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bloodborne by TPenney

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									OSHA 29CFR 1910.1030 Subpart Z

You must Plan Observe and Protect

Bloodborne Pathogens
What does bloodborne pathogens mean?

Bloodborne Pathogens
What does bloodborne pathogens mean?
“Bloodborne pathogens” means micro-organisms that are present in human blood (or other potentially infectious materials) and can cause disease in humans.

What types of diseases do you think you can get from Bloodborne Pathogens?

Bloodborne Pathogens What does bloodborne
pathogens mean?
“Bloodborne pathogens” means micro-organisms that are present in human blood (or other potentially infectious materials) and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens (diseases) include, but are not limited to: – Hepatitis B virus (HBV) – HIV, which causes AIDS – Hepatitis C virus – Malaria

“Other” potentially infectious materials means:

Bloodborne Pathogens

1. Bodily fluids including semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva, and any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between bodily fluids.
2. Any unfixed tissue or organ from a human being (such as torn skin). 3. HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions, and blood, organs, or other tissues from animals infected with HIV or HBV.

Bloodborne Pathogens
Why should you care?
• Approximately 5.6 million workers are at risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus.
• OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens standard prescribes safeguards to protect workers against the hazards from exposure to blood and other potentially infections materials, and to reduce their risk from this exposure. • A specific Written Safety Program regarding bloodborne pathogen safety and safeguards.

Bloodborne Pathogens
Who is covered by the standard?
• • • All employees who could be “reasonably anticipated” as the result of performing their job duties to face contact with blood and other potentially infectious materials. “Good Samaritan” acts such as assisting a co-worker with a nosebleed would not be considered occupational exposure. Some jobs within the city that are covered by the standard:
• • • • • • Wastewater Treatment Workers Childcare Workers Parks and Recreation Workers Custodial Services Workers Law Enforcement Personnel Firefighters

Bloodborne Pathogens
How does contamination occur? What risks do you have on your job that pose a hazard or exposure to bloodborne pathogens?

Bloodborne Pathogens
• Most common exposure is caused by needlesticks. 600,000 to 800,000 needlestick injuries occur each year in the United States.

How does exposure occur?
• Cuts from other contaminated sharp items (knives, broken glass, sharp metal, sharp wires, etc.). Sharp items mean any contaminated object that can penetrate the skin. • Contact of mucous membranes (eye, nose, mouth) or broken (cut or scraped) skin with contaminated blood. Keep in mind that the previous job titles could come in contact with one or more of these exposures… not just medical personnel.

Bloodborne Pathogens An Exposure Control Plan…
• • Identifies jobs and tasks where occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious material occurs. Describes how the employer will:
– – – – – Use engineering and work practice controls Ensure use of personal protective equipment (PPE) Provide training Provide hepatitis B vaccinations Use signs and labels .

Bloodborne Pathogens OSHA Requirements for
Exposure Control Plan…
• Written plan is required and must be accessible to employees. See the
Written Safety Program document from your company.

• Plan must be reviewed at least annually to reflect changes in:
– Tasks, procedures, or assignments which affect exposure, and – Technology that will eliminate or reduce exposure

• Annual review must document employer’s consideration and implementation of safer devices. • Must solicit input from potentially exposed employees in the identification, evaluation, and selection of engineering and work practice controls.

Universal Precautions

Bloodborne Pathogens

• Universal Precautions is the prevention strategy by which all blood and potentially infectious materials are treated as if they were, in fact, infections. • Treat all human blood and bodily fluids as if they are infectious. • Must be observed in all situations where there is a potential for contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials.

Bloodborne Pathogens
Engineering & Work Practice Controls
• These are the primary methods used to control the transmission of HBV and HIV. Engineering and work practice controls should be the first line of defense in keeping workers safe. When occupational exposure remains after engineering and work practice controls are put in place, personal protective equipment (PPE) must be used. Employers must obtain input from non-managerial employees who are potentially exposed to injuries from contaminated sharps in the identification, evaluation, and selection of engineering and work practice controls.

•

•

Bloodborne Controls Engineering & Work PracticePathogens
These controls reduce employee exposure by either removing the hazard or isolating the worker. Controls reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering how a task is performed.

What are some work practice controls that are in place at your work site, or could be implemented?

Engineering & Work Practice Controls
•

Bloodborne Pathogens

Examples include: – Wash hands after removing gloves and as soon as possible after exposure.

–
– – –

Do not bend or break sharp objects.
No food or smoking in work areas. Signs in high-risk areas. Decontaminate surfaces as soon as possible following contamination.

Bloodborne Pathogens Personal Protective Equipment
• Remember, engineering and work practice controls should be the first line of defense in keeping workers safe. When occupational exposure remains after engineering and work practice controls are put in place, personal protective equipment (PPE) must be used. • What types of PPE can you think of?

Bloodborne Pathogens
Personal Protective Equipment
Examples of PPE include:
• Specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for protection against infectious materials. These could include respirators, gloves, goggles, boots, safety garments, etc. PPEs must be properly cleaned, laundered, repaired, and disposed of at no cost to the employee. PPEs must be removed when leaving the area or upon contamination.

•

•

Bloodborne Pathogens Housekeeping
A written schedule must be developed for cleaning and decontamination at the work site based on the: • Location within the facility • Type of surface to be cleaned

• Type of soil present
• Task or procedure being performed
The term “work site” refers not only to permanent fixed facilities such as hospitals, offices, etc., but also include temporary non-fixed workspaces such as mobile offices, ambulances, etc.).

Bloodborne Housekeeping
• After completion of a task or procedure • When surfaces are contaminated • At the end of the work shift

Pathogens

Work surfaces must be decontaminated with an appropriate disinfectant:

• Disinfect surfaces with 99 parts water to 1 part bleach
The lists of EPA Registered products are available from the National Antimicrobial Information Network at (800) 447-6349.

Laundry

Bloodborne Pathogens

When a facility uses Universal Precautions in the handling of all soiled laundry, alternative labeling or color-coding is sufficient if it permits all employees to recognize that the containers require handling in compliance with Universal Precautions.
• Handle contaminated laundry as little as possible, and use PPE • Laundry must be bagged or containerized at the location where it is used. • Laundry must be placed and transported in labeled or color-coded containers.

Bloodborne Pathogens
Hepatitis B Vaccination Requirements
• The City must make available, free of charge at a reasonable time and place, to all employees at risk of exposure within ten working days o f initial assignment unless:
– – Employee has had the vaccination. Antibody testing reveals immunity.

•
•

The vaccination must be performed by a licensed healthcare professional.
Vaccine must be provided even if the employee initially declines, but later decides to accept the vaccination.

Bloodborne Pathogens
Hepatitis B Vaccination Requirements
• Employees who decline the vaccination must sign a declination form.
• Employees are not required to participate in an antibody prescreening program to receive vaccination series. • Vaccination booster doses must be provided if recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service.
Contact your supervisor if you need to schedule the Hepatitis B vaccine.

Here is Why to be Cautious

Hepatitis B

Bloodborne Pathogens

• Serious, sometimes fatal disease that affects the liver • Can survive on surfaces dried and at room temperature for at least a week • Vaccination is available • Yellow eyes and skin (Jaundice) • Abdominal pain & swelling • Fever and vomiting • Skin rash

Hepatitis C

Bloodborne Pathogens

• Serious, sometimes fatal disease that affects the liver • Not as infectious as Hepatitis B, but more common • Vaccination is NOT available • Yellow eyes and skin (Jaundice)

• Sore muscles, headache
• Abdominal pain, nausea
• Dark urine • Weight loss • Fatigue

AIDS
• •

Bloodborne Pathogens

Reduces the body’s ability to fight off normal diseases Transmitted mainly through sexual contact and contaminated needles. Can be spread by contact with infected blood and body fluids. It can NOT be transmitted by touch HIV (which causes AIDS) is very fragile and survives only a short time outside the human body.

•

•

Fever, swollen glands

•Diarrhea, abdominal cramps •Extreme weight loss •Skin rash or lesions

What to do if Bloodborne Pathogens an exposure occurs
• Equipment and tools must be cleaned and decontaminated before servicing or being put back in use with a solution of ¼ cup of bleach per one gallon of water • Cover spill with paper towels or rags, then gently pour bleach solution over towels/rags and leave for at least ten minutes • Wash exposed are with soap and water

• Flush splashes to nose, mouth, or skin with water - irrigate eyes with water or saline
• Report the exposure to your supervisor • Get medical attention from a healthcare professional

Treatment should begin as soon as possible after exposure, within 24 hours, and no later than 7 days.

Bloodborne Pathogens Post-exposure follow-up
Your supervisor may ask you to assist with the following:
•

Document routes of exposure and how exposure occurred Record injuries from contaminated sharps in a sharps injury log, if required

•

•
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Provide consent to test blood soon after exposure
Obtain risk counseling and post-exposure protective treatment for disease when medically indicated

Summary

Bloodborne Pathogens

• OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens standard prescribes safeguards to protect you against the health hazards from exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials, and to reduce your risk from this exposure. • Implementation of this standard not only will prevent hepatitis B cases, but also will significantly reduce the risk of workers contracting AIDS, Hepatitis C, or other bloodborne diseases. • The best best precaution against contamination is to have safeguard work practices in place to eliminate the exposure to the hazard. When that is not possible, then the use of PPE is absolutely necessary.

Here are Some Final Thoughts

From We’re Into Safety Training Material

OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Safety

OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Safety

• • • • •

46-year-old elementary school teacher Colorado’s fifth Hantavirus victim in a year She lasted five days Lived on a ranch with husband and three children 200 cases nationwide

OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Safety
• After using toilet:

– Women 74% – Men 61%
• • • • New York City- 60% Chicago- 78% New Orleans- 69% Atlanta Braves Game-

– Women 89% – Men 46%
Pass the popcorn!!

Questions?

You’re Not Quite Done

Let’s Review

Final Question

Where is information available to you regarding Bloodborne Pathogen safety at your work place

Final Questions?


								
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