matter shall thereafter be dealt with accordingly.

      f.       If the matter can be dealt with pursuant to procedures followed by one of the special
               complaint centres, as identified from time to time in Appendix A, it should be so
               dealt with unless the complainant otherwise elects. In the event that a formal
               adjudication is conducted by one of the special complaint centres listed in Appendix
               A, it shall be conducted in accordance with the Serious Infraction section of this
               Regulation.

C.    Mediative Procedures:

1.    Any complaints or hearing officer may, at any stage of the proceeding, and with the written
      consent of the complainant, the alleged offender and the Provost, establish a mediative
      procedure to deal with the matter.

2.    The complaints or hearing officer may, upon consent, assume mediative functions, but shall
      not thereafter perform adjudicative functions in relation to the complaint.

3.    As a condition of establishing a mediative procedure, the complainant and the alleged
      offender must agree to abide by the agreement reached in mediation. Violation of such an
      agreement shall itself be an act of misconduct, to be dealt with according to this regulation.

D.    Minor Infractions:

1.    Minor infractions shall be dealt with at the college level in the case of all students having



Student Handbook                              Page III.31                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

      a college affiliation, and at the Faculty level for all other students. In the event that a minor
      infraction involves students from two or more units, or does not relate to a particular college
      or Faculty, the Provost may give directions for dealing with the matter, and appoint a local
      hearing officer for this purpose.

2.    In dealing with a minor infraction, the Master, Dean or Principal, Director of Libraries,
      Associate Vice-President (Technological Services & Registrar), or person(s) designated by
      them, shall act as a local hearing officer.

3.    The local hearing officer shall advise the alleged offender of the substance of the complaint,
      and provide a fair, but informal, opportunity for response. After considering the evidence
      and submissions of the complainant and the alleged offender, and any further evidence or
      submissions which, in the discretion of the local hearing officer, may be relevant and helpful
      in disposing of the matter, a written order may be made:

      i.       dismissing the complaint;
      ii.      imposing a minor sanction; or
      iii.     in the event the matter appears to be serious, remitting it to the adjudicative
               procedure under Part E of these Regulations.

4.    The local hearing officer shall provide brief reasons for any order, and provide a copy to the
      complainant and the offender or alleged offender. If the order is to dismiss the complaint
      or to impose minor sanctions, in the discretion of the local hearing officer, the reasons may
      be placed in the offender's file (if sanctions are imposed) or made public within the unit. In
      the event that the order is one to remit the matter to formal adjudication, the reasons shall
      form part of the file to be considered by the University Discipline Tribunal, but shall not be
      made public.

5.    The minor sanctions which a local hearing officer may impose shall be limited to one or
      more of the following:

      i.       reprimand;
      ii.      public admonition;
      iii.     mandatory counselling;
      iv.      mandatory apology to the complainant (on pain of more serious sanction); and, in
               addition to or in lieu of such sanctions, one or more of the following:
      v.       denial of a local privilege (e.g., residence privileges, access to a pub or to licensed
               functions, participation in local activities)
      vi.      restitution for damage done not exceeding $250, or
      vii.     a fine not exceeding $200, to be paid to the University's student assistance fund.

6.    A local hearing officer may order that any sanction imposed be stayed, so long as the
      offender abstains from the conduct complained of.

7.    Decisions made or sanctions imposed by a local hearing officer may not be appealed.
      Conduct for which minor sanctions have been imposed shall not be the subject of further
      proceedings, except to the extent that they form part of a pattern of conduct, or aggravating



Student Handbook                              Page III.32                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       circumstances, in connection with a subsequent proceeding arising out of another
       complaint.



E.     Serious Infractions:

1.     General:

Unless dealt with on consent, by mediative procedures or at the local level, serious infractions shall
be dealt with through the formal adjudicative procedures established in this section.

2.     Complaints:

a.     A complaint of a serious infraction shall be referred to the Provost who, following
       preliminary investigation, may:

       i.      determine that the complaint is patently without merit, or is one to which these
               Regulations do not apply, or in special circumstances, is not appropriate for
               adjudication, and shall so inform the complainant (and, where appropriate, the
               complainee) and, thereafter, take no further action in regard to the complaint;
       ii.     refer the complaint to a local hearing officer, if he finds the matter is not serious;
       iii.    institute mediative procedures, with the consent of the complainant and the alleged
               offender;
       iv.     arrange for prosecution of the matter before a Trial Panel of the University
               Discipline Tribunal; and
       v.      in addition to, or in lieu of, any such action refer the matter to ordinary civil, criminal
               or other legal processes.

b.     In the event that the matter is prosecuted before a Trial Panel of the University Discipline
       Tribunal, the Provost shall arrange for its prosecution. The original complainant may be
       called as a witness, but shall not have responsibility for presenting the case.

3.     Hearings:

a.     Formal adjudication under these Regulations shall be conducted at first instance before a
       Trial Panel of the University Discipline Tribunal ('the Discipline Tribunal'), established by
       Presidential Regulation Number 3, as amended from time to time.

b.     The Trial Panel of the University Discipline Tribunal shall not be bound to observe strict
       legal procedures, but in order to ensure that its procedures are as fair as possible in the
       context of university circumstances and traditions, it shall comply with the following
       procedural guidelines:

       i.      the Provost or her/his representative shall provide the alleged offender and the Trial
               Panel with a copy of the complaint, a summary of the essential facts alleged against
               her or him, copies of any documents to be considered by the Trial Panel, a



Student Handbook                                Page III.33                        September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

               statement of the possible consequences of a finding of guilt, and a copy of all
               pertinent Regulations;
       ii.     the original complainant and all parties to the proceeding shall be given reasonable
               notice of the time and place of the hearing;
       iii.    all parties to the proceeding shall be afforded the right to be represented by counsel
               or other advocate, to call evidence and present argument;
       iv.     proceedings of the Trial Panel shall be open to the members of the York community
               unless either the complainant or the alleged offender can show cause why the Trial
               Panel should proceed in camera;
       v.      the Trial Panel is not bound by legal rules of evidence; it may receive evidence in
               written or oral form, and shall afford all parties the opportunity to respond to such
               evidence; where the evidence concerns an important matter about which there is
               a factual dispute, it should normally be presented orally through witnesses, who
               should be subject to cross-examination; the Trial Panel may in its discretion
               nonetheless accept other forms of evidence or decline to permit cross-examination
               if no other course is practically possible, or if the party challenging such evidence
               is abusing the process of the Trial Panel;
       vi.     the Trial Panel may take note of matters generally within the knowledge of members
               of the university community; it may inform itself by any means it deems appropriate
               of any facts material to its deliberations, provided the parties to the proceeding are
               apprised of such facts and afforded an opportunity to respond to them;
       vii.    in general, the University Discipline Tribunal and an individual Trial Panel may adopt
               such procedures and make such rulings as will permit it to determine matters fairly
               but expeditiously in light of the domestic nature of University discipline proceedings,
               without reference to formal legal procedures, but with due regard for the importance
               of the outcome from the point of view of the complainant, the alleged offender and
               the University.

c.     The Trial Panel shall produce a written decision stating its factual findings and conclusions,
       the sanctions (if any) to be imposed, and the procedures available by way of appeal. The
       decision shall be filed with the Secretary of the University and copies shall be provided to
       all parties to the proceeding and the original complainant. Unless the Trial Panel otherwise
       directs, the decision shall be considered a public document.

4.     Powers:

The Trial Panel may:

i.     at any time, with the consent of the complainant and the alleged offender, remit the matter
       to mediative procedures;

ii.    dismiss the complaint; or

iii.   uphold the complaint and impose sanctions.

5.     Sanctions:




Student Handbook                              Page III.34                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

If the Trial Panel finds the student guilty of misconduct, it may impose any sanction, commensurate
with the offence, which might have been imposed by a local hearing officer; in addition, the Trial
Panel may impose any or all of the following sanctions:
i.       rusticate the offender, terminating her or his right to continue as a student of the University
         permanently or for a fixed or indefinite period;

ii.     order the offender to pay full restitution for any damage caused;

iii.   impose a fine not exceeding $1,000, to be paid to the University's student assistance fund;
iv.    deprive the offender of any University privilege (e.g., apartment or residence, parking, use
       of licensed premises, use of University facilities or participation in University activities);

v.     prohibit the offender from entering the University campus or any portion thereof, absolutely
       or except in accordance with stipulated conditions, and to surrender occupation of any
       University office, laboratory, residence or apartment or other space;

vi.    order that any sanction imposed be stayed, so long as the offender abstains from the
       conduct complained of.

6.     Implementation:

a.     Unless otherwise ordered, all sanctions imposed by the Trial Panel shall take effect seven
       days after the date of the decision.

b.     Unless otherwise ordered, all decisions of the Trial Panel shall be entered on the offender's
       file seven days after the date of the decision.

c.     Violation of any ruling or order of, or any sanction imposed by, the Trial Panel is itself
       serious misconduct and may give rise to further charges and discipline proceedings.

d.     The Provost is responsible for the implementation of the decisions of the Trial Panel.

7.     Appeals:

a.     A decision of the Trial Panel of the University Discipline Tribunal may be appealed to an
       Appeal Panel of the University Discipline Tribunal established by Presidential Regulation
       Number 3, as amended from time to time. An appeal shall be commenced by written notice
       stating the grounds of appeal, and served within seven days following the decision of the
       Trial Panel upon:

       i.       the parties to the proceeding,
       ii.      the original complainant, and
       iii.     the Secretary of the University.

b.     The grounds of appeal must include one of the following allegations:

       i.       that the Trial Panel had no power under University regulations, rules or practices to



Student Handbook                                Page III.35                       September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

               reach the decision or impose the sanctions it did,
      ii.      that the Trial Panel made a fundamental procedural error seriously prejudicial to the
               appellant, or
      iii.     that the appellant is entitled to relief on compassionate or other grounds not
               considered by the Trial Panel.

c.    Within seven days of serving the notice of appeal, the appellant must provide a written
      statement setting forth the basic grounds upon which it intends to rely. Having done so, the
      appellant may apply to the Appeal Panel to stay the operation of any sanctions imposed.

d.    The Appeal Panel shall convene a hearing at the earliest possible date to deal with the
      request for a stay of sanctions. Where some more immediate response is required,
      application may be made to the Chair of the University Discipline Tribunal or a member of
      the University Discipline Tribunal designated by the Chair.

e.    The Appeal Panel shall hear the appeal within four weeks, and shall:

      i.       give the parties and the original complainant notice of the time and place of the
               appeal hearing, copies of any documents provided by the appellant in support of the
               appeal, and any regulations governing its procedures;
      ii.      afford the parties to the appeal, in its discretion, an opportunity to present oral or
               written argument or both, but not to present evidence.

f.    The Appeal Panel shall render a written decision disposing of the appeal by
      C     allowing the appeal,
      C     affirming or modifying the decision,
      C     affirming, reducing or increasing the sanctions appealed against, or
      C     requiring that a Trial Panel conduct a new hearing or reconsider some pertinent
            aspect of its decision.

g.    The decision of the Appeal Panel shall be filed with the Secretary of the University and
      copies shall be provided to all parties to the proceeding, to the original complainant, and
      to the members of the original Trial Panel. Unless the Appeal Panel otherwise directs, the
      decision shall be a public document.

8.    Presidential Review:

a.    Within seven days of the decision of the Appeal Panel, any party may submit a petition in
      writing requesting that the President review the decision on the grounds that the Appeal
      Panel had no power to reach the decision that it did, or that it has committed a fundamental
      procedural error prejudicial to the rights of the petitioning party.

b.    The petition must state the full grounds upon which the petitioner relies, and all arguments
      in support thereof. It must be served upon the other parties who must submit a full reply
      within seven days thereafter.

c.    While the parties may make written submissions, they will not be afforded the opportunity



Student Handbook                              Page III.36                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       for oral argument before the President. The President may appoint an examiner to review
       all or specified aspects of the case, and to make findings and recommendations to assist
       the President in disposing of the petition. Based upon the submissions of the parties, the
       findings and recommendations of the examiner, and a review of the decision of the Appeal
       Panel, the President may:
       C        dismiss the petition and affirm the decision of the Appeal Panel,
       C        grant the petition and vary or rescind the decision of the Appeal Panel,
       C        affirm, reduce or increase the sanctions imposed,
       C        order that the matter or certain aspects of it be reheard or reconsidered by an
                appropriate panel of the University Discipline Tribunal, or
       C        make such other disposition of the matter as seems appropriate in all the
                circumstances.

d.     The decision of the President shall be final and binding, and there shall be no further
       recourse for the parties or the original complainant.

e.     Copies of the decision shall be provided to the parties, the original complainant and
       members of the original Trial and Appeal Panels, filed with the Secretary of the University,
       entered on the file of the offender (if found guilty), and shall be a public document.

F.     Emergency Orders:

(Presidential Regulation 2 is amended as follows, effective June 30, 1992)

1.     Preamble:

The purpose of this regulation is to permit the University to act promptly and effectively to
safeguard the community or its members.

2.     Special Circumstances:

The Provost may make Emergency Orders in the following limited circumstances:

i.     when he/she has reason to believe that a student has caused another member or other
       members of the University to fear for their own safety or security;

ii.    when he/she has reason to believe that a student has caused or may cause serious
       disruption of a class, residence, library, examination, or study area;

iii.   when he/she has reason to believe that a student has committed or may commit serious
       damage to the property of the University; and in any such circumstances, when having
       regard to urgent considerations of safety and security he/she has reason to believe that it
       is not prudent or practicable to proceed by way of formal complaint and adjudication under
       these regulations.




Student Handbook                             Page III.37                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

3.     Emergency Procedures:

Where the Provost makes an Emergency Order, he or she shall make reasonable efforts to give
the student notice, which notice may be orally in person or by telephone, or in writing. The Provost
may act as expeditiously as necessary and is not required to hold a hearing prior to making an
Emergency Order.

4.     Effect of Emergency Orders:

a.     Emergency Orders may require the student absolutely or subject to defined conditions:
       i.    to abstain from coming on campus, or from entering specific classes or places, or
             from communicating with specific persons;
       ii.   to move out of a campus residence;
       iii.  to provide a written undertaking of behaviour;
       iv.   to abstain from any other action on campus when, in the opinion of the Provost,
             such an order is necessary to avoid or alleviate the apprehended or actual harm;

b.     An Emergency Order shall be:
       i.   effective immediately on being made;
       ii.  made in writing and as soon as possible given in person to the student or sent by
            registered mail or delivered by hand to the student's place of residence;
       iii. in force for a defined period of not more than 60 days or until a formal hearing under
            these regulations is convened, whichever is the shorter;

c.     Violation of an Emergency Order or an Undertaking given thereunder shall be an act of
       serious misconduct under this regulation.

5.     Further Proceedings:

a.     When an Emergency Order is made the Provost shall at the same time request the
       University Disciplinary Tribunal to convene a formal hearing.

b.     As its first task the tribunal shall summarily determine whether the Emergency Order should
       continue in force or be suspended pending a full hearing and determination of the matter.

c.     If the tribunal decides to suspend the Emergency Order, it may decide to do so absolutely,
       upon certain conditions, or for a period of time.

d.     Notwithstanding suspension of the Emergency Order the tribunal may reinstate the
       Emergency Order at any time during the course of a hearing hereunder, for the reasons
       and upon the terms set out in Section 2 hereof.

e.     The tribunal shall conduct a formal adjudication on the basis that the Emergency order
       constitutes a Complaint of a "serious infraction" under these regulations and the provisions
       and procedures pertaining to such a hearing shall apply.

f.     The tribunal shall at the conclusion of its deliberations, make a determination as to whether



Student Handbook                              Page III.38                     September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       the Special Circumstances set forth in Section 2 continue to exist. The tribunal may impose
       any of the sanctions available to be imposed by a panel hearing a serious infraction, or any
       of the terms and conditions included or which could have been included in the Emergency
       Order.


K.     PRESIDENTIAL REGULATION NUMBER 3:                           STUDENT DISCIPLINE -
       COMPLAINTS AND ADJUDICATION

I.     University Complaint Centre:

The Vice-President (Academic Affairs) and Provost shall establish in the Office of Student Affairs
a University Complaint Centre. The Centre may receive complaints concerning all aspects of
student non-academic conduct, including those matters for which special procedures have been
provided, shall advise complainants of the alternative forms of redress which may be available to
them, and shall assist them in pursuing the form of redress preferred. The Complaint Centre shall
also be a "complaints officer" within the meaning of that term in Presidential Regulation Number
2, and as such may itself process complaints.

II.    University Discipline Tribunal:

a.     The University Discipline Tribunal shall exercise the powers delegated to it under
       Presidential Regulation Number 2.

b.     The Tribunal shall comprise eighteen members, to be appointed for staggered two-year
       terms by the President, including:

       i.      three faculty members and three students nominated by the Dean of Osgoode Hall
               Law School;
       ii.     three faculty members nominated by the Council of Masters;
       iii.    three student members nominated by the York Federation of Students (YFS)
               following consultation with all duly constituted student governments;
       iv.     three faculty members and three student members nominated by the Provost.

c.     Nominations and appointments shall be made so as to effect a balance of male and female
       members on the Tribunal and, over time, among the categories. Normally, male and female
       members shall be nominated and appointed in succession to each other.

d.     The Tribunal shall sit in panels of three members, chosen by lot by the Secretary of the
       University, to hear trials and appeals. At least one member of each panel shall be a student,
       and one a faculty member, and at least one member of each panel shall be a male and one
       a female.

e.     In any case involving a student of Glendon College who wishes proceedings to be
       conducted in French, and in any other case where it may be necessary so to do, the
       President may appoint members ad hoc as required. The quorum requirements of
       paragraph d) shall apply in the case of such ad hoc appointments.



Student Handbook                             Page III.39                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


f.     No one shall sit as a member of a panel if, in the opinion of the Chair of the Discipline
       Tribunal, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the member will not be, or be seen
       to be, impartial. No one shall sit as a member of an Appeal Panel who was a member of
       the Trial Panel which heard the matter under appeal.

g.     The Chair of the University Discipline Tribunal shall designate a president for each panel
       from amongst its members.

III.   General:

a.     The University Complaint Centre, the University Discipline Tribunal and all other complaints
       officers and local hearing officers appointed under Presidential Regulation Number 2, shall
       have power to adopt procedures and policies, and to make rulings and give directions, to
       enable them to discharge their respective functions. All such policies and procedures
       should be recorded in writing, approved by the Provost, acting under the direction of the
       President, and filed in the office of the Secretary of the University.

b.     When a vacancy occurs, or insufficient members of the University Discipline Tribunal are
       available to act, the President may appoint additional members ad hoc to the University
       Discipline Tribunal.

c.     The members of the University Discipline Tribunal shall meet annually in April to select the
       Chair for the coming academic year. The Chair shall have responsibility for ensuring the
       effective operation of the Tribunal. The Secretary of the University or his/her delegate is ex
       officio the secretary of the Tribunal.

d.     The members of the University Discipline Tribunal, and of all bodies and individuals
       concerned with discipline, may meet from time to time to discuss general questions relating
       to student discipline with a view to ensuring that the system of student discipline at York is
       coherent, fair and efficient.

IV.    The Vice-President (Academic Affairs) and Provost:

The Vice-President (Academic Affairs) and Provost of the University, acting on behalf of the
President, shall have administrative responsibility for the operation of the system of student
discipline. The Provost shall report annually to the President on the operation of the system, and
may make recommendations for its improvement.

Appendix A

1.     The Sexual Harassment Education and Complaints Centre

2.     The Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations


L.     PROHIBITING ON-CAMPUS ACTIVITY BY ESSAY-WRITING SERVICES



Student Handbook                              Page III.40                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


Policy:

1.     York University regards as reprehensible so-called "essay services" which seek to provide
       students, almost always in return for some fee, with some course work done by others.

2.     Accordingly, the University will not tolerate the use of its premises, facilities or activities by
       agents, representatives and users of such services. It is the policy of the University
       vigorously to employ all lawful means at its disposal to prevent such activity from occurring
       on campus and to prosecute individuals, groups, organizations and companies which
       engage in it.

3.     Access to all University premises, facilities, activities and services is therefore denied to
       providers of such commercial essay services, including the promotion and advertising of
       such services.

4.     Should agents and representatives of such commercial services be observed on the
       campuses of the University engaging in any manner in the activity in question (e.g., pick-up
       and delivery, distribution of posters and flyers, etc.), the University shall undertake action
       under the Trespass to Property Act and, where members of the University community itself
       are involved, shall take such disciplinary action as is appropriate in view of the status of the
       individual(s) involved.

5.     Students who employ such services for their academic course work are subject to sanctions
       in accordance with the policies and procedures on academic dishonesty of the Senate, the
       Faculties and other academic units.

Procedures and Guidelines:

1.     All University officers responsible for buildings and physical areas of the University (Deans,
       Master, Directors, etc.) are encouraged and authorized promptly to have removed from
       bulletin boards, walls, counters, parked cars and other locations any written advertisements
       for commercial essay-writing services.

2.     The Assistant Vice-President (Facilities and Business Operations), the Director of Security
       Services, and the Assistant Vice-President (Student Affairs) are assigned responsibility for
       the coordination and implementation of regular procedures to monitor and remove from
       bulletin boards, walls, counters, parked cars, and other locations any advertisements for
       commercial essay-writing services.

3.     Notices of such occurrences, with a copy of the offending material, shall be sent to the
       Assistant Vice-President (Student Affairs) who shall undertake follow-up as appropriate,
       including investigation and the consideration of internal and external charges. Dates and
       locations of occurrences should be noted.

Note: In certain cases it may be unclear whether the service in question is one that offers to
students legitimate academic counselling as opposed to academic work that the student is



Student Handbook                               Page III.41                        September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

expected to do on his or her own. Where such questions arise about advertising or other
on-campus activity, the matter can be referred to the Assistant Vice-President (Student Affairs) who
shall undertake a determination with the Vice-President (Academic Affairs) and Deans.

Members of the University Community wishing to obtain further information on these matters may
contact the Office of Student Affairs, 103 Central Square, 736-5144


M.     RACISM

1.     York University affirms that the racial and ethnocultural diversity of its community is a
       source of excellence, enrichment and strength.

2.     York University affirms its commitment to human rights, and, in particular, to the principle
       that every member of the York community has a right to equitable treatment without
       harassment or discrimination on the grounds prohibited by the Ontario Human Rights Code,
       including race and ethnicity.

3.     York University acknowledges its on-going responsibility to foster fairness and respect, to
       create and maintain a positive working and learning environment and to promote
       anti-racism.

4.     Anyone in the York community who infringes a right protected by the Ontario Human Rights
       Code shall be subject to complaint procedures, remedies and sanctions in the University's
       policies, codes, regulations and collective agreements as they exist from time to time, and
       to such discipline (including rustication or discharge) as may be appropriate in the
       circumstances.


N.     SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Definition:

York University strives to provide an environment wherein all students, faculty and staff are able
to learn, study, teach and work, free from sexual harassment, including harassment on the basis
of gender identification and sexual orientation.

Sexual harassment is:

1.     Unwanted sexual attention of a persistent or abusive nature, made by a person who knows
       or ought reasonably to know that such attention is unwanted;

2.     The making of an implied or express promise of reward for complying with a sexually
       oriented request;

3.     The making of an implied or express threat of reprisal, in the form of actual reprisal or the
       denial of opportunity, for refusal to comply with a sexually oriented request;



Student Handbook                              Page III.42                     September 15, 2000
SECTION III:           POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


4.     Sexually oriented remarks and behaviour which may reasonably be perceived to create a
       negative psychological and emotional environment for work and study.

Incidents of sexual harassment, including harassment on the basis of gender identification and
sexual orientation shall be investigated and dealt with by the University in accordance with
guidelines and procedures put in place for that purpose from time to time.

Students, faculty and staff who, it is determined, have sexually harassed another member(s) of the
University community will be subject to discipline and sanctions as are appropriate in the
circumstances, including but not limited to discipline and sanctions provided for in Presidential
Regulations (in the case of students), and relevant collective agreements.


O.     SMOKING REGULATIONS

All Ontario Universities and Colleges are bound by the requirements of the Tobacco Control Act,
which was passed on November 30, 1994. Smoking is not permitted in any campus buildings
except in designated areas in pubs and food service areas and in student rooms in residences.
This legislation applies to everyone - students, faculty, employees and visitors - at the Glendon and
York campuses.



P.     WEATHER EMERGENCIES

Policy:

1.     In the interest of the safety of the University community and its visitors, the University may
       suspend normal operations, or programmes at its Keele and/or Glendon campuses in
       response to a weather emergency. A decision to adopt emergency procedures shall be
       taken when it is determined that weather conditions:

       a.      may prevent safe travel to and from the University; or,
       b.      may have a substantial adverse effect on normal University operations.

2.     The Vice-President, Institutional Affairs shall make the decision to adopt weather
       emergency procedures, or to suspend normal operating procedures. If classes and/or
       examinations at one or both campuses must be cancelled, the decision will be made by or
       with the Chair of Senate or delegate.

3.     When weather emergency procedures are in force, the University shall remain open and
       when and where possible, essential services shall be provided.

4.     A weather watch will be maintained throughout the period in which weather emergency
       procedures remain in force. Conditions will be monitored until a decision is made to return
       to normal operations.



Student Handbook                              Page III.43                      September 15, 2000
SECTION III:          POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY


5.     Unless a decision is made to continue the weather emergency, the University will return to
       normal operating procedures at 11:00 p.m. on the day of a weather emergency (for evening
       or night shift employees) and 8:00 a.m. the following morning for all other purposes.

6.     The Vice-President (Institutional Affairs) shall develop such Weather Emergency
       Procedures as are desirable to give effect to this policy.

Procedures:
(edited to include only information relevant to faculty and students)

I.     Decision Making

It is intended that a decision to declare a weather emergency should be made

a.     by 5:30 a.m., for suspension of daytime operations; and cancellation of classes, exams and
       activities;

b.     by 1:00 p.m., for suspension of evening operations; and cancellation of evening classes,
       exams and activities;

c.     by 9:00 p.m., for suspension of nighttime operations.

II.    Dissemination of Information

If a weather emergency is declared:

1.     The Director, Communications shall immediately call the following radio stations with the
       authorized Message: CKYC-AM (Country 59); CFRB-AM (1010); CJCL-AM (1430); CKFM-
       FM (99.9); CHUM (1050 AM & 104.5 FM); CFNY-FM (102.1); CFTR-AM (680); CHFI-FM
       (98.1); Q107; The FAN (590); CJEZ-FM; TALK640-AM; CKRG; CBC Radio AM & FM;
       CISS-FM; CFMX-FM; CHIN-AM; CJRT-FM; CHAY-FM and CHRY-FM (105.5) Radio York.

2.     The Security Control Centre shall immediately notify the Assistant Manager,
       Telecommunications who shall ensure that the approved message is initiated on the
       University Weather Emergency Line (736-5600), on the University Student Information Line
       (736-2100), and on the TTYTDD Hearing Impaired Line.
Q.     WOMEN’S REMEMBRANCE DAY

That Senate continues to endorse a University-wide initiative to commemorate Women's
Remembrance Day involving faculty, staff and students. es;

C      that Senate encourage the administration to facilitate the planning and adequate funding
       of activities appropriate to Women’s Remembrance Day through the Office of the Advisor
       to the University on the Status of Women.

C      that Senate encourage faculty to highlight Women’s Remembrance Day in their classes and



Student Handbook                             Page III.44                    September 15, 2000
SECTION III:         POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

      to incorporate in their classes, as appropriate, some of the issues facing women,
      particularly violence against women, and that the Administration support the development
      of workshops to assist faculty in this.

C     that Senate declare a cancellation of classes between the hours of 11:30 am to 1:30 pm
      on December 6 or on an alternate day identified by the Office of the Advisor to the
      University on the Status of Women, such date to be announced annually in time for
      inclusion in the usual publication of Sessional Dates.

C     that all information provided to students regarding the University’s scheduling for the
      academic year, including calendars and sessional dates, include a notification of the policy
      regarding Women’s Remembrance Day. Appropriate notification should be sent to the
      community in advance about various memorials and activities planned for Women’s
      Remembrance Day.

C     that the Executive Committee undertake to review these arrangements and report back to
      Senate no later than April 2003.




Student Handbook                            Page III.45                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


3.    Perspective Options

      3.1    The first-year Perspective Option shall be selected from courses and seminars
      designated by the Academic Policy Committee, with the consent of the instructor.

      3.2  Each first-year student shall select his/her Perspective Option by no later than mid-
      November.

      3.3    Except where criteria for admission are set by the instructor, in the event of a
      surplus of applicants over available places in a particular optional course or seminar,
      admission will be by lot.

4.    Second and Third Year

      4.1     All courses and seminars which are open to second- and third-year students are
      elective.

      4.2    Prior to the end of May, each first- and second-year student shall prepare and file
      a plan of study for the next academic year.

      4.3    The plan of study of each student will be subject to review by the Office of Student
      Services. While this is largely a monitoring function, with utmost deference being paid to
      the wishes of the student, in the event of a disagreement between the student and those
      responsible for the review of his/her plan, there shall be a right of appeal to the Associate
      Dean.

      4.4    Plans of study submitted for the second and third year shall comprise a program
      which:

              a.     lasts two semesters;
              b.     has an aggregate value of at least 60 credit hours (over the two years);
              c.     has a minimum value of 13 credit hours in each semester;
              d.     has a maximum value of 17 credit hours in each semester.

      The suggested program has 15 credit hours in each semester.

      4.5     The Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean may, upon application by a student
      before the 10th school day of the semester affected, give permission for a student to file
      a plan of study that comprises a program which has a minimum value of less than 13 or a
      maximum value of more than 17 credits in a single semester.



5.    Alternative Ways to Obtain Academic Credit

      With prior permission and upon compliance with the conditions stipulated, students may



Student Handbook                            Page II.2                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      also receive academic credit in the manner provided as follows in Rule 5.

      5.1     Law Journal

              a.     Senior editors of the Osgoode Hall Law Journal may receive credit in each
                     academic year to the value of 3 credit hours.
              b.     The application for credit must be made before the end of the first change
                     period of the academic year. The faculty member in charge shall certify that
                     the student is entitled to such credit by reason of having accepted responsi-
                     bility for substantial editorial work of an academic character.

      5.2     Legal Aid

              a.     Senior supervisory personnel of the Community Legal Aid Services Program
                     (C.L.A.S.P.) may receive 3 credit hours in either second or third year.
              b.     The application for credit must be made before the end of the first change
                     period of the academic year.
              c.     The C.L.A.S.P. Board of Management will notify the C.L.A.S.P. Counsel of
                     entitlement to such credit by reason of the student having accepted
                     responsibility for substantial supervisory work of an academic character,
                     including regular meetings with the C.L.A.S.P. supervisor. The credit shall
                     be certified by the C.L.A.S.P. Counsel.

      5.3     Upper Year Competitive Mooting Program

              a.     Students who participate in an upper-year competitive moot will be permitted
                     to enroll in a program of supervised research in the field of law which is the
                     subject of the moot.
              b.     Students enrolled in the said program of supervised research will be
                     evaluated on the basis of a Memorandum of Fact and Law and a Factum
                     which will be written in preparation for the competitive moot.
              c.     A faculty member will be named to assume responsibility for the supervision
                     of the mooting program. This faculty member, who should benefit from an
                     appropriate partial discharge of teaching duties, will assist students to
                     secure faculty supervision in the field of substantive law in which they are to
                     conduct research, will provide assistance in regard to the drafting of
                     memoranda of fact and law and factums, and will provide assistance in the
                     development of advocacy skills.
              d.     The grade for the program of supervised research will be assigned by the
                     faculty member responsible for the mooting program in consultation with the
                     faculty member who provides the student with assistance in regard to the
                     applicable substantive law. Successful completion of the program of
                     supervised research will entitle the student to 3 course credits.
              e.     A student is permitted to participate in the Upper Year Competitive Mooting
                     Program only once. This rule does not preclude a student who has tried out
                     for the Program, but not selected, from trying out again.
              f.     The Academic Director and the Chairperson of the Mooting Society together



Student Handbook                            Page II.3                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:         ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


                    participate in the try-out moots for the Upper Year Competitive Mooting
                    Program, but in selecting participants for the Upper Year Competitive
                    Mooting Program, and in assigning students to each moot, the role of the
                    Chairperson of the Mooting Society is advisory only.

      5.4     Research Papers

              a.    A student may receive a total of nine hours of academic credit for 3 hour
                    credit research papers under the supervision of faculty members, during one
                    academic year.
              b.    Research papers will normally carry a credit value of 3 credit hours, but the
                    Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean may in the appropriate case grant
                    permission for a student to pursue a research paper that carries a credit
                    value of 2 or 4 credit hours.
              c.    A student seeking permission to pursue a research paper shall submit to the
                    Office of Student Services, not later than 10 days prior to the commence-
                    ment thereof, a statement from the proposed supervisor stipulating:
                    i.       the topic or field of research;
                    ii.      the amount of academic credit to be obtained and the date for
                             submission of the completed research paper; and
                    iii.     consent to provide supervision.
              d.    Any change in the conditions of supervision may only be obtained upon filing
                    of a new statement by the supervisor.
              e.    The supervisor, upon application by the student or upon his/her own motion,
                    may permit or require the student to terminate a research paper upon such
                    terms and conditions as he/she may decide, provided that the supervisor's
                    decision shall be subject to approval by the Assistant Dean or the Associate
                    Dean.

      5.5     Research Program

              a.    A student may receive academic credit for a Research Program of not less
                    than 15 credit hours and not more than 30 credit hours, which may extend
                    throughout his/her second and third years.
              b.    A student will be permitted to pursue a Research Program if, in the opinion
                    of the Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean,
                    i.      the student's academic record in the Law School and elsewhere, and
                            other relevant evidence, shows promise of the ability to conduct with
                            distinction a major program of research;
                    ii.     the proposed Research Program is within the student's capacity, and
                            his/her entire plan of study is otherwise satisfactory; and
                    iii.    he/she will receive adequate supervision.
              c.    A Research Program will normally extend through the student's three final
                    semesters, but with the consent of the Assistant Dean or the Associate
                    Dean may extend through the final four or final two semesters.
              d.    A student seeking permission to pursue a Research Program shall submit
                    to the Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean, not later than 10 days prior to



Student Handbook                           Page II.4                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:         ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


                    the commencement thereof, a statement from the proposed supervisor
                    stipulating:
                    i.      the topic or field of research, and a tentative outline of research;
                    ii.     the amount of academic credit to be obtained and the date for
                            submission of the completed research paper; and
                    iii.    consent to provide supervision.
              e.    Any change in the conditions of supervision may only be obtained upon filing
                    of a new statement by the supervisor, and with the consent of the Assistant
                    Dean or the Associate Dean.
              f.    The Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean, on application by the student or
                    the supervisor, or upon its own motion, may permit or require the student to
                    terminate a Research Program upon such terms and conditions as she/he
                    may decide.

      5.6     Intensive Programs

              a.    A student may receive credit for an Intensive Program focusing on a
                    particular area of or approach to, law, so designated by Faculty Council, for
                    the number of academic credits allocated thereto by Faculty Council.
              b.    Conditions of entry and methods of obtaining credit shall be as authorized
                    by Faculty Council.
              c.    A student desiring to enrol in one of the Intensive Programs for the next
                    academic year shall submit an application to the Office of Student Services
                    on or before the last day of classes in the month of February.
              d.    Selection procedures for the applicants to each Intensive Program shall be
                    carried out in the month of March and a list of selected applicants and
                    alternates, if any, shall be posted for all Intensive Programs at the same
                    time by the Office of Student Services during the first full week in the month
                    of April.
              e.    A selected applicant shall have until the end of the seventh day following the
                    day of the posting of the selection lists to advise the Office of Student
                    Services that he/she is accepting the offer of a place in one of the Intensive
                    Programs. If a selected applicant does not accept the offer of a place within
                    the seven day period as provided above, he/she will be deemed to have
                    declined the offer.
              f.    At the end of the seven day period provided for in paragraph (e) above,
                    those places in each Intensive Program not accepted by a selected
                    applicant shall be offered by posting as before to the applicants on the
                    alternate list in the order that the alternates have been ranked. Each
                    alternate so selected shall have until the end of the seventh day following
                    the day of the posting of his/her name to advise the Office of Student
                    Services that he/she is accepting the offer of a place in the Intensive
                    Program. If the alternate so selected does not accept the offer of a place
                    in the Intensive Program within the seven day period as provided above,
                    he/she will be deemed to have declined that offer.
              g.    The foregoing procedure in paragraph (f) shall continue for applicants on the
                    alternate list for each Intensive Program until all the places in that Intensive



Student Handbook                            Page II.5                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:         ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


                    Program have been filled, or the alternate list for it has been exhausted.
                    Any places in an Intensive Program remaining unfilled after the foregoing
                    procedure may be filled thereafter through the Office of Student Services on
                    an ad hoc basis.
              h.    When a selected applicant has accepted a place in an Intensive Program,
                    he/she will be permitted to withdraw at any time up to the final withdrawal
                    date or dates to be determined by each Intensive Program and set forth on
                    the application form for that Program.
              i.    Any withdrawal after the final withdrawal date will only be permitted with the
                    consent of the Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean on the basis of
                    reasons which are deemed by him/her to have substantial merit. Withdrawal
                    after the commencement of an orientation period or the Intensive Program
                    itself will be permitted by the Associate Dean only for the most compelling
                    of circumstances.

      5.7     Exchange Programs

              a.    To be eligible for participation, a student must have completed first year,
                    and have maintained a cumulative average of B or better up to the time of
                    departure.
              b.    A student must submit a statement of why s/he wishes to study abroad, and
                    a plan of study showing which courses s/he intends to take. Substantial
                    departure from the plan of study will result in loss of academic credit
              c.    Courses will be taken on a credit-no credit basis.
              d.    Students will normally be permitted to study abroad for credit for not more
                    than one year. Students may also receive up to four credits for summer
                    study-abroad programs.
              e.    Students may receive credit only for study at approved institutions.
                    “Approved institutions” include
                    i.      those which are party to an exchange agreement with the law school
                            or with York University;
                    ii.     those which are covered by an arrangement or agreement estab-
                            lished by the federal or provincial government;
                    iii.    those which are administered by another Canadian law school;
                    iv.     those which are approved by the Association of American Law
                            Schools; and
                    v.      any other high quality program offered by a well-reputed university,
                            if approved by the Director, Special Projects.
              f.    Students are responsible for any failure to register or gain academic credit
                    in an international program due to failure to meet entry criteria, to comply
                    with visa, insurance or financial requirements, to secure adequate knowl-
                    edge of the language of instruction, to complete the program for any reason,
                    or to secure a passing grade. They accept the risk of administrative or other
                    problems which result in their grades not being submitted to Osgoode in a
                    timely fashion. Failure to receive credit while studying abroad will result in
                    the student having to take Osgoode credits in lieu.
              g.    Students will receive credit only in accordance with the terms of a letter of



Student Handbook                           Page II.6                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


                     permission issued in advance of enrolling in an international or exchange
                     program. The letter of permission will stipulate both the number of credit
                     hours to be received, and whether grades received will be on a credit/no
                     credit basis or will be recorded as the Osgoode equivalent of the grades
                     awarded by the host institution. A letter of permission will not be provided
                     retroactively. However, amendments may be made to the student’s plan of
                     study on the same basis as elsewhere in the LL.B. program, if requested in
                     writing in a timely fashion by the student.
              h.     Students may not normally receive credit for international internships or
                     placements undertaken during the summer. However credit may be
                     awarded for such international placements or internships if they involve
                     research which is intended to be incorporated into an independent research
                     paper or project supervised by a faculty member. At the discretion of the
                     faculty supervisor, an international internship or placement may be awarded
                     up to half of the total credit hours assigned to the paper or project to a
                     maximum of four credit hours, provided the placement or internship involves
                     research which will subsequently be used in that paper or project. The
                     approval of the program director or faculty supervisor must be filed with the
                     student’s request for a letter of permission to study abroad, and must set out
                     the arrangements prescribed. Retroactive requests for credit for interna-
                     tional internships and placements will not be accepted.

      5.8     Letters of Permission

              a.     The Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean may, upon the recommendation
                     of the Admissions Advisory Committee, issue to a student who has
                     successfully completed the first year of the LL.B. Program at Osgoode Hall
                     Law School, a letter of permission allowing that student, upon conditions set
                     forth in the letter, to receive credit toward the LL.B. degree of the Osgoode
                     Hall Law School for the work successfully undertaken at the other law
                     school.
              b.     Normally such letters of permission will not be issued for more than one
                     semester's or one academic year's work at another law school, but in
                     exceptional circumstances and where there would be real hardship to the
                     student involved, permission may be granted for an extra semester's work.
              c.     The recommendation of the Admissions Committee, with respect to granting
                     letters of permission, will take into consideration, inter alia, the law school
                     record of the student, the student's reasons for wishing to spend a period
                     of time elsewhere, the law school the student proposes to attend, and the
                     program of courses the student proposes to undertake.
              d.     This privilege may only be granted once during any student's law school
                     career.
              e.     A student who is attending another law school on this basis must continue
                     his/her registration at the Osgoode Hall Law School of York University.
              f.     An appeal lies from the decision of the Admissions Advisory Committee
                     regarding the granting of Letters of Permission to Faculty Council.




Student Handbook                            Page II.7                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      5.9     Extra-disciplinary Courses

              a.     A student may, with prior written approval of the Faculty or department
                     involved and subject to approval of his or her plan of study, enrol in up to a
                     maximum of three courses or seminars, not exceeding a total of 9 credit
                     hours, in other faculties or departments of the University, provided that the
                     courses or seminars requested are integral to the development of a plan of
                     study.
              b.     Each such course or seminar will rank as a seminar for the purpose of the
                     more-than-two seminars rule.

6.    Registration Restrictions

      6.1    Subject to Rule 5, and except with the permission of the Assistant Dean or the
      Associate Dean, to be given only in exceptional circumstances, a student shall not:

              a.     Be enrolled in more than two seminars in any semester;
              b.     Be enrolled in more than one Intensive Program over his/her second and
                     third years.
              c.     Be enrolled in both a Research Program and an Intensive Program over
                     his/her second and third years.
              d.     Be enrolled in more than four seminars in addition to an Intensive Program
                     or Research Program over his/her second and third years.

      6.2     For the purpose of this rule, "seminar" includes research papers and courses in
      other faculties and departments.

7.    Submission of Seminar and Research Papers

      7.1     Except with the written permission of the two instructors involved, no student shall
      gain credit for two courses or seminars by the submission of a single research paper. Such
      permission shall be given only if the proposed paper fits within the design of both courses
      or seminars, and involves effort equivalent to the credit requirements of both courses and
      seminars.

      7.2     A research paper written for credit shall be submitted in final form by the first day
      of the examination period of the semester for which the credit is earned, unless the
      instructor otherwise indicates.

      7.3    Where a research paper is written for credit in more than one semester, the paper
      shall be submitted in final form by the first day of the examination period of the last
      semester for which the credit is earned, unless the instructor otherwise indicates.

      7.4    Where a research paper is written, including a paper written as part of a Research
      Program, and a date has been fixed for the submission of the paper, the paper shall be
      submitted in final form by the day so fixed.



Student Handbook                            Page II.8                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      7.5    Late submission of a paper shall be penalized unless accompanied by an
      explanation acceptable to the instructor.


B.    EVALUATION IN THE FIRST YEAR

1.    Definition

      For the purpose of the Regulations regarding Evaluation (Sections B and C), a final
      examination means a test written at the Law School by all students in a course at the same
      time within two weeks of the end of the semester or later.

2.    Fall Semester of the First Year

      2.1   Every student in each section of the first year shall be required to write a mid-term
      examination in one of the subjects (excluding Legal Research and Writing) taught in the fall
      semester in which there is to be a final examination.

      2.2      The Office of Student Services shall at random divide each section into subgroups
      of approximately equal size. There shall be as many subgroups as there are subjects
      taught in the fall semester (excluding both Legal Research and Writing and any course in
      which there is to be no final examination). Each such subgroup shall be assigned to write
      a mid-term examination in a different subject from amongst those being taught in that year
      to first year students in the fall semester in which there is a final examination. Students
      shall be notified by September 15, or as soon thereafter as is administratively practicable,
      on which subject they will write their mid-term evaluation.

      2.3     The mid-term examination shall be similar in kind to that offered in the final
      examination in that subject in December. If an instructor intends to set an open-book
      examination in the final examination, the mid-term examination shall also be open-book; if
      the final examination is to be a closed-book examination, the mid-term examination shall
      also be closed-book.

      2.4    The examination shall be written on the fourth Monday of October unless this is later
      than the 25th, in which case the examination shall be held on the third Monday of October.
      The examination shall start at 8:30 a.m. and finish at 9:20 a.m. The examination shall be
      graded by the instructor. It shall count for 25 per cent of the final grade in the course,
      unless it would lower the final grade that would otherwise be awarded in the course, in
      which case it shall not be counted.

      2.5   All first-year classes which would otherwise be held between 8:30am and 9:20am on
      that Monday shall be cancelled, as shall all other classes which would otherwise be
      conducted at that time in the rooms used for the writing of the mid-term examination.

      2.6    The examination to be written by each subgroup in a given section shall be set and
      graded by the instructors assigned to teach the subjects in that section in the fall semester.



Student Handbook                             Page II.9                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      Instructors should inform students of their grades within 10 days from the day that the
      students wrote the mid-term examination. Instructors should be prepared, at the request
      of a student, to discuss individually with that student his or her examination paper which the
      instructor has graded.

3.    Winter Semester of the First Year

      In the winter semester of the first year, rules relating to “Evaluation in the Second and Third
      Year” (Section C, below) shall apply.

4.    Evaluation without a Final Examination

      4.1     In every section, one course each semester may have bases for evaluation which
      do not include a final examination.

      4.2     In any course where there is no final examination:
              a.      There must be at least two bases for evaluation;
              b.      Taken together, the bases for evaluation must fairly test a student's knowl-
                      edge of the whole course.
              c.      The bases for evaluation may include one mid-term examination.

      4.3     Where an instructor offers students a choice among forms of evaluation in a course,
      each student shall at the appropriate time communicate in writing his or her choice to the
      instructor.


C.    EVALUATION IN THE SECOND AND THIRD YEAR

1.    In those courses where credit is otherwise to be obtained solely by taking a final
      examination, a student may elect to take an additional evaluation procedure.

2.    The nature and weight of any such additional evaluation procedure shall be determined by
      the instructor.

3.    The instructor shall inform students, by not later than the end of the first week of the
      semester, of the following:
      a.     The nature of the additional evaluation procedure.
      b.     Any time limits stipulated for participation in, or completion of, such procedure.
      c.     The relative weight to be accorded the final examination and the additional
             procedure.

4.    A second- or third-year student has until the fourth week of a semester to notify the Office
      of Student Services if he/she wishes to undertake an additional evaluation procedure. The
      instructor of any course may, at his/her discretion, extend this deadline for such time as
      he/she thinks fit.




Student Handbook                             Page II.10                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:           ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


5.    A student who elects to undertake such additional procedure:

      a.      may revoke the election by written notice to the Office of Student Services at any
              time prior to the first date fixed for participation or, if none is stipulated, the date for
              completion;
      b.      shall comply with the dates fixed for participation or completion, or be penalized for
              lateness, unless an acceptable excuse is provided;
      c.      Shall forfeit any credit for the additional procedure unless it is completed.

6.    If a mid-term evaluation is given, appropriate feedback or a grade should be given to
      students within a reasonable time.


D.    ADMINISTRATION OF THE ELECTIVE SYSTEM

1.    Limited Enrolment Courses and Seminars

      1.1    Courses shall normally be limited to an enrolment of 80 and except in exceptional
      circumstances shall not exceed 105. Seminars shall normally be limited to an enrolment
      of 15 and except in exceptional circumstances shall not exceed 20.

      1.2    Basic courses or seminars may be designated by the instructor as academic
      prerequisites to advanced courses or seminars.

2.    Admission to Courses and Seminars

      2.1     When a student files his/her plan of study covering two semesters, the student shall
      indicate in order of priority the ten courses or seminars in which he/she is most interested.

      2.2    In assigning places in a limited enrolment course or seminar, priority shall be given
      to students who have marked it highest in priority of interest.

      2.3     Where there is a greater number of qualified students indicating equal priority of
      interest than there are places available or where there are no students indicating priority of
      interest, available places shall be allocated on the basis of a lottery.

      2.4     Students enrolled in the Intensive Program in Criminal Law, and in the Intensive
      Program in Immigration and Refugee Law are guaranteed admission to any prerequisite
      course, but insofar as guaranteed admission occurs, the students sacrifice their A and/or
      B priority.

      2.5    Second and third year students who have been required to repeat a year shall
      normally be allowed to enrol in those courses for which they received a grade below C in
      the year they are required to repeat.

      2.6     The Office of Student Services will determine the admission of each student to



Student Handbook                               Page II.11                        September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      courses and seminars and will advise him/her of his/her plan of studies prior to the
      commencement of the second and third years.

3.    Change in Electives

      3.1     A student may change his/her plan of study prior to the first week of August and
      during the first ten school days of the fall and winter semesters.

      3.2     Notwithstanding Rule 3.1 and subject to Rule 4 of Section A, the Associate Dean
      may, in his/her discretion in exceptional circumstances, allow a student to withdraw from
      a course or seminar at any time, but a student so withdrawing shall not be permitted to
      select an alternative course or seminar in that semester.


E.    EXAMINATIONS AND GRADING

1.    Examinations and Testing Procedures:

      1.1     Faculty/Student Colloquium:

      In view of the desirability of affording a student alternative methods of demonstrating his/her
      ability in a relevant way, a faculty/student colloquium should be convened for the purpose
      of exploring specific alternatives to the final examination system.

      1.2     Secondary Examiner:

      A secondary examiner shall be designated by the Associate Dean for each course in which
      one or more written examinations are given. The secondary examiner shall review all
      examination questions in advance and offer comments and suggestions to the primary
      examiner. In the case of disagreement, the decision of the primary examiner shall prevail.
      Failure to comply with this requirement will not invalidate an examination.

      1.3     Exam Invigilation:

      a.      Full-time and part-time instructors shall be present in the examination room in order
              to supervise the commencement of the examination.

      b.      During the writing of the examination, the instructor shall not remain in the
              examination room, but shall be available at all times to answer queries from the
              Office of Student Services.

      c.      The instructor shall return to the examination room just prior to the end of the time
              allocated for the writing of the examination, and shall supervise its conclusion. The
              instructor shall not, however, receive examination booklets or envelopes, or
              otherwise participate in any manner which may actually or apparently jeopardize the
              anonymity of the examination process.



Student Handbook                             Page II.12                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:           ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL



      d.      Examination questions must be handed in along with the examination answers at
              the conclusion of all examinations. Following the completion of the examination
              period and the release of grades, examinations will be available for review by
              students in the Library as has been the practice in the past.

      1.4     Mid-term Examination Procedures:

      a.      All mid-term grades are to be distributed by the Office of Student Services.

      b.      All mid-term examination papers are to be returned by instructors to the Office of
              Student Services along with grades.

      c.      Students wishing to review their papers with their instructors, either in person or by
              written communication, may collect their examination papers from the Office of
              Student Services and, following consultation with the Professor, shall return such
              papers to the Office of Student Services. In any event, papers shall be returned to
              the Office of Student Services no later than three weeks before the final examina-
              tion.

      1.5     Use of Computers in Examinations:

      a.      A student may use a computer for writing examinations only where the student has
              a disability which creates a significant barrier to effective problems which inhibit the
              use of a pen (or other difficulties which may require a student to use a computer)
              as determined by the Associate Dean and the Assistant Dean (Student Services)
              and on the basis of evidence provided.
      b.      A student to whom permission is granted to use a computer for writing examinations
              may do so on the following conditions:

              i.     Except where a student must use a personal computer (where the computer
                     is programmed to permit its use to accommodate a disability), a student
                     must use an Osgoode computer (not a personal laptop or other computer);
              ii.    Such students will be assigned to private rooms or the Osgoode computer
                     lab, as available, and will be invigilated accordingly by the Office of Student
                     Services; and
              iii.   The computer used by a student will be programmed so that only minimal
                     word processing functions (according to the PE program) will be available
                     so as to ensure fairness among all students undertaking the same
                     examinations; appropriate adjustments (including security arrangements) to
                     this requirement for students using a personal computer will be subject to
                     the discretion of the Associate Dean and the Assistant Dean (Student
                     Services).

      1.6     Instructor - Student Grade Review:

      a.      A student is entitled to a conference with the instructor regarding his/her grades,



Student Handbook                              Page II.13                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:             ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              provided he/she makes an appointment for this purpose within three weeks after the
              grades have been released.

      b.      Faculty members should make a serious effort to furnish each student with an
              explanation of why he/she obtained the result he/she did on the examination or
              projects used to evaluate his/her performance in each course or seminar.
              Wherever possible, the student should be informed as the course or seminar
              progresses. Where this is not possible, the professor should either:

              i.        Make written comments and make available the exam paper or assignment;
                        or
              ii.       Give the student an opportunity to attend a class where the exam or
                        assignment is discussed generally; or
              iii.      Make available the exam or assignment to the student and encourage
                        him/her to meet the professor privately to discuss it within three weeks of
                        the work being returned.

2.    Grading and Credit:

      2.1     Grades:

      A student shall receive one of the following letter grades for each course, seminar or
      program:

              A+/A:            Excellent
              B+/B:            Good
              C+/C:            Acceptable
              D+/D:            Marginal
              F:               Fail

      2.2     Credit / No-Credit:

      With the approval of Faculty Council, a course, seminar or program may be graded on a
      credit/no credit basis and a student enrolled in the course, seminar or program shall receive
      one of the following evaluations:

              Credit:          indicating that the student has successfully met the requirements of
                               the course, seminar or program;

              No Credit:       indicating that the student has not met the requirements of the
                               course, seminar or program.

      2.3     Grading Profile

      a.      The grading profile for all courses, seminars and intensive programs, before taking
              into account any changes made under the grade appeal procedures in section 6.5
              following, shall be as follows:



Student Handbook                              Page II.14                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL



                     A+/A:  15%
                     B+/B:  60%
                     C+/C:  20%
                     D+/D/F: 5%

      b.      Except in the D range, no instructor shall award more “plus” grades in a given range
              than one-third of the number of all of the grades awarded in that range.

      c.      Subject to paragraph (d) below, an instructor in a seminar, an intensive program,
              or a course with 30 or fewer students may be permitted by the Grades Review
              Committee in appropriate cases to allocated no C grades or fewer C grades than
              mandated by the grading profile (thereby increasing the percentage of B grades).

      d.      In determining whether to permit the deviation from the profile described in (c )
              above, the Grades Review Committee shall consider all the circumstances of the
              situation, including:

              i.     the stated objectives of the course, seminar or intensive program, the
                     pedagogical approaches used by the instructor(s), and the form(s) of
                     evaluation, and any other relevant factors relating to the process of
                     evaluation; and
              ii.    the difficulty of applying the grading profile to small groups of students, in
                     light of the factors set out in (i) above.

      e.      After a Grades Review Committee has released the grades pursuant to rule 6.1(f)
              as follows, no instructor shall alter a grade awarded to a student except in
              accordance with the grade appeal procedures in rule 6.5 following.

      2.4     Grade Point Average:

      a.      The grade point average of each student shall be calculated on the following basis:

                     A+              =   9
                     A               =   8
                     B+              =   7
                     B               =   6
                     C+              =   5
                     C               =   4
                     D+              =   3
                     D               =   2
                     F               =   0
                     Allowed         =   0

      b.      In the calculation of student grade point averages, the grades are weighted
              according to the number of credit hours associated with each course, commencing
              with the 1996-1997 academic year.



Student Handbook                             Page II.15                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL



      c.      Grade point averages thus calculated will be translated into the following letter
              grade averages:

                     Over 8.50               grade point average = A+
                     From 7.51 - 8.50        grade point average = A
                     From 6.51 - 7.50        grade point average = B+
                     From 5.51 - 6.50        grade point average = B
                     From 4.51 - 5.50        grade point average = C+
                     From 3.60 - 4.50        grade point average = C
                     Less than 3.60          grade point average = F

      d.      The Associate Dean (or Chair of the Grades Review Committee from time to time)
              shall inform each Grades Review Committee meeting for the winter semester each
              year as to the numbers of students with averages at the points of 8.50, 7.50, 6.50,
              5.50 and 4.50; and the Grades Review Committee, in each case, may determine
              whether to pass a motion to deem that such averages have achieved the higher
              grade level.



      2.5     Academic Standing:

      a.      Immediately upon release of the fall semester grades, students in all years who are
              in danger of not obtaining credit for the year will be specifically invited to discuss
              their papers with the instructor concerned, interviewed by the Assistant Dean or the
              Associate Dean, and warned of the danger that they may not obtain credit for the
              year. If they wish to do so, they will be permitted to complete this year.

      b.      All decisions as to whether a particular student passes or fails and whether any of
              his/her grades should be adjusted by the Grades Review Committee shall be taken
              at the end of the winter semester of each year.

      c.      A student will be failed and required to withdraw from the School if, in any academic
              year, he/she obtains:

              i.     an F grade in any course, seminar or program; or
              ii.    a No Credit in any course, seminar or program graded on a credit/no credit
                     basis; or
              iii.   a grade point average of less than 3.60.

              The grade referred to in this paragraph is the grade finally awarded to the student
              after faculty deliberation and exhaustion of supplemental privileges and appeals, if
              any.

      d.      A student who has failed in a subject will normally be graded as "allowed" by faculty
              decision where his/her grade point average (ignoring the failure) is not less than



Student Handbook                             Page II.16                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:           ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              4.75.

      e.      A student who has obtained a grade of D, F or Allowed in any course will not be
              allowed to take another course in substitution therefore.

      f.      A student who is failed and required to withdraw from the School will not normally
              be permitted to re-enter and repeat his/her year.

      2.6     Transcripts:

      a.      The portion of transcripts dealing with grades shall reveal only the letter grade in
              each course, the course size, the course average, the letter grade average earned
              each year by the student, the letter grade average of the class and the percentage
              of the class falling within each such letter grade average, but shall not reveal the
              actual grade point average or class rank.

      b.      In the case of students enrolled in any course, seminar or program which involves
              a substantial portion of a semester’s work graded on a credit/no credit basis, the
              instructor shall place in the student's file, on or before February 15th for the fall
              semester and on or before June 15th for the winter semester, a letter evaluating the
              student's performance in the course, seminar or program. The fact that such a
              letter of evaluation is on file shall be noted on the student's transcript, and a copy
              of such a letter shall be attached to the student's transcript.

      c.      A student's grades shall not be made public, nor shall they be disclosed to any
              person or institution without his/her consent.

3.    Supplemental Examinations:

      3.1    Supplemental examinations are a privilege which may be granted by the Faculty in
      special cases. They are not to be considered a regular method of enabling students to
      complete the requirements of the year.

      3.2     A student may be permitted to write supplemental examinations only if:

              a.      For medical, compassionate or equitable reasons he/she was unable to
                      write, or to demonstrate his/her ability at the regular examinations;
              b.      He/she does not qualify for aegrotat standing.

4.    Aegrotat Standing

      4.1    Aegrotat standing may, in the discretion of the Faculty, be granted to a student who,
      on medical, compassionate or equitable grounds, has been unable to write or to pass one
      or more examinations.

      4.2    A student will not be granted aegrotat standing unless his/her academic record
      taken as a whole justifies the assumption that he/she would have successfully passed the



Student Handbook                             Page II.17                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      examination. In the case of first year students, the absence of any law school record will
      normally lead to denial of aegrotat standing, although a good pre-law record, coupled with
      satisfactory semester work and success in other examinations written, may lead to the
      granting of aegrotat standing.

      4.3    Notwithstanding that a student has been denied aegrotat standing he/she may be
      permitted to write supplemental examinations.

      4.4     A student granted aegrotat standing in one or more subjects shall receive a grade
      point average calculated without reference to such subjects.

5.    Grade Reappraisal

      5.1    Subject to the requirements and procedures in section 6.5 following, a student may
      appeal a final grade in a course on one or both of the following grounds:

              a.     A significant error or unfairness in the assessment of the grade;
              b.     A defect in the evaluation process.

      5.2    A claim that the instructor held political opinions different from the student’s, or
      employed theoretical or other perspectives different from the student’s in teaching or
      evaluating the student’s work, does not constitute a ground of appeal. A claim that the
      grade given does not demonstrate the student’s knowledge of the subject matter or does
      not adequately reflect the student’s efforts to learn the material does not constitute a
      ground of appeal.

6.    Grade Review, Grade Reappraisal and Petitions

      6.1     Grades Review Committees:

      a.      There shall be two review committees, each comprising all faculty members
              teaching in the relevant years:

              i.     the First-Year Grades Review Committee; and
              ii.    the Second- and Third-Year Grades Review Committee.

      b.      The Chair of both Grades Review Committees shall be the Associate Dean.

      c.      The Grades Review Committees shall meet in January and May or June of each
              year in order to consider the results of courses offered, respectively, in the fall and
              winter semesters, and again in August to consider the results of supplemental
              examinations, if any.

      d.      The Grades Review Committees shall exercise all powers of the faculty members
              in Council in relation to examinations, grading, petitions, aegrotat standing,
              supplemental privileges, grade appeals and permission to repeat the year.




Student Handbook                             Page II.18                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      e.      Any Instructor whose percentage of A, B or C grades vary more than five points
              from the percentage of grades contained in the Grade Distribution Profile or whose
              percentage of D and F grades, taken together, vary more than five points from the
              percentage of D and F grades, taken together, contained in the Grade Distribution
              Profile, shall submit an explanation for such variation to the Grades Review
              Committee. The instructor in any course or seminar is permitted a maximum
              variation of five percentage points from the assigned profile, with variation in excess
              of five percentage points requiring the approval of the Grades Review Committee.
              In deciding whether to permit a greater deviation, the Grades Review Committee
              may, inter alia, wish to take into account the size of the class.

      f.      The Grades Review Committees shall release the grades for the fall and winter
              semesters immediately following their January, May or June meetings respectively.

      g.      Grade lists prepared for Grades Review Committee meetings by the Office of
              Student Services which identify students' names and grades must remain in the
              Office of Student Services with two exceptions:

              i.     they may be produced during a Grades Review Committee meeting but
                     must be returned to the Office of Student Services at the end of the
                     meeting;
              ii.    they may be held by the Dean, Associate Dean and Assistant Dean for the
                     performance of their duties.

      6.2     Petitions to the Grades Review Committee:

      a.      Petitions based on medical, compassionate or equitable grounds for aegrotat
              standing or supplemental privileges shall be submitted to the Office of Student
              Services in writing, together with all relevant material in support thereof, within ten
              days after the examination period to which the petition relates.

      b.      Petitions will be considered in the first instance by the Grades Review Committees
              for the relevant years at their May or June meeting.

      c.      A Grades Review Committee of its own motion may refer any petition considered
              by it to the Academic Standing Committee.

      d.      A student who has submitted a petition which has been considered by a Grades
              Review Committee may refer the petition to the Academic Standing Committee by
              submitting a statement to the Office of Student Services in writing, together with all
              relevant material in support thereof, within 30 days of the release of the grades by
              the Grades Review Committee at its May or June meeting.

      e.      A petitioner may attend a meeting of the Academic Standing Committee to present
              his/her case in person.

      6.3     Application to Repeat a Year:



Student Handbook                              Page II.19                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:           ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL



      a.      A student who has failed and is required to withdraw from the School may apply to
              the Academic Standing Committee for permission to repeat the year.

      b.      Such applications shall be submitted to the Office of Student Services in writing,
              together with all relevant material in support thereof, within 30 days of the release
              of the grades by the Grades Review Committee at its May or June meeting.

      c.      A petitioner may attend a meeting of the Academic Standing Committee to present
              his/her case in person.

      d.      Where

              i.      a student has done satisfactory work in one semester of an academic year
                      but, due to medical, compassionate or equitable circumstances in the other
                      semester of that year, has failed to meet the total requirements of the year,
                      and
              ii.     has not been granted aegrotat standing or supplemental privileges,

              the Academic Standing Committee may permit the student to repeat one semester
              on the basis that if the student's results in that semester together with his/her results
              in the semester unaffected by medical, compassionate or equitable circumstances
              would have constituted successful completion of an academic year if the semesters
              had been taken in the normal sequence, then the student shall be deemed to have
              successfully completed the academic year in question.

      6.4     Petition to the Academic Standing Committee:

      a.      The Academic Standing Committee shall not entertain a petition for aegrotat
              standing or supplemental privileges that has not been submitted to and considered
              by a Grades Review Committee, unless the student establishes that there are
              substantial reasons for his/her failure to submit the petition to the Grades Review
              Committee.

      b.      The Academic Standing Committee shall not review a petition referred to it under
              section 6.2(d) after the period specified for its referral unless the student establishes
              that there are substantial reasons for his/her failure to refer the petition within the
              specified period.

      c.      The Academic Standing Committee shall not hear an application under section
              6.3(a) that is submitted after the period specified for its submission unless the
              student establishes that there are substantial reasons for his failure to submit the
              application within the specified period.

      d.      For the purposes of this section, ignorance of a period specified in the regulations
              and difficulty in deciding whether to submit or refer a petition or to make an
              application, are not substantial reasons for a failure to comply with such a period.



Student Handbook                              Page II.20                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL



      6.5     Appeal of a Final Grade:

      a.      A student who wishes to appeal a final grade in a course may not commence a
              formal appeal until the student has made all reasonable efforts to meet promptly
              with the course instructor to obtain an explanation of the reasons for the grade, in
              accordance with section 1.6(a) and 1.6(b) of these regulations.

      b.      An instructor may only request the Academic Standing Committee to change a
              student’s grade at this stage in order to correct a mechanical error. For the purpose
              of this section, “mechanical error” means an error that is obvious on the face of the
              paper, for example, a question or part of a question that was not marked or
              numbers that were wrongly totalled.

      c.      A student who is not satisfied with the explanation that has been given for the grade
              may submit an appeal form to the Associate Dean requesting a change in the
              grade. All appeals must be accompanied by written reasons identifying the
              ground(s) of appeal and providing specific supporting arguments.

      d.      Subject to the discretion of the Associate Dean to extend the time because of
              exceptional circumstances, the appeal form must be submitted no later than 21
              days after the student’s grade was mailed to the student, or was received by the
              student if not mailed. If the student has not had the opportunity to speak with the
              course instructor within this time, then the appeal form must be submitted no later
              than 10 working days after the student has met with the instructor.

      e.      Upon receiving an appeal form, the Associate Dean may,

              i.     deny the appeal because it does not allege any ground(s) of appeal, does
                     not provide specific supporting arguments, or was not submitted within the
                     period allowed under paragraph 6.5(d) above;
              ii.    accept the appeal, and begin the formal appeal process by referring the
                     appeal to the Chair of the Academic Standing Committee.

      f.      The Chair of the Academic Standing Committee will inform the instructor when an
              appeal has been referred to the Chair by the Associate Dean. The Chair of the
              Academic Standing Committee will invite the instructor to give, as soon as
              reasonably practicable, a written explanation for the student’s grade and to supply
              any information thought to be helpful about the grading scheme, grade profile etc.,
              for the course. The instructor may recommend any change to the student’s grade
              that the instructor thinks appropriate, provided such recommendation is made in
              writing with reasons. The Chair of the Academic Standing Committee may either
              accept or reject a change recommended by the instructor and shall notify the
              student in writing, as soon as reasonably practicable, of both the instructor’s
              recommendation and the Chair’s decision.

      g.      If a student wishes to continue an appeal after completion of the procedures in



Student Handbook                            Page II.21                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              paragraph 6.5(f) above, the submissions of the student and the instructor shall then
              be forwarded to the members of the Academic Standing Committee (excluding any
              members who are parties to the appeal). The Academic Standing Committee shall,
              as soon as reasonably practicable, consider the submissions and information
              provided by the student and the instructor. The Academic Standing Committee
              may, if it thinks a reasonable case has been made out for doing so, consult with an
              Independent Reviewer with knowledge of the subject area involved (the Independ-
              ent Reviewer may already be a member of the Academic Standing Committee), and
              shall consider the Reviewer’s response equally with the submissions of the student
              and the instructor. The Academic Standing Committee shall be able to receive any
              information it requests, including information about the content of the course and
              the degree of emphasis placed on various parts, the instructor’s method of
              evaluation and the marking scheme.

      h.      The Academic Standing Committee shall, as soon as reasonably practicable, either:

              i.     dismiss the appeal;
              ii.    allow the appeal and assign the grade it believes should have been
                     assigned.

      i.      The Academic Standing Committee shall give its reasons in writing to the student
              and the instructor. In making its decision, the Academic Standing Committee must
              consider that the Osgoode grading profile will require instructors to make close
              judgment calls on papers and/or exams at the margins of each grade bracket.

      j.      Where the Academic Standing Committee allows an appeal, it may either raise or
              lower the grade appealed from.

      k.      Where a grade is changed in accordance with this regulation, the Chair of the
              Academic Standing Committee shall report the change to the Student Records
              Coordinator.

      6.6     The Academic Standing Committee:

      a.      There shall be an Academic Standing Committee consisting of five members of
              faculty, and one student as provided in the Rules and Procedures of Faculty Council
              (available in the Dean's Office, see Rule 16d), who shall be elected by Faculty
              Council not later than at its regular meeting in April of each year.

      b.      The Chair of the Academic Standing Committee shall have power to appoint to the
              Committee such alternate member as is required to replace any absent member.

      c.      The Academic Standing Committee shall meet subsequent to the May or June
              meetings of the Grades Review Committees in order to review and decide such
              petitions as may be referred to it pursuant to sections 6.2(c) and 6.2(d). The
              Academic Standing Committee shall exercise all powers of the Grades Review
              Committees in relation to such petitions.



Student Handbook                            Page II.22                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL



      d.      The Academic Standing Committee shall meet from time to time, subsequent to the
              May or June meetings of the Grades Review Committees, in order to hear and
              decide such applications as may be made to it pursuant to section 6.3(a). The
              Academic Standing Committee shall exercise all powers of the faculty members in
              Council in relation to such applications.

      e.      Only the members of the Academic Standing Committee and the Assistant Dean
              (Student Services), or designated alternate, shall be present after an applicant and
              any representatives have completed their submissions and the Committee has
              entered into the stage of its proceedings where it is deciding on an appropriate
              disposition of the matter in issue.

      f.      The Academic Standing Committee shall meet from time to time as necessary to
              consider any grade appeals referred to it pursuant to section 6.5 above. The
              Academic Standing Committee shall exercise all the powers of the Grades Review
              Committee in relation to such appeals.

      g.      The Academic Standing Committee may grant to a student who has permission to
              repeat the year a leave of absence for a period of one year. Such leave of absence
              may be extended, upon further application to the Academic Standing Committee,
              on a year to year basis.

      h.      In the Rules and Procedures of Faculty Council (available in the Dean's Office),
              Rule 21 shall not apply to the Academic Standing Committee.

      6.7     Mutatis Mutandis:

      The foregoing procedures shall apply "mutatis mutandis" to the supplemental examinations
      in August, except that:

      a.      A petition that has been considered by a Grades Review Committee shall be
              referred.

      b.      An application for permission to repeat the year shall be submitted to the Office of
              Student Services in writing, together with all relevant material in support thereof,
              within ten days after the release of the grades by the Grades Review Committee at
              its August meeting.

      6.8     Relief against Literal Application:

      Notwithstanding the provisions of these rules, the Grades Review Committees and the
      Academic Standing Committee shall have the power to relieve against the literal application
      of these rules in order to ensure that students are dealt with fairly and in keeping with the
      spirit of the rules. However, this power will only be exercised in exceptional cases.




Student Handbook                             Page II.23                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:           ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


F.    PROCEDURE FOR GRANTING OF EXAMINATION DEFERRALS

1.    Purpose

      The purpose of these guidelines is to establish a procedure whereby students may obtain
      permission to write an examination on a deferred basis, where they are unable to write the
      examination at the scheduled time due to medical, compassionate or equitable grounds.
      In the absence of such a policy, students have been required either to write their
      examination at the scheduled time or petition for relief to the Academic Standing
      Committee. These guidelines are being adopted in recognition of the fact that the existing
      procedure places students in a very difficult position and that where there are medical,
      compassionate or equitable grounds that would have a significant impact on a student’s
      performance, the student should be given the option of writing the examination at another
      time.

2.    Medical, Compassionate or Equitable Grounds

      2.1     In these guidelines, “medical, compassionate, or equitable grounds” shall be
      interpreted in a fair, large and liberal manner so as to ensure the attainment of the objects
      described in paragraph 1, consistent with their meaning in the “Academic Rules of Osgoode
      Hall Law School” as interpreted by the Grades Review Committee and the Academic
      Standing Committee. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, examples of medical,
      compassionate or equitable grounds would include: illness just prior to or during the
      examination; the death, hospitalization or serious illness of a near relative or of an individual
      with whom the student has a close personal relationship; the breakup of a marriage or close
      personal relationship; spousal abuse; and the illness of a relative for whom the student is
      the primary caregiver.

      2.2    In order to justify a deferral the medical, compassionate or equitable grounds must
      be such that they would significantly impair the student’s performance in the exam. The
      grounds must also be distinguishable from those which every student has to combat. For
      example, most students suffer a certain amount of pre-exam anxiety. If a student seeks
      deferral on the ground of anxiety, he or she must be able to establish that it is of a different
      order of magnitude than that which the average student suffers.

3.    Procedure

      3.1    Where a student believes that his or her performance on one or more examinations
      (“the Examination”) will be significantly impaired due to medical, compassionate or
      equitable grounds, the student shall, prior to the commencement of the Examination,
      attempt to bring the matter to the attention of the Assistant Dean or the Associate Dean (the
      “Assistant Dean”) and request permission to write the Examination on a deferred basis. As
      soon as is reasonably practicable, the student shall submit a written application to the
      Assistant Dean setting out the student’s name, student number, permanent and semester
      addresses and telephone numbers, along with a clear statement of the nature of the
      medical, compassionate or equitable grounds. The student shall also provide any
      documentation requested by the Assistant Dean, acting reasonably in respect of those


Student Handbook                              Page II.24                       September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      grounds. Where the application is based on medical grounds, the student shall normally
      supply documentation from a medical practitioner setting out the nature, extent and duration
      of the illness or malady.

      3.2    The Assistant Dean shall review the grounds put forward, including the
      documentation, if any, provided by the student and if necessary, meet with the student.
      The Assistant Dean shall determine whether the medical, compassionate or equitable
      grounds would significantly impair the student’s performance in the Examination that is the
      subject of the application. Where the Assistant Dean is of the opinion that the student’s
      performance would be significantly impaired, as described in paragraph 2.2, the Assistant
      Dean shall grant the deferral.

      3.3     If the Assistant Dean grants permission to write the Examination on a deferred
      basis, the Assistant Dean and the student shall jointly determine the time for writing the
      deferred Examination, however, the deferred Examination shall in all cases be written as
      soon as possible after the regularly-scheduled examination.

4.    Confidentiality

      Prior to receiving permission to write an Examination on a deferred basis, a student shall
      be required to sign a standard-form confidentiality agreement, whereby he or she agrees
      not to discuss the Examination with any other student at Osgoode Hall Law School prior to
      the writing of the deferred Examination. Breach of the terms of the confidentiality
      agreement shall be regarded as a serious academic offence and subject to the Sanctions
      for Academic Offences as set out in the Academic Rules of Osgoode Hall Law School,
      Section G - Academic Offences.

5.    Deferred Examination

      5.1    The Assistant Dean shall inform the professor in the course that a student has been
      granted permission to rewrite an Examination on a deferred basis and request that the
      professor submit the deferred exam which may be, but need not be, different than the
      regular examination in the course.

      5.2     The Assistant Dean shall make all reasonable efforts to preserve the student’s
      anonymity. Save in exceptional circumstances, the deferred examination shall be written
      prior to the Grades Review Meeting so that the deferred exam can be graded using the
      regular examination numbers.

6.    Further Deferral

      If a deferred exam has been scheduled but the student subsequently believes that his or
      her performance on the deferred examination will be affected by the same or different
      grounds, the student may apply for an additional deferral and these guidelines shall apply
      to any such request.

7.    No Derogation from Existing Rights



Student Handbook                            Page II.25                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL



      These guidelines shall not affect the rights of students who are unable to write an
      examination due to medical, compassionate or equitable grounds and who:

      a.      On reasonable grounds, fail to apply for a deferred examination; or
      b.      Are refused permission to write a deferred exam

      to petition for relief from the Grades Review Committee and the Academic Standing
      Committee.

8.    Reporting

      Without revealing the identities of any students involved, the Assistant Dean shall report
      annually to the Grades Review Committee meetings held in the spring semester on the
      numbers of exam deferrals granted or denied and the nature of the grounds on which
      deferrals have been granted or denied.


G.    ACADEMIC OFFENCES

1.    Preamble and Policy

      1.1      These regulations are intended to provide a code of academic honesty for the
      guidance of both faculty and students. The regulations grow out of two fundamental
      principles. First, that unless other arrangements are agreed to by the instructor, it is
      expected that all students will be evaluated on their individual performance and that all work
      submitted for evaluation will be entirely the product of the person submitting it. Second, it
      is also expected that where an individual's work has been drawn from or is dependent upon
      the work of others, these sources and the extent of their influence on the individual's work
      will be disclosed.

      1.2      These principles are not intended to discourage persons from engaging in
      collaborative work or from cooperation in research. Rather, they are designed to ensure
      that if students wish to be evaluated on the basis of a joint research project that they make
      appropriate arrangements with faculty members and that whether submitting joint or
      individual work, sources of assistance are disclosed.

      1.3    Every student has a responsibility to abide by these standards and, when in doubt,
      to consult with faculty members in order to determine a proper course of action.

      1.4     University education includes demands that might tempt some to violate standards
      of academic honesty. There are pressures on students to achieve high grades, obtain
      financial support, meet research or publication deadlines, gain recognition from the
      scholarly community and secure employment. Although faculty members can help students
      to maintain academic honesty despite these pressures, each student has final responsibility
      for his/her academic honesty.




Student Handbook                             Page II.26                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


2.    Application

      These regulations apply to all students enrolled in or attending courses at Osgoode Hall
      Law School. In the case of students from other faculties, their home faculty has observer
      status at a hearing and may make submissions as to penalty. Osgoode students taking
      courses in other faculties are subject to the regulations of those faculties. Osgoode
      students charged with committing academic offences with respect to University affairs, will
      be subject to the procedures set out in this regulation. Should a matter arise for which
      there appears to be no clear faculty jurisdiction, the Senate Appeals Committee may
      exercise its jurisdiction and make appropriate arrangements.

3.    Definitions

      These regulations are not intended to, and do not, provide a general code covering all
      conduct within the Law School community. In some cases, University or Osgoode
      regulations on non-academic discipline may apply. Other offences not covered by
      regulations may be dealt with on an ad hoc basis by the Dean and Faculty Council of the
      Law School. As well, some academic offences constitute offences under the Criminal Code
      of Canada; a student charged under Osgoode or University regulations may also be subject
      to criminal charges. Charges may also be laid against Osgoode students for matters which
      arise at other educational institutions.

      3.1     Cheating

      a.      Cheating is the attempt to gain an improper advantage in an academic evaluation.
              Among the forms this kind of dishonesty can take are: obtaining a copy of an
              examination before it is officially available or learning an examination question
              before it is officially available; copying another person's answer to an examination
              question; consulting an unauthorized source during an examination; obtaining
              assistance by means of documentary, electronic or other aids which are not
              approved by the instructor; or changing a score or a record of an examination result.

      b.      It is also improper to submit the whole or a substantial part of work done for one
              class or project to a second class, or as a second project, without getting the
              informed consent of the relevant instructors. Acceptance of one piece of work
              which is submitted for two classes must be arranged beforehand. It is understood
              that students may wish to build on previous research in the preparation of a paper,
              but students must also be aware that such a practice may run afoul of the intention
              of the assignment. In all such cases, the student must discuss the matter with the
              instructors and receive written permission beforehand.

      c.      The following rules apply specifically with respect to cheating on examinations.

              i.     Anyone who fails to observe any stated rule with regard to the procedure
                     used in an examination or any other form of exercise undertaken for
                     academic credit with the intent of thereby achieving relatively greater credit
                     is guilty of cheating.



Student Handbook                            Page II.27                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              ii.    The following rules shall be deemed to be stated rules governing examina-
                     tions at the School. These stated rules can be varied in individual situations
                     at the discretion of the examiner. Such variations shall be stated in writing
                     at the head of each question paper.

                     (a)      Work submitted for evaluation for examination credit shall be
                     performed during the time allotted for the examination.
                     (b)      No student shall have prior knowledge of the contents of any
                     examination question paper unless such knowledge has been made
                     available to all students taking the examination by the teacher setting the
                     examination.
                     (c )     During an examination a student is expected to perform independ-
                     ently of his/her own notes and of any other person and the work of any other
                     person. No student shall bring any form of written assistance into an
                     examination room for an examination not designated an "open-book"
                     examination.
                     (d)      During an examination designated as an "open-book" examination,
                     a student may use only such forms of written assistance which have been
                     authorized by the teacher, and which he/she brings into the examination
                     room.
                     (e)      Where it is intended that students answering "take-home"
                     examination questions should not consult with or seek the assistance of
                     other persons in doing their work, notice to this effect must be given by the
                     instructor, in writing, on the examination paper. If no such notice is given,
                     consultation or the seeking of assistance is not prohibited.

      3.2     Impersonation

      It is an academic offence to have someone impersonate one's self in class, in a test or
      examination, or in connection with any other type of assignment in a course or seminar.
      Both the impersonator and the individual impersonated may be charged.

      3.3     Plagiarism and Other Misappropriation of the Work of Another

      Anyone who knowingly or recklessly uses the work or ideas of another and knows he/she
      will create the impression that it is his/her own, or is reckless that he/she creates the
      impression that it is his/her own, is guilty of plagiarism. The most obvious form of this kind
      of dishonesty is the presentation of all or part of another person's published work as
      something one has written. However, paraphrasing another's writing without proper
      acknowledgment may also be considered plagiarism. This is not to say that students
      should not use the work of others with the proper acknowledgment. Trivial use of the work
      of another in a manner not material to the substance of a work submitted for academic pur-
      poses will not constitute an offence.
      3.4     Improper Research Practices

      Forms of improper research practices include: the dishonest reporting of investigative
      results either through fabrication or falsification; taking or using the research results of



Student Handbook                             Page II.28                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:           ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      others without permission or due acknowledgment; misrepresenting research results or the
      methods used; and selective reporting or omission of conflicting information or data to
      support a particular notion or hypothesis. Furthermore, all researchers have a responsibility
      to refrain from practices that may unfairly inhibit the research of others now or later. This
      responsibility extends to Osgoode students in other institutions or countries.

      3.5     Dishonesty in Publication

      It is an academic offence to knowingly or recklessly publish information that will mislead or
      deceive readers. This includes the falsification or fabrication of data or information, as well
      as the failure to give credit to collaborators as joint authors or the listing as authors of
      others who have not contributed to the work. Plagiarism is also considered a form of
      dishonesty in publication.

      3.6     Premature Oral or Written Dissemination of Information

      Information or experimental data that was collected with a member of the faculty or another
      student, and other works that involved the participation of a faculty member or another
      student should not be submitted for publication prematurely, without appropriate
      permission.

      3.7     Abuse of Confidentiality

      A student may be asked to help in the evaluation of confidential grant proposals, award
      applications, or manuscripts that will be or may have been submitted for possible funding
      or publication. Taking or releasing the ideas or data of others that were given with the
      expectation that they are confidential is inappropriate. Unless one is authorized to do so,
      it is improper to obtain a password assigned to another or to copy or modify a data file or
      program belonging to someone else. Proper authorization means being granted permission
      either by the owner or originator of that material, or by a faculty member, or an appropriate
      administrator. Similarly, it is an academic offence to violate the integrity of a computer
      system to harass another user or operator, damage software or hardware or evade
      appropriate monetary charges.

      3.8     Falsification or Unauthorized Modification of an Academic Record

      It is an academic offence to falsify, fabricate or in any other way modify a student
      examination, transcript, grade, letter of recommendation, or related document. Unautho-
      rized modification or falsification of any other official document, or failure to divulge previous
      attendance at another post secondary educational institution on an admissions application
      is also an offence.
      3.9     Misrepresentation of Academic Record

      It is an academic offence to misrepresent, either orally or in writing, one's grades or any
      other aspect of one's academic record.

      3.10    Obstruction of the Academic Activities of Another



Student Handbook                              Page II.29                        September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      It is an academic offence to interfere with the scholarly activities of another in order to
      harass or gain unfair academic advantage. This includes interference or tampering with
      library materials and other data that is intended to be available to others.

      3.11    Aiding or Abetting Academic Offence

      Persons who knowingly aid and abet in the commission of an academic offence are
      themselves guilty of an academic offence. This may include assisting others in the
      preparation of work submitted for appraisal or offering for sale essays or other assignments
      with the intention that these works would be submitted for appraisal.

4.    Sanctions for Academic Offences

      4.1     Penalties

      When verified, an academic offence may lead to one or more of the following penalties:

      a.      A reprimand issued by the panel together with, where appropriate and where
              plagiarism or cheating has been found, a direction given to the Professor alleging
              the offence to reconsider and regrade the work or exercise in question.

      b.      Denial of credit on the work in question with permission to submit substituted work
              or take a supplemental examination. The panel may also decide that the student
              may only receive a grade of pass or a grade below a certain level as the final grade
              for the course in relation to which the academic offence was committed.

      c.      Where assisting in the commission of an academic offence has been found, the
              panel may order that the grade point average of the student in question be
              calculated as if the student has taken one extra course and had received on that
              course a grade of C, D or F as the panel shall determine.
      d.      Suspension from the School for one or more semesters.

      e.      Denial of credit for the course in relation to which an academic offence has been
              found to have been committed with no eligibility for the award of a grade of allowed
              or any supplemental examination;

      f.      Where repeated academic offences have been found, where theft of lecture notes,
              theft of study notes or theft of research work has been found, or where a student
              has been found to have sold materials to a student for use by that student in
              committing an academic offence, expulsion from the School;

      g.      Where the panel has found that an offence has been committed and has ordered
              that a supplemental examination be written or a new exercise submitted, the panel
              may in its discretion also fix a minimum standard to be achieved by the work and/or
              a maximum grade that can be awarded for the work;

      h.      Upon consideration of all the circumstances a notation of the academic offence



Student Handbook                            Page II.30                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:           ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              charged and the finding made by the panel may, in addition to any other sanction,
              be attached to the student's record where the panel has decided that the student
              should be suspended or expelled. The notation will be forwarded with the student's
              transcript in response to any request for that transcript. The notation will remain
              attached to the student's transcript for such a period as the panel hearing the
              charge may direct. Students may petition to the Senate Appeals Committee to have
              the notation removed five years after the notation was entered.

      i.      A student who is suspended and is eligible to graduate may not apply to graduate
              until a suspension expires or is lifted.

      j.      The panel shall have the power to relieve against literal application of these
              penalties in order to ensure that students are dealt with fairly and in keeping with the
              spirit of the regulations. However, these powers will only be exercised in excep-
              tional cases.

      4.2     Factors in Selecting a Sanction:

      The following factors shall be considered when a sanction is being selected:

      a.      If the work or exercise has been submitted or undertaken for credit, the percentage
              of credit which the work or exercise represents in the course for which it was
              submitted or undertaken.

      b.      Whether there is evidence of previous academic offence on the record of the
              student charged with the commission of an academic offence.

      c.      Whether value was given or received for a work submitted for academic purposes
              or in connection with the commission of an academic offence.

      d.      Where plagiarism is alleged whether or not the work has been done for credit, the
              familiarity of the student with the type of research expected in the work in question
              and the proportion which the plagiarized material represents of the whole work.

      e.      Any other factor that may be appropriate.

      4.3     Academic Offence File

      a.      In all cases, whether concerned with the commission of an offence or with
              assistance in the commission of an offence, where the offence has been proven a
              copy of the panel's decision shall be placed in the Academic Offence File in the
              Associate Dean's Office.

      b.      The Academic Offence File is solely for the use of panels established to hear
              academic offences, the Academic Standing Committee where questions with regard
              to a student's eligibility to repeat a year have been raised, and the Admissions
              Committee where questions with regard to student's right to enter or re-enter Law



Student Handbook                              Page II.31                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              School have been raised. No inquiry with regard to the contents of the file from any
              other source shall be entertained.

      c.      Any notation on the Academic Offence File which discloses the student's identity
              shall be destroyed within one year after a student has graduated or voluntarily left
              the School or within the period during which the notation of an offence remains on
              the student's record pursuant to Sanctions for Academic Offences 4.1(h), whichever
              shall be longer.

5.    Procedures for Academic Offences

      5.1     Complaints

      a.      Complaints that an academic offence has been committed shall be addressed to the
              Associate Dean.

      b.      A full-time or part-time faculty member, staff member or person employed to assist
              in the administration of evaluations who has reasonable grounds to believe that an
              academic offence may have been committed, shall immediately notify the Associate
              Dean and provide him/her with such evidence of the commission of the offence as
              that person possesses. Where a written report cannot be made contemporaneously
              with the initial notification, it shall be prepared as soon as possible thereafter.

      c.      It is the responsibility of the person who detects or alleges the academic offence to
              confiscate suspect material as evidence and deliver it to the Associate Dean. In
              cases of suspected impersonation, the invigilator shall ask the person involved to
              remain after the examination and shall request appropriate identification or shall
              otherwise attempt to identify the person.

      5.2     Investigation

      a.      The Associate Dean shall investigate an allegation that an academic offence has
              occurred.

      b.      In the course of that investigation the Associate Dean may arrange an informal
              meeting with the student to discuss the matter. At this meeting the student may be
              accompanied by a representative and the Associate Dean may have another person
              present. During any such investigation, the Associate Dean should proceed quickly
              but, if interviewing a student, should give the student at least seven calendar days
              notice of such a meeting.

      c.      If the action was clearly unintentional, the Associate Dean may, in consultation with
              the faculty member for whom the work was done, take informal remedial steps so
              that the student may correct the mistake and avoid its recurrence. In such
              instances, no official response is required and no record shall be kept.

      d.      If the student wishes to admit to an academic offence, a document signed by the



Student Handbook                            Page II.32                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              student and the Associate Dean which includes the admission, a summary of the
              matter and a joint submission as to penalty may be forwarded to the panel which
              deals with allegations of breach of academic honesty. In such cases, the agreed
              upon penalty may not exceed failure in the course. The panel receiving such a joint
              submission will normally impose the penalty suggested, but if it is of the opinion that
              some other penalty would be more appropriate, it must arrange for a hearing of the
              matter.

      e.      If, upon an examination of all the evidence available, the Associate Dean believes
              that the offence may have been committed, he/she shall immediately notify the
              student in question of the allegation, inform the student that he/she is charged with
              an academic offence, and inform the student that the matter shall be heard on a day
              to be appointed. Such notification shall be in writing and a copy of the regulations
              concerning academic offences shall accompany the notification.

      f.      The matter shall be heard within a reasonable time in the manner set out in these
              regulations on a day appointed by the Associate Dean. The student in question
              shall be notified forthwith in writing of the day appointed for the hearing.

      g.      Once an investigation begins, a student may not drop or be de-registered from the
              course for any reason until a final decision is reached.

      h.      Transcripts will not be released to a student until a decision is made. A request by
              a student for a transcript to be sent to another institution or to a potential employer
              will be processed, but, if the student is found guilty of a breach of academic
              honesty, the recipients of the transcript will be so informed.

      5.3     Composition of the Panel

      a.      The matter will be heard before a panel consisting of three members selected by
              lot by the Associate Dean from amongst the entire eligible faculty. Upon the
              request of the person charged with an academic offence, the panel shall consist of
              two members selected by lot by the Associate Dean from among the entire eligible
              faculty and one member selected by lot by the Associate Dean from among all the
              eligible student members of Faculty Council.

      b.      Where any member of the panel selected by lot cannot serve he/she shall be
              replaced by another member of the faculty, or, where a person charged with an
              academic offence has so requested, a student member of Faculty Council, similarly
              selected.

      c.      The Associate Dean may in his/her discretion remove one or more members of the
              panel and substitute new members selected by lot where the person charged with
              an academic offence alleges, and presents appropriate evidence in support of the
              allegation, that one or more members of the panel may not be impartial in the case.

      d.      The Associate Dean shall appoint a member of the faculty of the School as case



Student Handbook                             Page II.33                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              presenter. The case presenter shall present evidence upon which a charge of
              academic offence has been brought and conduct the prosecution of the alleged
              offender.

      e.      The person who detects or alleges an academic offence, the Dean, and the
              Associate Dean, are ineligible to sit upon the panel or act as case presenter.

      5.4     Hearing Before the Panel

      a.      The panel shall select one of its members to act as Chairperson.

      b.      The Chairperson of the panel shall provide the student and case presenter with a
              written copy of the charge, a copy of the materials submitted by the Associate Dean
              which includes a summary of the evidence, a copy of the procedures to be followed
              and not less than 21 calendar days notification of the time and location of the
              hearing. If the student would like to waive all or part of the notice period, he/she
              should inform the Associate Dean in writing upon being notified that he/she is being
              charged with an academic offence. If the student wishes to file a written response
              to the charge it must be received by the Chairperson within 14 calendar days of the
              date of the sending of the information, and such response must be forwarded to
              case presenter. Both the student and case presenter must inform the panel of their
              intention to call witnesses and the names of these witnesses at least two business
              days prior to the hearing.

      c.      A student who acknowledges the accuracy of the charges may waive the right to a
              hearing by submitting a written statement that both admits guilt and waives the right
              to a hearing. In this statement, the student may make submissions as to
              appropriate penalty and give reasons.

      d.      All hearings are subject to the requirements of procedural fairness. Only the panel
              members, a recording secretary, the complainant, the accused, each party's
              advisor(s) (who may be lawyers) and the witnesses may be present. Witnesses
              (unless parties) shall be present at the hearing only while testifying. Exceptions to
              this policy may be made at the discretion of the panel. The panel shall arrange for
              the hearing to be recorded, the tape of which constitutes the official record of the
              proceedings. Parties may, if they wish, arrange for their own recording of the
              hearing to be taken. The Chair of the panel has full authority to assure an orderly
              and expeditious hearing. Any person who disrupts a hearing or who fails to adhere
              to the rulings of the panel may be asked to leave.

      e.      The panel shall consider the facts and circumstances of the case and determine
              guilt or innocence. A student who is accused of a breach of academic honesty shall
              be presumed innocent and shall not be found guilty unless the panel is satisfied,
              upon clear and compelling evidence, that an academic offence has been
              committed. If the student is found guilty, the panel shall hear submissions as to the
              appropriate penalty and then decide the penalty.




Student Handbook                            Page II.34                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      f.      If a party fails to appear at a hearing after proper notice, the hearing may proceed,
              a decision may be made and sanctions may be imposed, unless the party can
              establish, in advance of the hearing and to the satisfaction of the panel, that there
              are circumstances beyond his/her control which make an appearance impossible
              or burdensome. Except as noted here, no evidence shall be presented unless the
              accused student is present.

      g.      Parties must be allowed a full and fair opportunity to present their evidence and to
              contradict the evidence presented against them. Parties are allowed to cross-
              examine each other in matters related to the charge. The panel has the discretion
              to make rulings as to admissibility of evidence or the suitability of cross-examina-
              tion. The panel is not bound by formal rules of evidence applicable in courts of law.

      h.      When there is no further relevant testimony to be presented by either party or their
              witnesses, each party may present a final argument. Following this the parties shall
              be excused without further discussion. The panel shall then enter into closed
              session and each member shall vote on the question of guilt or innocence. A
              "guilty" verdict requires a simple majority vote.

      i.      Following a "guilty" verdict, the panel shall next allow parties to make a presentation
              as to suitable penalty. Normally, it is only at this point that the panel may be made
              aware of other academic offences in the student's file. The panel will again enter
              into closed session and decide upon the sanction. A motion to impose a particular
              penalty, as outlined in the Sanctions for Academic Offences of these Regulations,
              shall require a simple majority vote. The decision of the panel must be communi-
              cated to the parties in writing, delivered by hand or by mail.

      j.      The decision of the panel with regard to an academic offence shall be communi-
              cated to the Dean and the Associate Dean by the Chairperson. Except for the
              circumstances set out in paragraph k. below, the members of a panel shall keep the
              proceedings and decisions of the panel confidential.

      k.      If the student is found to have committed a breach of academic honesty in work
              related to a funded research project, the Vice President (Academic Affairs) shall be
              notified and the Vice President or a designee shall determine whether to notify the
              granting agency.

      l.      An appeal lies from the decision of the panel to the Senate Appeals Committee.

      5.5     The Order of the Hearing

      The following indicates the order in which a panel should proceed when hearing a charge
      of breach of academic honesty. The panel may alter the order in the interests of fairness.

      a.      The Chair shall:

              i.     introduce the parties and members of the panel



Student Handbook                             Page II.35                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


              ii.    identify the nature of the case and evidence before the panel

      b.      The case presenter shall:

              i.     briefly describe the case to be presented, in an opening statement
              ii.    present support for the charge through oral testimony of complainant and
                     witnesses, and through documentary evidence
              iii.   panel members normally ask questions at the end of each person's
                     testimony but may interrupt if clarity is required
              iv.    the student or representative may ask questions of each witness at the
                     close of that person's testimony.

      c.      The Student or representative shall:

              i.     briefly reply and indicate main arguments in an opening statement
              ii.    present support for his/her case through oral testimony of student and
                     witnesses as well as documentary evidence
              iii.   panel members normally ask questions at the end of each person's
                     testimony but may interrupt if clarity is required
              iv.    the case presenter may ask questions of each witness at the close of that
                     person's testimony

      d.      The case presenter shall be allowed to present testimony or other evidence in reply
              to new issues raised in the student's case which were not raised in the original
              presentation.

      e.      At any time the panel may require other witnesses or the production of other written
              or documentary evidence and may, if it sees fit, adjourn the hearing after allowing
              both parties the opportunity to speak to the adjournment.

      f.      Following the presentation of evidence, the parties are entitled to make closing
              arguments and to summarize briefly the main points of their cases, but no new
              arguments or evidence may be introduced. This will proceed in the following order:
              the student followed by the case presenter.

      g.      The panel will move into closed session for deliberations and decision. If there is
              a finding of guilt, the panel will then consider submissions as to appropriate penalty,
              then return to closed sessions and decide on the appropriate penalty.

      h.      The written decision of the panel shall include:

              i.     the names of panel members and all who appeared;
              ii.    a summary of the cases of the parties;
              iii.   the panel's findings of fact, decision and reasons;
              iv.    the route of appeal.

H.    EXTENDED TIME PROGRAM AND LEAVE OF ABSENCE


Student Handbook                             Page II.36                      September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


1.    Extended Time Program Guidelines

      1.1    First-year students accepted into the Extended Time Program will normally be
      required to carry between 13 to 17 credit hours over two semesters.

      1.2    Second- and third-year students accepted into the Extended Time Program will
      normally be required to carry between 13 to 17 credit hours over two semesters.

      1.3    The Extended Time Program has been approved on a pilot project basis and will be
      reviewed after four years (1998-1999). The following regulations concerning this program
      were approved by Faculty Council in March 1993 and February 1995.

      1.4   The Extended Time Program be available to first-, second- and third-year students
      completing the LL.B. degree.

      1.5   Admission to the first year of the Extended Time Program is determined by the
      Admissions Advisory Committee.

      1.6    Admission to the Extended Time Program is determined only after an applicant has
      been determined admissible to the LLB degree Program through one of the existing
      categories.

      1.7     Admission to the Extended Time Program is limited to a maximum of five students
      in any one academic year, with a total program of 30 students in all three years of the LLB
      Program at any one time.

      1.8    The division of the required first-year courses be determined by the Academic Policy
      Committee once the first-year curriculum revision is complete, allowing for a balance of
      courses and progression of studies.

      1.9     Students are allowed to enter or leave the Extended Time Program in any year level
      of the LLB Program, again subject to current program entry provision relative to students
      already enrolled at Osgoode.

      1.10 The Academic rules shall be applied to the Extended Time Program and to a
      student in the Program so that as near as possible, and subject to the fairness principle
      expressed in Rule 6.8 of Section E, a student in the Program shall be in the same position
      as a student who is not in the Program.

      1.11 When the following Rules are applied to a student in the Extended Time Program,
      the words "semester" and "academic year" shall have the same meaning they have when
      applied to a student not in the Program: Rules 5.6(c), 7.2 and 7.3 of Section A; Rules 3 and
      4 of Section C; Rules 3.1 and 3.2 of Section D; and Rule 6.1(f) of Section E.

      1.12 When the following rules are applied to a student in the Extended Time Program,
      the word "semester" shall mean a period made up of two semesters; and the words



Student Handbook                            Page II.37                     September 15, 2000
SECTION II:          ACADEMIC RULES OF OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL


      "academic year" shall mean a period made up of two academic years: Rules 4.4, 5.1(a),
      5.4(a), 5.8(b) and 6.1(a) of Section A; Rules 2.5(c), 6.3(a) and 6.3(d) of Section E.

      1.13 When Rule 5.5(c) of Section A and Rule 2.1 of Section D are applied to a student
      in the Extended Time Program the references of "two", "three" and "four" semesters shall
      read to mean four, six and eight semesters respectively.

      1.14 When Rule 5.1(b) of Section A is applied to a student in the Extended Time
      Program, the words "academic year" shall be read to mean the first academic year of the
      period made up of two academic years which constitutes each of the second year and the
      third year of a student in the Program.

      1.15 Rule 2.5(a) of Section E shall be applied to a student in the Extended Time Program
      as if the opening clause of the Rule reads as follows: "Immediately upon release of the fall
      semester grades and of the spring semester grades of the first academic year of the period
      made up of two academic years which constitutes each of the second year and the third
      year for a student in the Program,".

      1.16 When Rule 2.5(b) of Section E is applied to a student in the Extended Time
      Program it shall be deemed to include a provision that an interim decision whether any
      grade of such a student should be adjusted by the Grades Review Committee may be
      taken at the end of the winter semester of a year that is the first academic year of the
      period made up of two academic years which constitutes each of the second year and the
      third year for a student in the Program.

      1.17 When Rule 6.2(b) of Section E is applied to a student in the Extended Time
      Program it shall be deemed to include a provision that a Petition of a student in the
      Program may be considered in the first instance by the Grades Review Committee at its
      May or June meeting at the end of the winter semester of a year that is the first academic
      year of the period made up of two academic years which constitutes each of the second
      year and third year for a student in the Program.

2.    Leave of Absence

      2.1    Students who have successfully completed not less than the first year of LL.B.
      studies may request and receive, on a pro forma basis, one leave of absence of not more
      than two consecutive semesters. A request for a leave of absence for more than two
      consecutive semesters may be granted only in the most exceptional circumstances.

      2.2    A request for a leave of absence should be submitted to the Assistant Dean
      (Student Services).




Student Handbook                            Page II.38                     September 15, 2000
SECTION I:          RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                    OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY

      individuals and groups subject to discrimination; and

e.    a heightening awareness of the existence of systemic discrimination.


B.    OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL EQUALITY PROCEDURES

1.    Academic Procedures

1.1   Standards of Conduct - General Principles

      a.     Members of the Osgoode Community have a right to be free from discrimination or
             harassment directed at their race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin,
             citizenship, creed, political orientation, sex, age, marital status, sexual orientation,
             family status or handicap.

      b.     Any intellectual community thrives on the free and full expression of opposing ideas
             and values. However, only in an environment free of discrimination or harassment
             can the Law School fulfil its commitment to fostering an environment that promotes
             free and open inquiry by all members of the community. Students, staff and faculty
             have a responsibility to exercise their freedom of expression in a manner that
             promotes equality and justice.

1.2   Procedures Regarding Equality Complaints in Teaching and Curriculum

      a.     The purpose of these procedures is to provide access to swift and effective
             mechanisms to protect all students from discrimination and harassment as referred
             to in paragraph 1.1(a).

      b.     The faculty and the administration must accept responsibility for the goal of
             ensuring that equality principles be reflected in the curriculum and the classroom.


      c.     The disputes resolution process should not impose an undue burden on
             complainants. In addition, the process should provide a forum for giving voice and
             legitimacy to the experiences and concerns of all women and minority men in the
             community.

      d.     The administration should foster a climate of respect, consultation and assistance
             rather than confrontation in regard to faculty and students alike.

      e.     Students who invoke these procedures should not be penalized in any way. Nor
             should a decision not to invoke these procedures remove a student's right to pursue
             other formal or informal avenues of redress.
      f.     Any student who believes that the general principles in paragraphs 1.1(a) to 1.2(e)
             are being violated by the course content, the nature of the reading materials, or the



Student Handbook                            Page I.2                           September 15, 2000
SECTION I:           RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                     OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY

             conduct of the classes in the particular course, seminar or academic programme
             are encouraged, but in no sense required as a prerequisite to pursuing the
             remedies set out below, to raise the matter with the instructor either individually or
             in a group.

      g.     Students may initiate a complaint with the Safe Counsel, or, acting on their own
             behalf or with the assistance of the Safe Counsel, students may initiate a complaint
             to the Associate Dean, where they believe the general principles in paragraphs
             1.1(a) to 1.2(e) above are being violated by the course content, the nature of the
             reading materials, or the conduct of classes in a particular course, seminar or
             academic programme.

      h.     A student may request any remedy within the authority of the Associate Dean,
             including but not limited to any combination of

             i.      mediation;
             ii.     retroactive withdrawal from the course, seminar or programme;
             iii.    permission to attend lectures in another section;
             iv.     late entry into another course, seminar or programme;
             v.      tutorial assistance;
             vi.     alternative examination or grading arrangements;
             vii.    guaranteed enrolment in another section of the course, seminar or
                     programme to be offered in a future term or academic term; and
             viii.   the issuance of "damage control letters" with a view to securing extensions
                     or other forms of relief in other courses or seminars in which the
                     complainant is enrolled.

      i.     Where the Safe Counsel or Associate Dean forms the opinion that the complaint is
             not frivolous or abusive and represents a reasonable concern that the general
             principles expressed in paragraphs 1.1(a) to 1.2(e) above are being or have been
             violated, the Associate Dean shall provide remedial assistance. The relief to be
             granted by the Associate Dean in response to such a complaint shall be determined
             in consultation with the Safe Counsel and the student(s) concerned, and shall be
             fixed not later than ten school days after the receipt of the complaint by the
             Associate Dean, or after mediation (if pursued) has proved unsuccessful.

      j.     Students, acting on their own behalf or with the assistance of a Safe Counsel, may
             alternatively or simultaneously explore other options to resolve their concerns,
             including but not limited to a complaint to the Sexual Harassment, Education and
             Complaint Centre, the Race and Ethnic Relations Centre, or the University
             Complaint Centre.

      k.     Where a complainant has pursued relief under paragraphs 1.2(f) to 1.2(h), and both
             the Associate Dean and the Safe Counsel have found the complaint to be frivolous
             or abusive, the equality complaint shall be adjudged manifestly unfounded, in which
             case no further Law School procedures may be pursued by the complainant.



Student Handbook                            Page I.3                         September 15, 2000
SECTION I:          RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                    OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY


      l.     Alternatively, where the complainant is not satisfied with the result secured, and the
             complaint has not been adjudged manifestly unfounded under paragraph 1.2(j), the
             complainant, [or the Safe Counsel or Associate Dean on instruction from the
             complainant] may give notice to the Dean to convene an investigatory panel
             composed of three persons: one student, one faculty member, and an external chair
             designated by the Dean in consultation with the Sexual Harassment, Education and
             Complaint Centre, the Race and Ethnic Relations Centre, or the University
             Complaint Centre, as may be appropriate to the circumstances of the case.

      m.     An investigatory panel so established shall convene within 10 school days of notice
             being given to the Dean under paragraph 1.2(k), and shall conduct an informal
             inquiry that will consist of interviews with the parties, and such further investigation
             as it deems appropriate. The complainant and any students or faculty members
             implicated or involved in the complaint shall be given a copy of the complaint, and
             afforded an opportunity to respond to it orally and in writing. The panel's process is
             intended to be speedy and informal; the panel does not have the power to compel
             the attendance of witnesses or the production of documents.

      n.     The investigatory panel may make any decision which the Associate Dean could
             have made under paragraph 1.2(g).

      o.     The investigatory panel shall prepare a brief report of its work, including the nature
             of the complaint, the nature of the response thereto, its tentative findings of fact,
             and such other matters as it deems pertinent, which report shall not identify the
             complainant(s). If the panel concludes that the complaint has been founded, the
             respondent shall be given an opportunity to reply orally or in writing. The
             investigatory panel shall then prepare its final report having considered the reply,
             if any, of the respondent. A copy of the final report shall be delivered to the
             complainant(s) and the respondent.

      p.     The final report of the investigatory panel, if the complaint has been founded, shall
             be filed with the Dean, Associate Dean, Equality Committee, and the Office of
             Student Services. A registry of such reports of founded complaints shall be
             maintained by the Office of Student Services and made readily accessible to all
             students.

      q.     The Equality Committee shall table an annual report at Faculty Council in which it
             assesses the efficacy of the equality complaints procedure and notes issues of
             general concern.



2.    Non-Academic Procedures

2.1   Standards of Student Conduct (from Presidential Regulation 2)



Student Handbook                            Page I.4                           September 15, 2000
SECTION I:             RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                       OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY

       Students may think, speak, write, create, learn, pursue social, cultural and other interests
       and associate together for all of these purposes, subject to the requirement that they
       respect the rights of members of the University and general communities to pursue these
       same freedoms and privileges.

       Under this general standard, students are expected, amongst other things, to abide by all
       applicable laws, to refrain from conduct which harms or threatens harm to the rights, safety
       and well-being of members or guests of the University, and to refrain from assault, threat
       of assault, harassment and discrimination in contravention of the principles articulated in
       the Ontario Human Rights Code or the Canadian Charter of Rights or Freedoms.

3.     Complaints Procedure

Any violation of these standards by an Osgoode student may be the subject of a formal complaint
brought to the attention of the Associate Dean or the University Complaint Centre. In addition to
these two complaints officers, complaints of sexual harassment may be brought to the attention
of the Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre.

A complaints officer may attempt to mediate the complaint if the complainant consents. If
mediation fails, or is not requested, the complaints officer will investigate the complaint. As long
as the complaint is not patently without merit, it will be referred either to the Provost or to a local
hearing officer to be appointed by the Dean. The most serious infractions, such as sexual assault,
will be dealt with by the formal adjudicative procedures set in motion by the Provost. Sanctions
may include expulsion from the university. Less serious infractions, such as sexist or racist
remarks or behaviour, will be dealt with by an informal procedure before a local hearing officer.
Penalties can include any combination of the following: reprimand, public admonition, mandatory
counselling, mandatory apology to the complainant, denial of a local privilege, restitution for
damage done not exceeding $250, or a fine not exceeding $200. For further information, contact
the Associate Dean, the Osgoode Safe Counsel, the Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint
Centre or the University Complaint Centre.

Note: The full text of the standards and procedures summarized above can be found in
      Presidential Regulation 2 and 3.

4.     Dispute Resolution Mechanisms for Student Complaints

4.1    External Mechanisms

       a.      University Complaint Centre

       Assistance and advice with non-academic concerns is available from the University
       Complaint Centre or one of the many designated Complaint Officers representing each
       college and Faculty and the Library. Complaints may also be directed to special centres
       such as the Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations and the Sexual Harassment Education
       and Complaint Centre (SHEACC).




Student Handbook                               Page I.5                          September 15, 2000
SECTION I:           RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                     OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY

      For more information, contact: York University Complaint Centre, 103 Central Square;
      telephone 736-5144.

      b.     Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre

      The Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre (SHEACC) serves all members
      of the York community, students, faculty and staff. Anyone who is experiencing sexual
      harassment, or anyone who thinks what they are experiencing could be sexual harassment
      based on their gender or sexual orientation, should consult with the Sexual Harassment
      Education and Complaint Centre. The Centre offers advice, ensures confidentiality, and
      provides a supportive atmosphere. No action will be taken unless the complainant requests
      it. The two advisors at the Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre are
      available to give workshops on sexual harassment and related issues to colleges,
      residences and Faculties. There is a small library which students, staff and faculty are
      welcome to draw upon.

      An ongoing project of SHEACC’s is the Sexual Assault Survivors Support Line (SASSL).
      SASSL is a peer support telephone line, which provides referrals and support to callers on
      a 24 hour basis. The crisis line number is 650-8056 and the information line is 736-2100
      extension 40345. The line is closed on University Holidays with a message providing
      alternative crisis line numbers. SASSL is in the process of developing into a service for the
      York Community in its own right.

      The Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre is located in the Centre for
      Human Rights and Equity, 108 Central Square (next to south exit doors of Central Square)
      and is open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday or in the evening by appointment.
      The Centre can be reached by telephone at 736-5500. When the Centre is closed,
      telephone messages may be left at this number.

      c.     Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations

      The Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations (CRER) was established in 1988, to advise the
      University on policy relating to race and ethnic relations, and to provide anti-racism
      education for the entire community, as well as, support and services to York’s multi-ethno-
      racial community, so that working, studying and living at York will be a harmonious and
      rewarding experience for all.

      Students, faculty and staff have the right to study, live and work in an environment that is
      free from racial harassment and discrimination. Students, faculty and staff also have the
      responsibility not to racially harass any member of the York community, including other
      students, faculty and staff. This is in accordance with York University’s Policy Concerning
      Racism and the Ontario Human Rights Code, which prohibits harassment and
      discrimination on the grounds of race, colour, citizenship, place of origin, ancestry, ethnic
      background and creed. Every person has a right to freedom from harassment in the
      community, including such places as the classroom and the residences.




Student Handbook                            Page I.6                         September 15, 2000
SECTION I:           RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                     OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY

      The CRER works in cooperation with several campus groups and associations active in the
      area of human rights, anti-racism and employment equity. The advisors at the Centre are
      available to give workshops on anti-racism and related issues to all sectors of the
      University. The Centre offers public education programmes and a small resource library
      to increase awareness and action around issues of equality.

      The Centre is also a Complaint Centre which provides a confidential place in which
      members of the York community can seek information regarding racial harassment and
      discrimination. The advisors outline the many options (both informal and formal) available
      to students, faculty and staff and discuss ways of handling the situation.

      The Centre also works collaboratively with the University Complaints Centre and local
      complaints officers in the colleges and Faculties. The advisors aim to ensure that concerns
      expressed by all members of the community are addressed with sensitivity and fairness.

      The Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations is located in the Centre for Human Rights and
      Equality, 108 Central Square. Appointments can be made at (416) 736-5682.

4.2   Internal Mechanisms

      a.     Associate Dean

      The Associate Dean has general responsibility for the administration of the academic
      programme at the Law School. He/she exercises the discretion provided by the Academic
      Rules regarding such matters as the required number of credits, the maximum number of
      seminars, and the late adding and dropping of courses. The Associate Dean advises
      students on the rules relating to grading and the relief available to those unable to complete
      the requirements of a course for medical, compassionate or equitable reasons. He/she
      hears complaints about the academic programme, and can provide advice to students on
      how to deal with a situation and suggest appropriate avenues for redress. The Associate
      Dean has the power to provide relief to students with founded complaints of a breach of
      equality principles in teaching or curriculum. In addition, the Associate Dean is Osgoode's
      designated officer for receiving complaints regarding student non-academic offences.

      b.     Safe Counsel

      The Safe Counsel provides a formal link between Osgoode Hall Law School and York's
      Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre. The Safe Counsel provides
      information to students regarding sexual harassment and the range of remedial options.
      At the request of the complainant, the Safe Counsel can assist, for example, in the
      arrangement of mediation, counselling or the initiation of a formal complaint. In addition,
      the Safe Counsel has the power to direct the Associate Dean to provide remedial
      assistance to a student who has a founded complaint of a breach of equality principles in
      teaching or curriculum.

      c.     Student-Faculty Relations Committee



Student Handbook                             Page I.7                         September 15, 2000
SECTION I:          RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF ALL MEMBERS OF THE
                    OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL COMMUNITY


      The Student-Faculty Relations Committee is a standing committee of Faculty Council
      composed of two members of faculty and three students. The Committee has jurisdiction
      to hear complaints of an academic and non-academic nature raised by and affecting
      students, full-time and part-time faculty and sessional lecturers. It accepts confidential
      complaints and seeks to mediate them on a voluntary basis. For further information,
      contact the student chair of the Committee.




Student Handbook                           Page I.8                        September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                       TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

                     5.3    Upper Year Competitive Mooting Program ......................                        II.3
                     5.4    Research Papers .............................................................        II.4
                     5.5    Research Program ..........................................................          II.4
                     5.6    Intensive Programs ..........................................................        II.5
                     5.7    Exchange Programs .........................................................          II.6
                     5.8    Letters of Permission .......................................................        II.7
                     5.9    Extra-disciplinary Courses ...............................................           II.8
            6.       Registration Restrictions ............................................................      II.8
            7.       Submission of Seminar and Research Papers ...........................                       II.8

      B.    Evaluation in the First Year ................................................................. II.9
            1.    Definition .................................................................................... II.9
            2.    Fall Semester of the First Year .................................................... II.9
            3.    Winter Semester of the First Year ............................................. II.10
            4.    Evaluation without a Final Examination .................................... II.10

      C.    Evaluation in the Second and Third Year ......................................... II.10

      D.    Administration of the Elective System ...............................................              II.11
            1.    Limited Enrolment in Courses and Seminars ............................                       II.11
            2.    Admission to Courses and Seminars ........................................                   II.11
            3.    Change in Electives ..................................................................       II.12

      E.    Examinations and Grading ................................................................          II.12
            1.   Examinations and Testing Procedures ......................................                    II.12
                 1.1    Faculty/Student Colloquium ...........................................                 II.12
                 1.2    Secondary Examiner .....................................................               II.12
                 1.3    Exam Invigilation ...........................................................          II.13
                 1.4    Mid-term Examination Procedures .................................                      II.13
                 1.5    Use of Computers in Examinations ................................                      II.13
                 1.6    Instructor - Student Grade Review .................................                    II.14
            2.   Grading and Credit ...................................................................        II.14
                 2.1    Grades ...........................................................................     II.14
                 2.2    Credit / No Credit ...........................................................         II.15
                 2.3    Grading Profile ...............................................................        II.15
                 2.4    Grade Point Average ......................................................             II.16



Student Handbook                                  v                                       September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                        TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

                     2.5   Academic Standing .......................................................              II.17
                     2.6   Transcripts .....................................................................      II.17
            3.       Supplemental Examinations ......................................................             II.18
            4.       Aegrotat Standing .....................................................................      II.18
            5.       Grade Reappraisal ...................................................................        II.18
            6.       Grade Review, Grade Reappraisal and Petitions ......................                         II.19
                     6.1   Grades Review Committees ...........................................                   II.19
                     6.2   Petitions to the Grades Review Committee ....................                          II.20
                     6.3   Application to Repeat a Year .........................................                 II.20
                     6.4   Petition to the Academic Standing Committee ..............                             II.21
                     6.5   Appeal of a Final Grade .................................................              II.21
                     6.6   The Academic Standing Committee ..............................                         II.23
                     6.7   Mutatis Mutandis ............................................................          II.24
                     6.8   Relief against Literal Application ....................................                II.24

      F.    Procedure for Granting of Examination Deferrals .............................                         II.24
            1.    Purpose ....................................................................................    II.24
            2.    Medical, Compassionate or Equitable Grounds ........................                            II.25
            3.    Procedure ..................................................................................    II.25
            4.    Confidentiality ............................................................................    II.26
            5.    Deferred Examination ...............................................................            II.26
            6.    Further Deferral .........................................................................      II.26
            7.    No Derogation from Existing Rights ..........................................                   II.26
            8.    Reporting ...................................................................................   II.27

      G.    Academic Offences .............................................................................       II.27
            1.   Preamble and Policy .................................................................            II.27
            2.   Application .................................................................................    II.28
            3.   Definitions .................................................................................    II.28
                 3.1     Cheating .........................................................................       II.28
                 3.2     Impersonation ................................................................           II.29
                 3.3     Plagiarism and Other Misappropriation of the Work
                         of Another .....................................................................         II.29
                 3.4     Improper Research Practices ........................................                     II.30
                 3.5     Dishonesty in Publication ..............................................                 II.30
                 3.6     Premature Oral or Written Dissemination of Information                                   II.30


Student Handbook                                  vi                                        September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                        TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

                     3.7   Abuse of Confidentiality .................................................              II.30
                     3.8   Falsification or Unauthorized Modification of an
                           Academic Record ..........................................................              II.30
                     3.9   Misrepresentation of Academic Record ...........................                        II.31
                     3.10 Obstruction of the Academic Activities of Another ..........                             II.31
                     3.11 Aiding or Abetting Academic Offences ...........................                         II.31
            4.       Sanctions for Academic Offences .............................................                 II.31
                     4.1   Penalties ........................................................................      II.31
                     4.2   Factors in Selecting a Sanction .....................................                   II.32
                     4.3   Academic Offence File ...................................................               II.33
            5.       Procedures for Academic Offences ...........................................                  II.33
                     5.1   Complaints ...................................................................          II.33
                     5.2   Investigation ...................................................................       II.33
                     5.3   Composition of the Panel ..............................................                 II.34
                     5.4   Hearing Before the Panel .............................................                  II.35
                     5.5   The Order of the Hearing .............................................                  II.37

       H.   Extended Time Program and Leave of Absence .............................. II.38
            1.    Extended Time Program Guidelines ......................................... II.38
            2.    Leave of Absence ..................................................................... II.40

III:   POLICIES AND REGULATIONS OF YORK UNIVERSITY

       A.   Academic Honesty ............................................................................. III.1
       B.   Academic Implications of Disruptions or Cessations of University
            Business Due to Labour Disputes or Other Causes ........................ III.15
       C.   Campus Alcohol ................................................................................ III.18
       D.   Computing and Information Technology Facilities ........................... III.19
       E.   Disruptive and/or Harassing Behaviour by Student in Academic
            Situations ............................................................................................ III.21
       F.   Firearms and Weapons ...................................................................... III.24
       G.   Misconduct in Academic Research .................................................. III.24
       H.   Personal Relationships Between Instructors and Students ............. III.27
       I.   Physical Accessibility of University Facilities .................................... III.28




Student Handbook                                   viii                                        September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                        TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

      J.    Presidential Regulation Number 2: Regulation Governing the
            Conduct of Students ......................................................................... III.28
      K.    Presidential Regulation Number 3: Student Discipline -
            Complaints and Adjudication ............................................................ III.40
      L.    Prohibiting On-Campus Activity by Essay-Writing Services ............. III.42
      M.    Racism .............................................................................................. III.43
      N.    Sexual Harassment .......................................................................... III.43
      O.    Smoking Regulations ........................................................................ III.44
      P.    Weather Emergencies ....................................................................... III.44
      Q.    Women’s Remembrance Day ............................................................ III.46

IV:   STUDENT GOVERNMENT, CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

      A.    Student Government ........................................................................... IV.1
            1.    Legal and Literary Society ........................................................ IV.1
            2.    Student Caucus of Faculty Council ........................................... IV.1

      B.    Clubs and Activities ...........................................................................      IV.2
            1.    Asian Cultural Association ........................................................             IV.2
            2.    Athletics Council .......................................................................       IV.2
            3.    The Black Law Students Association .......................................                      IV.2
            4.    Osgoode Business Clinic ..........................................................              IV.2
            5.    Business Law Society ................................................................           IV.2
            6.    Canadian Bar Association .........................................................              IV.3
            7.    Christian Legal Fellowship ........................................................             IV.3
            8.    Community and Legal Aid Services Program ............................                           IV.3
            9.    Debate Society ..........................................................................       IV.3
            10.   Entertainment and Sports Law Association ...............................                        IV.3
            11.   Environmental Law Society .......................................................               IV.4
            12.   First Nations Law Students Association ....................................                     IV.4
            13.   Health Law Association .............................................................            IV.4
            14.   International Law Society ..........................................................            IV.4
            15.   Italian Cultural Society ...............................................................        IV.4
            16.   Jewish Students Association .....................................................               IV.5
            17.   John White Society ....................................................................         IV.5



Student Handbook                                   ix                                        September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                         TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

            18.       Law Games ............................................................................... IV.5
            19.       Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Collective ...................................... IV.5
            20.       Mature Student’s Association .................................................... IV.6
            21.       M.B.A./LL.B. Students Association ............................................ IV.6
            22.       Mock Trial .................................................................................. IV.6
            23.       Mooting Society ......................................................................... IV.6
            24.       Obiter Dicta ................................................................................ IV.7
            25.       Osgoode Hall Law Journal ........................................................ IV.7
            26.       Osgoode Pub: The Junior Common Room ................................
                      IV.7
            27.       Phi Delta Phi .............................................................................. IV.7
            28.       Radio Show: BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT ................... IV.8
            29.       Science and Technology Law Association ................................ IV.8
            30.       Share the Warmth ..................................................................... IV.8
            31.       South Asian Law Students Association .................................... IV.9
            32.       Student Research Foundation ................................................... IV.9
            33.       Women’s Caucus ...................................................................... IV.9

V:    OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL CENTRES AND SERVICES

      A.    Office of Student Services .................................................................... V.1

      B.    Library .................................................................................................   V.1
            1.     General ......................................................................................       V.1
            2.     Borrowing Privileges ...................................................................             V.1
            3.     Reference ..................................................................................         V.2
            4.     Inter-Library Loans ....................................................................             V.2
            5.     Microform Collection ..................................................................              V.2
            6.     Orientation .................................................................................        V.2
      C.    Career Services Office ....................................................................... V.2
      D.    Financial Assistance Office .................................................................               V.3
            1.    General .......................................................................................       V.3
            2.    Student Financial Assistance Officer ..........................................                       V.4
            3.    Fund Raising Efforts ................................................................                 V.4
            4.    Partnership with Royal Bank ......................................................                    V.4
            5.    On-site OSAP Assistance ..........................................................                    V.4



Student Handbook                                    x                                           September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                        TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

            6.       Out-of-Province Students ..........................................................            V.4
            7.       Bursary Program .......................................................................        V.5
                     7.1    Tuition Rebate ................................................................         V.5
                     7.2    Osgoode/Royal Bank Student Financial Options
                            Program .........................................................................       V.5
                     7.3    Osgoode Bursaries .........................................................             V.5
            8.       Emergency Loan Program .........................................................               V.6
      E.    Information Technology Services ....................................................... V.6
            1.    General ....................................................................................... V.6
            2.    The Osgoode Helpdesk .............................................................. V.6
      F.    Tutoring Program ................................................................................. V.7
      G.    Materials Distribution Centre .............................................................. V.7
      H.    Old Bailee Bookstore ........................................................................... V.7
      I.    Mail Room ........................................................................................... V.7
      J.    Cafeteria ............................................................................................. V.7

VI:   YORK UNIVERSITY CENTRES AND SERVICES

      A.    Athletic Facilities ................................................................................ VI.1
      B.    Bookstore ............................................................................................ VI.1
      C.    Childcare Centre ................................................................................. VI.1
      D.    Computing Services ........................................................................... VI.1
      E.    Counselling and Development Centre ...............................................                     VI.2
            1.   Personal Counselling ..............................................................               VI.2
            2.   Group Programs .......................................................................            VI.2
            3.   Learning Skills ........................................................................          VI.2
            4.   Learning Disabilities Program ................................................                    VI.2
            5.   Psychiatric Disabilities Program .............................................                    VI.3
            6.   Community Mental Health Consultation .................................                            VI.3
      F.    Health Services ..................................................................................... VI.3
            1.     York Lanes Health Centre ......................................................... VI.3
            2.     Health Education and Promotion Office .................................... VI.3
      G.    Housing ................................................................................................ VI.4




Student Handbook                                   xi                                         September 15, 2000
STUDENT HANDBOOK:                        TABLE OF CONTENTS - DETAILED

      H.    Human Rights and Equity Centre ...................................................... VI.4
            1.   Centre for Race and Ethnic Relations ...................................... VI.4
            2.   Sexual Harassment Education and Complaint Centre .............. VI.5
      I.    Libraries .............................................................................................. VI.5
      J.    Lost and Found ................................................................................... VI.6
      K.    Office for Persons with Disabilities .................................................... VI.6
      L.    Ontario March of Dimes - York University Attendant Services .......... VI.6
      M.    Parking Services .................................................................................. VI.7
      N.    Postal Services ................................................................................... VI.7
      O.    Scott Religious Centre ........................................................................ VI.7
      P.    Security Control Centre ...................................................................... VI.8
      Q.    Shopping Services ............................................................................. VI.8
      R.    Student Security Escort Service ......................................................... VI.8
      S.    Transportation .................................................................................... VI.9
      T.    University Complaint Centre .............................................................. VI.9
      U.    Women’s Centre ................................................................................. VI.9




Student Handbook                                   xi                                         September 15, 2000

				
DOCUMENT INFO