Screen Shots by ps94506

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									                              Screen Shots
                              CTS, Robert Ralston
                              Version June 9, 2006




General Laptop Display Configuration:

   1. PC Laptops with ATI graphics: Switching from extended desktop to mirroring
   2. Configuration of Intel Graphics PC Laptop Hardware
   3. Configuration of nVidia Graphics PC Laptop Hardware




Laptop Display Configuration for Dual Projection:

   4. QUICK START GUIDE: Dual Projection System, Art 204 & 217
   5. Dual Projection PC Laptop Configuration for Art 204 & 217: Using the VTBook
      card
   6. Dual Projection in Art 204 & Art 217 using a PC laptop and Matrox box
   7. Dual Projection in Art 204 & Art 217 using a Mac laptop and Matrox box



Other Laptop Configuration Issues:

   8. Dell Laptop Internet Connectivity with QuickSet
   9. Toshiba Satellite Laptop Start-Up Configuration
   10. PC Laptop Extended Desktop & PowerPoint Presenter View
   11. Laptop Memory and Performance
   12. Installation and Configuration of Mac Laptop Color Profiles




  ctsfile / ctsdoc / writing / screenshots
                  PC Laptops with ATI graphics:
            Switching from extended desktop to mirroring
                            CTS, Robert Ralston, April 25, 2006



       Mirroring (or cloned) is where the images on the laptop screen and the external
monitor or projector are identical. In a PowerPoint slide show, the same slide image will
display on both devices. Many faculty prefer this display mode for their presentations.1

        Extended desktop (or dual view) is where the external monitor or projector acts like a
second desktop, i.e. the cursor, windows, etc. can be dragged on or off of that screen from the
laptop screen. This display mode is required when using Presenter View (Presenter Tools on
the Mac), a feature in most modern versions of PowerPoint. When using Presenter View for a
PowerPoint slide show, students will see only the slide on the projection screen whereas you
will see the slide and your notes on the laptop, as well as other useful items.2

       Many ATI graphics controls allow easy selection of extended desktop mode but a
more complicated selection of mirrored mode.3 The following instructions illustrate changing
from extended to mirror mode. Note that in general you must have the external monitor or
projector attached in order to see all of the controls and make changes, i.e. you cannot
necessarily make appropriate changes beforehand, in your office before class.




General Instructions:

       1.   Open Display Properties/Settings and select Monitor 2.
       2.   Remove check from ‘Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor”.
       3.   Click ‘Apply’.
       4.   Select Monitor 1
       5.   Click the ‘Advanced’ button; click the ‘ATI Displays’ tab.
       6.   Enable the monitor by clicking the red tab on the left.
       7.   On ‘Panel’, click the blue button with a circle around a dot.
       8.   Click ‘Apply’.
Specific Instructions with Screen Shots: 4

        Open the Display Properties window, either by choosing Display from the Control
Panel (in Classic View)5 or right clicking on the desktop and choosing Properties. Then
select the Settings tab. Finally, click on the monitor box labeled ‘2’. In the figure below,
you can see that the ‘Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor’ box is checked (and the
‘Apply’ button is grayed-out) meaning that this particular laptop is already in extended
desktop mode.6

       Uncheck that “Extend my Windows …” box and click ‘Apply’. After a second or
two, there usually will no longer be any image on/from the external device.




       Select Monitor 1 as shown below and click the ‘Advanced’ button.7




                                                                                          2
        You will get the ATI control window with many tabs.8 Choose the ‘ATI Displays’
tab, as shown below. The red tab on Monitor means that that device, an external monitor or
projector, is not active.




        Click on that red tab to turn the monitor on. The tab will turn green and a tiny
‘desktop’ will appear on the small monitor. To the right of the laptop icon in ‘Panel’, click on
the ‘bulls-eye’ button to make sure it is selected. The circle and dot in the button should be
white rather than light blue. This ensures that the laptop screen is the primary device. Finally,
click ‘Apply’. After a few seconds, you will see a mirror image of the laptop screen on the
external monitor or projector.9




                                                                                               3
Endnotes:
1
    This document assumes other settings are already optimal.

         a.       Screen Resolution = XGA. A resolution of 1024 x 768, or XGA, works best
                  with most projectors. Both devices should have the same resolution, i.e. the
                  boxes representing the monitor should be the same size. Note that in
                  extended desktop mode the 2 devices can have different resolutions relative
                  to each other.

         b.       Relative position of monitors. The default position of Monitor 2 is to the
                  right of Monitor 1. Note that the Monitor 2 icon can be dragged into
                  different positions relative to Monitor 1, to represent the actual physical
                  placement of monitors when using extended desktop mode. The cursor will
                  move from one device to the other depending on this placement.

         c.       Color Quality = Highest (32 bit).

2
  When using Presenter View, it matters which device is designated as primary and which
one as secondary. Otherwise, you may find your notes being displayed on the projection
screen rather than on your laptop. Normally one leaves the laptop as the primary device. It is
easy to get the desired display result from settings in PowerPoint.
3
 The following behavior has really faked people out. They deselect ‘Extend my Windows
…’ and Apply that change. This typically removes any image from the projector. Then, they
use the Function and F-keys to toggle to both displays, thinking this will result in mirror
mode. Typically it does not. Instead, you will now find the ‘Extend my Windows …’ box
again checked for Monitor 2.
4
 These screen shots are from a Dell Latitude D610 with an ATI Mobility Radeon X300
graphics sub-system.
5
 With the Control Panel in Category View, select ‘Appearance and Themes’, and then
‘Change the screen resolution.’
6
 When in extended desktop mode, using the Function-Control Key (F8 in this case) will
provide a 3-way toggle: image only on laptop, image only on external device, or image on
both devices. Note that the extended desktop will appear only when both devices are enabled.
When only one device is enabled, either the laptop or the projector, then that image will
contain the ‘normal’ laptop desktop with tray, icons, etc.
7
 Note that Monitor 1 has that ‘Extend my Windows…’ checkbox checked. It is also grayed-
out so it cannot be de-selected. This behavior is probably so that there is always an image
somewhere, whether on the laptop or the external device.




                                                                                             4
8
 Below is an image of a ‘generic’ control window, i.e. it has no ‘ATI’ tabs. We must have
access to the ATI tabs in order to fully control the ATI hardware. If a generic window keeps
popping up, perhaps Monitor 2 has been selected, in mirror mode, before clicking on the
Advanced button. Or this could be an indication of a problem with the ATI driver software
(missing, corrupt) or a hardware problem.




9
 The screen below indicates mirroring with the external device as the primary and the laptop
as the secondary:




                                                                                               5
The screen below indicates extended desktop with the laptop as the primary and the external
device as the secondary. Note how the 2 blue buttons have changed from the mirrored mode:




                                                                                          6
          Configuration of Intel Graphics PC Laptop Hardware
                          CTS, Robert Ralston, March 2006


       Many of the newer PC laptops are coming with the Intel graphics hardware
rather than ATI or nVidia, although sometimes one can choose specific graphics
hardware at the time of purchase.

        One good thing with Intel hardware is that the Control Panel for it is very
straight forward compared to the controls for either the ATI or nVidia hardware. But
there are now two Control Panels that configure the graphics hardware, the legacy
control panel (Displays) and a second one, typically beginning with the word ‘Intel’.
Even though the Displays control panel works almost the same as before, it does not
offer the easier and fuller control provided by the new, second ‘Intel’ control panel,
one many users are not aware of.

       If you right-click on the desktop, the bottom item, like usual, is Properties. But
in the middle is a new option: Graphics Options. Under it is a Control Panel called
Graphics Properties… That newer Control Panel looks like this:




Here is where you can set the laptop for external device only (Monitor), laptop only
(Notebook), both displays or mirrored (Intel® Dual Display Clone), or have the
projector act like a second monitor where the cursor can be dragged between each
device (Extended Desktop).
       If the mirror mode is chosen (Intel® Dual Display Clone), then this Control
Panel changes to the one below, where you can specify which device is the Primary
and which is the Secondary. The default is to leave the laptop as the Primary. There
are situations where one might want to set the external device as the Primary, e.g. if
a video clip played correctly on the laptop but not on the projector.




   People generally do not see the new Intel Control Panel because when Control
Panel is opened in XP, the default view is Category View rather than Classic view.
And, in Category View, the new Intel Control Panel cannot be seen. If, however, you
switch to Classic View, then you can see the new Control Panel.




                                                                                     2
You can also get to the new Intel Control Panel through the Legacy Display
Control Panel as illustrated in the series of pictures below:

Select Settings and Advanced:




                                                                             3
Select Intel® Extreme Graphics




From here, you can select the Graphics Properties button to bring up that new
Control Panel. And you can also choose to Show Tray Icon to easily get to the
new Control Panel.




                                                                                4
        Configuration of nVidia Graphics PC Laptop Hardware
                         CTS, Robert Ralston, March 2006


       Our Dell Latitude C840s have the nVidia GeForce 440 Go graphics hardware.
With the most current driver as of Feb. 2006, it is easy to turn on extended desktop
mode but more complicated to get back to mirror mode. Although these instructions
and screen shots are from this specific laptop model, they will work for most nVidia
hardware.

       If the machine is in extended desktop mode, using the Fn-F8 toggle will keep
this mode. If you disable the extended desktop mode in Display Properties, and then
again toggle, the laptop will still be in the extended desktop mode !!

      Two steps are necessary to get a mirrored desktop back:

      1. Turn off extended desktop on the secondary device
      2. Select the primary device and enable clone mode.




Select device 2 (blue box with inner white box, which shows that the machine is in
extended mode) and uncheck the ‘Extend my Window desktop onto this monitor.”
This will make the Apply button active. Check Apply.
Select device 1 (blue box and inner white outline) and click Advanced.




Click the GeForce 440 Go tab.




                                                                         2
Wait for the small panel to slide out on the left which, sometimes, takes as much as
ten seconds the first time. Click on the ‘nView Display Mode’.




Note that the machine is still in ‘Standard (Dualview) mode, i.e. extended desktop
mode, in spite of the fact that you just disabled the extended desktop mode. Choose
the ‘Clone’ button and Apply.




                                                                                       3
Note that this is where one could also choose which device is the primary and which
the secondary, something which can help in some classroom situations, but a
difficult thing to explain to most users.




You will get this screen after clicking Apply from above.




You will get this screen after clicking OK from above.

After choosing Yes, you should have mirroring. And the Fn-F8 keys should toggle as
you would expect: laptop only, external device only, both in mirror mode.




                                                                                  4
                              QUICK START GUIDE
                        Dual Projection System, Art 204 & 217


What you need:
      a. A PC or Mac laptop with a CardBus32 slot. Most laptops purchased within
         the last couple of years will have this slot.
      b. You need to have backed up your laptop. Software needs to be installed,
         which always entails some risk.
      c. You need to have your laptop hardware address (also called Ethernet address
         or MAC) registered at http://computingaccounts.ucdavis.edu, if you plan to
         use Almagest or other internet resources in the classroom.
      d. Your laptop power adapter.
      e. You need the VTBook Card software installed. This can be done ahead of
         time with Leah and needs to be done one time only. Leah has the software on
         CD or it can be downloaded from the internet (http://www.villagetronic.com/).
         Be sure to choose the appropriate drivers. A complete installation of this
         software will require having the VTBook card.
      f. Your laptop video adapter to VGA (if it came with one, i.e. many Macs, some
         PCs).



Classroom Equipment needed: available from Leah
       a. Key for small cabinet on wall above media cabinet.
       b. Two VGA cables (or 2 DVI cables future possibility).
       c. One Ethernet cable (if using Almagest or other internet resources).
       d. One audio cable (if your presentation uses sound).
       e. VTBook Card + adapter from DVI to VGA (this is the second video
          connection to a second projector).
Classroom Hookup:

       a.   Unlock small cabinet on wall above media cabinet.
       b.   Put large screen down (watch out for obstructions below it).
       c.   Hookup VGA cable from laptop VGA port to Projector 1.
       d.   Insert VTBook card into laptop slot. Hookup second VGA cable from
            VTBook card to Projector 2.
       e.   Connect Ethernet cable from laptop to media cabinet.
       f.   Connect audio cable from your laptop headphone jack to audio jack below one
            of the projector buttons (if you need sound).
       g.   Connect laptop power brick to laptop and power strip on media cabinet.
       h.   Turn on both projectors (top power buttons; note: do not turn on the media
            cabinet-controlled projector).
       i.   Turn on laptop.
       j.   Select RGB (for VGA) with lower button for each projector
       k.   PC: mirror the PC laptop screen with the left hand projected image.
       l.   PC: extend the desktop to the right hand projected image.
       m.   PC: Auto hide the Task Bar and re-locate to right hand side of screen.
       n.   Mac: turn mirroring off. Arrange the 3 screens in a visually logical order (so
            that dragging cursor from screen to screen ‘makes sense’.
       o.   For all devices, either PC or Mac, select XGA resolution, i.e. 1024 x 768 and
            a refresh rate of 60 Hz or thereabouts.

At this point you should be able to drag the cursor across both projected images, and drag
windows from one side to the other.




Draft RR, CTS, December 19, 2005
     Dual Projection PC Laptop Configuration for Art 204 & 217
                      Using the VTBook card
                              Robert Ralston, CTS, February 7, 2006, draft




         These notes assume the use of the VTBook card, that all cables have been connected,
that the projectors are on, and that the user has logged onto their laptop account. At this point
there may or may not be any image on the projection screens but hopefully there is an image on
at least the laptop screen.

        The goal is to configure the laptop so that its desktop is extended to both projectors, in
the correct order, at the correct resolution, and at the correct height. Once this goal is achieved,
an Almagest window or PowerPoint can be opened, configured for dual projectors, and dragged
onto the 2 projection screens.

       The use of an extended desktop rather than mirroring the laptop with one projection
screen has been chosen for 2 reasons:
       1. This configuration is cross-platform, i.e. for both PCs and Macs.
       2. This configuration is much easier to achieve on many PCs, in contrast to having the
           laptop mirrored with one projection screen, and eliminates a possible subsequent
           problem of PC dock placement.

        The screen shots below are for a PC using an ATI or NVIDIA graphics card, not the
Intel Graphics Extreme card, which requires different screen shots. They are from a Dell
Latitude C840. Your configuration screens may look somewhat different but the main details
will normally be identical.1

       It is very important to get the laptop configuration correct before continuing forward
with Almagest or PowerPoint.


General Instructions:

       1. Open Display Properties
       2. Activate, extend, and apply to one projection screen.
       3. Activate, extend, and apply to the remaining projection screen.
       4. Move, if necessary, the second and third monitor icons to correspond to the physical
          placement of the projection screens, and apply. When correct, you will be able to
          move the cursor off the laptop and across both projection screens, as if all 3 screens
          were in a row.
       5. If necessary, configure all 3 devices for XGA resolution (1024 x 768).
       6. If necessary, position all three monitor icons so that they are horizontally aligned.
Specific Instructions with Screen Shots:

        Open Display Properties. There are at least 3 different ways to get the Display Properties
screen shown below:
              a. Right click on the desktop and choose Properties, then the Settings tab
              b. Choose Control Panel. If in XP Classic View, Choose Display and then the
                  Settings tab.
              c. Choose Control Panel. If in XP Categories view, Choose Appearance and
                  Themes, then the task ‘Change the screen resolution’.




        Note that there are 3 display devices, designated by the numbers 1, 3, and 2. Number 1 is
almost certainly the laptop screen (a default setting which, however, can be changed), while
numbers 3 and 2 represent the 2 projectors. One projector is being driven by the built-in VGA
laptop connector while the other is being driven from the VTBook card in the PC card slot.

        In this picture, all three devices are active, as indicated by the white box around each.
Note especially that monitor number 1 is selected because it has a blue box around it. A device
has to be selected before changes can be made to it. In Windows, a device becomes active only
if the desktop is extended onto it (i.e. on the PC, an external device is not considered active
when mirrored).

       Once a device is selected, various changes can be made to it such as activating it with an
extended desktop, changing its screen resolution, changing its color quality, and changing its
physical position relative to the other devices.




                                                                                                 2
       In the following screen shot, note that devices 2 and 3 are not active (dotted white boxes
and grayed out numbers), although number 2 has been selected. With monitor 2 selected, put a
check mark in the checkbox labeled: Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor.




        Look at the screen shot above. Once the checkbox called ‘Extend my Windows desktop
onto this monitor’ has been checked, the number 2 monitor icon changes in appearance to
active. However, device 2 is not really active until we press the Apply button at the bottom
right. After we Apply our requested change, we should see an image from one of the projectors.




                                                                                                3
        Do the same thing with the remaining monitor, in this case number 3. Select it, extend
the desktop to it, and Apply. Now we should have images on both projection screens. Note that
by ‘images’ I mean an extended desktop, i.e. perhaps just a background color with nothing else
on it, no icons, windows, etc.

       With all three monitors active and the laptop desktop extended onto the 2 projection
screens, we now need to identify which physical screen corresponds to the number 2 icon above
and which to the number 3 icon.

        Press the ‘Identify’ button. This will temporarily put a large number on each physical
screen. The laptop should show a number 1. The two projection screens could be in either
order, with the left-most screen showing a large number 2 and the other a number 3, or the
reverse, with the left-most screen showing a large number 3 and the other a number 2.

       The goal is to have the icons above, numbered 2 and 3, correspond to their physical
counterparts, the projection screens. Although we cannot easily move the projection screens or
projectors (one could switch the VGA cables but this might require a reboot of the laptop), we
can move the icons above. Note that the numbers above are in order from left to right, as 1, 2,
and 3. They may not be on your laptop, instead coming up as 1, 3, and 2.

       But the same principle applies: we want the middle icon to represent the left projection
screen and the right-most icon the right-most projection screen, regardless of their numbers.

        If the icons above are 2, 3 and the projection screens identify as 3, 2 (or if the icons
above are 3, 2 and the projection screens identify as 2, 3), then drag the right-most icon between
the other two. Press Apply and wait for the change to become active. Press Identify again. The
icon order should now match the screen order, from left to right.

        When the order is correct, you will be able to drag the cursor continuously across both
projection screens, from left to right and the reverse.



                                                                                                  4
        The next challenge is to set all resolutions equal to XGA (1024 x 768). Note that in the
screen shot below, the middle device, numbered 3, is set to a resolution larger than XGA,
namely, 1600 x 1200. If necessary, select each device, one by one, and set its resolution to
XGA.




       The final challenge is to get all 3 devices horizontally aligned. Note in the screen shot
below, device 2 is positioned below devices 1 and 3. This results in the problem that when
dragging the cursor from 3 to 2, the cursor will move to device 2 only from the lower half of
device 3, because that is the physical relationship of these 2 devices as represented by the icons.




                                                                                                   5
               When configured correctly, your Display Properties will look like the screen shot
below, except that the numbers 3 and 2 may be reversed.

               All three devices are:
                       a. active.
                       b. have an XGA resolution (1024 x 768).
                       c. aligned horizontally.




       And the Identify button has been used to verify, and correct if necessary, the physical
order of the projected images.

       Congratulations, the laptop configuration is complete!




Footnotes
       1
          Determining which graphics card your PC laptop has can be done, usually, through the
boot Setup screens, through the Advanced button in Displays Properties, through the vendor
factory configuration when available, or, sometimes, through the Hardware Device manager.
But there are many, many configurations. Another document will show, with screen shots, how
to identify your graphics card.




                                                                                                 6
 Dual Projection in Art 204 & Art 217 using a PC laptop and Matrox box
                          Draft, CTS, Robert Ralston, June 4, 2006


Required hardware: Matrox DualHeadToGo plus its power brick
                   3 VGA cables

Hardware hookup: The Matrox DualHeadToGo box has one VGA input connector and
two VGA output connectors. Using VGA cables, connect output 1 to projector 1, output 2 to
projector 2, and the input to the laptop VGA output. Be sure to plug in the power brick to the
Matrox box. Each projector must be set for RGB input rather than BNC or MD-1, using the
source buttons.

Software configuration:    Be sure to set the display configuration correctly before
opening up PowerPoint, Almagest, or any other application.

       The goal is to have the external monitor look to the laptop like two side-by-side
monitors, each at a resolution of 1024 x 768 or, actually, a single monitor at 2048 x 768. This
is accomplished by turning ‘mirroring’ off and turning on an ‘extended’ desktop.

        Many instructors prefer giving presentations in ‘mirror’ or ‘clone’ mode, where the
projected image looks the same as that on the laptop. In this mode the cursor moves
simultaneously on both the laptop screen and projected image, thus never ‘getting lost’.

        One can in fact use the ‘mirror’ mode while driving two projectors, in which case all
three images will look identical, one on the laptop screen and two on the projection screen.
This can be useful to deliver the same image so that a maximum number of students in a
large room can see the same image ‘straight on’. But the normal use of dual projection will
be to have different images, often for comparison, on the projection screen, and that will
required an ‘extended’ desktop.

        The extended desktop configuration means that you can drag your cursor across the
laptop screen and then onto the projected image (and back), a situation that frequently causes
confusion as your cursor ‘disappears’ from your laptop screen. Practice using this mode is
essential for ease of use in front of a class.

        The following screen shots assume that your laptop is set for ‘mirroring’. These
specific shots are from a laptop with ATI hardware but the pictures will look extremely
similar, even if you have Intel or NVIDIA hardware.
        Open up the Display Control panel to get the following window, and then choose the
‘Settings’ tab.




        By dragging the cursor over monitor 2, we see that it is ‘Not Active’. This means that
there either is no picture from the projector or there is a ‘mirror’ image of the laptop screen.
Our next step will be to enable the extended desktop mode.
        With monitor 2 selected (i.e., the external device, in this case the Matrox box), it has
a blue box around it. When we check the ‘Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor’ an
inner white rectangle then appears. You must then click the ‘Apply’ button.




        With monitor 2 still selected and in extended desktop mode, we then set the
resolution of monitor 2 to 2048 x 768, giving us that wide box. Many older PC laptops we
have tested do not allow this configuration although virtually all recent ones do.




        This is the desired configuration. You are now ready to open your application and
drag the window from the laptop to the projection screen where you can size it to fit the
entire screen.
 Dual Projection in Art 204 & Art 217 using a Mac laptop and Matrox box
                          Draft, CTS, Robert Ralston, June 4, 2006


Required hardware: Matrox DualHeadToGo plus its power brick
                   3 VGA cables

Hardware hookup: The Matrox DualHeadToGo box has one VGA input connector and
two VGA output connectors. Using VGA cables, connect output 1 to projector 1, output 2 to
projector 2, and the input to the laptop VGA output. Modern Mac laptops typically have a
DVI or mini-DVI output jack, thus requiring an adapter to VGA. Be sure to plug in the
power brick to the Matrox box. Each projector must be set for RGB input rather than BNC
or MD-1, using the source buttons.

Software configuration:    Be sure to set the display configuration correctly before
opening up PowerPoint, Almagest, or any other application.

       The goal is to have the external monitor look to the laptop like two side-by-side
monitors, each at a resolution of 1024 x 768 or, actually, a single monitor at 2048 x 768. This
is accomplished by turning ‘mirroring’ off and having an ‘extended’ desktop.

        The extended desktop configuration means that you can drag your cursor across the
laptop screen and then onto the projected image (and back), a situation that frequently causes
confusion as your cursor ‘disappears’ from your laptop screen. Practice using this mode is
essential for ease of use in front of a class.

        Open up Displays from System Preferences and click on ‘Gather Windows’ to get the
screen shown below (OS X 10.4). Note that there are 2 windows, the one called ‘Color LCD’
being for control of the laptop screen and the other, called ‘Display’ for control of the
external device, in this case the Matrox box.
       Click on the ‘Display’ window to bring it to the front. There should be a resolution of
2048 x 768 available, as shown below. This is assuming that ‘Mirror Displays’ is unchecked
as shown in the next screen shot after this one. Note that ‘Colors:’ is set to ‘Millions’ and the
‘Refresh Rate:’ to ’60 Hertz’.




      Going back to the laptop control window and choosing the ‘Arrangement’ tab, we
now see that the external device looks like a single wide monitor.




        This is the desired configuration. You are now ready to open your application and
drag the window from the laptop to the projection screen where you can size it to fit the
entire screen.




                                                                                                2
       The following screen shots show configurations, which you normally would avoid.
Note in the picture below that the two monitors can be positioned relative to each other. The
external wide monitor is now physically lower than the laptop screen.

        This means that one can no longer drag the cursor from the top right hand side of the
laptop screen onto the external projected image, although one still could do so by dragging
from the lower right hand side of the laptop. Dragging back to the laptop screen would work
only with the cursor at the upper left of the projected image.




        The screen shot below shows that the Mac menu bar can be positioned on either
device, in this case on the external image. This means that windows will open up on the
projection screen rather than the laptop screen. Such a configuration might be useful but you
should practice with it before class to verify that it behaves in a manner both useful and
logical to you.




                                                                                                3
               Dell Laptop Internet Connectivity with QuickSet
                             CTS, Robert Ralston, January 2006



        All of the factory-configured Dell laptops I’ve seen come without QuickSet, a
Dell application available on the drivers CD and Dell’s download site. If this software
is installed, it creates a new system tray icon (a blue ‘Q’ and orange ‘S’; look next to
the time in the screen shot below), allowing quick configuration of several things
including turning PowerPoint Presenter Mode on/off and turning the internal network
card on/off.




        Unfortunately, if the laptop owner does not see that new system tray icon and does not notice
the new Control Panel called ‘Internal NIC Configuration’ (see screen shot above), they may
inadvertently experience loss of Internet connectivity in the classroom.

         I found out about this new Control Panel while out on a QRT. The laptop had no Internet
connectivity. First I looked the usual way for the hardware address and active IP, using the ‘ipconfig
/all’ command within Command Prompt. Amazingly, the response back was that there was no NIC or
network interface card! Thinking that there must be a hardware problem, I opened Control Panels to
look at Network Connections, luckily noticed the new Control Panel, and fixed the problem by
activating the NIC.
         Examine the Internal NIC Configuration Control Panel below. The default configuration is to
disable the NIC when the laptop is running only on battery and there is no Ethernet cable plugged in,
which is a typical hookup sequence: the laptop is turned on before either the network cable or power
brick are connected. The laptop then boots up with the NIC turned off. If the user then connects the
power brick, this will normally activate the NIC. If, however, they decide to run on battery, chances
are the NIC will remain off.




        Fortunately, the default configuration will display notification messages as shown below,
which, hopefully, the user will notice and take corrective action if the NIC is off and they need it on.
This Control Panel does provide an easy way to check the status of the NIC.




                                                                                                           2
3
             Toshiba Satellite Laptop Start-Up Configuration
                        CTS, Robert Ralston, February 2006


      Without an external VGA device attached, the laptop would request password
access on the laptop screen. But when connected to a projector, the laptop would
always request access on the projected image rather than the laptop screen.

       When in a classroom, the instructor, initially, is typically looking towards the
class and away from the projection screen, so they sometimes do not see what they
need to from the projected image. This is very much like having an extended
desktop and ‘losing the cursor’ because of not looking at the projection screen.

      It is unknown which models of Toshiba Satellite function like this other than
model M55.

       Configuration is done, when booted into XP, through a program called
Toshiba Assist, which will bring up the screen shown below. Click on the ‘Optimize’
tab on the left.
        In this screen, you can check ‘Auto-Selected’ to have the access screen appear only
on the laptop screen, even when an external projector is attached.




       There were some older Dell laptops that had a similar power on setting but it could be
accessed only through the BIOS settings, something many users are not aware of.
       PC Laptop Extended Desktop & PowerPoint Presenter View
                          CTS, Robert Ralston, February 6, 2006



There are two requirements:

       a. Put laptop into extended display mode (Dualview) with both screens set for
          XGA (1024 x 768).
       b. In PowerPoint, user Presenter View and show slides on monitor 2.1



1. Set laptop for extended display mode:

       a.   Go to Display Properties / Settings
       b.   Select the number 2 monitor
       c.   Check ‘Extend my Windows desktop onto this monitor; click Apply.
       d.   If necessary, set ‘Screen resolution’ for 1024 x 768 for both.2


2. Set PowerPoint for “Show Presenter View’:

       a. In PowerPoint, go to Slide Show / Set up Show…
       b. Under ‘Multiple monitors’ check Show Presenter View’.
       c. Under ‘Display slide show on:’ select Monitor 2.




1
  This setting assumes that the laptop is the primary monitor, which is the default setting.
However, most video configuration windows allow one to choose either device as the primary
which then makes the other device the secondary or Monitor 2. So one could have the projector
set as the primary in which case one would then choose to show the slide show on the primary.


2
  Almost every general assignment classroom projector gives the best picture when displayed at
a resolution of XGA, or 1024 x 768. With lower resolutions (e.g. 800x600) pixel information is
not used and the whole PowerPoint slide will not fit on the screen. With higher resolutions (e.g.
SXGA or 1280 x 1024) not enough information is available to fill the screen so that algorithms
guess and fill in the missing information. Some algorithms work better than others.
Screen shots: Setting extended desktop mode

You get to this window by either:
      a. right-clicking on the desktop and selecting Properties, or
      b. choosing Display from the Control Panels (XP classic view).




You get to this window by either:
      a. Selecting the Settings tab on above window, or
      b. Selecting Appearance and Themes / Choose the screen resolution (XP
          Categories view).




In this shot, the cursor was moved over Display 2, temporarily displaying it is as Not
Active. Note that Display 2 is also not selected, i.e. it is not dark blue. This
configuration normally indicates either mirroring or nothing through the projector.
                                                                                         2
In the window below, Display 2 has been selected (it turned blue) and a checkbox has
been checked: Extend my Windows display onto this monitor. To complete this
process, you must click Apply.




At this point, the laptop and display are in extended desktop (Dualview) mode. The
projector is acting like a ‘second’ monitor. Note that both are in XGA resolution, or
1024x768, which is the best setting for all of the general assignment classroom
projectors.

Normally, that second monitor would be on your desk and its physical position relative
to your laptop (or desktop) would matter. For example, you can drag your cursor and
windows between screens, so you would want the physical position of the monitors to
equal the choice above, i.e. have the second monitor positioned to the right of the first
one and at the same height.

If you had your second monitor located physically above your first monitor, then you
could drag the monitor 2 icon above number 1 and apply that setting, after which you
could drag your cursor vertically between the two devices.




                                                                                            3
Screen shots: Selecting Presenter View from PowerPoint settings

You get to this window by launching PowerPoint and then selecting Set Up Show under
Slide Show. Click the checkbox next to Show Presenter View.




If the laptop is in mirror mode (where the projected image is the same as the laptop
image, then you will get the following message:




The Presenter View works only in extended desktop mode, as was set previously.

With Show Presenter View checked, we need to tell PowerPoint where to display the
slide show via the pop-down menu ‘Display slide show on:’. The default setting is for
the laptop display to be the primary monitor and the external device (projector or
second monitor) to be Monitor 2. Thus the setting below is correct, to have the slide
show through the projector.




                                                                                        4
                         Laptop Memory and Performance
                            CTS, Robert Ralston, February 2006


        If Windows XP is running very slowly, one reason might be insufficient memory or
RAM. Another symptom could be that a PowerPoint presentation loads very slowly or that
display through a projector is erratic, where some slides show only on the projector or only
on the laptop screen even though in mirror mode.

       Although XP will run with 128 MB of RAM, the result will be sluggish operation, as
the machine labors, swapping code and data from hard drive to memory and back. The
following experiment suggests having a minimum of 256 MB but with RAM prices generally
so cheap, 512 MB is recommended. When memory-intensive applications are used, like
Photoshop, the more memory the better, unless battery life is a crucial consideration.

       Note that there are a limited number of memory slots, usually 2 in a laptop.
Sometimes laptops have a single user-accessible memory slot since the second slot is factory
loaded. When upgrading memory, be sure to first understand what the laptop already has in it
because you may need to remove a memory module already installed. There is a useful
“Memory Advisor™ Tool” at: http://www.crucial.com.

      By using the switch /maxmem=<value> in the boot.ini file, you can force the
hardware to recognize less memory. I’ve tried the following experiment on an old 700 MHz
Gateway. It has 512 MB of RAM.

         I sequentially decreased RAM in 64MB increments, rebooted, and then timed how
long it took to fully boot. Although these figures were approximate, there was a definite
breakpoint for this machine where boot time virtually doubled, somewhere below about 192
MB. Although not tested, I would think that increased boot time would manifest itself in
virtually all other performance parameters. This machine was not compromised in having
insufficient hard disk space for the swap file.

        The following articles are good references: Microsoft Knowledge Base articles
Q170756 and Q108393. The following screen shots demonstrate finding and modifying the
boot.ini file. After experimenting, be sure to restore your original configuration.
right-click on Computer, select properties




select Advanced from above




                                             2
select Startup and Recovery Settings from above




select Edit




an example boot.ini file modified with the /maxmem switch




                                                            3
     Installation and Configuration of Mac Laptop Color Profiles
                            CTS, Robert Ralston, Jan. 2006


         A color profile is a small text file used by the operating system to correct the
signals going to a monitor or projector in order to drive them with maximum color
fidelity. These files can be copied and dragged into folders like any other file
(depending on the privilege level of the OS X user). Once the external projector is
attached, that profile will have to be selected.

       Like fonts, color profiles exist in multiple locations under OS X. The screen
shots below show the 3 principle locations, which correspond to these levels:
System, Computer, and User (using the terminology from ColorSync).

       We recommend not changing files at the System level. The normal place to
put color profiles will be at the Computer level unless it is desired, on a multi-user
system, to have specific profiles available only to specific users.

       The path at the Computer level is: Macintosh HD / Library / ColorSync /
Profiles / Displays /. Installation is simply dragging the supplied color profile file into
the Displays folder.


System Level




Computer Level




User Level
        Once the appropriate color profiles have been copied to the hard drive, they need to
be selected when an external device is attached.

        The screen shot below is from a PowerBook G4, running OS X 10.4, in mirror mode,
and attached to a Hitachi CP-X1200 projector, a model installed in many UCD general
assignment classrooms. The ‘Gather Windows’ button has been clicked.

       Open up System Preferences and select Displays. Note the two control windows:
‘Color LCD’ on top of ‘LCD PROJECTOR’ (you get two control windows only when an
external device is attached). The laptop screen is always controlled by a window called
‘Color LCD’, whereas the attached projector can have a variety of names, with ‘VGA
Display’ being a typical one. There are 2 separate windows because the characteristics of
each display, including color, can be individually controlled.




        In the picture below, the LCD PROJECTOR window has been selected as well as the
Color tab on both windows. We can now see the various color profiles available for each
device. By clicking on any of the Display Profiles in the LCD PROJECTOR window, you
will immediately see the change in color in the image on the projection screen. Likewise,
selecting any of the available profiles in the Color LCD window will immediately change the
color displayed on the laptop screen. If any particular profile is satisfactory, then use it. Or
look for and select the profile made for a specific classroom.
        In the picture below, there is a suggested profile, called LCD PROJECTOR. All the
other profiles are no longer showing because the ‘Show profiles for this display only’ box
has been checked. OS X is suggesting this profile due to communication between the laptop
and the projector. Sometimes these suggested profiles work well. In general, however, a
profile generated for a specific classroom will work the best.
         Examine the picture below. It shows the path for profiles at the User level. However,
there is no ColorSync folder as expected in the user Library. A ColorSync folder gets
installed when certain Adobe applications, like PhotoShop, are installed. You can, however,
still install the profile at the Computer level, as originally suggested.

								
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