COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VE by ps94506

VIEWS: 209 PAGES: 190

									                                        Revised
                                       07/09/09
                            *Consent Calendar Item C added*
COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                 Board of Trustees Meeting

                               Tuesday, July 14, 2009
                                     6:00 p.m.

                                    Location
             Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                              43-420 Trader Place
                                   Indio, CA
                                 (760) 342-8287

                                       AGENDA

Assistance for those with disabilities: If you have a disability and need accommodation to
participate in the meeting, please call the Clerk of the Board at (760) 342-8287 for
assistance so the necessary arrangement can be made.

Call to Order – Bruce Underwood, President

Pledge of Allegiance

Roll Call

1.    Confirmation of Agenda

2.    Public Hearing for Benefit Assessment

      1.     Resolution 2009-11 approving Engineer’s Report, Confirming
             Diagram and Assessment, and Ordering the Levy of Assessments for
             fiscal year 2009-10 for the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector
             Control District Mosquito, Fire Ant and Disease Control Assessment
             fiscal year 2009-10. (Pg. 1)

      2.     Close Public Hearing – President Underwood

      3.     Resolution 2009-11 approving Engineer’s Report, Confirming
             Diagram and Assessment, and Ordering the Levy of Assessments for
             fiscal year 2009-10 for the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector
                Control District Mosquito, Fire Ant and Disease Control Assessment -
                David I’Anson, Finance Manager (Pg. 4)


3.      Approval of Minutes for June 9, 2009, Special Board Meeting (Pg. 9)
        Approval of Minutes for June 9, 2009, Board Meeting (Pg. 10)

4.      Public Comment
        (Note: Those wishing to address the Board should complete a Public
        Comment Card and provide it to the Clerk of the Board.)

        Non-Agenda Items: Anyone wishing to address the Board on items not on
        the agenda should do so at this time. Each presentation is limited to no more
        than 3 minutes.

        Agenda Items: Comments should be made when the agenda item is called.
        Each presentation is limited to no more than 3 minutes.

5.      Announcements

6.      Correspondence (Pg. 19)
             • MVCAC Newsletter – Summer 2009 – Article: CVMVCD Finance
               Department Wins Award
             • Desert Hot Springs Response to Grand Jury Report
             • MVCAC Newsletter – Summer 2009 – Article: New Technology at
               CVMVCD (Attached to GIS Report)

7.      Approval of Expenditures for June 6 - 30, 2009 and July 1, 2009 (Pg. 25)

8.      Board Reports
        A.   President’s Report – President Underwood
        B.   Finance Committee – Trustee Howell, Chair (Pg. 35)

9.      Consent Calendar
        A.   Approval of vacation for General Manager, August 17-21, 2009. In
             the absence of the General Manager, the Finance Manager, David
             I’Anson will be designated as Acting General Manager to address any
             issues that may arise. – General Manager, Branka B. Lothrop.

        B.       Proposed policy regarding Board of Trustee meeting absences –
                 Branka Lothrop, General Manager and Steven B. Quintanilla,
                 Legal Counsel (Pg. 39)
Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda, July 14, 2009 – Page 2
        C.      Approval to renew the annual insurance policy with AVQuest
                Insurance Company, for the non-owned commercial aircraft, in an
                amount not to exceed $9,460.00 from budget line #6000.01.205
                Property and Liability Insurance. – James Saulnier Operations
                Manager (Attachment)

10. Old Business
    A.    Approval to go out to bid and award the lowest responsible bidder for
          soil removal/distribution in an amount not to exceed $40,000, from
          Thermal Facility Fund #3955.12.000, Thermal Remediation Project –
          Work Plan #2008-09-16 – Byron Jessie, Fleet/Facilities Supervisor
          (Pg. 43)

        B.      Approval of the Quarterly Update to the Coachella Valley Mosquito
                and Vector Control District Work Plan – David I’Anson, Finance
                Manager (Pg. 47)

        C.      Approval for Trustees attending the California Special Districts
                Association Strategic Planning for Special Districts Workshop August
                5, 2009, in San Diego, to be reimbursed for one nights lodging
                including meals at the regular federal per diem for San Diego of $203
                each from Fund #6110.01.250, Trustee Travel – President
                Underwood and Branka B. Lothrop, General Manager (Pg. 48)

11. New Business
    A.   Discussion and action relating to ratification of the Tentative
         Agreement between the District and employees in the Clerical,
         Professional, Supervisory, and Management Bargaining Units
         represented by Teamsters – Jeffrey Freedman, Don Jeffers, and
         Branka B. Lothrop, General Manager (Pg. 51)

        B.      Consideration of a proposed Public Records policy that will permit the
                posting of certain public documents that are subject to disclosure
                under the California Public Records Act or any other applicable law
                on the CVMVCD web site at the direction of the Board of Trustees or
                at the discretion of the General Manager – General Manager,
                Branka B. Lothrop and Legal Council, Steve B. Quintanilla (Pg.
                52)



Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda, July 14, 2009 – Page 3
        C.      Proposed change in Board of Trustees regular meeting schedule to
                exclude the month of August – Branka B. Lothrop, General
                Manager and Steven B. Quintanilla, Legal Counsel (Pg. 55)

        D.      Approval and /or Discussion of Resolution No. 2009-12 authorizing
                the General Manager and Finance Manager to Approve Transfer of
                Funds between the District’s Desert Commercial Accounts - David
                I’Anson, Finance Manager (Pg. 57)

        E.       Approval and /or Discussion of Resolution No. 2009-14 Establishing
                 a New Policy and Procedures Regarding the Expenditures of the
                 District - David I’Anson, Finance Manager (Pg. 59)

        F.       Approval and/or Discussion of Resolution 2009–15 Establishing
                 Signature Approval for Checks Written from District Accounts -
                 David I’Anson, Finance Manager (Pg. 61)
12.     Trustee Comments, Requests for Future Agendas Items and/ or Staff
        Actions
        The Board may not legally take action on any item presented at this time
        other than to direct staff to investigate a complaint or place an item on a
        future agenda unless (1) by a majority vote, the Board determines that an
        emergency situation exists, as defined by Government Code Section 54956.5,
        or (2) by a two-thirds vote, the board determines that the need for action
        arose subsequent to the agenda being posted as required by Government
        Code Section 54954.2(a). Each presentation is limited to no more than 3
        minutes.

13.     Report of District Activities (Pg. 65)
        A.   General Manager
        B.   District Programs; progress and events since last Board meeting.
             Reports by:
             1. Finance
             2. Human Resources
             3. Community Outreach
             4. Biocontrol, Vector and Disease Surveillance
             5. Field Operations
             6. Fleet and Facilities
             7. Safety Compliance Report
             8. IT and GIS

14.     Informational Items
Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda, July 14, 2009 – Page 4
        A.      Conferences, Trainings, and Seminars – Anita Jones, Human
                Resources Manager (Pg. 105)

        B.      Annual research reports from University of California Riverside,
                Davis and The Texas A&M University System, for FY 2008/2009. -
                Jeremy Wittie, Vector Ecologist (Pg. 112)



        C.      Staff reports from:
                Special District and Local Government Institute, Administration
                Seminar, June 18-19, 2009, Seaside, California (Pg. 124)

        D.      Report of Trustee’s Attendance at Conference (Pg. 125)

15.     Legislative Update
        A.    Legislative Update – Branka B. Lothrop, General Manager (Pg.
              129)

16.     Closed Session
        A.   CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Labor Negotiators Regarding
             Labor Negotiations Pursuant to Government Code § 54957.6. District
             Negotiators: Branka Lothrop, Don Jeffers and Jeffrey Freedman.
             California Teamsters Local 911 Negotiator: Ray Whitmer

        B.       CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel Regarding
                 Existing Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) Complaint
                 Pursuant to Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name:
                 California School Employees Association & its Chapter 2001 v.
                 Coachella Valley Vector Control District; PERB Case No. LA-CE-
                 493-M

        C.       CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel Regarding
                 Potential Exposure to Litigation Pursuant to Government Code §
                 54956.9, subd. (b). Number of Potential Cases: Four.

        D.       CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel Regarding
                 Existing Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) Complaint
                 Pursuant to Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name:
                 California School Employees Association & its Chapter 2001 v.
                 Coachella Valley Vector Control District; PERB Case No. LA- CE-
                 123-M and LA-CE-178-M
Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda, July 14, 2009 – Page 5
        E.      CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel Regarding
                Existing Workers Compensation Claim Pursuant to Government Code
                § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name: Robert Mann v. Coachella Valley
                Vector Control District; Case No. WCAB No. RIV 0080446

        F.       CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel Regarding
                 Existing Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) Complaint
                 Pursuant to Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name:
                 California School Employees Association & its Chapter 2001 v.
                 Coachella Valley Vector Control District; PERB Case No. LA-CE-
                 511-M

17.     Adjournment


At the discretion of the Board, all items appearing on this agenda, whether or not
expressly listed for action, may be deliberated and may be subject to action by the Board.

All public records relating to an agenda item on this agenda are available for public
inspection at the time the record is distributed to all, or a majority of all, members of the
Board. Such records shall be available at the District office located at 43420 Trader
Place, Indio, California


************************************************************************
                           Certification of Posting

I certify that on July 9, 2009, I posted a copy of the foregoing agenda near the regular
meeting place of the Board of Trustees of the Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector
Control District, said time being at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting of the Board
of Trustees (Government Code Section 54954.2)

Executed at Indio, California, on July 9, 2009.


_________________________________
Crystal D. Garcia, Clerk of the Board




Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda, July 14, 2009 – Page 6
                                            Section

                                              2




          Public Hearing




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009



Agenda Topic: Public Hearing
Resolution 2009-11 approving Engineer’s Report, Confirming Diagram and Assessment, and
Ordering the Levy of Assessments for fiscal year 2009-10 for the Coachella Valley Mosquito
and Vector Control District Mosquito, Fire Ant and Disease Control Assessment – David
I’Anson, Finance Manager

Background:
Resolution No. 2009-09, accepted by the Board of Trustees June 9, 2009, approves the intention
to levy assessments for fiscal year 2009-10, preliminarily approving engineer's report, and
providing for notice of hearing for the CVMVCD mosquito, fire ant, and disease control
assessment. Resolution No. 2009-11, approves the Engineer’s Report and orders the levy of the
assessment.

In 2005, Coachella Valley property owners approved a yearly fee of $16.00 per residential unit
for the Mosquito, Red Imported Fire Ant, Vector and Disease Control Measure by 74.19%, the
highest approval rating for a similar measure in the State of California that year. Included in the
voter approval was an inflation escalator allowing for a 3% per year inflationary increase to the
assessment. State law requires the District to renew the base assessment and any inflationary
increase each year through a public hearing process.

The District’s Board is now conducting a public hearing to consider the assessments for the
2009–2010 fiscal year to fund its programs and services. The District provides services and
programs for surveillance, disease prevention, control of vectors and abatement. The mosquito
abatement, vector control, and disease prevention projects and programs include, but are not
limited to, source reduction such as, ground and aerial control applications, disease monitoring,
public education, and research as well as maintenance, and operating expenses. The District’s
services encompass approximately 2,400 square miles and are provided to properties
accommodating over 400,000 permanent residents with a seasonal influx of over 100,000 people.

The majority of the District’s funding is generated by a percentage of the 1% property tax
collected from Coachella Valley property owners. Any property owner who feels that the
assessment levied on the subject property is in error as a result of incorrect information being
used to apply the foregoing method of assessment, may file a written appeal with the General
Manager of the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District or his or her designee.
Any such appeal is limited to correction of an assessment during the then current Fiscal Year or,
if before July 1, the upcoming fiscal year.

In each subsequent year for which an assessment will be levied, the Board must;
    •   Preliminarily approve at a public meeting a budget for the upcoming fiscal year’s costs
        and services;

    •   Preliminarily approve at a public meeting an updated annual Engineer’s Report, and;

    •   Provide an updated assessment roll listing all parcels and their proposed assessments for
        the upcoming fiscal year and;

    •   Call for the publication in a local newspaper of a legal notice of the intent to continue
        the assessments for the next fiscal year and set the date for the noticed public hearing.
        At the annual public hearing, members of the public can provide input to the Board prior
        to the Board’s decision on continuing the services and assessments for the next fiscal
        year.

The yearly assessment is subject to an annual adjustment tied to the Consumer Price Index-U for
the Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County Area as of December of each succeeding year (the
“CPI”), with a maximum annual adjustment not to exceed 3%. The yearly assessment rate per
single family equivalent benefit unit for the Mosquito, Fire Ant and Disease Control Assessment
may increase in future years by an amount equal to the annual change in the CPI, not to exceed
3% per year. In the event that the annual change in the CPI exceeds 3%, any percentage change
in excess of 3% can be cumulatively reserved and can be added to the annual change in the CPI
for years in which the CPI change is less than 3%.

The assessments for 2008 – 2009 were levied at the yearly rate of $10.55 per single family
equivalent benefit unit as described in the Engineer’s Report for fiscal year 2008 – 2009 with
estimated total annual revenue of approximately $1.8 million.

The fiscal year 2009-2010 assessment budget includes:

    •   Outlays for West Nile Virus
    •   Surveillance and mosquito control
    •   RIFA control
    •   Capital equipment
    •   Supplies
    •   Disease testing programs
    •   Other vector programs

The annual CPI change for the Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County Area from December
2007 to December 2008 is 0.11%, which is less than the 3% maximum allowed annual increase.
The maximum CPI increase that can be used in fiscal year 2009-10 is 3%. This percentage is the
sum of 0.11% and 2.88% of the total 7.48% reserved cumulative CPI increase over the actual 3%
maximum collected in prior years. Including the authorized annual adjustment, the maximum
authorized assessment rate for fiscal year 2009-10 is $18.00 per single family equivalent benefit
unit. The proposed fiscal year 2009-10 assessment rate per single family equivalent benefit unit
for the Mosquito, Fire Ant and Disease Control Assessment is $9.14 which is almost 50 percent
less than the maximum allowable rate.

Since property owners in the assessment ballot proceeding conducted in 2005 approved the
initial assessment including the CPI adjustment schedule, the assessment may be levied annually
and may be adjusted by up to the maximum annual CPI adjustment without any additional
assessment ballot proceeding.

Recommendation:
Staff recommends the acceptance and adoption of Resolution #2009–11, which reduces the
annual benefit assessment amount to $9.14 per single family equivalent family unit, in order to
properly finalize and adopt the assessment proceedings accordingly defined in Proposition 218.


Fiscal Impact:
By ordering the levy of assessments the District will receive an additional amount approximated
at $1.4 million for the fiscal year 2009-10 Budget.
                                                                Riverside County Fund No. 68-4556

                               RESOLUTION NO. 2009-11

        A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE
   COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT

                         A RESOLUTION
     APPROVING ENGINEER’S REPORT, CONFIRMING DIAGRAM AND
                        ASSESSMENT, AND
              ORDERING THE LEVY OF ASSESSMENTS
                     FOR FISCAL YEAR 2009-10
FOR THE COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
       MOSQUITO, FIRE ANT AND DISEASE CONTROL ASSESSMENT


 WHEREAS, the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District (“District”) was
 established in 1928 as an independent special district by the Riverside County Board of
 Supervisors; and

 WHEREAS, the mission of the District is to reduce the risk of disease transmission by
 mosquitoes and other vectors for the residents and visitors of the Coachella Valley; and

 WHEREAS, the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District is authorized,
 pursuant to the authority provided in Health and Safety Code Section 2082 and Article XIIID
 of the California Constitution, to levy assessments for mosquito, vector and disease control
 services; and

 WHEREAS, the District provides vector control services which includes a system of public
 improvements and services intended to provide for the surveillance, prevention, abatement
 and control of vectors as provided under Proposition 218 (“Services”); and such vector
 surveillance and control services provide tangible public health benefits, reduced nuisance
 benefits and other special benefits to the public and properties with the areas of service; and

 WHEREAS, an assessment for mosquito, fire ant, vector and disease control projects and
 services has been given the distinctive designation of the “Mosquito, Fire Ant, and Disease
 Control Assessment” (“Assessment”), and is primarily described as encompassing the
 District jurisdictional boundaries, which covers nine incorporated cities along the I-10
 Freeway (Cathedral City, Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indian Wells, Indio, La Quinta,
 Palm Desert, Palm Springs, and Rancho Mirage), and the unincorporated areas in the greater
 Coachella Valley from the San Bernardino County line to the north to the Imperial and San
 Diego County lines to the south; and

 WHEREAS, the Assessment was authorized by an assessment ballot proceeding conducted
 in 2005 and approved by 74.19% of the weighted ballots returned by property owners, and
 such assessments were levied by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella Valley Mosquito and
 Vector Control District by Resolution No. 2005-04 passed on July 26, 2005;

 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella
 Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District that:
         SECTION 1. Willdan Financial Services, the Engineer of Work, prepared an engineer’s
         report (the "Report") in accordance with Article XIIID of the California Constitution and
         Section 2082, et seq., of the Health and Safety Code for the Assessment. The Report have
         been made, filed with the secretary of the board and duly considered by the Board and are
         hereby deemed sufficient and preliminarily approved. The Report shall stand as the
         Engineer's Report for all subsequent proceedings under and pursuant to the foregoing
         resolution.

         SECTION 2. On June 9, 2009, this Board adopted Resolution No. 2009-09 to continue to
         levy and collect Assessments for fiscal year 2009-10, preliminarily approving the
         Engineer’s Report, and providing for notice of hearing on July 14, 2009, at the hour of
         six o'clock (6:00) p.m. at the meeting chamber of the Coachella Valley Mosquito and
         Vector Control District headquarters located at 43-420 Trader Place, Indio, California,
         92201.

         SECTION 3. At the appointed time an place the hearing was duly and regularly held, and
         all persons interested and desiring to be heard were given an opportunity to be heard, and
         all matters and things pertaining to the levy of Assessment were fully heard and
         considered by this Board, an all oral statements and all written protests or
         communications were duly heard, considered and overruled, and this Board there by
         acquired jurisdiction to order the levy of assessment prepared by and made a part of the
         Engineer’s Report to pay the costs and expenses thereof.

         SECTION 4. The above recitals are true and correct

         SECTION 5. The public interest, convenience and necessity require that the levy be
         made.

         SECTION 6. The Engineer’s Report for the Assessment together with the proposed
         assessment roll for fiscal year 2009-10 is hereby confirmed and approved.

         SECTION 7. That based on the oral and documentary evidence, including the Engineer’s
         Report offered and received at the public hearing, the Board expressly finds and
         determines that: (a) each of the several lots and parcels of land subject to the Assessment
         will be specially benefited by the services to be financed by the assessment proceeds in at
         least the amount of the assessment apportioned against such lots and parcels of land,
         respectively; (b) that the Assessment is levied without regard to property valuation; and
         (c) that there is substantial evidence to support , and the weight of the evidence
         preponderates in favor of, said finding and determination as to special benefit to property
         from the mosquito, fire ant, vector and disease control services to be financed with
         assessment proceeds.

         SECTION 8. That assessments for fiscal year 2009-10 shall be levied at the rate of
         NINE DOLLARS AND FORTEEN CENTS ($9.14) per single-family equivalent benefit
         unit as specified in the Engineer’s Report for fiscal year 2009-10 with estimated total
         annual assessment revenues as set forth in the Engineer’s Report; and

         SECTION 9. That the mosquito, fire ant and disease control services to be financed with
         assessment proceeds described in the Engineer’s Report are hereby ordered.
Coachella Valley MVCD Resolution No.2009-11                                                    Page 2
         SECTION 10. No later than August 10th following such adoption, the Board shall file a
         certified copy of the diagram and assessment and a certified copy of this resolution with
         the Auditor of the County of Riverside (“County Auditor”). Upon such filing, the County
         Auditor shall enter on the County assessment roll opposite each lot or parcel of land the
         amount of assessment thereupon as shown in the assessment. The assessments shall be
         collected at the same time and in the same manner as County taxes are collected and all
         the laws providing for collection and enforcement shall apply to the collection and
         enforcement of the assessments. After collection by the County, the net amount of the
         assessments, after deduction of any compensation due the County for collection, shall be
         paid to the Mosquito, Fire Ant and Disease Control Assessment.

         SECTION 11. All revenues from Assessments shall be deposited in a separate fund
         established under the distinctive designation of the Coachella Valley Mosquito and
         Vector Control District, Mosquito, Fire Ant and Disease Control Assessment.

         SECTION 12. The Assessment, as it applies to any parcel, may be corrected, cancelled
         or a refund granted as appropriate, by order of the Board of Trustees of the District. Any
         such corrections, cancellations or refunds shall be limited to the current fiscal year.

The foregoing Resolution was PASSED and ADOPTED by the Board of Trustees of the
Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District at a regular meeting thereof held on July
14, 2009, at the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District headquarters located at
43-420 Trader Place, Indio, California, 92201.


AYES:

NOES:

ABSTAINED:

ABSENT:

                                              ____________________________________________
                                              Bruce Underwood, President, Board of Trustees
                                              Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District

    ATTEST:
                                              ____________________________________________
                                              Gary Howell, Secretary/Treasurer, Board of Trustees
                                              Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District




Coachella Valley MVCD Resolution No.2009-11                                                         Page 3
                                            Section

                                              3




                  Minutes




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                                                            DRAFT
              COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                            Special Board of Trustees Meeting

                                                            June 9, 2009

Call To Order:
President Underwood called the meeting to order at 5:05 p.m.

Pledge of Allegiance:
Trustee Baker led the Pledge of Allegiance.

Roll Call:
Those present at roll call: President Underwood, Vice-President Lock, Secretary/Treasurer Howell,
Trustees Baker, Cox, Keck, Trover, and Walker. Also present were General Manager Branka Lothrop,
Clerk of the Board Crystal Garcia, Information Systems Analyst Edward Prendez, and Legal Counsel
Steven Quintanilla. Trustees Gilbert, Hernandez, and Hobart were absent.

1.       Confirmation of Agenda

2.       Public Comment:
         Public comment made by Teamsters Representative Ray Whitmer regarding Closed Session Item A.

3.       Closed Session
         A.    CLOSED SESSION: Conference with labor negotiators. [Pursuant to Government Code
               section 54957.6] Agency designated representatives: Branka Lothrop, Don Jeffers, and
               Jeffrey Freedman. Employee Organizations: California Teamsters Local 911.

         B.        CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel -- Anticipated Litigation. Exposure to
                   litigation pursuant to Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (b). Number of potential cases:
                   One

         C.        CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel -- Existing Litigation Pursuant to
                   Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name: California School Employees
                   Association & Its Chapter 2001 v. Coachella Valley Vector Control District Case Number:
                   Public Employees Relations Board Case Nos. LA-CE-123-M and LA-CE-178-M

         D.        CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel – Existing Litigation Pursuant to
                   Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name: Robert Mann v. Coachella Valley
                   Vector Control District; Riverside County Superior Court Case No. (Pending)

         Returning from Closed Session, President Underwood announced that there was no reportable
         action in regards to Items 3.A, B, and D. In regards to Item 3C the Board voted unanimously to not
         appeal the PERB decision.

4.       Trustee Comments:
         None.

5.       Adjournment:
         The meeting was adjourned by President Underwood at 6:20 p.m.

Special Board of Trustees Meeting – June 9, 2009 – Page 1
                                                    DRAFT
        COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                         Board of Trustees Meeting

                                                    June 9, 2009

Call To Order:
President Underwood called the meeting to order at 6:30 p.m.

Pledge of Allegiance:
Trustee Trover led the Pledge of Allegiance.

Roll Call:
Those present at roll call: President Underwood, Vice-President Lock, Secretary/Treasurer
Howell, Trustees Baker, Cox, Keck, Trover, and Walker. Also present were General Manager
Lothrop, Finance Manager I’Anson, Human Resources Manager Jones, Operations Manager
Saulnier, Clerk of the Board Garcia, Information Systems Analyst Prendez, and Legal Counsel
Quintanilla. Trustees Gilbert, Hernandez, and Hobart were absent.

Trustee Baker asked if the District had any indication as to why the trustees were absent and if
so would it be appropriate to call any of them excused. President Underwood responded that he
heard from Trustees Hobart and Hernandez. A discussion ensued. Trustee Baker stated that
trustee Hobart and Hernandez should be excused, because of extenuating circumstances, and
that if Trustee Gilbert has an excuse the next time the Board meets then he’ll be excused as well.
Trustee Baker made the motion to excuse Trustees Hernandez and Hobart from the meeting
since they had called in advance. The motion was seconded by Vice-President Lock and carried
unanimously.

1.       Confirmation of Agenda

2.       Minutes:
         A.   Approval of Minutes for May 12, 2009, Special Board Meeting
              Approval of Minutes for May 12, 2009, Board Meeting

         Trustee Trover made the motion to approve the minutes of the May 12, 2009, Special
         Board Meeting, and the May 12, 2009, Board Meeting. The motion was seconded by
         Trustee Walker and carried with seven (7) approved (Baker, Cox, Howell, Keck, Trover,
         Underwood, Walker) one (1) abstained (Lock), and three (3) absent (Gilbert, Hernandez,
         and Hobart).

3.       Public Comment:
         Public comments made by William Wolfs regarding New Business Item 11B and Ray
         Whitmer regarding New Business Item 11A.



Board of Trustees Meeting – June 9, 2009 – Page 1
                                                    DRAFT
4.       New Business:
         A.   Discussion and action relating to ratification of the Tentative Agreement between
              the District and employees in the Clerical, Professional, Supervisory, and
              Management Bargaining Units represented by Teamsters – Don Jeffers and
              Jeffrey Freedman

         Trustee Howell made the motion to continue the item for 90 days allowing the General
         Manager to discuss it and make sure it fits the parameters that she wants it to fit.
         President Underwood also added that any decision made 90 days from now that proposed
         salaries will be retroactive based on the calendar year starting July 1st. The motion was
         seconded by Trustee Lock and carried unanimously. Trustee Baker commented that he
         was very appreciative of the support shown by the employees and of that fact that the
         Board is close to an agreement. Trustee Baker stated that he thinks its only fair that the
         General Manager has an opportunity to look at a couple of fine points, that he is sincerely
         hopeful the agreement will be approved as presented, and that he didn’t want the
         employees to leave the meeting thinking they were being turned down. A discussion
         ensued.

5.       Announcements:
         A.   Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Award

         President Underwood announced that the Government Finance Officers Association of
         the United States and Canada presented an award of Financial Reporting Achievement to
         David I’Anson, Finance Manager, on behalf of the Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector
         Control District in California. President Underwood stated that he believes this is a huge
         step in right direction and thanked Finance Manager I’Anson.

6.       Correspondence:
         None.

7.       Approval of Expenditures for May 9-31, 2009 and June 1-5, 2009:
         Trustee Walker made the motion to approve the expenditures for May 9-31, 2009, and
         June 1-5, 2009. The motion was seconded by Trustee Howell and carried unanimously.

8.       Board Reports
         A.   President’s Report – President Underwood
         B.   Finance Committee – Trustee Howell, Chair

         A. President Underwood reported that he’s been busy meeting with General Manager
         Lothrop, working on strategic planning, and the Grand Jury report response. He also
         reported that on July 10th there are currently three sessions scheduled with Assemblyman
         Nestande, Senator Benoit, and Assemblyman Perez. President Underwood reported that
         there is also a conference call scheduled with Senator Ducheny sometime soon and that
         tomorrow there was going to be a radio interview on K-NEWS.

Board of Trustees Meeting – June 9, 2009 – Page 2
                                                    DRAFT
         B. Trustee Howell reported that the Finance Committee met three times since the last
         Board Meeting, twice for Budget Workshops and once prior to the Board Meeting.
         Trustee Howell also reported that the committee decided to move two CD’s to the LAIF
         fund.

9.       Consent Calendar:
         A.   Approval for General Manager and Trustees desiring so to attend the California
              Special Districts Association Strategic Planning for Special Districts Workshop
              August 5, 2009, in San Diego in an amount not to exceed $500 from Fund
              #7600.01.200, Admin. Staff Training, and $1,500 from Fund #6110.01.250,
              Trustee Travel – Branka B. Lothrop, General Manager

         Trustee Baker made the motion to approve. The motion was seconded by Trustee Cox
         and carried unanimously. President Underwood advised any trustees interested to inform
         Clerk of the Board Garcia. Trustee Baker requested a flyer be emailed to trustees. A
         discussion ensued.

10.      Old Business:
         A.   Discussion and/or approval of Response to 2008-2009 Grand Jury Report,
              Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District - Branka B. Lothrop,
              General Manager

         General Manager Lothrop thanked Legal Counsel Quintanilla for helping with the report
         and Finance Manager I’Anson for helping with the financial information. Trustee Howell
         made the motion to approve and amend as suggested the response to the 2008-2009
         Grand Jury Report. The motion was seconded by Trustee Lock and carried unanimously.
         Trustee Howell made a few suggestions. A discussion ensued.

         B.        Discussion and/or approval, based upon Board adopting proposed FY2009-10
                   Budget, to select an environmental firm to design and implement a larvicide
                   monitoring plan that meets all of the National Pollutant Elimination System
                   (NPDES) permit requirements in an amount not to exceed $50,000 from Line Item
                   #6095.01.225 – Misc Professional Fees – Branka B. Lothrop, General Manager

         Vector Ecologist Jeremy Wittie gave a report regarding the bid results and updates
         regarding the NPDES permit. He reported that on Monday, June 8th, the sixth circuit
         panel granted a two-year stay, which gives the District another two years as exempt under
         the EPA. Vector Ecologist Wittie reported that in April 2011 the District will need
         permits for larviciding and adulticiding; he recommended that the item be tabled until
         spring 2010. A discussion ensued. Trustee Keck made the motion to table Item 10B until
         spring 2010. The motion was seconded by Trustee Howell and carried unanimously.

11.     New Business (cont’d):
        B.   Approval and /or Discussion of Resolution No. 2009-08 Adopting FY 2009-10
             Budget David I’Anson, Finance Manager
Board of Trustees Meeting – June 9, 2009 – Page 3
                                                    DRAFT

         Public comment made by Dennis Christenson and Ray Whitmer regarding the 2009-10
         Budget.

         Finance Manager I’Anson reported on the budget process. A discussion ensued. Trustee
         Howell made the motion that the Finance Committee recommends the Board to approve
         the 2009-10 Budget. The motion was seconded by Trustee Baker and carried
         unanimously.

         C.        Discussion and/or approval of Resolution No. 2009-09 intention to levy
                   assessments for fiscal year 2009-10, preliminarily approving engineer's report, and
                   providing for notice of hearing for the CVMVCD mosquito, fire ant, and disease
                   control assessment. David I’Anson, Finance Manager

         Trustee Baker made the motion to approve Resolution No. 2009-09. The motion was
         seconded by Trustee Keck and carried unanimously.

         Seven Minute Break

         D.        Discussion and/or approval, based upon Board adopting proposed FY2009-10
                   Budget, to purchase from the lowest responsible bidder 12 ToughBook laptops and
                   12 ToughBook vehicle, riser laptop mounts in an amount not to exceed $73,000
                   from Line Item #8415.13.210– IT Capital Outlay - Jim Saulnier, Operations
                   Manager, Edward Prendez, Information Systems Analyst, Cary Roberts, GIS
                   Specialist

         Operations Manager Saulnier gave a brief report on the need for the Toughbooks. Trustee
         Keck asked if the mount for the Toughbooks was secure in case of theft. Information
         Systems Analyst Prendez responded that the only way to take the ToughBook off the
         mount, without a key, would be to destroy the unit. A discussion ensued. Trustee Baker
         made the motion to approve Item 11D. The motion was seconded by Trustee Howell and
         carried unanimously.

         E.        Discussion and recommendation on draft RFP and Scope of Work for a Strategic
                   Planning consultancy firm – Branka B. Lothrop, General Manager

         General Manager Lothrop reported on the draft RFP and Scope of Work for strategic
         planning and requested that the Trustees give her any suggestions or recommendations of
         what they would like included in the scope. A discussion ensued. Trustee Baker made a
         suggestion for an open ended RFP and made the motion to approve Item 11E. The motion
         was seconded by Trustee Howell and carried unanimously.

         F.        Discussion and approval to authorize the President to execute the final covenant
                   subject to any changes deemed acceptable by the General Manager and approved
                   as to form by General Counsel after consultation with the California Regional
Board of Trustees Meeting – June 9, 2009 – Page 4
                                                    DRAFT
                   Quality Control Board staff - Byron Jessie, Fleet/Faculties Supervisor and
                   Diane Glanz, Assistant to the General Manager

         Trustee Keck excused himself from the room on grounds that he owns property within
         500ft of the District’s Thermal property. Trustee Baker made the motion to approve Item
         11F. The motion was seconded by Trustee Lock and carried unanimously.

12.      Trustee Comments, Requests for Future Agenda Items and/or Staff Actions:
         Trustee Lock commented that she wanted to thank whoever put the packets together and
         that she loved the new Board Packets. She also said that she liked the way it was
         presented and how the people who received promotions are listed and the legislative
         update. A discussion ensued. Trustee Baker commented that his board packet does not
         need to be sent by Express Mail. Trustee Howell commented that he attended the
         Cathedral City Council meeting last night and that they are voting on the response to the
         Grand Jury at their next meeting.

13.      Report of District Activities:
         A.   General Manager
         B.   District Programs; progress and events since last Board meeting. Reports by:
                  1. Finance
                  2. Human Resources
                  3. Community Outreach
                  4. Biocontrol
                  5. Vector and Disease Surveillance
                  6. Field Operations
                  7. Fleet and Facilities
                  8. Risk Management/Safety
                  9. IT/GIS

         Trustee Baker made the motion to accept Item 13 as presented.

14.      Informational Items:
         A.    Conferences, Trainings, and Seminars – Anita Jones, Human Resources
               Manager

         B.        Staff reports from:
                   1. Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California (MVCAC), Spring
                   Quarterly Meeting, May 7-8, 2009, Visalia, California.

         As in Board Packet.

         Trustee Baker made the motion to accept as presented. The motion was seconded by
         Trustee Howell and carried unanimously.


Board of Trustees Meeting – June 9, 2009 – Page 5
                                                    DRAFT
15.      Legislative Update

         As in Board Packet.

16.      Closed Session
         A.    CLOSED SESSION: Conference with labor negotiators. [Pursuant to Government
               Code section 54957.6] Agency designated representatives: Branka Lothrop, Don
               Jeffers, and Jeffrey Freedman. Employee Organizations: California Teamsters
               Local 911.

         B.        CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel -- Anticipated Litigation.
                   Exposure to litigation pursuant to Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (b). Number
                   of potential cases: One

         C.        CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel -- Existing Litigation
                   Pursuant to Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name: California School
                   Employees Association & Its Chapter 2001 v. Coachella Valley Vector Control
                   District Case Number: Public Employees Relations Board Case Nos. LA-CE-123-
                   M and LA-CE-178-M

         D.        CLOSED SESSION: Conference with Legal Counsel – Existing Litigation
                   Pursuant to Government Code § 54956.9, subd. (a). Case Name: Robert Mann v.
                   Coachella Valley Vector Control District; Riverside County Superior Court Case
                   No. (Pending)

         Returning from Closed Session, President Underwood announced that there was no
         reportable action.

17.      Adjournment:
         The meeting was adjourned by President Underwood at 8:45 p.m.




Board of Trustees Meeting – June 9, 2009 – Page 6
                                            Section

                                              5




         Correspondence




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                                            Section

                                              7




   Financial Information




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                     Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                 FINANCES AT A GLANCE
                                  ALL FUNDS COMBINED
                             For the Month Ended May 31, 2009



                                                                  Change
                            Beginning of                           During            End of
                             the Month                           the Month         the Month

INVESTMENTS                $   14,248,410                    $    1,643,934    $ 15,892,344
CASH                       $      265,753                           (98,868)   $    166,885
INVESTMENTS & CASH         $   14,514,162                    $    1,545,066    $ 16,059,229

CURRENT ASSETS                    715,618                           235,664           951,281
FIXED ASSETS                   11,482,707                          (366,324)       11,116,383
OTHER ASSETS                      487,568                            14,897           502,465

TOTAL ASSETS               $   27,200,054                    $    1,429,303    $ 28,629,357

TOTAL LIABILITIES                 763,404                    $       64,632    $      828,036
TOTAL DISTRICT EQUITY          26,436,651                         1,364,670        27,801,321

TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY $   27,200,054                    $    1,429,303    $ 28,629,357


        RECEIPTS                                             $    2,352,081

        CASH DISBURSEMENTS

                                   Payroll   $     416,937

                           General Admin     $     438,877


                           Total Cash Disbursements          $     (855,814)

        NON-CASH ENTRIES:                                    $      (66,964)
        Accrual Modifications -
        Changes in A/P, A/R & Pre-paid insurance

       Change during Month - Excess of Cash over             $    1,429,303
       Receipts & Non-Cash Adjustments
                                                   COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                                                           INVESTMENT FUND BALANCES AS OF MAY 31, 2009


    INSTITUTION           IDENTIFICATION             Issue Date    Maturity Date         YIELD                BALANCE              PERCENT OF TOTAL INVESTMENTS


LAIF                Common Investments                                                   1.53%          $           5,625,620                  35.40%
Riverside County    Funds 51105, 51110 and 51115                                         1.57%          $           7,624,188                  47.97%
Desert Commercial   Market Rate                                                          0.95%          $           1,630,898                  10.26%
Bank of America     Certificate of Deposit          2004-06-22     2009-06-22            3.92%          $             100,000                   0.63%
PFF Bank & Trust    Certificate of Deposit          2008-11-16     2009-07-14            3.14%          $             100,000                   0.63%
Desert Commercial   CDARS                           2009-03-12     2010-03-11            1.77%          $             150,000                   0.94%
Desert Commercial   CDARS                           2008-05-29     2010-05-27            3.41%          $             411,638                   2.59%
Desert Commercial   CDARS                           2009-03-12     2011-03-11            1.92%          $             150,000                   0.94%
Bank of America     Certificate of Deposit          2008-08-20     2012-08-20            3.15%          $             100,000                   0.63%
                    Total Investments                                                                   $          15,892,344                 100.00%




                                                   COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                                                                  LISTING OF MONTHLY RECEIPTS
                                                                       For Month of May 31, 2009


       DATE              RECEIVED FROM                                                 AMOUNT                                   DESCRIPTION


     5/7/2009       Seven Lakes HOA                                                            556.00   Pesticide Reimbursment
     5/7/2009       The Madison Club                                                         3,135.00   Pesticide Reimbursment
     5/7/2009       CSEA                                                                       439.69   Reimbursement of staff hours
     5/7/2009       County of Riverside                                                      2,674.48   RDA Pass Thru
     5/7/2009       County of Riverside                                                        100.00   Reimbursement of deposit
     5/12/2009      Indian Canyons GC                                                        3,990.00   Pesticide Reimbursment
     5/12/2009      Mountain View CC                                                         2,280.00   Pesticide Reimbursment
     5/20/2009      Shiflet, Kane & Konoske                                                     49.53   Witness Fee
     5/20/2009      Rancho La Quinta                                                         3,634.00   Pesticide Reimbursment
     5/21/2009      Palm Valley GC                                                           2,351.25   Pesticide Reimbursment
     5/21/2009      Burrtec                                                                     20.47   Refund of closed account
     5/21/2009      County of Riverside                                                    720,392.75   Benefit Assessment
     5/27/2009      County of Riverside                                                         88.61   Benefit Assessment
     5/27/2009      The Quarry at La Quinta                                                  1,853.00   Pesticide Reimbursment
     5/27/2009      US Bank                                                                    333.39   CALCard Rebate
     5/31/2009      County of Riverside                                                     15,721.51   Homeowners Exemption
     5/31/2009      County of Riverside                                                  1,549,272.11   Current Secured
     5/31/2009      County of Riverside                                                     44,097.56   Current Secured
     5/31/2009      Desert Commercial Bank                                                   1,091.34   Interest

                    Monthly Total                                                       2,352,080.69
                                        Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                      FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES
                                                          GENERAL FUND
                                                        For the period Ended
                                                            May 31, 2009
                                                             (In Dollars)
                                                      Budget               This                      Budget              %
                                                    2008-2009             Month          Y-T-D       Balance            Y-T-D

REVENUES
       Current Taxes                                  4,557,691         1,593,370        4,568,511       10,820         100.24%
       Homeowner's Tax Relief                            44,044            15,722           38,181       (5,863)         86.69%
       Interest on Investments                           90,000                 -           68,896      (21,104)         76.55%
       Miscellaneous Revenue                             25,078                 -           41,340       16,262           0.00%
       Disposal of Surplus Property                      15,000                 -                -      (15,000)          0.00%
       Prior Taxes                                      130,591                 -           54,444      (76,147)         41.69%
       Redevelopment Pass-Thru                        2,620,257             2,674        1,661,523     (958,734)         63.41%
       Interest Income                                  191,550             1,091          163,840      (27,710)         85.53%
       Reimbursement - Services                           7,560           (15,092)             670       (6,890)          8.86%
       Miscellaneous Receipts                            21,000               503          375,835      354,835        1789.69%
       Benefit Assessment Income                      1,771,129           720,481        1,781,434       10,305         100.58%
TOTAL REVENUES                                        9,473,900         2,318,750        8,754,673     (719,227)          92.41%

Transfer from Reserve for New Positions                 297,000

Total Revenue & Transfers                             9,770,900
EXPENSES
Payroll Expense
  5101 Payroll - Full Time                            3,168,937           245,839        2,881,128      287,809           90.92%
  5102 Payroll - Seasonal                               228,000            19,808          186,706       41,294           81.89%
  5103 Temporary Services                                43,360                 -           14,656       28,704           33.80%
  5105 Overtime Expenses                                                      241           32,522      (32,522)
  5150 State Retirement Expense                          222,006           20,927          220,174        1,832          99.17%
  5155 Social Security Expense                           197,462           16,567          188,067        9,395          95.24%
  5165 Medicare Expense                                   46,673            3,874           44,727        1,946          95.83%
  5170 Group Insurance Expense                           495,000            9,246          518,472      (23,472)        104.74%
  5180 Deferred Compensation                              93,857           12,296           60,117       33,740          64.05%
  5195 Unemployment Insurance                             61,916            1,745           39,938       21,978          64.50%
Total Payroll Expense                                  4,557,211          330,543        4,186,507      370,704          91.87%
Administrative Expense
  5250 Tuition Reimbursement                             30,000               690             690        29,310           2.30%
  6000 Property & Liability Insurance                    99,211             7,715          83,785        15,426          84.45%
  6001 Workers' Compensation Insurance                   73,328             6,558          72,138         1,190          98.38%
  6050 Dues & Subscriptions                              29,720               500          25,710         4,010          86.51%
  6060 Public Education Materials                        34,750                22           1,741        33,009           5.01%
  6065 Recruitment/Advertising                           30,000               686          13,450        16,550          44.83%
  6070 Office Supplies                                   48,000             2,278          38,188         9,812          79.56%
  6075 Postage                                            6,365                74           2,921         3,444          45.89%
  6080 Computer & Network Systems                       136,717             1,338          78,626        58,091          57.51%
  6085 Bank Service Charges                               1,000                 -             188           812          18.80%
  6090 Local Agency Formation Commission                  5,981                 -           1,588         4,393          26.55%
  6095 Miscellaneous Professional Fees                  141,750             6,341          62,334        79,416          43.97%
  6100 Attorney Fees                                    337,000            39,175         344,989        (7,989)        102.37%
  6110 Conference Expense                                34,000               428          27,417         6,583          80.64%
  6115 Trustee In-Lieu Expense                           14,400             1,100           8,800         5,600          61.11%
  6120 Trustee Support Expense                           24,000             1,045          22,150         1,850          92.29%
  6130 Special Events                                    18,000                 -          10,394         7,606          57.74%
  6200 Meetings Expense                                  16,000             1,791           8,724         7,276          54.53%
  6210 Promotion & Education                             20,875                 -           8,690        12,185          41.63%
  6220 Advertising and Media                             60,000                 -          16,292        43,708          27.15%
  6500 Benefit Assessment Expense                       197,797                 -         101,899        95,898          51.52%
Total Administrative Expense                          1,358,894            69,743         930,712       428,182          68.49%




                                                           UNAUDITED                                               Page 1 of 2
                                     Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES
                                                       GENERAL FUND
                                                     For the period Ended
                                                         May 31, 2009
                                                          (In Dollars)
                                                   Budget               This                      Budget               %
                                                 2008-2009             Month          Y-T-D       Balance             Y-T-D


EXPENSES (cont.)

Utility Expense
  6400 Utilities                                      51,705             1,997           35,665       16,040            68.98%
Total Utility Expense                                 51,705             1,997           35,665       16,040            68.98%

Operating Expense
  7000 Uniform Expense                                36,000             2,765           46,244       (10,244)        128.46%
  7050 Safety Expense                                 11,553             1,257           13,624        (2,071)        117.93%
  7100 Physician Fees                                 10,000               475            4,674         5,326          46.74%
  7150 Communications & Site Rental                    2,511                42            2,181           330          86.88%
  7200 Household Supplies                              9,000               879            9,530          (530)        105.89%
  7225 Building & Grounds Security                    18,000             1,871           17,149           851          95.27%
  7250 Janitorial Expense                             39,060             2,719           32,915         6,145          84.27%
  7300 Building & Grounds Maintenance                 49,700             6,665           62,210       (12,510)        125.17%
  7305 Surplus Property Maintenance                    5,000             1,772            1,772         3,228          35.44%
  7350 Storage Tank Permits & Fees                     1,000                 -              282           718          28.24%
  7400 Vehicle Parts & Supplies                       54,000             3,582           51,677         2,323          95.70%
  7450 Equipment Parts & Supplies                     15,800                27            8,018         7,782          50.74%
  7500 Small Tool Expense                              5,000                 -            3,810         1,190          76.21%
  7550 Lab Supplies & Expense                         51,768             2,179           40,111        11,657          77.48%
  7575 Surveillance                                  174,045                 -           78,478        95,567          45.09%
  7600 Staff Training                                 62,954             2,982           47,150        15,804          74.90%
  7675 Contract Services                               3,100                 -                -         3,100           0.00%
  7700 Motor Fuels & Oil                             120,000             7,443           88,908        31,092          74.09%
  7750 Field Supplies                                 50,000             5,411           48,971         1,029          97.94%
  7800 Control Products                            2,141,200          (143,003)       1,158,693       982,507          54.11%
  7850 Aerial Applications                            70,000             2,100           63,217         6,783          90.31%
  8415 Operating Equipment                            18,700             1,427           14,560         4,140          77.86%
  8510 Research Projects                             292,139            45,572          193,179        98,960          66.13%
Total Operating Expense                            3,240,530           (53,834)       1,987,354     1,253,176          61.33%


TOTAL EXPENSES                                     9,208,340           348,448        7,140,237     2,068,103           77.54%

Transfer to Capital Budget                           550,186

REVENUES & TRANSFERS less EXPENSES                    12,374         1,970,302        1,614,436




                                                        UNAUDITED                                                Page 2 of 2
                                        Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                  Summary of Capital Expenditure
                                                        For the period Ended
                                                            May 31, 2009
                                                             (In Dollars)

                                                     Budget               This                         Budget        %
                                                    2008-2009            Month           Y-T-D         Balance      Y-T-D


TRANSFERS
        From Operating Budget                            550,186
        From Reserves                                    310,000
TOTAL TRANSFERS FROM RESERVES                            860,186

EXPENSES
Capital Expense
  8000 Loss on Write-off of Capital Assets                     -                 -                -             -    0.00%
  8300 Depreciation Expense                                    -                 -                -             -    0.00%
  8415 Capital Outlay - Information Systems              175,186                 -          153,774        21,412   87.78%
  8415 Capital Outlay - Vehicles                         375,000                 -                -       375,000    0.00%
  8487 Facility Improvements                             310,000                 -           89,227       220,773   28.78%
Total Capital Expense                                    860,186                 -          243,001       617,185   28.25%


TOTAL EXPENSES                                           860,186                 -          243,001       617,185           0


TRANSFERS less EXPENSES                                         -                -         (243,001)




                                                           UNAUDITED
                                     Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                               Summary of Capital Expenditure
                                                     For the period Ended
                                                         May 31, 2009
                                                          (In Dollars)

                                             Budget               This                          Budget             %
                                            2008-2009            Month            Y-T-D         Balance           Y-T-D


Reserve
          Thermal Capital Project Reserve      450,000

TOTAL TRANSFERS FROM RESERVES                  450,000

EXPENSES
Capital Expense
          Environmental Assessment                                                    8,595
          Permit Fees                                                                   769
          Thermal Facility Improvements                            242,444          448,385


Total Capital Expense                                -             242,444          457,749               -


TOTAL EXPENSES                                       -             242,444          457,749               -


TRANSFERS less EXPENSES                        450,000            (242,444)         (457,749)        (7,749)




                                                         UNAUDITED                                             Page 1 of 2
                                                                    Coachella Valley Mosquito Vector Control District
                                                                                       Balance Sheet
                                                                                     As of May 31, 2009


                                                           General Fund                       Capital Replacement             Other Governmental Funds           Total Governmental Funds
ASSETS

Cash and Investments
        Total Investment Fund Balances                              $   15,892,344
        Total Cash and Investments                                  $   14,412,714                        $   1,719,655                      $    (73,141)                        16,059,229


Current Assets
    Accounts Receivable                            $      42,012                                                                                                                     42,012
    Interest Receivable                            $           -                                                                                                                          -
    Inventory                                      $     683,644                                                                                                                    683,644
    Prepaids and Deposits                          $     225,625                                                                                                                    225,625
          Total Other Current Assets                                $     951,281

Fixed Assets
        Total Fixed Assets                                          $   11,254,980                                                                                                11,254,980

Other Assets
   Resources to be Provided                        $     502,465
        Total Other Assets                                          $     502,465                                                                                                   502,465

TOTAL ASSETS                                                        $   27,121,440                        $   1,719,655                      $    (73,141)                        28,767,954

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

LIABILITIES

Current Liablities
    Accounts Payable                               $     283,274                       $        16,069                    $       23,836                     $      323,178
    Accrued Payroll and Payroll Taxes              $       1,199                                                                                             $        1,199
    Deferred Revenue                               $           -                                                                                             $            -
    Claims/Judgments Payable                       $     260,865                                                                                             $      260,865
    Union Dues/Charity Payable                     $       1,194                                                                                             $        1,194
         Total Current Liabilities                                  $     546,532                         $     16,069                       $    23,836                            586,437

Long Term Liabilities
   Compensated Absences Payable                    $     241,600                                                                                             $      241,600
        Total Long Term Liabilities                                 $     241,600                                                                                                   241,600

         TOTAL LIABILITIES                                          $     788,132                         $     16,069                       $    23,836                            828,036


EQUITY - FUND BALANCE
  Fund Balance
  Invested in Fixed Assets                         $   11,254,980                                                                                            $   11,254,980
  Reserved                                                                                                                                                   $            -
    Reserved for Inventory                         $     418,401                                                                                             $      418,401
    Reserved for Prepaids & Deposits               $     239,898                                                                                             $      239,898
  Unreserved                                                                                                                                                 $            -
      Designated for General Reserve               $    5,712,658                                                                                            $    5,712,658
      Designated for Special Projects & Programs   $    6,740,157                      $     1,910,109                    $      450,000                     $    9,100,266
      Undesignated                                 $      352,779                                                                                            $      352,779
                                                                                                                                                             $            -
    Excess Revenue over (under) Expenditures       $    1,614,436                      $      (206,523)                   $      (546,976)                   $      860,937

         TOTAL EQUITY                                               $   26,333,308                        $   1,703,586                      $    (96,976)                        27,939,918

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY                                        $   27,121,440                        $   1,719,655                      $    (73,141)                        28,767,954
                                                                                           UNAUDITED
                                            Section

                                              8




           Board Reports




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                                       DRAFT
     COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO & VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                  43-420 Trader Place, Indio, CA 92201

                              Special Finance Committee
                              Meeting/Budget Workshop
                                        Minutes
                                Tuesday, June 9, 2009
                                       3:30 p.m.


  Call To Order:

  Secretary/Treasurer Gary Howell called the meeting to order at 3:55 p.m. on June 9, 2009, in
  the District’s Multi Purpose Room. Present at roll call were Vice-President Lock and Trustee
  Walker. Also present were Finance Manager I’Anson, Assistant to the General Manager Glanz,
  Risk Management/Safety Officer Anderson, Field Supervisor Wolfs, and Secretary / Treasurer
  of Teamsters Local 911, Raymond Whitmer.


  Approval of Minutes from May 12, 2009 Finance Committee Meetings

  MOTION: Trustee Walker moved to approve the minutes as presented. The motion was
  seconded by Secretary/Treasurer Howell. Vice-President Lock abstained.
  Approval of Minutes from May 26, 2009 Finance Committee Meetings

  MOTION: Trustee Walker moved to approve the minutes as presented. The motion was
  seconded by Secretary/Treasurer Howell. Motion carried unanimously.
  Confirmation of Agenda:

  The agenda was confirmed as presented.

  Public / Staff Comments

  Comments were made by Field Supervisor William Wolfs, Risk Management/Safety Officer
  Molly Anderson, Assistant to the General Manager Diane Glanz, and Secretary / Treasurer of
  Teamsters Local 911, Raymond Whitmer, in regards to organizational chart changes.
  Review of Check Report from FundWare

  Reviewed

Review of April Financials for June Board Packet

  Reviewed

  Treasurer’s Report and Review of Investments

  The Committee directed to staff transfer the two maturing CDs to LAIF.

                                                                             June 9, 2009 Minutes
                                      DRAFT
Review of Finance Related Board Agenda Items

  Reviewed

  Discussion and /or approval of FY 2009-2010 Draft Operating Budget and Draft Capital
  Budget

  MOTION: Vice-President Lock moved to send Draft Budget to Board for approval. The
  motion was seconded by Trustee Walker. Motion carried unanimously.
  Trustee Comments:

  None

Adjournment

  The meeting was adjourned at 5:35 p.m.




                                                                        June 9, 2009 Minutes
                                            Section

                                              9




       Consent Calendar




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                         Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                   Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                                                         July 14, 2009




Agenda Topic: Consent Calendar
Proposed policy regarding Board of Trustee meeting absences – Branka Lothrop, General
Manager and Steven B. Quintanilla, Legal Counsel

Background:
California Government Code Section 1779 (which is applicable to “special districts”) provides
that an office becomes vacant when, prior to the expiration of his or her office, the official ceases
to discharge the duties of his or her office for the “period of three consecutive months,” except
when prevented by sickness, or when absent from the state with the permission required by law.

In order to avoid any unintended vacancies on the Board of Trustees (“Board”), it is
recommended that whenever a Trustee cannot attend a special or regular Board meeting, he or
she should notify either the President or the General Manager prior to the meeting to explain why
he or she cannot attend the meeting. This will provide the Board with an opportunity to have the
absence formally excused by the Board in order to prevent an “unintended” automatic vacation
of the absent Trustee’s office.

During roll call, a motion to excuse an absence should be considered and offered to the Board for
its consideration and any action taken on the motion (including no action) should be noted for the
minutes.

Staff Recommendation:
That the Board take whatever action it deems appropriate.

Fiscal Impact:
None




P:\APPS\WPDATA\MVCD\0001-01 GENERAL\DOC\011 - TRUSTEE ATTENDANCE STAFF REPORT (07.14.09).DOC
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009



Agenda Item: Consent Calendar
Approval to renew the annual insurance policy with AVQuest Insurance Company, for the non-
owned commercial aircraft, in an amount not to exceed $9,460.00 from budget line
#6000.01.205, Property and Liability Insurance. – James Saulnier Operations Manager

Background:
Non-owned aircraft insurance coverage is not currently offered through Vector Control Joint
Powers Agency (VCJPA). The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District, as most
Districts in VCJPA, contracts with an outside company to do aerial applications of control
products and, as part of that agreement, requires the contractor to have specific limits and types
of coverage. At the request of VCJPA, AVQuest developed a program to protect only the
interests of the Districts.

The AVQuest Insurance proposal for the coming fiscal year is at an annual premium of
$5,600.00. In addition the proposal also offers coverage for Acts of Terrorism per the Terrorism
Risk Insurance Act (TRIA) of 2002, at the cost of $3,360.00, and Broker Fee in the amount of
$500.00. The cost of all components for the AVQuest Aerial Insurance Policy renewal for
protecting the District for aerial applications of pesticides will not exceed $9,460.00.

Annual Premium = $5,600.00
Terrorism Risk Insurance = $3,360.00
Broker Fee = $500.00
Annual Premium + Terrorism Risk Insurance + Broker Fee = $9,460.00.

Staff Recommendation:
Staff recommends approval of renewal of Insurance Policy for non-owned commercial aircraft
coverage with AvQuest.

Fiscal Impact:
Cost of non-owned commercial aircraft coverage renewal with AVQuest, is $9,460.00. This is a
budgeted item from Fund #6000.01.205 Property and Liability Insurance this expenditure is
approximately 7% of this line item.
                                            Section

                                             10




            Old Business




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                        Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                  Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                                                    July 14, 2009




Agenda Topic: Old Business
Approval to go out to bid and award the lowest responsible bidder for soil removal/distribution
in an amount not to exceed $40,000, from Thermal Facility Fund #3955.12.000, Thermal
Remediation Project – Work Plan #2008-09-16 – Byron Jessie, Fleet/Facilities Supervisor

Report:
As of June 11, 2009 the Deed Restriction has been recorded and sent to the California Regional
Water Quality Control Board (CRWQCB). Subsequently, the District has received the “Closure”
or “No Further Action” letter confirming the completion of the corrective action for the pesticide
contamination at the site.

The only remaining issue is the disposal of two soil piles that were generated during the grading
and excavating operations.

Pile #1, of approximately 40-60 cubic yards consists of contaminated soil that was generated
from the excavation of the contaminated areas. An analysis was done on this pile and it was
determined that due to its low level of contamination that it could be disposed of at a Hazardous
Materials landfill.

Estimated average cost for this method is: $11,500.00

Pile #2- OPTION 1- of approximately 1800-2000 was generated from the grading of the areas
in sections 2A, 2B and 3. Originally, according to the plans prepared by the project engineer, this
was supposed to be a minor stock pile of dirt that could be redistributed at the site. However this
is not the case and considering the size of the pile it cannot remain or be redistributed on the site
and will have to be hauled away.

Estimated average cost for this method is: $22,500.00

Pile #2 –OPTION 2 - is to spread it on the adjacent property owned by the Coachella Valley
Unified School District.
Consent was given by the School District’s Maintenance Operations manager to spread the soil
over their lot, which adjoins the Thermal property to the east, as the site has been identified as
potential soccer fields in the future. However, the District would have to test and certify that the
pile is free of any pesticides. Because of the size of the pile the District would have to hire a
certified geologist to set forth testing guidelines and procedures to ensure adequate testing
methods are outlined and adhered to for accuracy. After which bids for the testing could be
solicited.
The estimated cost for the geological testing guidelines and procedures is: $4,000.00
The estimated cost for testing soil is: $4,800.00
The estimated cost for spreading the soil on the school districts site is: $10,000.00

Total estimated cost for spreading soil on school district property: $18,800.00

Staff Recommendation:
Approve soliciting of formal bids for the removal/distribution of the contaminated and non-
contaminated soil at the Thermal site in an amount not to exceed $40,000.

Fiscal Impact:
Current funds available from Thermal Facility Fund #3955.12.000 are $47,500. This expenditure
is 85% of the available account balance.
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009



Agenda Item: Old Business
Approval of the Quarterly Update to the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
Work Plan – Finance Manager David I’Anson

Background:
This Agenda Item includes as an attachment the June 31, 2009 Quarterly Update of the 2008-
2009 Work Plan. The purpose of the Work Plan is to list short and long-term assignments
identified as “Projects” to be accomplished within a specified timeframe. These Projects focus
on addressing the service priorities identified in the District’s Mission Statement, strategic goals
established by the Board of Trustees, and operational objectives set forth in the annual budget.
Each Project has a designated Project Manager, and a Project Team made up primarily of District
employees.
The Work Plan is updated quarterly by the Finance Manager and staff for the Board of Trustees.
Work Plan project descriptions are updated as required during the year to reflect their current
status. New Projects are added in numerical order by calendar year and completed Projects are
removed from the Work Plan by the end of the year in which they are accomplished.

Since the last update, Project 2008-22 District Travel Policy and Project 2009-02 Succession and
Professional Development Plan were completed. Three new Work Plan projects were added,
Project 2009-12 Administrative Policies and Procedures Manual, Project 2009-13 Mud Room
Remodel and Project 2009-14 District Vehicle Needs Assessment and Shop Audit.



Staff Recommendation:
Receive and file the 2008-2009 Work Plan Update

Fiscal Impact:
None



Attachment:
2008-2009 Work Plan Quarterly Update
COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO & VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT




                      WORK PLAN
                         2008-2009
                      Quarterly Update
                         6/30/2009




43-420 Trader Place                      760.342.8287
Indio, CA 92201                          www.cvmvcd.org
                      TABLE OF CONTENTS

PROJECT OBJECTIVES:

2008-01   REMODEL RIFA AND OPS FACILITIES – Project Manager Byron
          Jessie

2008-02   REVISE PERSONNEL POLICY AND PROCEDURES MANUAL –
          Project Manager Anita Jones

2008-03   SALARY SURVEY – Project Manager Anita Jones (Project Completed)

2008-04   EMERGENCY ABATEMENT PROCEDURE – Project Manager James
          Saulnier

2008-05   GENERAL MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION – Project Manager Anita
          Jones (Project Completed)

2008-06   DEVELOP NEW PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORMS FOR
          MANAGERS,           SUPERVISORS, PROFESSIONALS,   AND
          ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CLASSIFICATIONS –Project Manager
          Ray Griest (Project Completed)

2008-07   REVISE THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORM FOR CSEA
          REPRESENTED EMPLOYEES – Project Manager Diane Glanz (Project
          Completed)

2008-08   CERTIFICATE OF AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN BUDGETING
          – Project Manager David l’Anson

2008-09   Y2K20 STRATEGIC PLAN – Project Manager Ray Griest (Project
          Completed)

2008-10   CUSTOMER SATISFACTION SURVEY – Project Manager James
          Saulnier

2008-11   ALTERNATIVE DISTRICT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES –
          Project Manager Ray Griest (Project Completed)

2008-12   SOLAR ARRAY – Project Manager John Schroeder (Project Completed)

2008-13   REPLACE COMPUTER NETWORK SERVERS – Project Manager
          Edward Prendez (Project Completed)

2008-14   MONTHLY BOARD TRAINING UPDATES – Project Manager Anita
          Jones (Project Completed)
2008-15   PURCHASING POLICY AND GUIDELINES – Project Manager David
          l’Anson

2008-16   THERMAL FACILITY REMEDIATION – Project Manager Byron Jessie

2008-17   YARD FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS – Project Manager Byron Jessie

2008-18   DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS RENNOVATION – Project Manager
          Byron Jessie

2008-19   LABORATORY FACILITY – Project Manager Branka Lothrop

2008-20   CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT MASTER PLAN – Project Manager David
          I’Anson

2008-21   ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT RETENTION – Project Manager Edward
          Prendez

2008-22   DISTRICT TRAVEL POLICY – Project Manager David I’Anson
          (Project Completed)

2008-23   DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT – Project Manager Ray Griest
          (Project Completed)

2008-24   DEVELOP A CLASSIFICATION PLAN – Project Manager Anita Jones
                      TABLE OF CONTENTS


PROJECT OBJECTIVES:

2009-01   DEVELOP AN INFORMAL BIDDING PROCEDURE – Project
          Manager David I’Anson

2009-02   SUCCESSION & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN –
          Project Manager David I’Anson (Project Completed)

2009-03   TRUSTEE ORIENTATION PLAN – Project Manager David I’Anson

2009-04   FUND BALANCE POLICY – Project Manager David I’Anson

2009-05   PEST INVENTORY MANAGEMENT STRATEGY – Project Manager
          David I’Anson

2009-06   FUNDING DISTRICT’S OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS
          (OPEB) LIABILITY – Project Manager David I’Anson

2009-07   INVENTORY & CATALOGUE ASSEST OVER $500 – Project
          Manager David I’Anson

2009-08   EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT AND DISPOSAL POLICY – Project
          Manager David I’Anson

2009-09   MANAGEMENT OF DISTRICT INFORMATION                    SYSTEMS
          NETWORK – Project Manager Edward Prendez

2009-10   INVENTORY & CATALOGUE DISTRICT                BUILDINGS    &
          STRUCTURES – Project Manager Byron Jessie

2009-11   GIS ENHANCEMENT OF DISTRICT OPERATIONS – Project
          Manager Edward Prendez

2009-12   ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL –
          Project Manager David I’Anson

2009-13   MUD ROOM REMODEL – Project Manager Byron Jessie

2009-14   DISTRICT VEHICLE NEEDS ASSESSMENT & SHOP AUDIT –
          Project Manager Branka Lothrop
                        EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

                                  Overview

The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District (CVMVCD) protects
residents of the Coachella Valley and unincorporated areas of the county within
its boundaries by controlling and monitoring disease-carrying insects and animals
(vectors). Vectors include mosquitoes, flies, rats, ticks, and other potentially
harmful wildlife. The CVMVCD protects the health and comfort of the public
through the control and surveillance of vertebrate and invertebrate vectors. In
addition, the CVMVCD regularly tests for diseases carried by vectors such as
mosquitoes and small mammals. CVMVCD conducts an education program to
inform the public about how to protect themselves from diseases transmitted by
these vectors.

The Riverside County Board of Supervisors established the District in 1928 for
controlling eye gnats which were transmitting disease (conjunctivitis) at an
alarming rate. In 1951, the CVMVCD Board of Trustees (Board) recognized the
need for added protection from additional vectors of public concern and added a
program for mosquito control. In 1995, the District expanded its services into a
full vector control agency.

The District is governed by a Board of Trustees. This Board is comprised of
eleven members who include representatives from each of the nine incorporated
cities of the Coachella Valley and two from the County at large. The Board
meetings are held at 6:00 p.m. on the second Tuesday of every month. The
public is welcomed to attend.

                              Mission Statement

We are dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for our community by providing
effective and environmentally sound vector control and disease prevention
programs through research, development, and public awareness.

                                   Services

The District conducts projects, provides services and programs for surveillance,
disease prevention, abatement, control and eradication of vectors and Red
Imported Fire Ants (RIFA) within the District. Vector control and disease
prevention projects include, but are not limited to, source reduction such as
ground and aerial control applications, disease monitoring, public education,
research and interagency cooperative activities.
The main services currently provided by CVMVCD are:

   •   Mosquito Surveillance and Control – year-round service designated to limit
       the number of adult mosquitoes present in the Coachella Valley and limit
       the spread of mosquito-borne disease.
   •   Eye Gnat and Fly Control – seasonal service designed to prevent the
       increase of abundance of flies and eye gnats to control the population in
       areas where they are a nuisance.
   •   Rodent Surveillance and Testing – yearly service designed to provide
       information on rodent disease in wild rodents.
   •   Red Imported Fire Ants Surveillance and Control

                                   Work Plan

The purpose of the Work Plan is to list short and long-term objectives, identified
as “Projects,” to be accomplished within a specified timeframe. These Projects
focus on addressing the service issues identified in the District’s Mission
Statement, strategic goals established by the Board of Trustees, and operational
priorities set forth in the annual budget. Each Project has a designated Project
Manager, and a Project Team usually made up entirely of District employees.
The Work Plan is updated quarterly by the Finance Manager and staff for the
Board of Trustees. Work Plan project descriptions are updated as required
during the year to reflect their current status. New Projects are added in
numerical order by calendar year and finished Projects are removed from the
Work Plan by the end of the year in which they are completed.
                          PROJECT NO. 2008-01

                REMODEL RIFA AND OPS FACILITIES

Project Manager: Byron Jessie, Fleet/Facilities Supervisor

Project Team: Jim Saulnier, Rodney Chamberlain, Phil Boeing, and Mike Martinez

Scope of Work: Construct three additional offices, expand locker room and
bathroom area, and close-in mud room.

Cost: $310,000 - $500,000

Benefit: Added work area and upgrades to locker room and bathroom area will
provide needed additional work space and improve working conditions for the
employees assigned to these facilities.

Target Completion Date: Revised from June 30, 2009 to December 31, 2009

Current Status: Holt informed us added restroom fixtures were not needed to
accommodate another 20 employees.

6/13/2008 plans were presented at a meeting on this date and areas for offices were
agreed upon.

6/24/2008 the project was discussed at a management meeting and general
consensus was to hold back major construction that would affect Operations crews.

7/11/2008 - A meeting was held including Diane Glanz, John Schroeder, and Ray
Griest. It was agreed to break-up the project into phases to allow the offices to be
built first as it would not interrupt operations.

9/15/2008 – A meeting with Byron Jessie and Tim Holt of Holt Architects has been
scheduled for Thursday September 18, 2008 at 10:30 a.m., to discuss the remodel
as well as the addition of a third office and additional parking spaces.

9/18/2008 - A meeting was held with Architect Tim Holt of Holt Architects to discuss
enclosing the offices of the GIS Specialist, Information Systems Analyst, and the
Operations Biologist. Below are three floor plan options that were presented for our
consideration. The differences among the three are the points of ingress and egress.
The existing HVAC, lighting, fire suppression, and power source will be tailored to fit
each office. Consideration as to which plan to go with will be taken up at the next
management meeting after which Holt Architects will submit the plans to the city for
approval and a subsequent RFP can be released.
1/31/2008 - The plans have been submitted to the city as of 10/31/08 and are
anticipated to be back from plan check by the 14th of November.

12/3/2008 - The plans have been approved by the City of Indio and Holt Architects
have prepared a set of plans and specifications that will accompany the RFP. A
January staff report to the Board will be prepared to obtain their approval to issue an
RFP for the proposed work.

1/13/2009 - The Board of Trustees approves putting the project out to bid for an
amount not to exceed $80,000

1/23/2009 - Bid documents sent in Word format to Rutan and Tucker for review and
editing

4/2/2009 – Funding for enclosing the Mud Room, adding air conditioning, and
removing the old inefficient ice machine from the dining area in Operations and
installing a new one in the Mud Room are added to the FY 2009-2010 Preliminary
Budget in the Facility Capital Improvement Budget


6/16/2009 – Project scaled back to only include reorganization of operations and
RIFA rooms. Cost will be minimal construction of new offices not needed. Additional
booth screens needed cost estimated to be approximately $2,000. Mud Room
project is now allocated its own separate project Work Plan 2009-13.




                                          2
                             PROJECT NO. 2008-02

REVISE PERSONNEL POLICY AND PROCEDURES MANUAL


Project Manager: Anita Jones Human Resources Manager

Project Team: David l’Anson, Branka Lothrop, James Saulnier, District legal counsel, CSEA
and Teamster representatives

Scope of Work: Revise Personnel Policy and Procedures Manual (PPPM) dated April 8,
1997 to address current terms and conditions of employment for all employees. This is a
major project because of the volume of benefit information and rules regarding the
administration of benefits that are contained in the Personnel Policy and Procedures
Manual. Add to this the problem created by the fact that different bargaining units in the
District may have slightly different benefits and the difficulty involved with completing this
project is multiplied.

The best approach may well be to divide this project up into phases. The first phase
involves gathering data and developing a table of contents outline of the material to be
included in the new PPPM. Staff will attempt to find at least 10 public agencies comparable
to ours that have recently adopted new Personnel Policies and Procedures. In addition,
staff will ask the League of California Cities; City Books Division (916-658-8257) to send a
copy of their Model Personnel and Procedures Manual for cities if it is still in print. Staff will
then collate the contents of these by topic and take the best from the available samples to
use as the basis for developing our Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual. The next
step in the process will be to forward our draft document(s) to legal counsel for review and
approval. The final step will be to submit these documents to the various District bargaining
units and meet and confer as required.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Revising the Personnel Policy and Procedures Manual is a priority for the Board of
Trustees. Adoption of the revised Personnel Policy and Procedures Manual will provide the
District as well as its employees with an up-to-date compilation of current information about
various terms and conditions of employment including but not limited to hours of work, sick
leave, vacation leave, disciplinary procedures, and grievance procedures.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: Current 1997 PPPM circulated to supervisors the week of May 12th and to
CSEA on June 10, 2008.

5/15/2008 – Distributed copies of draft manual dated October 2005 for review and
comments.

6/3/2008 – Submitted comments to IGM at Manager’s Meeting on October 2005 Draft
Manual. Determined 2005 draft deficient and decided to request manuals from other districts
to use as samples.
6/18/2008 – Requested copies of personnel manuals from the following nine vector control
districts: Orange County, Contra Costa, San Mateo, Marin/Sonoma, San Mateo, Santa
Clara, Greater LA County, LA County West, and Sacramento-Yolo. These Districts were
selected as they are larger districts and have a number of programs that are similar to ours.

6/24/2008 – Reviewed manuals received from Orange County, Contra Costa, San Mateo,
and Sacramento-Yolo.

6/27/2008 – Provided team with a draft table of contents for their review and suggestions.

7/1/2008 – Received an additional format style from Finance Administrator that he received
at SDI’s Administration Conference.

7/14/2008 – Team met to discuss page style format. The Team decided to approach the
project by taking small sections/policies at a time. It was determined there would be one
writer to provide a consistency in writing style which, hopefully, should make it easier for the
reader. The entire Team will review each draft section and serve as editors. The first
sections/policies to be addressed are: alcohol and drug use, harassment, discrimination,
and equal opportunity. The next meeting was scheduled for August 11, 2008 at 11 a.m.

7/16/2008 – Received a copy of Northwest MVCD’s manual.

12/15/2008 – Template requested from Liebert Cassidy and Whitmore to ensure that
provisions that are dictated by law are written as required. The committee will then add
sections that specifically relate to the District’s unique policies which will then be reviewed
by legal counsel as to content.

12/16/2008 – Received from Liebert Cassidy and Whitmore their Annual Audit of Personnel
Rules workbook which was updated in November and extracted the sample policies in word
format.

05/01/2009 – General Manager Lothrop made the completion of the Personnel Policy and
Procedures Manual a priority Work Plan project for completion by December 2009. A draft
form of the Policy will be given to legal counsel for review in September to be presented to
the Board of Trustees in November.




                                               2
                                  PROJECT NO. 3
                                       FY 2008-2009

                                 SALARY SURVEY

Project Manager: Anita Jones, Human Resources Manager

Project Team: Diane Glanz, David l’Anson, Branka Lothrop, James Saulnier

Scope of Work: Prepare a salary survey of management classes and administrative
support classes using comparable jurisdictions using numbers of employees and budget
size to establish salary levels for similar classifications for the 2007-08 fiscal year.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Establishing competitive pay rates for all District personnel is essential to hiring
and retaining well-qualified personnel and is critical to operating the District in a cost-
effective manner.

Target Completion Date: June 23, 2008

Current Status: Project Completed - nineteen (19) classifications were surveyed using
vector control districts throughout the State of California and selected cities in our area. The
following are the results for District classifications above (+) or below (-) the average
midpoint of the survey agencies:

General Manager: +26.93%
Assistant to GM: -13.52%
Scientific Operations Manager: +8.04%
Operations Manager: +7.07%
Finance Manager: -25.78%
Human Res. Manager: -20.28%
Vector Ecologist: +14.67%
Senior Biologist: +5.94%
Information Systems Analyst: -1.96%
Field Supervisor: +5.10%
Public Information Officer: +16.71%
Fleet/Facilities Supervisor: -5.08%
GIS Specialist: -11.75%
Fishery & Environmental Biologist: -16.89%
Assistant Biologist/Assistant
Vector Ecologist: -21.19%
Community Educator: -14.30%
Accounting Clerk: -10.25%
Administrative Clerk: -22.23%
Office Assistant: -29.71%
                        PROJECT NO. 2008-04

            EMERGENCY ABATEMENT PROCEDURE

Project Manger: James Saulnier, Operations Manager

Project Team: Victor Teran, Rodney Chamberlain

Scope of Work: Develop an Emergency Abatement Procedure that will enable the
District to react quickly in an emergency and short-cut the normal six month timeline to
deal with abatement issues. Draft procedure will then be submitted to the Board of
Trustees for consideration.

Cost: Staff time.

Benefit: This procedure will enable the District to respond quickly to potential health
hazards like an outbreak of West Nile Virus and to deal with the situation effectively
and quickly to save lives.

Target Completion Date: January 1, 2010

Current Status: With the private property access warrant available to the District along
with the current form abatement procedures in place, the majority of Vector
Control issues such as neglected green swimming pools, Psorophora
control, and other issues related to any abatement approach required are at this time
adequately covered.
                              PROJECT NO. 5
                                  FY 2008-2009

             GENERAL MANAGER JOB DESCRIPTION

Project Manager: Anita Jones, Human Resources Manager

Project Team: Board of Trustees, Ray Griest

Scope of Work: Prepare an updated draft job description for the position of
General Manager.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: An up-to-date job description for the General Manager will facilitate
recruiting and provide a basis for surveying comparable salaries from other agencies
should this become necessary.

Target Completion Date: July 1, 2008

Current Status: Project completed. A draft job description was provided to the
Interim General Manager on July 1, 2008. The draft job description has been
distributed to the Board of Trustees.
                             PROJECT NO. 6
                                  FY 2008-2009

DEVELOP NEW PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORMS FOR
  MANAGERS, SUPERVISORS, PROFESSIONALS, AND
    ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CLASSIFICATIONS

Project Manager: Ray Griest, Interim General Manager

Project Team: Diane Glanz, David I’Anson, Edward Prendez, Anita Jones, Branka
Lothrop, James Saulnier

Scope of Work: Develop new performance evaluation forms focus on quantifiable
objectives that relate to effective job performance

Cost: Staff time

Benefit:    Well developed performance evaluations are a key to improving
performance and productivity in an organization. Developing an approach that
involves the employee in the process, allows them to clearly understand in advance
what is expected, and reduces the subjectivity that is inherent in the evaluation
process is essential to encouraging positive outcomes.

Target Completion Date: October 1, 2008

Current Status: Project completed
                                PROJECT NO. 7
                                     FY 2007-2008

   REVISE THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FORM FOR
           CSEA REPRESENTED EMPLOYEES

Project Manager: Diane Glanz, Assistant to the General Manager

Project Team: Anita Jones, Branka Lothrop, James Saulnier, Rodney Chamberlain, Victor
Teran, John Schroeder, Philippe Boeing, William Wolfs, Fernando Rey

Scope of Work: Revise the performance evaluation form used to rate CSEA represented
employees by eliminating overlapping categories and adding decimal values to the nearest
tenth to help differentiate levels of performance.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Timely and accurate evaluation of employee performance is essential to motivating
employees to perform up to their potential.

Target Completion Date: Project Completed

Current Status:

5/20/08 – Met with supervisors to discuss and review the evaluation form because of the
complaints from supervisors regarding the inadequacies in the form.

6/5/08 – Met with all supervisors and managers of represented employees and HR Manager
to review previous suggestions that were incorporated into the form. At the request of
Branka, added Fernando Rey to the team, as he also supervises represented employees.
Revisions were suggested for a second draft.

6/19/08 – Met with team.     Reviewed red-lined copy created from discussion of 6/8/08
meeting.

7/3/08 – Met with team. Reworking the area C – Compliance with Safety Standards.

7/17/08 – Met with team. Continue to research evaluation standards for this section. Meet
again August 7 to finalize draft.

8/27/08 - Met with team. Discussed two minor changes and agreed to forward to IGM Griest
for future CSEA Meet and Confer discussion.

10/08 – Draft Provided to Jeff Freedman for consideration by CSEA at their meetings.
                PROJECT OBJECTIVE NO. 2008-08

       CERTIFICATE OF AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN
                      BUDGETING

Project Manager: David l’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team: Program Supervisors

Scope of Work: Develop the FY2009-2010 CVMVCD Budget in conformity with
the standards established by California Society of Municipal Finance Officers to
receive “Certificate of Award for Excellence in Budgeting “.

Cost: Staff time, consultant fees and application fee

Benefit: The District has adopted a new format for the annual budget in FY
2008-09. Further progress can be made in refining this format next year by
adopting a budget that conforms to the guidelines established by California
Society of Municipal Finance Officers. The award for excellence will go a long
way in demonstrating to the citizens we serve that the District is holding itself to
the highest standards of professionalism with regard to our budget and financial
practices.

Target Completion Date: March 31, 2011

Current Status: District received a Certificate of Award for “Outstanding
Financial Reporting for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2008” from the California
Society of Municipal Finance Officers on February 20, 2009.

District received a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial
Reporting for its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) for the Fiscal
Year ending June 30, 2008 from the Government Finance Officers Association
(GFOA) of the United States and Canada on May 18, 2009.
COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO & VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
BOARD OF TRUSTEES POLICY

Subject                                                     Policy       Date          Date
Operating Budget Policy                                     Number       Adopted       Revised
                                                                         DRAFT         3/11/09


Operating Budget Policy Components

The operating budget policy outlines the budget process, documenting how the budget is
formulated and adopted. It shows that the budget is not merely a financial tool but is also
a strategic document designed to aid the District in its decision making processes.
Linking the budget to the District’s strategic plan ensures consistency in the allocation of
resources to each program to meet their goals. The operating budget policy includes
components for scope (comprehensiveness, budget form, basis of budgeting and budget
calendar), roles and responsibilities, and a balance budget definition. It also includes
monitoring components budgetary control system, and balanced budget deviations.


    I. Links to financial and strategic plans

The District Mission statement:

“We are dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for our community by providing
effective and environmentally sound vector control and disease prevention programs
through research, development, and public awareness.”

Formalize link with strategic plan goals and objectives

The District’s annual budget will be developed in accordance with the policies and
priorities in the 5 year strategic plan, 5 year financial plan, District goals, the needs of the
residents of the Coachella Valley, and federal and state laws. Program/project priorities
and service levels will be established by the aforementioned plans.

   II. Scope

The scope of the budget defines comprehensiveness, budget form, basis of budgeting, and
the budget calendar.

            A. Comprehensiveness

This component gives an outline of what the budget includes; contents of the budget
document include transmittal letter, budget ordinance, fiscal policies and procedures,
budgets by fund/department/program, and the annual capital budget for the year with
project descriptions.

The District shall submit to the Board each June, the annual budget covering the next
fiscal year. The budget shall contain the following information:
• A letter from the General Manager discussing the proposed financial plan for the next
    fiscal year, a review of the previous year’s activities and the current financial
    condition of the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District.
• Proposed capital, operations and maintenance, debt service (if applicable)
    expenditures by program and type of expenditure for the budget year, along with
    comparisons to estimated expenditures for the current year and actual expenditures
    for three prior years.
• Proposed receipts, by source for the budget year, along with comparisons to estimated
    receipts for the current year and actual expenditures for three prior years.
• Table of organization with proposed staffing levels by program, along with
    comparisons to staffing levels for the current year.
• A summary of designated balances for system operations normal replacements and
    improvements, debt service, self-insurance, and future capital projects.

           B. Budget form

The budget form creates the methodology that is consistent from one year to the next, it is
important to establish the budget form through policy. This includes specifying annual or
biennial budgeting, level of detail (information per fund, department service area, and /or
program), and budget format.

•   The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District’s operating budget will
    be developed on annual basis. Appropriations will be approved by the Board of
    Trustees each year in their normal monthly meeting after reviewing the draft version
    the month earlier.
•   The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District’s operating budget will
    be presented in program budget format. The purpose of this format is to clearly
    outline the major programs and associated expenditures.


           C. Basis of budgeting

The basis of budgeting is the method used to determine when revenue and expenditures
are recognized for budgetary purposes.

•   The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District’s operating budget is
    based on generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as promulgated by the
    Governmental Accounting Standards Board. The budget basis will conform to the
    accounting policies contained in the comprehensive annual financial report, Note 1
    Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.
            D. Budget calendar

The budget calendar is an important part of the budgeting process helping to define the
major and minor milestones for all stakeholders.

•    The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District’s budget year starts July
     1st ending June 30 the following year.
•    The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District’s budget packages for
     annual preparations which include forms and instructions shall be distributed no later
     than January 15th each year. The package will include a budget calendar with
     timelines.
•    The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District’s budget will be
     distributed to the Board of Trustees at the regular meeting in May each year to be
     approved and adopted at the June meeting.


    III. Roles and responsibilities

Budgeting is a cooperative effort among Trustees, management and the budget office
(finance).

•    The Finance Manager prepares the budget document. The Finance Manager serves as
     the focal point for issuing guidelines, responding to questions and along with the
     General Manager reviewing departmental budget requests. The Finance Manager is
     responsible along with the General Manager to prepare and present the budget to the
     Finance Committee (Budget Committee), made up of Secretary/Treasurer and two
     other Trustees appointed by the Board President. The proposed budget will be tied to
     goals/objectives in the District’s strategic plan. The Finance Committee reviews, and
     if necessary, revises the proposed budget. The Finance Committee also determines
     whether the proposed budget adequately addresses the priorities set forth in the
     District’s strategic plan. The Finance Committee must approve the proposed budget
     and submit it for adoption by the full Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees has
     the final responsibility for adopting the budget and for making the necessary
     appropriations.


    IV. Budgeting control system

The purpose of a budgeting control system is to ensure that actual expenditures do not
exceed expenditures set forth in the budget. Fundamental to this is the generating of
budget to actual reports on a regular basis. Reports allow management and Trustees to
take corrective action if actual numbers vary significantly from budgeted expenditures.
Analysis may show that some areas need service reduction that exceeds budget
expenditure or transfers of surplus from other line items or programs.
•   The Finance Manager will be responsible to maintain a budgetary control system to
    ensure adherence to the adopted budget. On a quarterly basis the Finance Manager
    will prepare summary reports that compare actual revenues and expenditures to
    budgeted amounts. The reports will also compare targeted performance levels and
    actual results. These reports will be sent to both the Finance Committee and Board of
    Trustees to keep them informed of the District’s operating performance. These same
    reports will be provided to the General Manager and department heads on a monthly
    basis to assist them in managing the day to day operations of the District.


           A. Amendments to the budget

An aspect of the budgeting control system is the process for approving amendments to
the operating budget. Amendments must be approved by the Board of Trustees and
consist of changes to the appropriations in the budget document after Board adoption but
before the end of the year. Criterion for budget amendment include unexpected downturn
in economic conditions, rising costs for services or supplies purchased by the District,
new priorities, or forecast errors can lead to the need for formal amendments to the
budget.

Department heads prepare memo to Finance Manager and General Manager for a request
to amend line items or program budget along with reasons for the amendment. After
review and providing approval by the Finance Manager and General Manager, the budget
amendment is then presented to the Finance Committee for review and /or approval who
then submit the amendment request to the Board of Trustees, who are responsible for
final approval of all budget amendments.

    •   The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District may in certain
        instances, amend budget appropriations after budget adoption. All budget
        amendments require Board of Trustee approval. These are allocations from the
        General Fund General Reserve, appropriations from other unrestricted funds and
        appropriation reallocations.

    V. Balanced budget definition

A balanced budget is necessary for correct financial management of the District.

    •   Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector District shall annually adopt a balanced
        budget where operating revenues are equal to, or exceed, operating expenditures.
        Any increase in expenses, decrease in revenues, or combination of the two that
        would result in budget imbalance will require budget revision, rather than
        spending not appropriated surpluses or designated reserves to support ongoing
        operations. Any year end operating surpluses will revert to not appropriated
        balances for use in maintaining reserve levels set by policy and the balance will
        be available for capital projects and /or “one time only” general fund
        expenditures.
           A. When deviations allowed

Under certain circumstances it may be necessary to deviate from this policy of balanced
budget. Justifications for this include natural disasters and civic emergencies. These
deviations can be corrected by unitizing reserve balance, raising additional revenues or
cutting expenditures.


  VI. Performance measurement

Local governments are increasingly using performance measures as a tool in their
operational and budget decision making process. An advantage with including
performance measures in the budget policy is that newly appointed Trustees and staff
may more readily recognize the importance of these initiatives when they are
incorporated into policies. Support will grow for these initiatives as the policy helps to
institutionalize performance measurement and the value to the District and constituents.

   •   Where possible the District will integrate performance measurement, service level
       and productivity indicators in the District’s published budget document.
       Department heads will integrate operating efficiency, operating effectiveness,
       customer satisfaction, and human resource efficiency performance measures into
       their department’s budgets. Department heads will be required to tie service levels
       (both quantity and quality) to funding levels (budgeted dollars).
                          PROJECT NO. 2008-09

                         Y2K20 STRATEGIC PLAN

Project Manager: Ray Griest, Interim General Manager

Project Team: David l’Anson, Diane Glanz, Edward Prendez, Branka Lothrop,
James Saulnier, and John Schroeder

Scope of Work: To develop a Plan for approval by the Board of Trustees that
includes additional personnel and facility improvements to address the Coachella
Valley’s future vector control service needs based on a projected urban population
increase of 40% between 2010 and 2020, and 83% by 2030. These population
statistics are cited in the February 2007 “Western Coachella Valley Municipal
Service Review.” The cities referenced, Cathedral City, Desert Hot Springs, Indian
Wells, Palm Desert, Palm Springs, and Rancho Mirage worked with Riverside
County Center for Demographic Research to develop these projections for their
communities and for the Valley as a whole. In January 2007, these population
growth figures were adopted by the Coachella Valley Association of Governments
(CVAG) and as we understand it reflect current planning projections for each of
these communities.

In terms of the District’s need to deal with this future growth, the collective view of
staff is that a direct relationship does and will continue to exist between projected
population increases in the Valley and the need to augment personnel and facilities
to maintain our current level of vector control services. This assumption is based on
the fact that vector control is a very labor intensive activity in urban areas requiring
District personnel to literally go from house to house, as opposed to operations in
less populated areas where methods such as aerial spraying by contractors can be
used to cover large areas. Another assumption for purposes of our calculations is
that there will be no expansion of current programs or new programs, and that
annual expenditure levels for personnel, operations and maintenance, and capital
items not related to any Strategic Plan priorities will increase in line with inflation
through FY2019-2020. Expanded or new programs may require increases in District
personnel and facilities beyond simply matching urban population trends because
even today we are experiencing “growing pains” providing the current level of
service from our existing facilities.

Cost: If our personnel roster grows from 60 to 84 (an increase of 40%) by 2020,
then staff estimates based on the assumptions in this analysis that the District’s
operating budget will more than double from the current $9.8 million to $20.2 million.
We also estimate it will cost more than $9.4 million to add the 1.3 acres (58,487
square feet) of facility improvements to our existing 3.4 acre (146,217 square foot)
complex that will be needed to support this increase in staffing.
Construction of any new facilities if approved would likely be completed in several
phases over a period of years. As an interim step the Board may wish to consider
using the Thermal facility until some or all of the planned new construction is
completed. Thermal is currently being leased by the School District. This lease runs
to the year 2011. It is estimated that the cost to renovate the Thermal facility to
make it useable as a satellite facility would be in the neighborhood of $100,000.

The first phase of new facilities construction will likely begin with the 3,000 square
foot Laboratory Facility (Work Plan Project 19). The Lab is an approved project
tentatively scheduled for completion by the end of 2012. The estimated cost in
today’s dollars for the Lab is $1.8 million of which $1.2 million has already been
allocated in the FY2008-2009 Budget. It is estimated that the cost to complete this
project will increase to about $2.2 million in three years after factoring in an assumed
inflation rate of 4% and a 10% contingency.

The second phase of construction would then focus on adding the remaining 55,000
or so square feet of needed facility improvements and for purposes of our cost
estimates is shown as being completed by 2015. The amount of new development
in this phase would likely require us to expand beyond the boundaries of our current
complex onto some of the six plus acres of undeveloped property owned by the
District. Assumptions for phase two also include an annual inflation rate of 4%
during this period; FY2008-2009 construction costs of $400/square foot on average
for buildings other than the Lab, $50/square foot for covered parking, and $9/square
foot for asphalt; and that the ratio of buildings, to covered parking, to asphalt will
remain the same. Other expenses that are difficult to calculate at this point such as
architectural and engineering fees, geological studies, construction management,
and City of Indio permit fees need to be taken into account as well, and these could
add another 10% or more to the overall cost.

On the funding side, the Board has a number of options available to pay for any
approved Y2K20 facility improvements including “pay-as-you-go” and various forms
of financing. For the moment, let’s consider only two of the pay-as-you-go options.
One of these choices involves funding the estimated $9.4 million for proposed
improvements up front in FY2009-2010 from the current Fund Balance Reserve.
This choice would reduce our “Fund Balance to Operating Ratio” from 143% based
on our current $14 million reserve, to a reserve balance of about $6.3 million or 61%.
Another choice involves allocating funds for construction incrementally over several
years as we are doing with the Lab. But under either of these scenarios, the
proposed capital construction would substantially reduce the current Fund Balance
Reserve between now and FY2014-2015 without additional revenues to offset such
expenditures.

Revenue from tax sources is forecast by staff to increase at an annual rate of
between three and four percent and to approximate the rate of inflation between now




                                           2
and FY2019-2020. Return on investments, on the other hand, is expected to lag
during the period between 2009 and 2015 creating a potential shortfall between
income and annual operating expenses even without including potential expansion
plans. To offset this loss, it may be necessary to increase the current $10.55 per
unit benefit assessment sometime within the next five years. The point at which
such an increase may become necessary rests in part on a policy determination as
to what the amount of the District’s Fund Balance Reserve should be. Our
consultants, Macias, Gini & O’Connell, have opined that a fund balance between
66% and 220% of a public agency’s annual operating budget is more or less typical
today, but the appropriate level for this District is obviously a decision for the Board.
If the Board were to increase the assessment in FY2009-2010 to the potential
maximum of $18.00 per unit to augment reserves or to address other operational
issues, such an action would increase revenues by about $1.25 million annually.

It should be noted that this proposed Strategic Plan is being provided for discussion
purposes only at this point. Approval by the Board, buy-in from the 10 public
agencies served by the District, and input from the community at large will be
essential in validating any options or set of assumptions that have been presented or
ultimately may be implemented to address our future growth and development.
Achieving this kind of consensus may not be easy. There may be debate over
whether to use housing starts or something other than population to forecast the
future vector control needs of the Coachella Valley. If population growth is selected,
there are other agencies like the Southern California Association of Governments
(SCAG) that have developed different projections for the Valley that could be used
instead. If it is decided that the population forecast from the Riverside County
Center for Demographic Research is the best choice, it may be that their projections
for 2020 and 2030 turn out to be incorrect and will need to be revised. The potential
for deviations to occur between forecast and actual results applies to our staff
projections as well. This is one reason why we have not attempted to extend our
planning scenarios beyond 2020 in our first draft of a Strategic Plan.

Yet having acknowledged some of the potential pitfalls inherent in this process, if we
accept the proposition that it is a good thing to be proactive in planning for the future,
then we must do the best we can to make the right choices from among those
available to us to forecast that future. If we make the right decisions now and are
able to implement a Strategic Plan that does a good job of anticipating the level of
vector control services that will be needed in 2020, it should be possible to build on
that success and develop a follow-on Plan using the same methodology for Y2K30.

Benefit: What this exercise in advanced planning shows is that decisions made by
the District over the next 18 months using any set of growth assumptions for the
year 2020 are likely to have a substantial impact on future budgets and on the
allocation of our financial resources between now and then. Reaching agreement
on how to plan for this future will enable the District to allocate the resources that are




                                            3
available more efficiently and effectively over the next 10 to 20 years. Adoption of a
Strategic Plan will also contribute significantly to the effort currently underway to
develop a Capital Improvement Master Plan (Work Plan Project 20).

Our initial CIP could be structured to cover a 10 year timeframe and include possible
future projects such as those in any approved development plans for Y2k20. The
CIP matrix will be particularly useful in filling in the details for any approved second
phase of construction since we will be starting from scratch and will need to identify
and prioritize the specific improvements to be included within the proposed 55,000
square foot development footprint, establish completion schedules for this
construction, refine our cost estimates, and apportion the capital resources by
source and amount that will be required to pay for these new facilities.

Target Completion Date: January 31, 2010 for submitting proposals to the Board
of Trustees to fully fund Phase I and Phase II of the Y2K20 Strategic Plan. Between
now and then, the Board may wish to submit this Plan to the Finance Committee for
consideration and to include the issue on future agendas for further discussion. In
the months ahead, the Board may wish to solicit input on this Plan from the public
agencies served by the District. Further down the road, the Board may wish to
schedule public hearings and to hire an architectural/engineering firm to translate
this input into renderings of possible facility layouts prior to selecting a final design.
The Board may also wish to appoint an Ad Hoc Committee at some point in the
future to oversee the final construction of any approved facilities.

Some of the specific questions that should be addressed between now and January
31, 2010 include the following:

1.     What assumptions will be used to forecast future required vector control
service levels for the Coachella Valley, as well as the personnel and facilities needs
of the District (i.e. population growth, housing starts, etc.)?

2.     What assumptions will be used to forecast the District’s tax-based revenue
stream between 2010 and 2020 (i.e. Cost of Living Index, other State/County/federal
data, 10 year Note/20 year Bond yields, etc.)?

3.    What baseline price figures will be used to forecast future facilities
construction costs (i.e. $400 sq/ft for buildings etc.)?

4.     How will Strategic Plan capital improvements be funded (i.e. pay-as-you-go,
financing, etc.)?

5.     What is an appropriate Fund Balance Reserve to maintain between 2010 and
2020 (i.e. 61%, 66%, 143%, 220% etc.)?

Current Status: Presentation to the Board of Trustees of an updated Strategic Plan
at the January 13, 2009 Board Meeting.


                                            4
                                        WORK SHEET

2008 District Developed Area:                             2008 Construction Costs:
Buildings =            29,804 sq/ft                       Buildings = $400 sq/ft
Covered Parking =      24,376 sq/ft                       Covered Parking = $50 sq/ft
Asphalt =              92,037 sq/ft                       Asphalt = $9 sq/ft
            Total =   146,217 sq/ft

Forty percent (40%) of 146,217 = (146,217) (.40) = 58,487 sq/ft = 1.34 acres

2008 District Undeveloped Area:
One Acre = 43,560 sq/ft
Total District Area = 10 acres
Total District Developed Area = 3.36 acres (146,217/43,560)
Total District Undeveloped Area = 6.64 acres (10 – 3.36)

Note: The 6.64 acres that is not developed has been zoned for additional District
improvements. The entire area has been rough graded - electrical, sewer, and water lines
are installed.

Assumed Inflation Rates:
FY2010-2012 (4% compounded for 3 fiscal years) =                    1.12
FY2010-2015 (4% compounded for 6 fiscal years) =                    1.27
FY2010-2020 (4% compounded FY2010-2015; 3% compounded FY2016-2020) =1.47

Assumed Interest Rate (LAIF rate as of June 25, 2008 is 2.86%):
FY2010-2012 (3% compounded for 3 fiscal years) =                               1.09
FY2010-2015 (3% compounded for 6 fiscal years) =                               1.19
FY2010-2020 (3% compounded for 11 fiscal years) =                              1.38

FY2008-2009 Current Construction Costs:
Laboratory Facility (3,000 sq/ft) ($600 sq/ft) =                         $1,800,000
Buildings (26,804) ($400 sq/ft) (40%) =                                   4,288,640
Covered Parking (24,376 sq/ft) ($50 sq/ft) (40%) =                          487,520
Asphalt (92,037sq/ft) ($9 sq/ft) (40%) =                                    331,333
10% Contingency =                                                           690,749
                                                                         $7,598,242

FY2011-2012 Phase I Construction Costs:
Laboratory Facility (3000) (600) (1.12) =                                 $2,016,000
10% Contingency =                                                            201,600
                                                                          $2,217,600
FY2014-2015 Phase II Construction Costs:
Buildings (26,804) (400) (.40) (1.27) =                                   $5,446,573
Covered Parking (24,376) (50) (.40) (1.27) =                                 619,150
Asphalt (92,037) (9) (.40) (1.27) =                                          420,793
10% Contingency =                                                            648,652
                                                                          $7,135,168
($2.22 million) + ($7.19 million) = $9.41 million


                                                5
FY2008-2009 District Finances:
District Operating Budget = $9.8million
District Fund Balance Reserve = $14 million (Net after allocating $1.2 million for Lab Facility)

FY2019-2020 District Operating Budget with No New Personnel:
(9.8) (1.47) = $14.41 million

FY2019-2020 District Operating Budget Including 40% Increase in Personnel:
(9.8) (1.47) (.40) = $5.76 million
(14.41) + (5.76) = $20.17 million

Fund Balance Calculations:
FY2008-2009 Fund Balance/Operating Ratio = (14) / (9.8) = 143%
FY2009-2010 Fund Balance/Operating Ratio = (14 +1.2 x 1.03) – 9.4) = $6.26 million
                                         = (6.26) / (9. 8 x 1.04) = 61%
Assessment Income Calculation:
Units in Benefit Assessment District = 194,608 total parcels

Current Benefit Assessment = Zone A, $10.55 for 167,851.44 SFE Units; and Zone B, $5.27
   for 65.71 SFE Units

FY2009-2010 Maximum Authorized Rate = $18.00 /SFE Unit

Benefit Assessment Income = FY2008-2009 = $1,765,827.22

Benefit Assessment Income = FY2009-2010 = (1,765,827.22) ($18.00/10.55) = $3,012,786

$3,012,786 - $1,771,179 = $1,241,607




                                               6
                         PROJECT NO. 2008-10

              CUSTOMER SATISFACTION SURVEY

Project Manger: James Saulnier, Operations Manager

Project Team: Vector Control Crews

Scope of Work: The “Service Request Response Evaluation” form will be revised to
allow a random sampling of customers served by the District to evaluate the quality of
the service we provide by rating our performance between 1 and 10. This information
will be collected for 12 months, collated, and scored to come up with an average of al
those surveyed. This survey information will then be compared to the 74.19% vote in
2003 authorizing the District’s assessment of $16.47 per residential unit for vector
control. This approval percentage was the highest approval rating of any similar
measure in the State of California that year. If we see customer satisfaction rates in
the 70th to 80th percentile it will strongly suggest that we continuing to maintain this
extraordinary level of customer satisfaction and providing a correspondingly high level
of service.

Cost: Staff time.

Benefit: The purpose of this project is to establish a performance measure that can be
used to evaluate the level of customer satisfaction with the service being provided by
the District. This measure of performance will be updated annually and monitored on
an ongoing basis.

Target Completion Date: August 1, 2009

Current Status: Project assigned on June 3, 2008. All pertinent service request
sample data will be assessed during early July, 2009, and presented as an annual
comprehensive report on or before August 1, 2009.
                                PROJECT NO. 11
                                      FY 2008-2009

ALTERNATIVE DISTRICT ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES

Project Manager: Ray Griest, Interim General Manager

Project Team: David l’Anson, Anita Jones, Diane Glanz, Branka Lothrop, James
Saulnier, Ed Prendez

Scope of Work: Analyze the organizational charts from up to 16 other vector
control districts with similar characteristics to our District in terms of budget size and
per capita employees for their service area to determine what management
classifications are common to most districts and also to determine if we are “top
heavy” with managers as has been asserted by at least one Board Trustee. The
end result will be a report to the Board of Trustees by the General Manager outlining
the results of the survey that includes alternatives and options for the District to
consider in developing a long term human resources allocation plan.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: This analysis will allow the Board of Trustees to see factual information
relating to the organizational structures in other vector control districts. In addition, it
will provide this District with a means to assure that resources are being allocated to
provide cost-effective services to our customers.

Target Completion Date: Project completed

Current Status: Report provided to the Board at their December 9, 2008 Meeting.
The Board tabled discussion of the report to their February 2009 Meeting.
                             PROJECT NO. 12
                                   FY 2008-2009

                               SOLAR ARRAY

Project Manager: John Schroeder, Fleet/Facilities Supervisor

Project Team: Real Goods/Carlson Solar

Scope of Work: Construct a 125,000 watt solar array and inversion controller for
net metering

Cost: $1,067,677

Benefit: Decrease the cost of power for the District using a clean energy source.

Target Completion Date: July 1, 2008

Current Status: Project completed
                              PROJECT NO. 13
                                    FY 2008-2009

           REPLACE COMPUTER NETWORK SERVERS

Project Manager: Edward Prendez, Information Systems Analyst

Project Team: Diane Glanz, David l’Anson, Ray Griest, Jay Dover, Art Meneses

Scope of Work: Analyze the need to replace our current computer network servers
based on their age and the need to upgrade our security systems to protect the data
stored on the system - past, present, and future.

Cost: $63,000 for hardware and technical support

Benefit: The various hardware and software components of the District’s computer
network are between one and four years old. Computer technology is evolving at
such a pace that many times after just a couple of years systems are out of date and
in need of replacement. This analysis will pull together the information being
provided by a number of computer experts, and analyze when it will be most
appropriate to replace our existing system with new hardware and/or software to
update our system and enhance our network security.

Target Completion Date: Project completed

Current Status: Our computer consultants and Attorney Melanie Poturica from
Liebert, Cassidy, Whitmore have recommended that we replace our servers this
year rather than wait until FY 2009-2010.

Security considerations as well as the age of the servers themselves dictate that the
network be upgraded. The servers are responsible for daily communications and
data retention for the District. These two processors are vital to daily operations at
the district. Operating servers in use longer than five years increase the risk of poor
performance issues and of irrecoverable data due to disasters.

Configuration changes to the current servers have become a routine maintenance
issue due to the need for more capacity in the system. Programs and data can no
longer be written to some of the available drives. Data is being moved to other
drives to compensate for security updates. The need to move data is causing an
illogical placement of this data across the network. Furthermore there is currently
limited manufacturer support for some of the hardware currently configured in the
Network.
Based on the foregoing issues, staff recommended replacement of the current
servers. The staff proposal for the new system was approved by the Board at their
September 9, 2008 Meeting.




                                       2
                              PROJECT NO. 14
                                    FY 2008-2009

              MONTHLY BOARD TRAINING UPDATES

Project Manager: Anita Jones, Human Resources Manager

Project Team:      N/A

Scope of Work: The Board has requested that staff provide monthly updates of
training opportunities up to three months in advance. An agenda item will need to
be prepared for each Board meeting and updated on a monthly basis to identify
these upcoming seminars, workshops, and meetings of organizations such as the
Special District and Local Government Institute

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Providing Board members with the opportunity to learn about training that
is available to enhance their knowledge and skills in areas of benefit to the District.

Target Completion Date: July 8, 2008, and monthly thereafter

Current Status: Project completed
                          PROJECT NO. 2008-15

             PURCHASING POLICY AND GUIDELINES

Project Manager: David l’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team: Diane Glanz, Branka Lothrop, James Saulnier

Scope of Work:           Revise Resolution 1987-01, “Establishing A Purchasing
Procedures Policy” for the purchase of supplies and equipment and define the
division of authority within the organization for the purchasing function.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: An up to date Purchasing Policy is an effective way to assure that supply
and equipment purchases for the District are expedited and at the same time
acquired at the lowest possible cost commensurate with the quality needed.

Target Completion Date: Revised from March 2009 to June 30, 2010

Current Status: The draft policy has been reviewed by Moreland and Associates
and by Department Managers. Draft policy is scheduled to go to Finance Committee
on July 8, 2008.

Finance Committee reviewed draft policy at their July 8, 2008 Meeting, tabled
decision for August 12, 2008 Meeting to review further and discuss with their
appointing entities with a view to propose draft policy to the full Board of Trustees at
their Meeting October 14, 2008. The Finance Committee has postponed the review
of the draft Purchasing Policy until February 2009 Finance Committee Meeting.
Postponed until after strategic plan.
                          PROJECT NO. 2008-16

                  THERMAL FACILITY REMEDIATION

Project Manager: Byron Jessie, Fleet/Facilities Supervisor

Project Team: Diane Glanz; Ray Griest; EAR Engineering, Construction & Support
Services (951.735.5575)

Scope of Work: Remediate approximately 50,000 square feet of area found to be
contaminated with DDT, DDE, and DDD at the old District headquarters located on
the south side of Avenue 55 by capping it with a layer of asphalt. The site contains a
complex of structures, maintenance areas, covered auto parking, and storage
buildings. Some of the area in the complex is asphalted and some is open ground.

Cost: $450,000

Benefit: Compliance with environmental regulations and improvement of the
property belonging to the District.

Target Completion Date: Revised from December 1, 2008 to May 1, 2009

Current Status:

11/17/2009 – Riverside County Transportation & Land Management Agency issues
conditional approval of the accepted work plan for the Project subject to receiving
clearance from the Coachella Valley Water District to proceed

12/9/2009 – Board approves award of contract for Thermal Remediation Project to
the low base bidder D & L Wheeler for $445,533 and approves Options 1 and 2 that
provide for capping the entire site

12/30/2008 – California Regional Water Quality Control Board issues extension
approval to July 1, 2009 for the Project with the added condition that a report must
be submitted to the Regional Board by July 1, 2009 from a qualified professional
who is registered as a Civil Engineer or Geologist certifying that the capping has
been completed in accordance with the accepted work plan for the Project

2/10/2009 – Board authorizes Interim General Manager to enter into an agreement
with Calvada Environmental Services to complete the Remedial Action Report as
required by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board

3/3/2009 – Non-Interference Agreement and required clearance executed between
the Coachella Valley Water District and the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector
Control District
3/10/2009 – Professional Services Agreement with Calvada Environmental Services
and the District signed off

3/16/2009 – “Notice to Proceed” signed off for the Thermal Remediation Project

3/17/2009 – D & L Wheeler begins work on Thermal Remediation Project with the
work expected to be completed on or about April 30, 2009

6/30/2009 – Construction complete, the Deed Restriction has been recorded and
sent to the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (CRWQCB).
Subsequently, the District has received the “Closure” or “No Further Action” letter
confirming the completion of the corrective action for the pesticide contamination at
the site. The only remaining issue is the disposal of two soil piles that were
generated during the grading and excavating operations.


FY2009-2010 – The asphalt pavement should be repaired or repaved every 10
years by applying an additional one inch layer. The estimated cost using today’s
numbers is around $450,000; based on a CPI increase of 3 % in 2020 the cost
estimate is $605,000. The FY2009-10 budget funds this future liability by a $32,000
transfer from the General Operating Fund and revenue from the Thermal lease, both
to be increased annually using the CPI numbers from LA, Orange and Riverside.




                                         2
                          PROJECT NO. 2008-17

                   YARD FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS


Project Manager: Byron Jessie, Fleet/Facilities Supervisor

Project Team:         Diane Glanz; Branka Lothrop, Consulting Engineers and
Contractors

Scope of Work: The overall Project encompasses construction of new parking
canopies, adding a 1,200 square foot storage building, and moving the sentinel
chicken coop. Phase I of this Project involves adding the storage building and
moving the chicken coop at an estimated cost of $122,000. The proposed storage
structure is a metal building with 3 inch insulation roof and walls, 2 ridge vents, 4
skylights, 1 single man door, 1 double man door, 2 roll-up doors, concrete with
trough. Planning, engineering, and labor costs are included in the estimated cost
figure.

Cost: Phase 1 - $122,000/Total Project cost - $1,010,000

Benefit: The additional storage space is urgently needed. This additional storage
space and the new parking canopies will provide much needed facility
enhancements that will increase efficiency and effectiveness of District operations.

Target Completion Date: Phase 1 is expected to be completed by June 30, 2010

Current Status: This Project is in the initial planning stage.

September 15, 2008 – Clarification of the coop and storage location as well as any
other required component(s) has to wait until Branka returns from vacation during
the week of September 22, 2008. After which an RFP can be prepared and
commence the bidding process.

September 18, 2008 - Holt Architects discussed the addition of covered parking to
the staff and west parking areas, along with the addition of a cantilevered shade
structure over the parking spaces at the north end of the staff lot. Holt Architects is
preparing a quote for services to produce the plans and specifications and if
approved, will commence with their preparation. Arturo Gutierrez is the Bio Labs
contact in regards to relocating the chicken coop, including, coordination of its
design and construction. It will be located along the fence line near the fish pond.
Plans for the coop are currently being gathered.
October 24, 2008 - Holt Architects has begun preparing a site plan study and
conceptual design for additional parking to the main staff and west fleet areas
including extending the existing cantilevered shade structures and adding one to the
north staff parking area.

December 3, 2008 - Holt Architects has prepared a conceptual plan depicting the
number of additional parking spaces that can be obtained in the staff parking and
west fleet areas. There are 10 spaces in the staff lot and 28 in the west fleet lot. All
of which will be covered. The City of Indio has already been notified of these
proposed changes and has indicated that approval of the plans will be given after
minor conditions are met. The next step is to have the conceptual plan reviewed by
management for approval. Carport conceptual plan was approved by management.
Next step is to get cost estimate from architect.




January 8, 2009 – Holt estimates the cost for this Project at $784,960.
January 9, 2009 - Management wants cost to break project into two parts.
January 13, 2009 - Request was made to Holt Architects to breakdown project into
two parts.
April 2, 2009 – Repair of drive and parking areas at the District’s headquarters are
included in FY 2009-2010 Preliminary Budget in the Facility Capital Improvement
Budget. Plans call for repairing cracks and the application of two layers of slurry
seal coat.

June 30, 2009 - $120,000 has been allocated in FY 2009-10 Budget for repaving of
parking and drive areas.




                                           2
                         PROJECT NO. 2008-18

            DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS RENOVATION

Project Manager: Byron Jessie, Fleet/Facilities Supervisor

Project Team: Diane Glanz

Scope of Work: This project involves infrastructure replacements within the District
Headquarters. The facilities are seven years old, the HVCAC, for example, has a 12
year lifespan.

Cost: $200,000

Benefit: Improved working conditions

Target Completion Date: June 30, 2013

Current Status:     Resource allocation phase. Reserve for Existing Facility
Renovation has allocated $900,000 for infrastructural replacements.
                           PROJECT NO. 2008-19

                          LABORATORY FACILITY

Project Manager: Branka Lothrop, Scientific Operations Manager

Project Team: Byron Jessie

Scope of Work: This project involves upgrading our current facility classified as a
Bio-safety level I to a Bio-level III.

Cost: $2.2 million in FY2011-2012 - It is estimated that a new 3,000 square foot
surveillance laboratory will cost approximately $600 a square foot in FY2008-2009
dollars. The design concept includes one room with the Bio-safety level III
designation; one laboratory room at Bio-safety level II, and one room at Bio-safety
level I. The price per square foot for the new surveillance laboratory is a staff
estimate, and is based on the Riverside County, Economic Development Agency
projects of a similar type with additional cost for one bio-safety level III room.

Benefit: The current District surveillance laboratory is classified as Bio-safety level
1 facility. This means that the laboratory is suitable for work that involves well-
characterized agents not known to consistently cause disease in healthy adult
humans, and of minimal potential hazard to laboratory personnel and the
environment. Within the next three years it is anticipated that there will need to
provide more proactive testing of exotic agents up to and including those which may
cause serious or potentially lethal disease as a result of inhalation exposure. This
more rigorous testing will require the expanded capabilities provided by Bio-level II
and III testing facilities. The new facility will provide faster and more efficient onsite
evaluation of positive mosquito pools with results being available within 24 to 72
hours and will assist staff by allowing us to take control measures earlier than at the
present time.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2012

Current Status: Resource allocation phase 2009-10 Budget designates $2,300,000
Reserve for Laboratory Facility
                         PROJECT NO. 2008-20

            CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT MASTER PLAN

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team: Diane Glanz, Edward Prendez, Branka Lothrop, James Saulnier,
Rodney Chamberlain, Victor Teran, Byron Jessie, Philippe Boeing, William Wolfs

Scope of Work: Develop a long term capital improvement plan extending our at
least five years to use in allocating District resources and planning for the future.
This project involves surveying other vector control districts and possibly some
municipal agencies to obtain examples of their CIP’s. Staff will develop a draft
and submit this draft to the Finance Committee and then to the Board of
Directors in time to incorporate this information in to the budget planning process
for the 2009-2010 fiscal year.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Development of a capital improvement master plan will enable the
District to better allocate its resources on a long term basis. The CIP will enable
the Board of Directors and staff to develop revenue projections based on the
estimated cost of needed improvements. This information can then be used to
establish our reserve requirements for construction and to more accurately
calculate the assessment that will be required to fund these projects and
maintain an adequate reserve.

Target Completion Date: Revised from June 30, 2009 to June 30, 2010

Current Status:     Project assigned on June 17, 2008. A draft Capital
Improvement Plan outline has been developed and a procedure and policy has
been distributed to the Finance Committee. Staff are currently using this
procedure.
COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO & VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
BOARD OF TRUSTEES POLICY

Subject                                                    Policy       Date         Date
Draft Capital Improvement Plan Policy and                  Number       Adopted      Revised
Procedures                                                              DRAFT        12/04/08


Overview

Annually local governments, in general, devote a large portion of the budget to capital
projects. Large financial investment is needed to maintain and expand public facilities
and infrastructure. Adequate consideration to capital needs has to take place in order to
assure ongoing service delivery. If governments do not maintain their capital stock,
facilities and infrastructure will deteriorate until costly, constant maintenance is required,
resulting in services being threatened. Capital improvement policies consist of general
guidelines to encourage debate on the best choices for capital projects while providing
enough guidance on making sound financial decisions.
The capital policy addresses the following issues:
    • Capital improvement plan (CIP) formulation (i.e. a multi year forecast of capital
         needs);
    • Capital budget (i.e. the current year authorization for capital spending);
    • Project financing
    • Post project evaluation

Capital Improvement Policy Components

    I. Capital Improvement Plan (CIP)

The capital improvement plan is a multi-year projection of the Coachella Valley
Mosquito and Vector Control District’s (District) capital needs and is key to an effective
capital budgeting process. The CIP helps to build consensus on what the most important
projects are, prioritizing these projects. The CIP also provides a picture of future
financing requirements, allowing the District to better align financial resources with
future needs and it also is a tool for growth management.

           A. Scope

The scope of the CIP includes the time period and type of projects subject to the planning
process.
Time Period
   • The time period for the CIP is five years. The capital program identifies each
       proposed capital project to be undertaken, the year in which it will be started
       or acquired, the amount expected to be expended on the project each year,
       and the proposed method of financing these expenditures. Capital
        Improvement Budget is the first year of the capital improvement plan and is
        the government’s annual appropriation for capital spending and is legally
        adopted by the legislative body.
Type of Project
Distinguish between capital and operating expenditures, a capital asset is defined as an
asset that is nonrecurring, has a useful life or more than three to five years and is
expensive to purchase. A capital project is undertaken to acquire a capital asset, examples
include construction of District buildings, major improvements to facilities and
acquisition of new trucks.

•      The District defines a capital asset as an item with a value in excess of $5,000
       that is nonrecurring, has a useful life of more than one year, such as vehicles,
       equipment and furniture.
•      These items will continue to be included in the operating budget, within each
       department. Items such as vehicles, minor equipment, and furniture are not
       included in the capital improvement program.
•      Definition of a capital project – a project expected to have a useful life
       greater than ten years and an estimated cost of $30,000 or more. Capital
       projects include the construction, purchase, or major renovation of District
       facilities / buildings, or other structures; purchase of land and major
       landscaping projects.
•      Projects meeting the above definition will be included in the capital
       improvement program document rather than the operating budget
       document. The information will be tied to the operating budget and the
       totals for each account in the capital improvement program will be included
       in the operating budget summaries of each fund.


           B. Selecting Projects

Guideline for selecting a project for the CIP involves:
   • Demonstration of need;
   • Cost estimates for planning, land, construction, and furnishings;
   • Effects on the operating budget (e.g. increased need for annual maintenance)
   • Relationship to other projects;
   • Project priority;
   • Recommended finance sources.
Service-level goals or objectives must show a direct relationship with the need for
capital infrastructure

    Program Goals &                              Capital Expenditure
    Objectives
Service-level goals or objectives are the fundamental means by which the District can
illustrate to residents of the Coachella Valley the level of services to be provided with the
available resources. Therefore, goals must be clear enough to show a direct relationship
to the need for capital infrastructure. Having objectives that support operating
activities can focus the attention on the importance of capital needs and projects to
service delivery.

After defining objectives, the District should develop a set of performance measures to
track the progress and communicate results to residents, Trustees, employees, and other
stakeholders.

The needs assessment should address any gaps in service delivery and form the basis for
a capital project request. The needs assessment for any potential project should also
identify the development of the project as the best method for achieving these stated
goals. The process for a needs assessment will involve staff expertise, such as department
managers and other staff experts, and professional consultants with advanced knowledge
of the specific service area.

Needs assessments should consider time and begin to account for available resources to
determine if the project is even feasible.

All levels of involvement in the needs assessment require a familiarity with basic
operating practices for service delivery and understanding of desired outcomes. Including
the finance officer throughout the needs assessment process will only help to develop
more accurate budgets and more appropriate capital financing strategies. In addition, in
the event that the jurisdiction ultimately needs to limit the project scope, the finance
officer will be in a much better position because he understands the project components
and the resulting service delivery implications of potential cuts.

   •   To add a project to the CIP, District requirements include a needs
       assessment. This involves a capital project request outlining the need for the
       proposed capital infrastructure. The needs assessment must show a direct
       correlation with District service level goals and the need for the project. The
       needs assessment will outline the development of the project, the timelines
       and the resources needed. The capital project request will be evaluated using
       the project checklist outlined in this policy.
   •   Information needed to evaluate new projects include: Title of asset;
       Description and scope; Justification; Schedule of major milestones;
       Estimated cost; Impact on revenues; Project cash flows.

Evaluation and Disclosure Goals

The proper disclosure and communication with Trustees, department managers,
employees, and, most importantly, citizens will allow a better understanding of the
proposed capital project. Additionally, providing information will generate more focused
feedback during public input sessions, and if necessary, will prevent any modifications
after project initiation.

All levels of involvement in the needs assessment require a familiarity with basic
operating practices for service delivery and understanding of desired outcomes. Including
the Finance Manager throughout the needs assessment process will help to develop more
accurate budgets and more appropriate capital financing strategies. In addition, in the
event that the District ultimately needs to limit the project scope, the Finance Manager
will be in a much better position because they understand the project components and the
resulting service delivery implications of potential cuts.

Criteria for Evaluating Capital Projects

   •   Does the Project meet the District Service Level Goals

   •   Fiscal Impacts: The fiscal impact refers to the total cost impact of the project,
       and includes variables such as direct construction costs, maintenance costs,
       operating costs, and potential legal liabilities.

   •   Health and Safety Impacts: These are the direct and indirect effects a project
       may have on health and safety of the community. For example a project
       improving operating services will have a direct impact on public health due to
       better control of vectors rather while a research laboratory would have a less
       direct effect.

   •   Economic Effects: These are the influence a project has on the community’s
       economic development efforts and can effect factors such as tax base, property
       value and neighborhood stabilization.

   •   Environmental, Aesthetic and Social Effects: how a project will affect the
       quality of life of the community.

   •   Disruption and Inconvenience: Inconvenience aspect of capital project during
       construction.

   •   Distributional Effects: Ensures equitable distribution of benefit to the
       community.

   •   Feasibility: how the project conforms to public desires as expressed through
       public hearings, master plans etc.

   •   Implications if Project is Deferred: A deferred project could have cost
       implications such as increased maintenance costs.
    •   Amount of Uncertainty: this is the extent to which critical assumptions underpin
        the project could change during the course of the project such as unstable buyers
        market.

    •   Effect on Surrounding Governments: impact on other governments for example
        the water district or the City.

    •   Impact on other Capital Projects: For example a new operations building
        would mean building a new parking garage to take care of the extra staff.

   • Legal Obligation and Mandates: Some projects are required due to court orders,
federal mandates or state laws.


          C. Responsibility for creating CIP
The planning process is a cooperative effort among Trustees, management and the
finance.

•   The department manager is responsible for submitting the initial plans for the
    project. The Finance Manager assembles the required document. The Finance
    Manager serves as the focal point for issuing guidelines, responding to questions
    and along with the General Manager reviewing departmental capital project
    requests. The Finance Manager is responsible along with the General Manager
    to prepare and present the capital project to the Finance Committee (CIP
    Committee) in a public meeting, made up of Secretary/Treasurer and two other
    Trustees appointed by the Board President. The proposed project will be tied to
    goals/objectives in the District’s strategic plan. The Finance Committee reviews,
    and if necessary, revises the proposed project. The Finance Committee also
    determines whether the proposed project adequately addresses the priorities set
    forth in the District’s strategic plan. The Finance Committee must approve the
    proposed project and submit it for adoption by the full Board of Trustees in an
    open public meeting. Once the project has followed these steps, it is added to the
    Capital Improvement Plan.

            D. Operating Budget Impact Statements in the CIP
New capital infrastructure has an impact on the operating budget; expanded programs
require more staff meaning increased costs, replacement of aging structures may decrease
operating and maintenance expenditures.
To establish the importance of due diligence for capital project selection, the operating
budget impact statement should provide the projected operating costs of the capital
projects for each year of the CIP. Costs include new staff salaries, debt service payments,
maintenance expenses and utilities.

•   For all capital projects, the District requires an operating budget impact
    statement. The total cost (operating and capital) of the project is to be calculated
    and presented before selection can be made. The operating impact of proposed
     capital projects, include personnel, operating expenditures, capital outlay, and
     debt service, as applicable, will be identified in the CIP document and
     considered in preparing the five year financial plan.

    II. Capital Budget

The capital budget is the current-year spending authorization for capital projects and
reflects implementation of the CIP. The capital budget is therefore an integral part of the
capital improvement process.

            A. Moving projects from the CIP to the capital budget

•    All capital improvement projects approved in the annual operating budget are
     approved at the budgeted amounts through the completion of the project. The
     Board of Trustees approves both the individual project total budget and the
     projected cash outlays for all capital improvement projects for the current fiscal
     year.

•    Staff will identify the estimated costs, potential funding sources, and project
     schedule for each capital project proposal before it is submitted to the Board of
     Trustees for approval.

•    Staff will coordinate development of the capital improvement budget with the
     development of the operating budget. All costs for internal professional services
     needed to implement the CIP will be included in the operating budget for the
     year the CIP is to be implemented.

•    Cost tracking for components of the capital improvement program will be
     updated quarterly to ensure project completion against budget and established
     time lines.


            B. Minimum maximum capital spending

     •   The maximum annual expenditure should not exceed the designated reserve
         fund balance for the project item.

            C. Definition of capital budgeting fiscal year

     •   The capital budget year is July 1 to June 30; this is concurrent with the
         operating budget.

    III. Project Financing


            A. Pay-as-you-go versus pay-as-you-use
   •   The District uses a pay-as-you-go, funding projects from revenue streams
       and fund balance reserves.

           B. Types of financing instruments

   •   The District determines the financing option by the nature and amount the
       project will cost. Ongoing projects are generally funded from current
       operating revenues, while major projects are funded from designated
       reserves.
   •   The District shall establish and maintain a capital projects reserve fund to
       accumulate reimbursements from other governmental agencies for the prior
       purchase of real assets, as well as transfers from the general fund
       undesignated fund balance. This fund shall be used to pay for non-routine
       and one-time expenditures, such as land and building purchases,
       construction and maintenance projects with a ten-year life, capital
       equipment and vehicles with a ten-year life, and technology improvements
       with a five-year life. Expenditures from this fund shall be aimed at protecting
       the health and safety of citizens and employees, and protecting the existing
       assets of the District.

           C. Remaining balances

   •   The remaining balances from projects will be either returned to the capital
       improvement fund balance for general use with other projects or designated
       for similar projects.

  IV. Evaluation of Capital Projects

   •   The District will evaluate capital projects, assessing the need to replace and
       /or repair the District assets. Each capital asset will be evaluated on an
       individual basis, estimating the useful life and project replacement cost.

For financial reporting, the following depreciation methods and useful lives are used for
the following asset classifications:

Asset Class                          Useful Life                Method
Buildings and Improvements           Forty Years                Straight line
Improvements other than              Ten to forty years         Straight line
Buildings
Machinery and Equipment              Ten to Twenty Years        Straight line
Autos and trucks                     Three to Ten Years         Straight line
Office Furniture and Equipment       Three to Ten Years         Straight line
•   On a continual basis the District will inventory all capital assets. All
    equipment will have a repair and replacement schedule. This schedule will be
    used as a planning tool for replacing equipment and vehicles.
                          PROJECT NO. 2008-21

                    Electronic Document Retention

Project Manager: Edward Prendez, Information Systems Analyst

Project Team:    Anita Jones, David I’Anson,

Scope of Work: Investigate and/or recommend an electronic document retention
system for the District if feasible

Cost: To Be Determined

Benefit: Currently records are in paper form and not easily accessible. These
documents and records must be retained for long periods of time, some
permanently. There is also the problem of a lack of storage space as the years
pass. There are systems today whereby records and documents can be scanned
into the computer data base and managed in a manner that allows indexing of
documents and easy identification and retrieval, something that is very difficult with
the current paper storage method.

In essence, the system should: reduce costs by automating processes; eliminate
the need for complex user training; enforce security controls with authentication and
audit tracking; demonstrate compliance to legal or regulatory requirements; maintain
a secure and central content repository; improve worker efficiency by allowing
access to organization knowledge assets, anywhere at anytime.

Target Completion Date: July 1, 2010

Current Status: Assigned June 19, 2008

6/27/08: Contacted Donna Bartlett-May, Board Secretary of the Helix Water District.
Donna is a Special District’s Institute Instructor and covered this topic at a
conference the Assistant to the General Manager attended in Anaheim on May 24
and 25, 2007.

In her response she stated they visited similar agencies in their area that had
already purchased some form of document imaging software. She noted that
everyone was using something different. This was an opportunity to evaluate
multiple systems. They asked the agencies to share the pros and cons of the
system they were using and they asked if they would choose it again, and if not,
which software they would chose.
Helix Water District chose at that time Sharepoint which was also used by two other
agencies. They also hired a consultant to help them navigate the initial phase of
decision making. They chose Kofax software to use to take the scanned documents
and place them in Sharepoint. They needed to do some customization to enable
this process. Although other agencies had hired temps to do the scanning, they
chose not to scan older documents and are just scanning current information and all
the prior minutes and resolutions. This is one of the decisions that must be made for
our District as we have 80 years of documents in permanent storage which occupies
approximately      sq. ft. of space at the District.

One of the reasons their District determined the need for an electronic document
retention system was to enable them to retrieve documents in case of a disaster as
their files are not in a fire proof room. Others were the ability to retrieve documents
from their computers at their work stations; the ability to destroy hard copies and
allow more storage space.

6/30/2008 – Ed Prendez spoke with Jim Mark, Records Management Coordinator at
the City of Rancho Mirage. They currently use LaserFIche through ECS Imaging,
Inc.     He indicated a desire to move to another system provided by Sire
Technologies, a system designed for cities and governments. We will be setting up
visits to other cities and districts to see other systems and to talk with their users.

OCR, optical character recognition, enables users to scan a document and
edit/search on words in the document. This feature not built into the system.

2/11/2009 – Ed Prendez held a web conference with e-FileCabinet
(http://www.efilecabinet.com). Attendees: Anita Jones, Branka Lothrop, Crystal
Garcia, David I’Anson. Web conference demonstrated the functionality of storing
documents in an “electronic filing cabinet.” Application’s interface is very similar to a
windows folder directory. OCR is extra feature not included in the base product.
Quote will be sent based on five users, OCR and a high speed scanner.

2/12/2009 – Ed Prendez held a web conference with Incrementum
(http://www.incrementum.us.com) a distributor for LaserFiche. Attendees: Anita
Jones, Branka Lothrop, Crystal Garcia, David I’Anson. Application uses forms to
search on key fields, for example, APN Number, Address, Date, PO Number, etc.
Forms can be created for each department and auto-populate to reduce data entry
errors. Application can post notes, highlight and redact documents. OCR is built into
the application. Quote will be sent based on five users, SQL Server/Express and
high speed scanner.

2/19/2009 – Ed Prendez during a conference call with CDW-G Document
Management Solution learned about Informa (http://www.informasoftware.com ),
Michael Liwanag, Managed Print and Document Mgmt Specialist, has sent me a
demo video to watch. Update to come.



                                           2
2/25/2009 – Ed Prendez communicated with Bruce Elliott, Sire Sales Representative
(http://www.siretechnologies.com), who indicated he is holding a presentation for
Desert Hot Springs the week of March 16th. I have asked him to stop at our District
to give us a presentation.

6/30/2009 – will research Microsoft Sharepoint further.




                                          3
                           PROJECT NO. 2008-22

                        DISTRICT TRAVEL POLICY

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team: Anita Jones, Diane Glanz, Edward Prendez, Branka Lothrop, James
Saulnier

Scope of Work: Develop a comprehensive travel, conference, and meeting policy
for the Board Trustees and staff that incorporate information from prior Resolutions
and administrative procedures. The Policy should specifically address what types of
training is authorized, as well as deal with the issues of meals and travel time.

Cost: Staff time.

Benefit: The current rules regulating travel, conference, and meeting expenses are
not clearly defined making it difficult for Board members and staff to understand. For
staff there is a great deal of confusion over when and if meals, particularly lunch, is
eligible for reimbursement. Similarly, some Board members have expressed
frustration over the lack of clear-cut guidelines as to which conferences and
meetings are appropriate for them to attend. A Policy that clearly addresses these
issues will eliminate some of the inconsistencies and confusion associated with the
current administration of this benefit.

Target Completion Date: Project Completed

Current Status: Project assigned on July 9, 2008

The first phase of this project is developing a clear staff policy on travel, conference,
and meeting expenses. This has been distributed and discussed in management
meetings. The latest draft staff policy has been distributed to the Finance Committee
and is on the Agenda for September’s Meeting. The second phase of this project is
the Trustee version of the Travel, Conference and Meeting Policy which is being
developed by staff through guidance from a Board appointed ad hoc committee. The
ad hoc committee is developing a Travel Resolution for the type of travel authorized
by position on a needs basis.

Resolution 2009-05 Adopted May 12, 2009.
                              PROJECT NO. 23
                                    FY 2008-2009

                   DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT

Project Manager: Ray Griest, Interim General Manager

Project Team: Board of Trustees

Scope of Work: Develop a revised Mission Statement for the Coachella Valley
Mosquito & Vector Control District. The current Mission Statement reads as follows:

“The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District mission is to reduce the
risk of disease transmission by mosquitoes and other vectors for residents and
visitors of the Coachella Valley.”

The Mission Statement drafted on December 11, 2008 by the Team for Mission
Statement Review and Revision reads as follows:

“We are dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for our community by providing
effective and environmentally sound vector control and disease prevention programs
through research, development, and public awareness.”

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: A well drafted Mission Statement is an effective tool to define in broad
terms why an organization exists and to focus the energy of its human resources on
achieving this purpose. The Mission Statement in turn provides the basis for
developing specific goals and objectives for the people in an organization to
accomplish. Goals consistent with the mission are then developed for each
functional unit in the organization, and project objectives with established completion
dates are assigned to individuals and teams to attain each of these goals.

Target Completion Date: Project completed

Current Status: Revised Mission Statement approved by the Board of Trustees at
the September 9, 2008 Meeting.
                           PROJECT NO. 2008-24

                   DEVELOP A CLASSIFICATION PLAN

Project Manager: Anita Jones, Human Resources Manager

Project Team: David I’Anson, Ray Griest, Branka Lothrop, James Saulnier

Scope of Work: Pursuant to the Personnel Policy and Procedures Manual, prepare
a Classification Plan consisting of the class specifications for all authorized positions
in the District.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: The Personnel Policy and Procedures Manual assigns to the General
Manager the responsibility to prepare and maintain a Classification Plan consisting
of those authorized positions employed by the District arranged into classes,
together with the titles and specifications describing each class. The Human
Resources Manager currently maintains a set of job descriptions that are used for
recruitments, and with certain modifications these can be incorporated into the
classification plan format that is referenced in the District’s Personnel Manual. The
objective of this Project will be to develop a standard format, to update the
information included in the new class specifications, and to eliminate certain internal
inconsistencies that exist in the current job descriptions.

Up to date class specifications that clearly define the duties and responsibilities of
employees are an important corner stone in building an efficient and effective
personnel system. Personnel costs are a substantial portion of this District’s budget.
A properly prepared and maintained Classification Plan will provide the Board of
Trustees and the staff with a necessary tool to properly allocate resources on an
ongoing basis to accomplish the District’s assigned mission.

Target Completion Date: Revised from July 1, 2009 to September 8, 2009

Current Status: A draft Classification Plan has been prepared that incorporates
input from the management group and any agreed to changes resulting from our
discussions with the California School Employees Association and the Teamsters.
The Classification Plan will include class specifications for some positions that are
no longer being used and these should be eliminated with Board approval after the
FY 2009-2010 Budget is adopted. Also included in the Classification Plan are class
specifications for new positions that may or may not be approved by the Board.
These can also be eliminated with Board approval from the Classification Plan after
the FY 2009-2010 Budget is adopted.
                       PROJECT NO. 2009-01

                   INFORMAL BIDDING PROCEDURE

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team: Finance Committee

Scope of Work: Develop a procedure for District to use informal bidding rather
than go to formal bid for every item over $5,000

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Reduce time spent on formal bidding

Target Completion Date: June 30, 2010

Current Status: Review after Strategic Plan
                             PROJECT NO. 2009-02

     SUCCESSION & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team: Anita Jones, Diane Glanz, Branka Lothrop, James Saulnier, Mike Martinez

Scope of Work: The strategic planning event held in autumn of 2007, called for an enhanced
and formalized management and leadership development program. This would include
succession planning, internal staff advancement, and support for staff wishing to enhance their
education through tuition reimbursement. The planning event found that the District lacked a
written policy regarding the succession process, lacked clear steps for education and promotion,
and has no formal guidelines for advancement.

The Succession and Professional Development Plan will:
•     Create a personal career development plan for individual employees
•     Develop a written plan for employee promotions
•     Develop supervisory and management programs
•     Create improved written protocols for training
•     Develop Staff advancement policy that allows for flexibility
•     Provide vocational training

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Reach the District goal of Empowering & Engaging Our Employees

Target Completion Date: Project Completed

Current Status: Tuition Reimbursement Policy adopted May 12, 2009.
                       PROJECT NO. 2009-03

                   TRUSTEE ORIENTATION PLAN

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team, Anita Jones, Diane Glanz, James Saulnier, Branka Lothrop, ad
hoc committee

Scope of Work: The strategic planning event held in autumn of 2007, called for
a Board Orientation and Development Program that would include developing
Board procedures, and encouraging education through CSDA Leadership
Programs. The orientation plan for Trustees will cover education regarding
Vectors, the District policies and procedures, Brown Act, AB1234 requirements,
Form 700 reporting and other subjects the ad hoc committee decides.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Educates and informs Trustees helping them to govern the District in
the goal of Positioning Ourselves for Excellence

Target Completion Date: June 30, 2010

Current Status: Project assigned on January 22, 2009
                        PROJECT NO. 2009-04

                       FUND BALANCE POLICY

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team, Byron Jessie, Finance Committee

Scope of Work: Develop a comprehensive fund balance policy that addresses
appropriate size of unreserved fund balance, how resources are set aside for
unreserved fund balance, and methods of utilizing unreserved fund balance.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Help District plan for contingencies and for long term growth

Target Completion Date: June 30, 2010

Current Status: Draft policy distributed to Finance Committee
                        PROJECT NO. 2009-05

    PESTICIDE INVENTORY MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team, Edward Prendez, Diane Glanz, Rod Chamberlain, Phil Boeing,
Jim Saulnier, Branka Lothrop

Scope of Work: Develop a strategy for management of pesticide inventory

This project includes a policy that determines the stock of pesticides held on site.
An emergency level of adulticide / larvacide pesticides to use for Epidemic
Condition as needed in the CVMVCD Mosquito-borne Virus Surveillance and
Response Plan will be held on site at all times. A two months supply of adulticide
/ larvacide will be ordered bimonthly no more than this will be held in storage,
inventory will be FIFO basis the Contingency pesticides will be used and
replenished so chemicals will not expire. All other pesticides will be stored for no
more than 2 months ordered bimonthly also.

Possibilities include purchasing of chemicals approved at the beginning of the
fiscal year, suppliers agree to predetermined delivery dates. Any purchase over
and above the agreed policy will go before the Board for approval.

A bar code reader will be used to track chemicals used and stored. This will help
to record treatments in ESRI, help for inventory control and for ordering inventory
as reports will show when replenishment is needed.

Cost: Staff time, software and hardware for bar code reader

Benefit: Track chemical usage, more accountable, help with budgeting, better
use of District resources (i.e. fund balance held in interest bearing accounts
rather than storage).

Target Completion Date: June 30, 2010

Current Status: Project assigned January 30, 2009
                         PROJECT NO. 2009-06

    FUNDING DISTRICT’S OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT
             BENEFITS (OPEB) LIABILITY

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team, Anita Jones, Finance Committee

Scope of Work: Develop a strategy for pre-funding the District’s other post
employment benefits.

The term OPEB is other post-employment benefits. These are retirement
healthcare benefits medical, dental, vision, and other health related benefits
provided separately or provided through a defined benefit pension plan. It also
includes post-employment benefits such as life insurance, disability and long
term care benefits. Statement No. 45 of the Governmental Accounting Standards
Board (GASB 45), Accounting and Financial Reporting by Employers for Post-
employment Benefits Other Than Pensions, establishes the standards for the
measurement, recognition, and display of OPEB expense/expenditures, and
related liabilities (assets) in the financial reports of state and local governmental
employers. The GASB statement recommends government employers pre-fund
the liability associated with these costs.
Benefits

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Benefits of pre-funding future OPEB costs include earnings from trust
fund investments reduce employer OPEB costs; employer investment rate
assumptions, known as discount rate assumptions, will be higher, reducing
annual expenses and the unfunded liability for OPEB costs; prevents OPEB
obligation from becoming a significant liability on balance sheet and improves
financial security for active workers and retirees.

Target Completion Date: June 30, 2010

Current Status: Finance Manager is scheduled to go to CalPERS CERBT
Workshop September 2, 2009. This item will be presented to the Board by
October 2009.
                        PROJECT NO. 2009-07

    INVENTORY & CATALOGUE ASSESTS OVER $500

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team, Edward Prendez

Scope of Work: Inventory and catalogue all District equipment that has a useful
lifespan of more than one year and is worth more than $500.

Cost: $55,000 allocated in FY 2009-10 Capital Budget for software, hardware
and an inventory specialist

Benefit: Benefits include controlling non-capitalized assets, help in calculating
equipment replacement needs which in turn will make it easier to budget for
these items.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: Project added April 1, 2009
                        PROJECT NO. 2009-08

  EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT AND DISPOSAL POLICY

Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team, Edward Prendez, Byron Jessie

Scope of Work: Documenting a process and procedure for equipment
replacement and disposal of capital items with an historical cost of over $5,000.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: The current purchasing policy allows for disposal of surplus supplies but
does not identify what the procedure is for identifying surplus equipment or for
equipment replacement. Benefits include calculating future equipment
replacement needs, which helps management and the Board make decisions on
replacement and disposal of equipment through the budget process.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: Project added April 1, 2009
                       PROJECT NO. 2009-09

 MANAGEMENT OF DISTRICT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
                  NETWORK

Project Manager: Edward Prendez, Information Systems Analyst

Project Team, David I’Anson

Scope of Work: Develop a management plan for the District’s Information
Systems Network. This will include security of network, backup of information,
updating of software, identifying hardware and software needs, equipment
replacement, licensing, network consulting and control and security of hardware.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Benefits include documenting a management protocol for the Districts
Information Systems Network, planning for future equipment replacement needs,
software needs, and management and security of the network.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: Project added April 1, 2009
                       PROJECT NO. 2009-10

             INVENTORY & CATALOGUE DISTRICT
                 BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES

Project Manager: Byron Jessie, Fleet Facilities Supervisor

Project Team, David I’Anson, Edward Prendez

Scope of Work: Inventory and catalogue all District buildings and structures in
order to establish replacement values and allocate resources

Cost: $1,000 for scanner and identification labels (Software to support Project
2009-07 should support this Project as well)

Benefit: Benefits include documenting facilities for disaster planning,
replacement, improvement and identifying future needs for facility upgrades.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: Project added April 1, 2009
                        PROJECT NO. 2009-11

      GIS ENHANCEMENT OF DISTRICT OPERATIONS


Project Manager: Edward Prendez, Information Systems Analyst

Project Team, Cary Roberts, Branka Lothrop, Jim Saulnier, David I’Anson

Scope of Work Enhancing the District operations through the use of Geographic
Information Systems in the field. The GIS system will be responsible for capturing
all the District’s activities related to treatment, surveillance, and reporting.

Cost: $350,000 (cost estimate includes software and hardware)

Benefit: The benefits include accurately reporting of surveillance information,
reporting of treatments and enabling the District to manage field operations in
real time as the individual operators enter their data from the field.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: The District has purchased software from ESRI, and has
currently purchased four Toughbooks. The next stage is to evaluate the best
practices and protocols to gain best use of this technology.

June 30, 2009 – Eight of the nine, Panasonic Toughbooks have arrived.
Installation of the Mobile Inspection Application is scheduled to being the week of
July 20th. Once the application is installed, classroom style training sessions can
begin in the Boardroom using the Panasonic Toughbooks. A manual is also
being developed for technicians on the Mobile Inspection Application. Below is
the section explaining the button functionality of the “Main Toolbar” in the
application. The vehicle mounts for the Toughbooks are in the process of being
order and the components should be received in two to three weeks.
                       PROJECT NO. 2009-12

      ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
                      MANUAL


Project Manager: David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Project Team, Anita Jones, Jim Saulnier, Branka Lothrop

Scope of Work Develop an Administrative Policies and Procedures Manual to
memorialize operational practices currently in use by the District.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Address Grand Jury recommendations related to completing a
procedure manual for finance, but also for personnel and other operational areas
in order to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of District operations.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: A first draft of an Administrative Policies and Procedures
Manual has been developed by staff for review by the Board.
                       PROJECT NO. 2009-13

                        MUD ROOM REMODEL


Project Manager: Byron Jessie, Fleet Facilities Supervisor

Project Team, Jim Saulnier, Branka Lothrop, David I’Anson

Scope of Work Enclosing Mud Room, adding air conditioning and install new ice
making machine

Cost: FY2009-10 Budget Estimate is $84,000

Benefit: Will make better use of Mud Room and allow ice making machine to
operate more efficiently

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: A needs assessment and RFP are planned to be ready for the
August Board Meeting
                       PROJECT NO. 2009-14

    DISTRICT VEHICLE NEEDS ASSESSMENT & SHOP
                      AUDIT


Project Manager: Branka Lothrop, General Manager

Project Team, Jim Saulnier, Byron Jessie, David I’Anson

Scope of Work: Evaluate the District’s current vehicle need based on position
analysis and job description, evaluate the District’s current complement of
vehicles, recommend purchases and / or disposals, evaluate purchasing as
opposed to leasing, analyze repair and maintenance program.

Cost: Staff time

Benefit: Will help District plan better use of resources by comprehensively
evaluating vehicle purchasing, retention and disposal as well as repairing and
maintenance.

Target Completion Date: December 31, 2009

Current Status: Project added June 16, 2009
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009



Agenda Item: Old Business
Approval for Trustees attending the California Special Districts Association Strategic Planning
for Special Districts Workshop August 5, 2009, in San Diego, to be reimbursed for one nights
lodging including meals at the regular federal per diem for San Diego of $203 each from Fund
#6110.01.250, Trustee Travel – President Underwood and Branka B. Lothrop, General
Manager

Background:
The attendance of this workshop was approved at the June 2009 Board Meeting, however, the
workshop starts at 9:00 am. Travel from the Valley to San Diego takes at least two hours, traffic
congestion will probably add more time to the journey. For San Diego, the regular federal per
diem rate in IRS Publication 1542 for lodging is $139 and $64 for meals and incidental expenses
(M&IE) giving a total reimbursable per Trustee of $203. Currently we have four Trustees
registered to attend the workshop.

Staff Recommendation:
Take whatever action deemed necessary by the Board.

Fiscal Impact:
Balance available from Fund #6110.01.250 is $15,400.00 which is 100% of the budgeted amount
for this line item. Per Trustee, this expenditure is approximately 1% of the available balance.
                                            Section

                                             11




           New Business




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                      Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                            July 14, 2009



Agenda Item: New Business
Discussion and action relating to ratification of the Tentative Agreement between the District
and employees in the Clerical, Professional, Supervisory, and Management Bargaining Units
represented by Teamsters – Jeffrey Freedman, Don Jeffers, and Branka B. Lothrop, General
Manager

Background:
District representatives and Teamsters representatives have reached a Tentative Agreement on
matters related to wages, hours, terms and conditions of employment for the employees in the
Clerical, Professional, Supervisory, and Management Bargaining Units. The term of the
Agreement is for two years from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2011. The specifics of the Agreement
have been discussed in Closed Session, and this item on tonight’s Agenda provides the Board
with an opportunity to discuss the matter in Open Session, receive public input, and take
appropriate action.

Staff Recommendation:
Approval
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                                                  July 14, 2009




Agenda Topic: New Business
Consideration of a proposed Public Records policy that will permit the posting of certain public
documents that are subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act or any other
applicable law on the CVMVCD web site at the direction of the Board of Trustees or at the
discretion of the General Manager – General Manager, Branka B. Lothrop and Legal
Council, Steve B. Quintanilla

Background:
In an effort to increase transparency of the District’s business, it is recommended that certain
public documents that are subject to disclosure under the Public Records Act or any other
applicable law be posted on the District’s website at either the direction of the Board or at the
discretion of the General Manager. Under the Public Records Act, it is provided that access to
information concerning the conduct of the people’s business is a fundamental and necessary right
of every person in the state.

The general policy of the Public Records Act favors disclosure and a refusal to disclose
information must be justified by the specific exceptions enumerated in the Act. In general, any
document is subject to inspection and copying if it is a writing containing information relating to
the conduct of the District’s business that is prepared, owned, used, or retained by the District
regardless of its physical form or characteristics. There are few exemptions, which include but
are not limited to:
   •   Preliminary drafts, notes or inter-agency / intra-agency memoranda if these are not
       retained by the District in the ordinary course of business and if the public interest in
       nondisclosure outweighs the interest in disclosure;
   •   Litigation documents pertaining to pending litigation, until the litigation is finally
       adjudicated or settled; and
   •   Personnel, medical or similar records if these kinds of records would constitute an
       unwarranted invasion of privacy.

Ordinarily, under the Public Records Act, any public document requested by the public must be
made available for public inspection at all times during the normal office hours of the District.

Although the Public Records Act describes what documents must be made available for
inspection and copying by the public and when such documents must be made available for
inspection, the Act allows a public agency to adopt requirements for itself that allow for faster,
more efficient or greater access to records than prescribed by the minimum standards created by
the Act.

In light of the above, posting certain public documents (that contain information relating to the
conduct of the District’s business that is prepared, owned, used, or retained by the District) on
the District’s website will clearly provide faster, more efficient and greater access to certain
records of the District than the minimum standards created by the Public Records Act. Such a
policy will not only be consistent with the objectives of the Public Records Act 1, but will also
help build the public’s trust and confidence in the District’s business operations and in the
people, who govern, administer and carry out the everyday duties of the District. It may also
help reduce the District’s costs in responding to various Public Records Act requests for records
that can be easily obtained from the District’s website.

The kinds of documents that are being proposed to be posted on the District’s website (in
addition to those that are already posted 2) include but are not limited to the following:

    •    Grand Jury Report
    •    Grand Jury Response
    •    Both Labor Unions’ Memoranda of Understanding
    •    Job Descriptions
    •    Employee Salaries
    •    Final Public Employment Relations Board Decisions and Orders
    •    Requests for Proposals
    •    Consultant Contracts
    •    Settlement Agreements
    •    District Awards and Recognition Certificates
    •    Blanket Inspection Warrant

In addition to the above, the Board of Trustees and the General Manager should have the
discretion to have other documents posted on the District’s website, provided that the posting of
such documents do not result in an unwarranted invasion of a particular individual’s right of
privacy or disclose any confidential information that may put the District at a disadvantage in the
context of pending litigation, real estate negotiations, labor negotiations, etc. Moreover, it is
proposed that such documents should remain posted for time periods deemed sufficient by either
the Board or General Manager. 3

In conclusion, this proposed policy will lead to not only greater transparency but it will also
greatly improve the level of communication between the Board, Management and District staff.
In addition, this policy should provide a mechanism for all interested public agencies (and the
local media) to easily monitor the business operations of the District in a manner that was never
made available to them in the past.


1
  This proposed policy is intended to supplement the minimum standards of the Public Records Act.
2
  The District currently posts Board agendas, minutes, the District’s current Fiscal Year Budget, etc. on its website.
3
  This proposed policy is not intended to supplement or replace any applicable records retention requirements.
Staff Recommendation:
That the Board of Trustees approve the proposed Public Records policy to permit the posting of
certain District documents on the District’s website at the direction of the Board or at the
discretion of the General Manager.

Fiscal Impact:
None




P:\APPS\WPDATA\MVCD\0001-01 GENERAL\DOC\009 - Website Postings Staff Report (07.07.09).doc
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                                                  July 14, 2009




Agenda Topic: New Business
Proposed change in Board of Trustees regular meeting schedule to exclude the month of August
– Branka B. Lothrop, General Manager and Steven B. Quintanilla, Legal Counsel

Background:
Currently, the Board of Trustees (“Board”) regularly meets the second Tuesday of every month
throughout the year. This is in conformance with section 2028 of the California Health and
Safety Code, which provides that a board of trustees is required to meet “at least once every
three months.”

In the Coachella Valley, it is not uncommon for many local jurisdictions to “go dark” for the
month of August. For instance, the cities of Cathedral City, Desert Hot Springs, La Quinta, Palm
Desert, Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage do not traditionally conduct both of their scheduled
bimonthly regular meetings of their city councils in the month of August. (Some of these cities
conduct no regular city council meetings at all during August while some only conduct one their
two regular city council meetings during August.) Traditionally, most of the cities in the
Coachella Valley have refrained from holding both of their regular city council meetings in
August for two primary reasons: (1) the intense summer heat motivates many full time residents
(and staff) to take vacations outside of the Coachella Valley, and (2) August is considered part of
the “off season” when many part time residents (“snowbirds”) are not present to attend public
meetings that may involve very important matters that may affect their interests in some manner.

In light of the fact that the jurisdictional boundaries of the District encompass the boundaries of
all nine Coachella Valley cities, it is reasonable to conclude that the same reasons why the cities
have gone dark for the month of August equally apply to the District. In addition, since several
of the Trustees also serve as city council members of some of the local cities, it may be very
accommodating to their personal/family schedules if they could also count on not having to
attend any regular District Board meetings in the month of August.

This proposal should not disrupt the business of the District in any significant manner, since the
daily operations of the District will continue as usual and Board will always have the opportunity
to call special meetings to deal with matters that require the immediate attention of the Board.

If the Board approves “going dark” for the month of August, the monthly stipend provided to the
Trustees will be eliminated, although those Trustees who are able to any attend special meetings,
standing committee meetings or ad-hoc subcommittee meetings called during the month of
August will be compensated as required under the current policy.
Staff Recommendation:
That the Board take whatever action it deems appropriate.

Fiscal Impact:
Potential savings of $100 dollars per Trustee for attending a single regular meeting plus the cost
of staff time to prepare for and attend a single regular meeting and the cost of electricity
associated with conducting a single regular meeting in the month of August. Currently, the fund
balance of Fund # 6115.01.250 - Trustee Support is $14,400.




P:\APPS\WPDATA\MVCD\0001-01 GENERAL\DOC\010 - Cancellation of August Regular Meeting Staff Report (07.14.09).doc
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009




Agenda Item: New Business
Approval and /or Discussion of Resolution No. 2009-12 authorizing the General Manager and
Finance Manager to Approve Transfer of Funds between the District’s Desert Commercial
Accounts - David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Background:
This resolution supersedes Resolution 2007-16. It gives authorization for the General Manager to
be added to the District’s Desert Commercial Bank accounts and for the General Manager to
authorize fund transfers, initiated by the accounting clerks, between the Market Rate, General
Checking, and Payroll accounts. Currently, because of District reorganization, only the Finance
Manager has this capability.

Staff Recommendation:
Approve Resolution No. 2009-12 Authorize the General Manager and Finance Manager to
Approve Transfer of Funds between the District’s Desert Commercial Accounts.
                                    Resolution No. 2009-12

            A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE
      COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
     TO AUTHORIZE THE GENERAL MANAGER AND FINANCE MANAGER TO
      APPROVE TRANSFERS OF FUNDS BETWEEN THE DISTRICT’S DESERT
                    COMMERCIAL BANK ACCOUNTS

WHEREAS, the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District is a political sub-
division and a “local agency” of the State of California, created and operating under the authority
and provisions of California Health and Safety Code Section 2000 et. seq., and is also a “local
agency” within the meaning of Section 53600 of the California Government Code, and

WHEREAS, this Board of Trustees of said District has been granted the statutory authority and
responsibility to administer the financial affairs of the District;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella Valley
Mosquito and Vector Control District that the General Manager and Finance Manager, subject to
the District’s Investment Policy, are hereby authorized to approve transfers of funds initiated by
an Accounting Clerk between the District’s following Desert Commercial Bank accounts: Market
Rate, General Checking, Payroll Checking, and Building Fund, which shall supersede the
provisions set forth in Resolution 2007-16.

PASSED AND ADOPTED by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella Valley Mosquito and
Vector Control District on this 14th day of July 2009 by the following vote:

         AYES:
         NOES:
         ABSENT:
         ABSTAIN:


                              ____________________________________
                              Bruce Underwood, President, Board of Trustees
                              Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District


         ATTEST:
                              ____________________________________
                              Gary Howell, Secretary/Treasurer
                              Board of Trustees, Coachella Valley Mosquito &
                              Vector Control District




Res2009-12
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009




Agenda Item: New Business
Approval and /or Discussion of Resolution No. 2009-14 Establishing a New Policy and
Procedures Regarding the Expenditures of the District - David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Background:
This resolution states that all expenditures of the District have to be approved by the Board of
Trustees before checks are issued except for payroll and benefit related obligations to comply
with both the CSEA and Teamster Memoranda of Understanding and State Law, payment of
utility bills, replenishment of the District’s postage meter and the District’s Petty Cash fund.

In addition this resolution authorizes the District to make electronic draft payment of payroll and
benefit related obligations to comply with both the CSEA and Teamster Memoranda of
Understanding and State Law, payment of utility bills. Reasoning behind this change is that these
expenditures are already pre-approved, and it is more efficient to make payment in this way. For
example CalPERS payments are often incurring late fees because the checks are signed once a
month, paying electronically would eliminate these charges.


Staff Recommendation:
Approve Resolution No. 2009-14 Establishing a New Policy and Procedures Regarding the
Expenditures of the District
                               Resolution No. 2009-14

   A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE COACHELLA
        VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
   ESTABLISHING A NEW POLICY AND PROCEDURES REGARDING THE
                 EXPENDITURES OF THE DISTRICT

WHEREAS, the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District (“District”) is a
political sub-division and a “local agency” of the State of California, created and
operating under the authority and provisions of California Health and Safety Code
Section 2000 and following, and is also a “local agency” within the meaning of Section
53600 of the California Government Code, and

WHEREAS, the Board of Trustees of the District is required to establish Policy and
Procedures regarding the expenditures of the District.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella
Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District that the District’s Purchasing Policy and
Procedures shall be amended as follows:

    1. The Board must approve expenditures before checks are sent except for: (1)
       payroll and benefit related obligations to comply with the CSEA and Teamster
       Memoranda of Understanding and State law, (2) payment of utility bills, (3)
       replenishment of the District’s postage meter and (4) replenishment of the
       District’s Petty Cash fund.

    2. The payment of payroll and benefit related obligations to comply with CSEA and
       Teamster Memoranda of Understanding and State law, and the payment of utility
       bills may be made by electronic draft.

PASSED AND ADOPTED by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella Valley Mosquito
and Vector Control District on this 14th day of July 2009 by the following vote:

         AYES:
         NOES:
         ABSENT:
         ABSTAIN:

                            Bruce Underwood, President, Board of Trustees
                            Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District


         ATTEST:

                            Gary Howell, Secretary/Treasurer, Board of Trustees
                            Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District


Res 2009-14.Doc
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009



Agenda Item: New Business
Approval and/or Discussion of Resolution 2009–15 Establishing Signature Approval for Checks
Written from District Accounts—David I’Anson, Finance Manager

Background:
Currently all checks that are written by the District are signed by any two Trustees from the
following: the President, Vice President, Secretary / Treasurer or Finance Committee Trustee.
The District prints approximately between 80 and 100 checks a month, all of these need to be
signed. The Finance Committee reviews all expenditures on a monthly basis and signs the checks
on the night of the Board Meeting. This resolution establishes the signature approval for checks
written by the District, authorizes the District to use a check signing machine to sign the checks
below $10,000. Checks above $10,000 will still need manual signatories. Benefit of this will
reduce the time spent by Trustees signing checks.

Staff Recommendation:
Approve Resolution 2009-15

Fiscal Impact:
None
                                              Resolution No. 2009 - 15

                  A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE
             COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                ESTABLISHING SIGNATURE APPROVAL FOR BANK DRAFTS
                             WRITTEN BY THE DISTRICT

WHEREAS, the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District is a political subdivision
and a “local agency” of the State of California, created and operating under the authority and
provisions of California Health and Safety Code Section 2000 et. seq., and is also a “local agency”
within the meaning of Section 53600 of the California Government Code; and

WHEREAS, there is a need to annually establish authorization to sign bank drafts for District
expenses; and

WHEREAS, this Board of Trustees of said District has been granted the statutory authority and
responsibility to administer the financial affairs of the District.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella Valley
Mosquito and Vector Control District that:

    1. The Finance Committee Trustee / Trustees, in addition to the President, Vice-President and
       Secretary/Treasurer are authorized to sign bank drafts for District expenses.

    2. Bank drafts for the payment of expenditures up to $9,999.99 that are not pre-authorized
       per Resolution 2009-14, may be electronically signed with the signature of the President
       and the Secretary / Treasurer.

    3. Bank drafts for expenditures $10,000 and over that are not pre-authorized per Resolution
       2009-14, must be manually signed by the President and at least one of the following in
       this order of availability: Secretary / Treasurer, Vice President, or a Finance Committee
       Trustee.


PASSED AND ADOPTED by the Board of Trustees of the Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector
Control District on this 14th day of July 2009 by the following vote:

         AYES:
         NOES:
         ABSENT:
         ABSTAIN:
                                      _______________________________________
                                      Bruce Underwood, President, Board of Trustees
                                      Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District


         ATTEST:                      _______________________________________
                                      Gary Howell, Secretary/Treasurer, Board of Trustees
                                      Coachella Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District

P:\APPS\WPDATA\MVCD\0007-01 FINANCE\DOC\002 Resolution 2009-15 - Checks Written by the District (7.6.09).doc




Res2009-15
                                            Section

                                             13




           Report of
       District Activities




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                                                   FINANCE

The financial reports included in the packet show the balance sheet, receipts, and the revenue and
expenditure report for the month ending May 31, 2009. The revenue and expenditure report
shows that the operating budget expenditure for July 1 to May 31, 2009 is $7,140,237; total
revenue is $8,754,673 resulting in excess revenue over (under) expenditure for the year to May
31, 2009 of $1,614,436. This item is reported on the balance sheet as Excess Revenue over
(under) Expenditures.

The District’s investment fund balance for the period ending May 31, 2009, is $15,892,344; the
portfolio composition is shown in the pie chart. Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) accounts
for 35 % of the District’s investments; the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund is 49 % of
the total. The LAIF yield for the end of May 2009 was 1.53 %; the Riverside County Pooled
Investment Fund was 1.578 %; this gives an overall weighted yield for District investments of
1.54 %.

District Investment Portfolio 5/31/2009




                         Certificate of Deposits
                                   6%
                     Money Market
                         10%
                                                                     Local Agency
                                                                   Investment Fund
                                                                         35%




                       Riverside County
                      Pooled Investment
                             Fund
                             49%




The auditors Mayer Hoffman and McCann are scheduled to be at the District for the two weeks
commencing August 3, 2009.
                                  HUMAN RESOURCES

Recruitment
Recruitment has begun for Seasonal Vector Control Operators.

Job Offers Extended
None

New Employees
None

New Assignments

     Employee             Current Position       New Assignment            Effective Date
Jeremy Wittie           Vector Ecologist         Interim Scientific         July 6, 2009
                                                Operations Manager

Vacant Positions

                                                                              Number of
        Department                            Position
                                                                              Vacancies
Lab/Bio-Control               Scientific Operations Manager                      1
Total Vacancies                                                                  1

Training

Employee             Position                Training                    Date
Crystal Garcia       HR Clerk/Clerk of the   Administrative Assistants   June 16-17
                     Board                   Conference
Marc Kensington      Lab Assistant I         Excel (online training)     June 17 – July 29
Phil Boeing          Field Supervisor        PAPA              Seminar   June 18
                                             (continuing education)
Maria Kylis          Community Educator      PAPA              Seminar   June 18
                                             (continuing education)
Jim Saulnier         Operations Manager      PAPA              Seminar   June 18
                                             (continuing education)
Phil Boeing          Field Supervisor        Managing Performance        June 24
Rodney               Field Supervisor        Managing Performance        June 24
Chamberlain
David I’Anson        Finance Manager         Managing Performance        June 24
Byron Jessie         Fleet/Facilities        Managing Performance        June 24
                     Supervisor
Anita Jones          Human Resources         Managing Performance        June 24
                     Manager
Branka Lothrop       General Manager         Managing Performance        June 24
Jim Saulnier         Operations Manager      Managing Performance        June 24
Victor Teran         Field Supervisor          Managing Performance        June 24
Don Warkentin        Senior Biologist          Managing Performance        June 24
Jeremy Wittie        Vector Ecologist          Managing Performance        June 24

CSEA Catastrophic Sick Leave Bank
In compliance with the 2008-2011 Memorandum of Understanding between CVMVCD and
CSEA, a Catastrophic Sick Leave Bank has been established for CSEA members. Catastrophic
Leave Bank Donation, Withdrawal Request and Attending Physician’s Statement forms have
been distributed to all CSEA members. Open enrollment for membership and donation of sick
leave days to the bank is July 1 through October 1.


                         COMMUNITY OUTREACH PROGRAM

TV
Television spots on West Nile Virus featuring the “I Am One” PSA, began running on KESQ,
KMIR and KDFX during local morning and evening news segments, Good Morning America,
Ellen, Dr. Phil, The Doctors, and the Early Show. The 30 second spot illustrates that while most
people infected with West Nile virus (WNv) will show mild or no symptoms, there is a chance
you will be one whose life is changed forever by this disease. The Public Service
Announcement displays WNv survivors that know first hand about the devastating effects of this
disease.

RADIO
The District has began running 59 radio spots per week West Nile virus in English and Spanish
on stations 1270AM La Voz, KNEWS 970, 1140, and 1250. The 30 second spot explains to
residents the dangers of West Nile virus and how they can prevent mosquito bites.

PRESS
Duane Gang, a reporter for the Press Enterprise, visited the District on June 25th to tour the
facility and to do a story on the research that is being done. Gang’s article, “Vector Control
District Works to Keep Bugs Out All Year,” focused on the new strain of cold water
mosquitofish the District will be using this coming winter – see attached.

 The press releases “Vector Control’s Journey with Red Imported Fire Ants” was distributed on
June 29, 2009. The news release had a brief history of red imported fire ants (RIFA) and their
journey to the Coachella Valley - see attached.

The District recently sent an article on neglected pools and the importance of reporting them to
all the cities. This article was published in Palm Desert, La Quinta and Indian Wells newsletters
– see attached.
          DEPARTMENT OF BIOCONTROL AND EFFICACY ASSESSMENT

   •   During June, 2009, the Department of Biocontrol and Efficacy Assessment
       focused on the following activities:

Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis)
  • The indoor mosquitofish production system has produced 27,860 fish for the month of
      May, 2009. (Final fry count is one month behind). The fry have been collected and
      transferred to grow-out indoor tanks, while fingerlings were transferred to the grow-out
      outdoor pond.

                                        Mosquitofish
                                        Production       2006       2007       2008     2009
                                           January        N/A       5,250     31,620   28,000
                                           February       N/A      13,655     31,817   11,525
                                            March         N/A       5,419     25,701   11,900
                                             April        N/A      10,637     20,618   23,735
                                             May          N/A      13250      26,510   27,860
                                             June        1,197     26,997     25,805
                                             July        3,512     45,332     36,055
                                            August      12,758     54,525     61,020
                                          September     19,844     37,773     63,800
                                           October      11,751     23,554     50,550
                                          November      18,319     18,314     35,625
                                          December      10,557     23679      31,000
                                           TOTAL        77,938    278,385    440,121   103,020
                                                             M os quitofis h
                                                       TANK SYSTEM PRODUCTION

                                        70,000

                                                                                          January
                                        60,000
                                                                                          February
                                                                                          March
               Number of fry produced




                                        50,000
                                                                                          April

                                        40,000                                            May
                                                                                          June
                                        30,000                                            July
                                                                                          August
                                        20,000                                            September
                                                                                          October
                                        10,000                                            November
                                                                                          December
                                            0
                                                       2008                 2009
                                                                 ye ar
   •   As indicated by the presented data and graph, tank system production declined during the
       months of February and March 2009 compared with the same months of 2008. This
       decline may have been a result of the age of the majority of female broodstock. These
       spent females are being removed from the broodstock tanks and stocked into various
       ponds, basins, and neglected pools for integrated control. They are being replaced in the
       tanks with young newly mature females. Production data for April and May, 2009
       indicate that this strategy to increase production should be continued to determine if
       production numbers will consistently return to the numbers achieved for 2008.

   •   Cold tolerant Gambusia affinis (mosquitofish) from New Jersey have acclimated well to
       their new surroundings. Mortality is less than 1% after approximately 4.5 months in our
       system. Consumption of mosquito larvae/pupae and prepared feed has increased daily.
       Fry production has begun, and approximately 1000 fry have been collected and
       transferred to growth tanks.

   •   As of June 29, 2009, 75 neglected pools are currently under mosquito control
       management by Gambusia affinis (mosquitofish). These pools are located in the
       following cities: 19 in Palm Springs, 5 in Cathedral City, 19 in La Quinta, 9 in Desert Hot
       Springs, 1 in Rancho Mirage, 18 in Indio, and 4 in Palm Desert. Because of a
       tremendous increase in the number of neglected pools identified from the 2009 aerial
       survey, plans are underway to train additional District staff to assist with mosquitofish
       stocking and assessment.

Tadpole shrimp (Triops newberryi)

   •   A total of 1216 kg of District-produced tadpole shrimp egg-laden soil (190 eggs/kg)
       scraped from the District’s outdoor tadpole shrimp pond and from tadpole shrimp ponds
       located on the campus of the University of California; Riverside was distributed to Oasis
       Date Garden in June of 2009. Assessment by District staff indicates that tadpole shrimp
       hatch and development at Oasis Date Garden is excellent six days after irrigation
       flooding. Examination of collected tadpole shrimps indicates that egg production has
       already occurred six days post flooding.

   •   Soil (1.5 inches) containing tadpole shrimp eggs was distributed into the outdoor shrimp
       production pond. The pond was flooded for the first time this season on May 18. No
       tadpole shrimp survived until adulthood. The pond is currently dry and it will be refolded.

Nematodes (Romanomermis iyengari and Romanomermis culicivorax)

   •   From January through June, 2009, three infections for assessing and maintaining
       nematode colonies have been performed. The third infection with Romanomermis
       iyengari and collection of post-parasitic nematodes has been completed. Results ranged
       from 83% to 100% parasitism of mosquito larvae.
   Larval Bioassays

       •   Larval Bioassays are being developed and considered to utilize for two purposes.
           First, to test each lot of received control products of Bti, B.spericus, and methoprene
           received by the District for activity versus Culex quinquefaciatus mosquitoes.
           Second, to monitor wild populations of Culex quinquefaciatus and to detect the
           possible development of resistance versus Bti, Bacillus sphericus, and methoprene.
           Preliminary tests were conducted in June, 2009 by District staff using the District’s
           colony of Culex quinquefaciatus to develop test methodology appropriate for
           conducting these bioassays.

   Outdoor Mosquitofish and Microcosm Pond Expansion

       •   Draft plans and a request for proposal (rfp) outline for expansion of outdoor
           mosquitofish and microcosm ponds were drawn and submitted to the General
           Manager. Pending additional consideration and discussion, a final plan and rfp will
           be prepared and released.

Urban Mosquitofish Stocking and Assessment

       •   Three urban potential mosquito sources in Indio that had been stocked with
           mosquitofish by District staff between August 2007 and April 2009 were assessed.
           Detention pond, an unfinished residential pond and river water feature that had been
           stocked in 2007, were found to be teeming with mosquitofish, including adult fish
           and fry, indicating that mosquitofish breeding had occurred at these locations. There
           was no observed mosquito breeding at these locations.

       •   At the third location, an approximately 5000 sq. ft. pond stocked in April 2009, no
           mosquitofish were found. Turtles that were observed in the pond may have eaten the
           mosquitofish. No mosquito breeding was observed.



                          DISEASE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM


Surveillance include the monitoring, visualization and analysis of data on climatic factors,
immature (larvae) and adult mosquito abundance and virus activity measured by testing
mosquitoes, sentinel chickens, wild birds, horses and humans for evidence of infection.
Surveillance must focus not only on mosquito-borne viruses known to exist in California, but be
sufficiently broad to also detect newly introduce viruses.

The California Mosquito-borne Encephalitis Surveillance Program in the Coachella Valley is a
cooperative effort of the District, University of California at Davis, California Department of
Public Health, Division of Vector-Borne Disease and Mosquito, and Mosquito and Vector
Control Association of California. The statewide surveillance program was established in 1969.
The District began encephalitis surveillance in the early 1980s and the current program has been
in place since 1990.

THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:
  • Mosquito population monitoring
  • In-house RAMP (Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform) testing of mosquitoes for WN
     virus
  • Mosquito population testing for St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLE), western equine
     encephalomyelitis virus (WEE) and West Nile virus (WN) at the Center for Vectorborne
     Diseases (CVEC) at UC Davis
  • Serological testing of sentinel chickens from nine flocks located throughout the
     Coachella Valley and two from northern part of the Imperial Valley using Enzyme
     Immunoassays (EIA) for SLE, WEE and WNV.
  • Mosquito and chicken flock data input into the California Vector-borne Disease
     Surveillance Gateway
  • Wild rodent surveillance
  • Eye gnat surveillance
  • Fly Surveillance


     ARBOVIRUS SURVEILLANCE TESTING       –                  COACHELLA VALLEY
   2009    # Tested - WNV -     WNV–                         WEE- positive SLE –
              YTD     Positive   Positive                       YTD        Positive
                       June      YTD                                       YTD
 HUMANS                  0         0                              0          0
 EQUINES       0         0         0                              0          0
  DEAD         0         0         0                              0          0
  BIRDS
MOSQUITO     1311        0         0                                0               0
  POOLS
CHICKENS      450        0         0                                0               0

   RAMP          POOLS        NEGATIVE        POSITIVE       CONFIRMED
   WNV           TESTED
    YTD             0               0              0                0
    June            0               0              0                0
                                           CO2 Traps – North Shore of Salton Sea
                                           The laboratory staff used 6 CDC-CO2 baited traps for the
                                           mosquito surveillance. The June average number of Cx. tarsalis
                                           mosquitoes calculated per trap night located at the North Shore
                                           area was 3, which is 94% lower than the threshold for last 5
                                           years.




       .
 Table 1. Monthly averages for all traps                       NORTH
 on the North Shore of Salton Sea.                             SHORE   2006 2007 2008 2009
                                                              JANUARY   48    48 186 237
                                                             FEBRUARY 55      26  29 64
                                                               MARCH    20    88 163 192
                                                                APRIL   56   166 151 72
                                                                MAY     40   107 235 101
                                                                JUNE    28    93  89    3
                                                                JULY     7    14   6
                                                               AUGUST    1     2  16
                                                             SEPTEMBER 11     39  53
                                                              OCTOBER   32    39  49
                                                             NOVEMBER 50      92  44
   CO2 Traps – West Shore of Salton Sea                       DECEMBER 50     28  58
The laboratory staff used 6 CDC-CO2 baited traps
for the mosquito surveillance. The June average               WEST
number of Cx. tarsalis mosquitoes calculated per             SHORE   2006 2007 2008 2009
trap night located at the West Shore area was 177,          JANUARY   110 104 162 485
which is 23% higher than threshold for last 5              FEBRUARY 106     62  177   73
years.
                                                             MARCH    203 294 277    321
                                                              APRIL   208 165 525    261
                                                              MAY     158 101 199    165
                                                              JUNE    325   82  222 177
       Table 2. Monthly averages for all traps                JULY     38   31  55
       on the West Shore of Salton Sea.                      AUGUST     4   55   40
                                                           SEPTEMBER 25    122 104
                                                            OCTOBER   194 270   417
                                                           NOVEMBER 231 262 132
                                                           DECEMBER    90   36   74
                                                                     GRAVID TRAPS
                                                                  Seventeen gravid traps are at the following locations:
                                                                  Bermuda Dunes, Indian Wells, Palm Desert (2), Mecca,
                                                                  Indio (2), Palm Springs, La Quinta (2), Rancho Mirage
                                                                  (2), Cathedral City, Desert Hot Springs, Thermal, 1000
                                                                  Palms, and Coachella. The gravid trap is a selective
                                                                  sampler that is used with an infusion of hay-yeast mixture.
                                                                  Within urban and suburban settings, they are placed in
                                                                  shade beneath overhanging landscape vegetation to
                                                                  simulate naturally occurring breeding sources and
                                                                  maximize attraction. The average numbers for Culex
                                                                  mosquitoes, mostly the southern house mosquito, Culex
                                                                  quinquefasciatus, per trap night, for suburban/urban trap
                                                                  sites are presented below.




                                              AVERAGE MONTHLY NUMBER OF MOSQUITOES/TRAP/NIGHT
                                                         IN GRAVID TRAPS/CITY - 2009
AVERAGE MOSQUITOES/TRAP/NIGHT




                                300

                                250

                                200

                                150

                                100

                                50

                                 0
                                                                                                            47
                                                Co 2




                                                                            21



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                                      JANUARY     FEBRUARY        MARCH          APRIL         MAY           JUNE

                                      JULY        AUGUST          SEPTEMBER      OCTOBER       NOVEMBER
                                       TINKHAM EYE GNAT TRAPS


                                                     The results are represented in Average
                                                     Eye Gnat Collection for June 2009
                                                     table and graph.
                                                         • 22 Tinkham traps replaced four
                                                             times
                                                         • Eye gnats counted from 88
                                                             Tinkham traps (22 traps, 4
                                                             weeks)

          Tinkham trap


                                 AVERAGE EYE GNAT COLLECTION - 2009
                                          Coachella Valley

           80.0

           70.0

           60.0

           50.0
                                                                                         2009 Average
           40.0                                                                          2008 Average
                                                                                         2007 Average
           30.0

           20.0

           10.0

            0.0
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                                           Fly Surveillance
        Biweekly fly surveillance is performed with 23 traps located in both suburban and rural areas
of the Coachella Valley. The surveillance range extends from Palm Springs to the Salton Sea State
Park. Trap locations in suburban areas include Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Indian Wells, Thousand
Palms, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, Bermuda Dunes, La Quinta, and Indio.
Rural traps are situated in the vicinity of Coachella, Thermal, Oasis, Mecca, and North Shore. Traps
are placed in open sunny areas and baited with a fly lure. After a 24-hour period, captured flies are
counted and sorted according to their family and genus. Commonly found flies belong to the
following families:
     • Muscidae: House flies, lesser house flies, false stable flies, and black garbage flies
     • Sarcophagidae: Flesh flies
     • Calliphoridae: Bottle flies and blow flies
     • Other: Picture-winged flies, fruit flies, and any other flies that belong to non-filth fly families
In June, the average number of total flies per trap/day in suburban areas was 40; in rural areas the
average number was 58.


                                                                                              June 2009
                                                                           Average Abundance of Flies/Trap/Day
                                                                            in Suburban and Rural Areas of the
                                                                                     Coachella Valley
                    Fly Abundance (log scale)




                                                                 100


                                                                  10


                                                                      1
                                                                                   Suburban                       Rural
                        Houseflies                                                     32                          28
                        Blow.Bottle Flies                                              5                           26
                        Fleshflies                                                     2                           3
                        Other                                                          1                           1
                                                                                                 Locations




                                                                          Three Year Comparison of Average Fly
                                                                               Abundance (Flies/Trap/Day)
                                                                700

                                                                600
                                                Fly Abundance




                                                                500

                                                                400

                                                                300

                                                                200

                                                                100

                                                                  0
                                                                           June.2007              June.2008               June.2009
                                                  Suburban                    37                    101                      40
                                                  Rural                      603                    147                      58
                                                                                              Month of the Year
                                    WILD RODENTS
                               HANTAVIRUS SURVEILLANCE

The Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District started the wild rodent surveillance
program in September 2001. The Palm Springs Tramway and Whitewater Canyon are used
periodically as sampling sites and consist of a mixture of chaparral sage and grass at an elevation
of about 2000 ft. To date, 1,308 animals have been trapped, and all tested specimens were
negative.
TRAPPING RESULTS:
    Bottom of Palm Springs Tramway (Elevation = 2,000 ft)                    June 12, 2009

    Trapped animals were identified as:
       1. Cactus Mouse - Peromyscus eremicus                            10
       2. Canyon Mouse – Peromyscus crinitus                             2
       3. Desert Woodrat – Neotoma lepida                                4


    Top of Palm Springs Tramway (Elevation = 8,400 ft)                       June 19, 2009

    Trapped animals were identified as:
       1. Deer Mouse - Peromyscus maniculatus                            1




              IDENTIFICATION OF SAMPLES & PHONE CONSULTATIONS

•   Mosquito larval samples ID                 186
•   Sample ID                                    2
•   Phone consultation                           1


                RIFA SURVEILLANCE AND EVALUATION PROGRAM

                                            June 2009

Testing the efficacy of the products used for control of red imported fire ants (RIFA) which
started in October 2008 is ongoing and yielding very valuable results. The goal of the survey and
evaluation program is to create the protocol for the control program that will be the most
effective and fiscally sound. The objective is to assess each product, as well as the combination
of products that are used for suppression of RIFA on Golf Courses that have never been treated
in the past. The chemicals being tested are:
   •   Advion® Fire Ant Bait
   •   Distance® Fire Ant Bait Insect Growth Regulator
   •   Extinguish Plus® Fire Ant Bait
   •   Chipco® Choice TM Insecticide (as the season and EPA Registration allows).

In order to do this evaluation, we are performing four replicates of each chemical being
analyzed. Currently l sixteen of the golf courses are in use for this survey and evaluation. Golf
Courses currently under research are:

   1. Indian Ridge Grove/Arroyo Course – Advion-Distance
   2. Indian Canyons Resort South Golf Course – Advion-Distance
   3. PGA West Arnold Palmer Course – Extinguish Plus
   4. Rancho La Quinta Jerry Pate Golf Course – Extinguish Plus
   5. Seven Lakes Golf Course – Advion
   6. Indian Canyons Resort North Golf Course – Advion
   7. Rancho La Quinta Reese Jones Golf Course – Advion
   8. Tahquitz Creek Resort Course – Distance-Advion
   9. Tahquitz Creek Legends Course – Distance-Advion
   10. Outdoor Resorts Course – Distance-Advion
   11. PGA West Nicklaus Tournament Course-Advion
   12. PGA West Citrus Golf Course-Advion-Distance
   13. Rancho Las Palmas Course-Advion-Distance
   14. PGA West Weiskopf Course-Distance-Advion
   15. PGA West Nicklaus Private Course-Extinguish Plus
   16. PGA West Stadium Course-Extinguish Plus

The two month evaluation for the following Golf Courses was performed in June 2009 and the
results are presented in the table below indicating the reduction of RIFA. The evaluation is done
by including 30 randomly selected locations at six holes of the 18 hole golf course within the
Tee, Fairway and Greens. The same location will be followed for every post-treatment survey.

                  RANCHO LA QUINTA JERRY PATE GOLF COURSE

           DATE OF            DATE OF            PRODUCT          PERCENT OF
         TREATMENT          EVALUATION             USED            CONTROL
             PRE-
         TREATMENT
           SURVEY               04/01/09                               67%
              1st                              EXTINGUISH
         TREATMENT              04/09/09          PLUS
            POST-
         TREATMENT
          SURVEY -2
            MONTH               06/16/09                               96%
                         TAHQUITZ LEGENDS GOLF COURSE

           DATE OF            DATE OF           PRODUCT         PERCENT OF
         TREATMENT          EVALUATION            USED           CONTROL
             PRE-
         TREATMENT
           SURVEY               03/03/09                              57%
              1st
         TREATMENT              04/02/09       DISTANCE
            POST-
         TREATMENT
          SURVEY -2
            MONTH               06/08/09                              95%

                       INDIAN CANYONS NORTH GOLF COURSE

           DATE OF            DATE OF           PRODUCT         PERCENT OF
         TREATMENT          EVALUATION            USED           CONTROL
             PRE-
         TREATMENT
           SURVEY               03/05/09                              29%
              1st
         TREATMENT              03/23//09        ADVION
            POST-
         TREATMENT
          SURVEY -2
            MONTH               06/01/09                              89%


FORAGING ACTIVITY
The 24 hour studies are ongoing to evaluate the foraging activity of RIFA. Up to date 4 studies
were conducted; Oct. 2008, Dec. 2008, Feb. 2009 and April 2009. The last two are scheduled
for July and September to complete a 12 month evaluation.

The protocol includes placing bait at a surface level and 1”, 2” and 3” in the ground and taking
temperature readings every hour for 24 hours. The outcome of this study will provide RIFA
foraging activity both above ground and underground through the season and indicate the best
time for treatment activity.
                              DISTRICT FIELD OPERATIONS

RURAL MOSQUITO HABITATS

Salton Sea Marshes
Breeding along the Salton Sea marshes is localized and relatively minimal compared to several
months past. Ground water, particularly along the North Salton Sea shoreline, continues to be
surfacing and forming new, potential mosquito breeding habitats.

Agricultural Breeding Sources
Agricultural irrigation is now very active producing breeding conditions and situations for both
floodwater and Culex mosquitoes. Three Seasonal Technicians are now assisting with
Psorophora (floodwater mosquitoes) control program on areas where Psorophora has historically
been a problem.

URBAN MOSQUITO HABITATS

Neglected Swimming Pools
Recent aerial reconnaissance for neglected pools was conducted the first week of June, and
recovered      1,278 new locations that require ground inspection and possible treatments.
Currently, there are over 1,000 active neglected pools under surveillance and treatment in the
department’s data base for neglected pools.

Residential Control Activities
The surveys conducted this past month for mosquito breeding in the residential include small
breeding sites associated with storm water drainage structures.

FLY AND EYE GNAT PROGRAM
Currently 34 country club golf courses are participating in the control program that started on
March 1st, when 2,048 collar traps were placed. These traps are serviced on a 10-day cycle. In
addition, to date, 4,704 traps have been established throughout the agricultural areas and serviced
on a biweekly basis. During this reporting period, 2,483 gallons of mixed egg bait was used to
service these traps.
                           MOSQUITO CONTROL ACTIVITIES
              15    TREATMENT EVALUATIONS BY SUPERVISORS
               5    SERVICE REQUEST EVALUATIONS
               4    OPERATIONAL MEETINGS
              13    FIELD SAFETY CHECKS
              12    STANDING WATER REQUESTS
             126    NEGLECTED POOL ADVISORIES RECEIVED
               5    MEETINGS WITH OWNERS/REPRESENTATIVES
               6    NEW MOSQUITO BREEDING SOURCES
              34    MOSQUITO SERVICE REQUESTS
            6,367   FIELD MOSQUITO INSPECTIONS CONDUCTED BY
                    TECHNICIANS
            1,141   MOSQUITO TREATMENTS (Larval)
              0     URBAN/SUBURBAN ACREAGE FOGGED
              0     RURAL ACREAGE FOGGED
              1     AERIAL LARVICIDE (Valley Sanitation District Wetlands)
                    15.5 Acres
              0     ADULTICIDE NIGHTS       0 Ground 0Aerial
              3     MAJOR MOSQUITO SOURCE REDUCTION ACTIONS
              LARVAL AND ADULT CONTROL OF MOSQUITOES
       CONTROL METHOD      ACREAGE TREATED   ACREAGE TREATED
                             May -June 2009    May -June 2008
         LARVACIDING             478 Acres       330 Acres
        ADULTICIDING             0 Acres          0 Acres

                             MOSQUITO HABITAT TREATED
    HABITAT                April 2009         May 2009                         June 2009
                       Acres        %    Acres         %                   Acres      Percent
   Salton Sea           10.34       4.1    9.31       2.0                    0           0
   Duck Clubs           70.86      28.3   63.53      14.0                   34.4        7.6
   Residential          59.33      23.7  105.46      23.3                   57.3       12.0
   Agriculture          110.0      43.0  274.25      60.6                  384.0       80.4
     Totals            250.52     100.00 452.44     100.00                 475.7      100.00

                               RIFA CONTROL ACTIVITIES
                                      JUNE 2009

The majority of control activities for RIFA remain to be focused in the cities of Cathedral City,
Palm Desert, Palm Springs, and Rancho Mirage where infestation continues to be the most
severe. Warmer weather has been providing good field conditions for RIFA foraging activities,
improving baiting operations as well as broadcast and spot treatments control activities. Each
treatment requires an inspection either by baiting or tapping to determine the degree of property
infestation, which then determines whether the site requires a broadcast or spot treatment.
                         RIFA TREATMENTS AND ACREAGE
                                    JUNE 2009
                       CITY        Treatments Treated
                                              Acreage
                  Bermuda Dunes        14        9.00
                   Cathedral City      30       54.11
                      Coachella         1         .67
                  Desert Hot Sprs.      4        1.80
                    Indian Wells        9       16.73
                        Indio          11        7.63
                     La Quinta         25      774.73
                    Palm Desert        51      132.96
                   Palm Springs        40      110.31
                  Rancho Mirage        40      336.02
                      Thermal           0          0
                  Thousand Palms        1        1.07
                     TOTALS           226     1,445.03

                            SERVICE REQUEST REPORT
                                   JUNE 2009

    CITY         Mosquito   RIFA   Fish   Gnats   Flies   Bees   Rats   Other   TOTAL
   Bermuda                   1                                                    1
    Dunes
Cathedral City      1        2                                                    3
   Coachella        2        1                     2                              5
  Desert Hot                 2                                                    2
     Sprs.
 Indian Wells       1        1                     2                              4
     Indio          8        4                     1                             13
  La Quinta         5        6      1              1                             13
    Mecca           1                                                             1
 North Shore
     Oasis                                         1                              1
 Palm Desert        7        11                    1       2      1              22
 Palm Springs       2        13                                   1      1       17
Rancho Mirage       1         3                            1      1               6
  Sky Valley                                                      1               1
   Thermal          5                      1       6                             12
   Thousand
    Palms
  TOTALS           33        44     1      1      14       3      4      1       100
                                   FLEET AND FACILITIES

Scheduled Maintenance Activities

Carpets cleaned:

   •    All carpets throughout the District offices were commercially steamed cleaned on June
        13th 2009.
Currently an analysis is being done to determine if it would be more cost effective for the
District to perform all hard floor and carpet cleaning in house as opposed to contracting it out.
The results of that analysis will be included in next months Fleet/Facilities Board Report.

                                 Facilities Maintenance & Repairs
   Routine               Total          Maintenance             Total Other        Total
   Maintenance                          requests                      Errands etc.
   Lighting                1(Entire     Engraving of RIFA        1    Pickup        1
   inspection, ballast     facility)    equip.                        electrical
   & lamp                                                             fittings
   replacement
   Restocked               1(Entire     Display setup in            1   Pickup            1
   janitorial supplies     facility)    board room                      items for
                                                                        board
                                                                        meeting
   Removed parking         1(Entire     MSDS display setup          1   Took trash        1
   space names for         facility)                                    & other
   employees no                                                         debris to
   longer here                                                          dump
   Prepared board             1         Round-up                    1
   room for meeting                     application to lawn
   Emptying of            4(weekly)     Re-hanging of               1
   recycling bins                       cabinet door
                                        Painting of wood            1
                                        lattice overhang
                                        Clearing of old parts       1
                                        of equipment and
                                        other debris in back
                                        of storage facility
                                  Shop Maintenance & Repairs
   Routine Service       Total Major Repairs        Total Other Equipment                Total
                                                          repairs
   Oil & Filter            8     Air                 3    Application                      5
   Changes                       Conditioning
   Field Service calls     4     Brake Work            2    Argo, ATV’s etc.               3
   Tire Repairs            2     Electrical            1    Welding Fabrication
   Batteries               2     Fuel Systems               Trailer repairs                1
   Replaced
   Tire rotation           1     Tire                  3
                                 Replacement
   Fluid check &           1
   replacement



                            Gas Company Odor Fade Safety Bulletin

The Gas Company sent out a safety bulletin with information about the potential for natural gas
odor fade. The purpose of this notice is to provide contractors and customers who work on
natural gas piping, appliances and equipment, with additional safety information on natural gas
odorant and the potential for odor fade.

The Southern California Gas Company adheres to United States Department of Transportation
(DOT) and California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) rules and regulations regarding the
odorizing of natural gas. Even though a distinctive odor is added to natural gas to assist in the
detection of leaks, you should not rely solely on your sense of smell to determine if a gas leak
exists or if natural gas is present. Some persons may not be able to detect the odorant because
they have a diminished sense of smell or olfactory fatigue, or because the odor is being masked
by other odors in the area. In addition, certain conditions such as odor fade may cause the
odorant to diminish so that it is not detectable.

Odor fade occurs when the level of odorant in the gas is reduced due to physical and/or
chemical processes including, absorption and oxidation. In gas piping systems, odor fade occurs
predominantly in installations of new pipe rather than in existing pipe and is more pronounced in
new steel pipe of larger diameters and longer lengths. However, it can also occur in plastic pipe
and in smaller and/or shorter pipe installations. New pipeline installations or additions of new
piping segments may require the conditioning of the pipe before it is placed into service to
prevent occurrences of odor fade.

For more information this safety bulletin will be posted on the bulletin boards in the Operations
and Administration buildings or you can go to: http://www.socalgas.com/safety/
                            SAFETY COMPLIANCE REPORT

As of mid June, the General Manager assumed the responsibilities of the District Safety Officer.
In the upcoming months, the wide-range safety training will be covered during each Staff
meeting, while each Department Supervisor will offer more specific monthly training to the staff
he/she supervises via tailgate meetings.

During June, the topic of tailgate meetings was “Handle the Heat.” Supervisors provided the
staff with the heat risk factors and heat related illnesses and injuries information, and
understanding of how the body reacts to heat and how to prevent heat-related disorders.

From the last accident/incident report, May 26 and up to June 30, there was one accident
reported on May 28 in the category of Sprain/Strain.

                      TYPE OF INJURY             2007                 2008   2009
                        SLIP/FALL                  1                    0      0
                      SPRAIN/STRAIN                5                    3      2
                      CUT/CONTUSION                1                    2      0
                        BITE/STING                 1                    1      1
                      MENTAL STRESS                1                    1      0
                        PUNCTURE
                          WOUND                       1                1      0



                                      TYPE OF INJURY
                                  FROM 2007 TO JUNE 30, 2009



                                          PUNCTURE        SLIP/FALL
                                           WOUND             10%
                                            10%

                              MENTAL STRESS
                                   10%


                                                     '/
                             BITE/STING
                                10%


                                                             SPRAIN/STRAIN
                              CUT/CONTUSION                      50%
                                   10%
                                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Eight of the nine, Panasonic Toughbooks have arrived. Microsoft Updates are being applied to
the operating systems on the Toughbooks. Installation of the Mobile Inspection Application is
                                   scheduled to being the week of July 20th. Once the
                                   application is installed, classroom style training sessions
                                   can begin in the Boardroom using the Panasonic
                                   Toughbooks. This gives our technicians a “hands-on”
                                   training environment to learn workflows, ask questions and
                                   provide solutions.
                                   A manual is also being developed for technicians on the
                                   Mobile Inspection Application. Below is the section
                                   explaining the button functionality of the “Main Toolbar”
                                   in the application.
                                   The vehicle mounts for the Toughbooks are in the process
                                   of being order and the components should be received in
two to three weeks.
      TOUGHBOOKSPECIFICAITONS:
      CF-30KCP54AM *VISTA COA* Intel Core 2 Duo SL7300 1.6GLV(Centrino2), V
      Pro,13.3" Touch XGA, 2GB, 160GB, Intel WiFi a/b/g/n,Win XP SP2, TPM1.2,
      Bluetooth, Dual Pass (Upper WWAN/Lower GPS), Fast GPS-3W, Gobi, NO
      Optical, Emissive Backlit Keyboard



2009 Mobile GIS Application Tool Bar



Main Toolbar




Buttons
   1. File




   2. Zoom In
      User clicks the “Zoom In”
      button. Application
      changes the cursor to the
   Zoom In (+) sign.
   Application zooms into the
   area within the box defined
   by the user
3. Zoom Out
   User clicks the “Zoom
   Out” button. Application
   changes the cursor to the
   Zoom Out (-) sign.
   Application reduces the
   scale of the current map to
   the defined box until it
   reaches the full extent
4. Pan Map
   User clicks the “Pan Map”
   button. Application
   changes the cursor the pan
   cursor. User clicks and
   drags on the map to change
   the center of the map.
5. Map Navigation
   User clicks the “Map
   Navigation > and selects
   on of the following:
   Refresh Map
   Application redraws map
   Show Full Map
   Application changes the
   current map extent to its
   full extent
   Zoom to GPS
   Application change current
   map extent to the current
   position captured by the
   GPS

       A. Show
          Latitude/Longitude
          User clicks the
          “Map Navigation >
          Show
          Latitude/Longitude
          ” button. User
          clicks anywhere on
          the map.
          Application shows
           latitude and
           longitude in degree,
           minute second and
           decimal degree
           units on the popup
           window.
       B. Goto
           Latitude/Longitude
           User clicks the
           “Map Navigation >
           Goto
           Latitude/Longitude
           ” button.
           Application shows
           a popup window to
           enter
           latitude/longitude in
           either
           decimal/minute/sec
           ond or decimal
           degree unit.
           Application closes
           the popup window
           and zooms in to the
           specified
           latitude/longitude.
6. Identify
   User clicks the Identify
   button and then clicks on
   the map. Application
   shows attributes of all
   layers on the user’s
   specific location
7. Measure Tools
   User clicks Measure Tools
   > Measure Distance or
   Distance & Bearing or
   Area. User draws a line or
   multiple line segments with
   single clicks. Application
   show the distance as the
   line or multiple line
   segments are drawn on the
   map. User double clicks to
   end this measure distance
   function.
8. GPS




9. Messaging




      A. Send Msg by
         Location
         User clicks MSG >
         Send message by
         location. User
         draws a box on the
         map to select users
         who have reported
         their positions.
         Application shows
         a window for user
         to enter a text
         message. User
         types the text
         message and clicks
         the “Send” button.
         Application sends
         the text message to
         the selected users.
      B. Send Msg by List
         User clicks MSG>
         Send message by
         list. Application
         shows list of users.
         User selects one or
         more users form the
         list to send a
         message.
         Application display
         s popup window for
         the user to enter a
         text message. User
         clicks the “Send”
         button. Application
         sends the message
         to the selected
         users.
Work List Toolbar




Buttons
   1. Start Shift


   2. Inspect the selected Item




   3. Zoom To Inspection




   4. Flash selected Inspection
      Location



   5. Filter selection drop down




                                        GIS REPORT

NEGLECTED POOL PROGRAM (NPP)
The Neglected Pool Program (NPP) was lunched on 22nd of June in the new mobile and database
system. The transfer of records went well with approximately 1300 records of existing pools in
various stages of treatment. A new aerial flight added even more pools, making the need to
track, report and map the location all that more important.

Current focus is on coding a new application to select for the neglected pools in the Coachella
Valley by City, Status (Active, Dry, Mosquito Fish) and by Field Technician. We are in the final
stages of testing for display and for the reporting process.
                                            Section

                                             14




     Informational Items




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009




Agenda Item: Informational Item
Conferences, Trainings, and Seminars – Anita Jones, Human Resources Manager

Background:
Throughout the year many conferences, trainings, and seminars are presented by various
organizations that may be of special interest to members of the Board of Trustees. The following
are training opportunities that are available:

   •   July 24, 2009: Developing and Updating Essential District Policies – This workshop
       provides an overview of how an agency could and should develop a comprehensive and
       ongoing public policy approach including administrative and human resource
       management techniques at every level in the organization. (CSDA, Ontario, CA)

   •   August 5, 2009: Strategic Planning for Special Districts - The interrelationship between
       mission, vision and strategic actions is discussed and clarified. (CSDA, San Diego, CA)

   •   August 7, 2009: Board’s Role in Finance and Fiscal Accountability - looks at how the
       special district board carries out its fiduciary responsibility in the district. (CSDA,
       Bakersfield, CA)

   •   August 7, 2009: How to Legally Stay in Compliance - This workshop covers three
       crucial areas: Conflict of Interest Law, Public Records Act and the Brown Act.
       Attendees will also receive Ethics AB 1234 Compliance training. (CSDA, Thousand
       Oaks, CA)

   •   August 14, 2009: Board’s Role in Finance and Fiscal Accountability - looks at how the
       special district board carries out its fiduciary responsibility in the district. (CSDA, San
       Diego, CA)

   •   August 14, 2009: Understanding The Brown Act and Your Responsibilities – This two-
       hour workshop presents an overview of the latest updates and protocols for closed
       sessions and discusses how the latest technology can cause a district to be out of
       compliance with the Brown Act. (CSDA, Oakland, CA)

   •   August 21, 2009: Everything You Need to Know About a Special District – This
       workshop is designed to assist staff and board members with terminology, history, law
       and more. (CSDA, Sacramento, CA)
•   August 21, 2009: Board’s Role in Human Resources – This workshop addresses the
    board’s ongoing relationship with the manager, the senior staff and other staff in the
    district. It also focuses on what to do and not to do in human resources. (CSDA,
    Oakland, CA)

•   September 4, 2009: Board’s Role in Human Resources – This workshop addresses the
    board’s ongoing relationship with the manager, the senior staff and other staff in the
    district. It also focuses on what to do and not to do in human resources. (CSDA,
    Bakersfield, CA)

•   September 10-11, 2009: Special District Finance – This seminar shows how to take
    control of the agency’s financial affairs. (SDI, San Diego, CA)

•   September 21, 2009: Governance Foundations - This course focuses on Special District
    Trustees as Policy Leaders, the Effective Special District Board, and the Board’s
    Responsibilities and Roles in Special Districts. (CSDA, Palm Springs, CA)

•   September 21-24, 2009: CSDA Annual Conference - The CSDA Annual Conference is
    an educational opportunity designed to provide information, speak to trends in special
    district management and operations, and offer training for directors/trustees, general and
    assistant managers, financial managers, supervisors and special district staff members.
    (CSDA, Indian Wells, CA)

•   October 9, 2009: Board’s Role in Human Resources – This workshop addresses the
    board’s ongoing relationship with the manager, the senior staff and other staff in the
    district. It also focuses on what to do and not to do in human resources. (CSDA, Irvine,
    CA)

•   October 11-15, 2009: 5th International Society for Vector Ecology Congress – Vectors
    Without Borders – Every four years, the Society for Vector Ecology has an international
    meeting. The meeting this year will be held in Antalya, Turkey. (SOVE, Antalya
    Turkey)

•   October 16, 2009: Everything You Need to Know About a Special District – This
    workshop is designed to assist staff and board members with terminology, history, law
    and more. (CSDA, Riverside, CA)

•   October 22 – 23, 2009: Special District Finance - Focuses on raising revenue through
    rates, charges and assessments; how to exercise financial oversight and control;
    understanding and using audits; legal requirements of finance; keys to financing capital
    projects; and guidelines for developing public support. (Special District and Local
    Government Institute, San Diego, CA)

•   October 23, 2009: Understanding The Brown Act and Your Responsibilities – This two-
    hour workshop presents an overview of the latest updates and protocols for closed
    sessions and discusses how the latest technology can cause a district to be out of
    compliance with the Brown Act. (CSDA, Clovis, CA)
•   October 28 – October 30, 2009: MVCAC Fall Meeting. (MVCAC, South Lake
    Tahoe, CA)

•   February 7 – 10, 2010: MVCAC 78th Annual Conference. (MVCAC, Sacramento, CA)

•   March 28 – April 1, 2010: The American Mosquito Control Association Annual Meeting
    – This meeting consists of presentations and exhibits that illustrate and highlight the
    latest science, technology and products used to conduct research and control vectors.
    This meeting also provides an opportunity to network with vector control professionals,
    researchers and educators from around the world. (AMCA, Lexington, KY)
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009



Agenda Item: Informational Item
Annual research reports from University of California Riverside, Davis and The Texas A&M
University System, for FY 2008/2009. - Jeremy Wittie, Interim Scientific Operational
Manager

Background:
The District provides research grants to the University of California Riverside, UC Davis and
Texas A&M University. UC Riverside research projects include the study the use of bio-control
agents such as nematodes and tadpole shrimp for mosquito control, seasonality and abundance of
eye gnats in agricultural and urban habitats and the influence of the water quality and wetland
management on mosquito production in treatment wetlands. UC Davis research projects include
monitoring of mosquito-borne viruses and evaluation and optimizing of mosquito vector species
control. Research through Texas A&M consists of optimizing RIFA surveillance techniques,
development of ant bait treatment and efficacy monitoring protocol, and local ant identification.

Fiscal Impact:
The research grants are approved for FY 2008/2009, and posted in the budget as account
#8510.1.600 in an amount of $238,139 and the ending payment (total - $118, 267.50) will be
distributed as:

   1.   UC Riverside – Dr. M. Mulla - $18,360.00
   2.   UC Davis – Dr. Reisen - $43,509.00
   3.   UC Riverside – Dr. Walton - $28,176.00
   4.   UC Riverside – Dr. Platzer - $8,222.50
   5.   Texas AgriLife Extension Services – Dr. Drees -$20,000.00

The annual payment is 100% of the approved FY 2008/2009 research budget- #8510.01.600.
                       UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT DAVIS
                             Center for Vectorborne Diseases
                         Hugh D. Lothrop, William K. Reisen, PhD


                  RESEARCH IN THE COACHELLA VALLEY,
                SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR JANUARY-JUNE 2009

Alternative Pesticides
Environmental groups continue to challenge the use of pesticides for public health, as evidenced
by the current NPDES controversy. Developing EPA exempt formulations may lessen this
political pressure in addition to providing alternative chemicals that will reduce resistance
development in mosquito populations.

Ultra-low Volume
Twenty field trials consisted of 3 replicate transects of caged sentinel mosquitoes spaced 50 feet
part. Of these, 7 trials had sufficiently even distribution to be used for analysis. Suitability for
analysis was based upon droplet densities on 5 Teflon slide rotators placed among the cages
throughout the test plot. The table below shows mortality at different ultra-low volume (ULV)
application rates. Plot Mortality is the average mortality over the plot, whereas Max Mortality is
the mortality in the cage with the highest mortality for that treatment. The potential effectiveness
of EcoEXEMPT MC is represented by the maximum mortality, but the variability of the method
of ground ULV application is demonstrated by the average plot mortality. Further study is needed
to increase the consistency of mortality among cages and bring all measures closer to the
maximum potential mortality.

                                                                            Percent
             oz/acre AI    Plot Mortality      Max Mort        Fogger
                                                                          EcoEXEMPT
                2.09            16%              83%         Becomist        100%
                2.65            58%              99%         London          50%
                4.20            45%              100%        London          95%
                4.41            35%              91%         Becomist        80%
                4.52            72%              99%         Becomist        100%
                6.41            12%              48%         Becomist        100%
                2.55            81%              82%         Micronair       10%

Herd Immunity
Herd immunity is the collective antibody prevalence within a host species. Our work focuses on
peridomestic passerine birds that are responsible for the seasonal virus amplification of
encephalitis viruses. A high seroprevalence in early spring bird populations may limit the
potential of West Nile virus to amplify to epidemic levels. Peridomestic species such as House
Finches and House Sparrows are suitable hosts and live in proximity to urban areas as well as
rural communities in the Coachella Valley. Focusing sampling on these species may optimize
surveillance of herd immunity and alert the District to the public heath threat in the coming
season.

Wild bird Sampling
House Sparrows were the most common species of 214 samples collected in nets and ground
traps since January 2009. It appears that House Finch populations have been reduced since the



                                                                                                  1
introduction of West Nile virus (WNV) in 2003, but visual surveillance indicates they have been
underrepresented in our sampling. In agreement with low mosquito infection rates during 2009,
only 1 WNV positive House Sparrow was collected at the District Headquarters. Seropositivity
rates should be interpreted in relation to the WNV-related mortality in this species which
averages about 40%. These data will be compared to 3 other sites in California, to evaluate the
influence of ecological factors on seropositivity in these species.

Adult Mosquito Abundance Sampling Methods
Carbon-dioxide baited CDC style traps are a standard adult mosquito abundance sampling
method throughout the state. Placement of these traps is never uniform due to the diversity of
habitats and physical constraints where they are located. Data from past experiments has
indicated that weather strongly influences the effectiveness of these traps, especially wind
velocity and direction. Replicate sampling is currently being conducted with 10 traps placed to be
influenced by windward or leeward position along vegetation ecotones. Results will be presented
in the next reporting period.

Managed Wetlands as Virus Foci
Managed wetlands in the arid SW United States tend to be foci of mosquito and wild bird
abundance. This combination has the potential to act as an early season focus of mosquito-borne
virus amplification that can subsequently disseminate to surrounding communities. Our study
includes 3 sites; a fish farm effluent maintained marsh on the west shore of the Salton Sea, waste
water treatment wetland in Indio, and the duck club region south of the community of Mecca.

Mosquito Abundance and virus infection.
Although spring populations of Culex tarsalis have been high, to date this year, no virus has been
detected by the surveillance system in the Coachella Valley. However, using Vero cells culture to
search for emerging viruses, 7 as yet unidentified viruses have been isolated by our laboratory
from mosquitoes collected in the Coachella Valley. This winter we also tested adults mosquitoes
that were reared from field collected larvae and detected West Nile virus in 2 pools of Cx. tarsalis
from the duck club area. Although we previously had detected evidence for vertical passage of
virus from this species collected in the Coachella Valley during summer, this was the first
evidence that WNV may overwinter as vertically infected Cx. tarsalis larvae.

Publications
Research papers describing our studies in Coachella Valley are listed below:

Hugh D. Lothrop, Branka B. Lothrop, Melissa Snelling, Jeremy Wittie,
       William K. Reisen. 2009. Novel Adulticides suitable for Culex control. Proc. Mosq.
      Vector Control Assoc. Calif. Submitted.

Armijos V, Clark DC, Fang Y, Reisen WK, Brault AC. 2009. Two Novel Mosquito-borne
       flaviviruses from California. Proc. Mosq. Vector Control Assoc. Calif. Submitted.

Fang Y, Garcia S, Brault AC, Clark DC, Lu H, Armijos MV, Nordhausen R, Dannen M, Reisen
       WK. 2009. Surveillance diagnostics and the search for new viruses. Proc. Mosq. Vector
       Control Assoc. Calif. Submitted.

Reisen WK 2009. Ecology of West Nile virus in California: lessons learned during the first five
       years. Proc. Mosq. Vector Control Assoc. Calif. Submitted.




                                                                                                  2
 Evaluation of a Mosquitofish Stocking Program and a Comparison of Mosquito
Production from Two Species of Emergent Vegetation at a Constructed Treatment
                     Wetland: Progress Report June 2009
William E. Walton, Ph.D. and David A. Popko, M.S.
Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521

Objectives:

     The goals of this project are (1) to evaluate the survival and production of mosquitofish (Gambusia
affinis) in a stocking program at the Valley Sanitary District wetland and (2) to compare the growth,
survival, and decomposition of two bulrush species and measure mosquito production from each species
of bulrush. A greater understanding of mosquitofish populations will facilitate the successful use of
environmentally friendly control measures that do not compromise water quality and, ultimately, reduce
the cost of mosquito abatement.

Progress to Date:

                                     Mosquitofish Population Monitoring
     G. affinis numbers in 2009 have been at their highest levels in wetland C minnow traps since
monitoring began at VSD and are comparable to numbers found previously at another southern California
wastewater wetland (Figure 1). Although the impact of fish predation on mosquito populations has been
masked by larvicide applications, a spike in mosquito production this year suggests the presence of
mosquitofish, at the very least, failed to prevent mosquito outbreaks. More information on the location of
this surge in mosquito numbers – i.e. did it occur equally in all wetlands, or was isolated to the apparently
fish-less wetlands A and B? – is needed. Re-stocking of Gambusia into wetlands A and B in early
summer to test the assumption that water quality has improved at these locations (see previous Progress
Report) is no longer recommended because VSD recently decided to carry out vegetation management in
August. Emergent vegetation removal in summer of 2007 may have been a key factor that severely
reduced mosquitofish populations in all wetlands during 2008 (Figure 1) and a similar trend can be
expected after vegetation management occurs this year.
     .

                                                  100            Hemet            Pond A
                       No. of G. affinis per trap + 1




                                                                 Pond B           Pond C



                                                        10




                                                        1
                                                                 9
                                                                 7




                                                                 9
                                                                 7

                                                               07

                                                                7




                                                               08




                                                                8
                                                               08

                                                                8




                                                                8
                                                               08
                                                            l-0




                                                              -0
                                                              -0




                                                              -0
                                                            r-0




                                                              -0
                                                             -0




                                                             -0
                                                           p-




                                                           g-
                                                           b-



                                                           n-




                                                          ar
                                                          ay




                                                          ay
                                                           ct
                                                          ec




                                                          ec
                                                         Ju




                                                        Ap
                                                        Se




                                                        Au
                                                        Fe




                                                        Ju




                                                        O



                                                        M
                                               M




                                                        M
                                                        D




                                                        D




 Figure 1. Mean (± SE) numbers of Gambusia at VSD, 2007- 2009. The dashed line with gray circles depicts Gambusia
            trap abundance at the Hemet-San Jacinto Regional Wastewater Reclamation Facility, 2005-2006.


                                                             1
                         Evaluation of Survival and Decomposition of S. maritimus
    About 500 culms of the alkali bulrush (Schoenoplectus maritimus) were transplanted from nursery
ponds at the UC Riverside Aquatic Research Facility into 3 meter by 3 meter plots at VSD on April 29th.
Groups of about 15 culms each were transplanted into the substrate at the corners and in the middle of
plots at the outflow of wetland C (Figure 2). Three plots positioned at the west end averaged 30 cm in
depth and three plots located on the east side averaged 40 cm in depth. Survival and growth of S.
maritimus at these sites is being assessed twice monthly; at present no new emergent stems are apparent
in any of the plots.




    Figure 2. Transplanted S. maritimus plots (background) and a transect of decomposition bags (foreground) in wetland C.

    A comparison of the decomposition rates of S. maritimus and S. californicus began April 30th when
mesh bags containing 15 grams of dried stems from each species were deployed on stakes at the inflow of
wetland A and outflow of wetland C (Figure 2). A single bulrush species was present in all triplicate mesh
bags wired to a single stake and species were alternated across 10 evenly spaced stakes in 20 meter long
transects. Triplicate bags from each species and wetland have or will be removed 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18
weeks after deployment. On the past 2 sample dates, collected bags were secured in double plastic bags,
transported on ice, and placed at 34 ° F. Separation of invertebrates from vegetative matter was completed
no later than a week after collection. Invertebrates and non-vegetative matter were washed with tap water
or removed by hand from bulrush stems, soaked in 95% alcohol and stored in 20 mL scintillation vials.
Bulrush biomass was dried at 50-55 ° C until mass changes were negligible (usually 3 days), weighed,
and frozen. After 3 weeks S. californicus lost about twice as much dry weight as S. maritimus (Figure 3),
which was surprising since green stems of S. californicus are more rigid than green stems of S. maritimus.
Our initial assumption that live-stem rigidity translates into greater resistance to degradation for dead
stems appears to be incorrect, at least at this preliminary stage, and it is possible that the greater diameter
of S. californicus stems enhance abiotic and biotic processes of decomposition when compared to S.
maritimus. Nevertheless, analysis of more sample collections that includes determinations of associated
invertebrate communities, plant elemental (carbon, nitrogen) ratios, and water quality conditions are
needed to resolve the issue.
                                                         Wetland A, Cal    Wetland C, Cal
                                                         Wetland A, Mar    Wetland C, Mar
                                                15
                               Dry weight (g)




                                                12


                                                 9


                                                 6


                                                 3
                                                29-Apr   4-May   9-May    14-May   19-May   24-May


            Figure 3. Mean (± SE) dry weights of S. californicus (Cal) and S. maritimus (Mar) in wetlands A and C.
                                                                  2
    Ammoniacal-N and nitrate-N concentrations analyzed from water chemistry samples on the dates of
bag collections indicate 2-6 fold higher concentrations in wetland A compared to wetland C, consistent
with previous findings (e.g. Progress Report 10, December 2006). Preliminary physiochemical profiles
generated from real-time water probe measurements indicate higher pH and dissolved oxygen levels in
wetland C compared to wetland A.

                                Sprinkler and Bulrush Species Experiment
        Year 2 of the sprinkler experiment to compare oviposition deterrence of sprinklers
between S. maritimus and S. californicus began in May with twice monthly egg raft surveys and
once monthly dipper sampling and vegetation surveys. Egg rafts counts continue to be higher in
ponds without sprinklers at a similar rate to that of year 1 and S. maritimus pools have been
observed to produce more egg rafts than S. californicus pools to an even greater extent than
observed in 2008 (Figure 4). Growth of new S. maritimus stems occurred rapidly during the onset
of spring and has largely replaced dead stems that predominated during winter months. Monthly
surveys of bulrush densities and heights continue to monitor mortality and growth of each plant
species during the upcoming seasonal changes.

                                                                             CA -sp      CA +sp       MAR -sp                                      MAR +sp
                                         100
   (Number of egg rafts / 0.09m 2) + 1




                                                                                                                                             100



                                                                                                           Number of immatures per dip + 1
                                                                    2008                      2009
                                                                                                                                                                             2008




                                         10                                                                                                  10




                                          1                                                                                                   1
                                          28-Mar   5-May   12-Jun   20-Jul   27-Aug         4-May 11-Jun
                                                                                      4-Oct May                                               31-Mar 2-May   3-Jun   5-Jul     6-Aug   7-Sep


               Figure 4. Mean (± SE) numbers of mosquito egg rafts (left) and immatures (right) in pools of S. californicus (CA) and S.
                                       maritimus (MAR) with (+sp) and without (-sp) sprinkler treatments.




                                                                                              3
                                  “Mermithid Nematodes for Biocontrol of Mosquitoes in Coachella Valley”
                                                                              E.G. Platzer, June 9, 2009


     “Mermithid Nematodes for Biocontrol of Mosquitoes in Coachella Valley”

                              Progress Report, June 2009


Objectives: The goals of this project are as follows:

   1. In collaboration with the personnel at Coachella Valley MVCD establish a model
      rearing facility for mermithid parasites of mosquitoes at CVMVCD;
   2. Institute training for nematode production and use as biocontrol organisms;
   3. In collaborative studies with CVMVCD, determine the effectiveness of
      mermithids against locally important mosquito species both in the laboratory and
      field.
   4. Prepare a mermithid nematode handbook with full documentation of the
      development of the model system at CVMVCD.
   5. Selection experiments will be undertaken at UCR to increase the tolerance of
      mermithid nematodes for salinity/increased osmolality to accommodate the
      aquatic conditions facing CVMVCD staff. Also, selection for increased infectivity
      of mermithids for late instar mosquito larvae to facilitate dispersion of mermithids
      and reduce labor costs for manual dispersion of the mermithids.

Progress: In general, significant progress has been made.This has been achieved because
of Dr. Perez’s expertise and the excellent staff and facilities at CVMVCD.

1. Dr. Perez visited CVMVCD several times during a two-week return from Oaxaca,
Mexico at the beginning of May, 2009. He consulted with CVMVCD staff and worked
on the equipment, facilities, and procedures for infection of mosquitoes with
Romanomermis iyengari. The facility is now functional for the production of small
amounts of nematodes for laboratory tests of mermithid infectivity on field collected
mosquitoes. The CVMVCD staff regularly infect colonized mosquitoes for the
production of material for nematode trials. Dr. Perez delivered R. iyengari produced both
in Mexico and at UC Riverside to supplement production at CVMVCD. He also visited
field sites and consulted on the infection trials planned for the experimental ponds
established at CVMVCD.

2. CVMVCD staff have been trained in laboratory procedures for evaluation of
infectivity. Dr. Perez will returned during May (2 – 18) for continued training in field
application of mermithid nematodes.

3. Dr. Perez has compiled the standard procedures established at CVMVCD. The
procedures require considerable editing which we continued during his May visit. We
anticipate producing the first draft this fall.

4. Selection experiments for mermithid nematode transmission to adult mosquitoes were
initiated in July, 2007 at UCR. The infectivity and efficiency of the transmission was
determined (R. iyengari infects 26%, 49%, and 65% of Aedes aegypti, Aedes sierrensis,



                                                                                                      1
                                   “Mermithid Nematodes for Biocontrol of Mosquitoes in Coachella Valley”
                                                                               E.G. Platzer, June 9, 2009


and Culex pipiens fourth instars respectively) and initial selection experiments were
initiated by an Honors student in Biology, Tiffany Redmon. In addition, Dr. Perez
initiated parallel selection experiments at his facilities in Oaxaca, Mexico. Unfortunately,
Ms. Redmon was not able to continue the selection research due to the demands of her
academic curriculum. The selection for adult transmission in Romanomermis culicivorax
was restarted in the past summer (2008) by Michelle Ontiveros who is a MARC*U
Trainee in Biology at UC Riverside. Unfortunately, Michelle elected to move to a fish
biology laboratory in December and the project is on hold again at UCR. Selection
experiments on tolerance to increased salinity/osmolality has been taken up by Dr. Perez
with the assistance of a Master’s program student and they have found increased
tolerance to salinity within five cycles with R. iyengari. Currently, we have a series of
experiments in place to test for the retention of the tolerance in the absence of selective
pressure. In addition, tolerance to pH is being tested in R. iyengari and after delineation
of the pH limits, we’ll initiate selection for pH tolerance.

   5. No further progress has been made on cryopreservation. However, we have
      determined the water requirements for typical maintenance of cultures on sand
      (50 mL water per 400mL #12 mesh silica sand) which helps standardization of
      culture maintenance. Dr. Perez is investigating light materials as substrates and
      has preliminary results with vermiculite and other materials as substrate.
      However, we have difficulty in repeating the vermiculite results at UC Riverside
      but this may be related to the difference in vermiculite particle size as suggested
      by Dr. Perez during his recent visit. A material lighter than sand would be of great
      benefit in distribution of Romanomermis cultures to Mosquito Control districts
      from a central producer such as CVMVCD.

6. A visiting scientist, Dr. Jay Burr, initiated studies this spring on light responses of the
infective juveniles of R. culicivorax and has found that there appears to be a bipolar
response, i. e., the infective juveniles are both attracted and repelled by visible light. In
the literature, there are divergent and opposite results reported for the light sensitivity of
the infective process for Romanomermis species and we hope this work will resolve this
confusion. In addition, this research has important implications for the timing of field
applications of Romanomermis for biocontrol.

Respectfully submitted,




Dept. of Nematology, University of California Riverside
<edward.platzer@ucr.edu>
[http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~edplat/index.html]




                                                                                                       2
  PROGRESS REPORT: Red Imported Fire Ant Program Evaluation and Improvement
                                 July 1, 2008 - June 30, 2009
Bastiaan M. Drees, Professor and Extension Entomologist
Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Department of Entomology, The Texas A&M System

Summary. From July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009, three trips have been made to the Coachella Valley
Mosquito and Vector Control District (CVMVCD): Sept. 24-26, Dec. 15-16, 2008 and March 18-20,
2009). Ongoing efforts are designed to study:
    1) basic biological traits that the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera:
Formicidae) display in the man-modified desert habitat environment of the Coachella Valley, California;
    2) investigate other ant species within imported fire ant (IFA) control areas;
    3) seek sampling/monitoring methods, treatments and treatment approaches to improve on the current
treatment program protocol;
    4) seek to implement biological control options to augment chemical treatments to address long-term
suppression or help in the goal of eradication.
Finally, an effort is continuing to provide assistance and considerations to the CVMVCD administration
to assess the impact their overall IFA treatment program efforts. Since the employment of Roberta
“Bobbye” Dieckmann, with asistance from Jeremy Wittie, research proposed by Drees has been
implemented and data gathered throughout the year and analysis will be performed as monitoring efforts
are concluded for each element.
This report focuses on efforts from Dec. 2008 (last progress report submitted) through June 2009. See
Dec. 2008 Progress Report for additional progress made during this fiscal year.
One major impact of this funded program effort on the RIFA program on golf courses being implemented
by CVMVCD occurred on March 2, 2009 (Memorandum to RIFA Operations Crew by Jim Saulinier):
Effective immediately, the initial treatment would be made using Advion®, followed 1 month later with
the insect growth regulator (IGR), Distance®. This decision was based, in part, on discussions between
Drees and field staff and is the subject of the golf course program monitoring program (see below).

1) Basic biology studies. Since Sept. 2008, R. Dieckmann and J. Wittie, have gathered data to
development of two new ant monitoring approaches: a) comparing surface food lure (e.g., Frito corn
chips or slices of hot dogs) sampling to sub-surface sampling; and b) evaluating subterranean foraging
activities of ants at a distance of roughly 1 meter from ant colonies.
The results of the first 24-hr. assessment of surface food lure vial sampling methods currently used by the
field crew, versus a sub-surface placement of food lure vials in auger-drilled holes demonstrate that
sampling for RIFA foraging workers collected more ants and for a longer period of time into the day,
even during the moderate temperatures encountered in Februray (Fig. 1). Adoption of this method would
allow field crews detecting and/or assessing RIFA population levels could work longer into the day (after
surface RIFA ceased due to high temperatures) and document fewer false negative data than the current
method used. Repetition of this experiment through the year will provide further support for and
validation of this proposed new method.

Fig. 1. Red imported fire ant monitoring results over a 24-hr. period using in-ground versus surface
(conventional) placement of food lure (Frito corn chips) containing plastic vials.



2) Ant ecology. During the March 2009 visit to Coachella valled, Drees joined Jim Saulinier on a visit to
an area suspected to have RIFA and ants were collected and identified by B. Summerlin as Dorymyrmex
                                                    1
pyramieus. Other ants collected that date and ants collected by the field staff during regular operations
were also identified. Bill Summerlin, Technician with the Center for Urban and Structural Entomology
(http://urbanentomology.tamu.edu/index.cfm) continues to be available to make ant identifications for
CVMVCD. He is certified as an ant taxonomist by USDA-APHIS to verifiy RIFA determinations.

3) Treatments and treatment approaches (Golf course assessments). Implementation of a formalized
monitoring program has been initiated on selected golf courses under the coordination of R. Diechmann.
As of March 2009, a number of golf courses had been contracted and included in the treatment program
evaluation effort, representing at least the first seasonal “replicate” of the treatment programs to be
assessed over the coming year(s):
1) Distance® followed by Advion® - traditional treatment (Rep. 1: Tahquitz Creek Golf Course; Rep. 2:
    Outdoor Resorts Golf Course, Nov. 5, 2008);
2) Advion® followed by Distance® - new proposed treatment implemented March 2 to CVMVCD RIFA
    program (Rep 1: Indian Ridge Grove and Arroyo Golf Courses, Oct. 7, 2008); Rep. 2: Indian
    Canyons South Golf Course);
3) Advion®, only (Rep. 1: Indian Canyons North Golf Course; Rep. 2: Seven Lakes Golf Course);
4) Extinguish® Plus - alternative and “maintenance” treatment option (Rep. 1: PGA West Arnold Palmer
    Course, Oct. 11, 2008; Rep. 2.Club Shenandoah Springs).
Early results from broadcast applied ant bait treatments made during cooler moths were less than stellar,
as expected. Treatments applied during more favorable environmental conditions are expected to provide
more dramatic results.

4) Biological control. Approval for a RIFA microsporidian disease, Thelohania (Kneallhazia)
solenopsae, release by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been delayed due to concerns over the disease
potentially affecting native Solenopsis ant species. Dr. David Oi, Research Scientist, USDA-ARS, has
been addressing ecological concerns in order to obtain approval for release in Orange Co. Once
obtained, efforts to make a release in Coachella Valley will continue to be considered.

Overall Treatment Program Assessment. During Drees’ March 2009 visit, he was asked to provide
field staff a program detailing the research being implemented for this project by R. Dieckman to foster
appreciation and collaboration in assuring support and compliance (i.e., appreciation of the importance of
leaving untreated control areas in participating golf courses). Handout copies from this training are
available upon request.
Data collected prior to Drees’ involvement in assessing the CVMVCD RIFA treatment program
compiled and analyzed by Phil Boeing has been obtained and efforts to better interpret these data are
under discussion.
The air-assisted Herd GT-77 model seeder was ordered and recieved. However, demonstration of the
capabilities of this application device has yet to occur.

Additional activities. Drees has developed a proposal to continue this effort from July 1, 2009 through
June 30, 2010. He has also been asked to develop a Standard Operations Manual for field crew
technicians focusing on RIFA and management technology.




                                                    2
         RESEARTCH ON EYE GNATS AND TADPOLE SHRIMP FOR MOSQUITO

                            CONTROL IN THE COACHELLA VALLEY

                                       (JANUARY – JUNE 2009)

Continued to maintain eye gnat colony (Liohippelates collusor) in the laboratory at U.C. Riverside for
research and outreach purposes. Field observations on eye gnats were reduced in the winter as population
density was at a low level. Considerable laboratory research, however, was initiated during this period.
Field research was initiated in June when eye gnat population density increased. Observation on date
gardens for tadpole shrimp (TPS) as a mosquito control agent every other week for the first quarter and
then on a weekly schedule starting in mid April.

EYE GNATS – During the winter months, an initial screening program was established in the laboratory
to evaluate the bioefficacy of various biorational pesticides as soil larvicides and biocontrol agents against
larvae. These pesticides are registered for use in organic farming practices. It will be desirable to
ascertain the activity of these against eye gnats when used in crop pest management. Their use in crops
might control the eye gnats breeding in cropland.

These pesticides are derived from plant extracts, bacteria, fungus, or nematodes. If effective against eye
gnat larvae (developing in the soil), they could be incorporated into the soil where high gnat populations
breed. If promising, these biocontrol agents will be field tested where eye gnat populations abound.

TADPOLE SHRIMP AS BIOCONTROL AGENT ON MOSQUITOES – Date gardens under observation
included the Anderson date garden (two rows), the Oasis date garden (two blocks), the Hadley date
garden (three blocks), and the Barreto date garden (two blocks). Inspection occurred twice a month, until
April, when inspection went on a weekly basis.

JANUARY – Cool winter month kept irrigation water temperature low, preventing shrimp eggs from
hatching. Bimonthly inspection of all date gardens indicated no tadpole shrimp (TPS) or mosquito activity
when standing water was present. Some date gardens were also dry on inspection dates.

FEBRUARY – Cool weather continued, water temperatures remained low on all date gardens, and at
times the gardens may have been dry, with no standing water. No TPS or mosquitoes evident.

MARCH – Cool weather still prevailed. When standing water observed, no TPS or mosquitoes observed
in any date garden. Block A at Hadley date garden planted with wheat in row centers and irrigated by
overflow from drip irrigation of date palms. No TPS seen in water overflow.

APRIL – Weather starting to warm up. No TPS found in early and mid April in all date gardens. First
week in April found a light population of mosquitoes at Hadley date garden (Block D). No TPS seen.
However, the later week of April found large TPS (2-3 cm) in standing water in older block at Oasis date
garden. Young TPS (0.5 cm.) observed at Barreto date garden in both blocks inspected. This is first
indication of TPS hatch in 2009. No mosquitoes observed.

MAY – Initial May inspections found Anderson date garden had received an irrigation, standing water
was fresh, and as expected no TPS observed (TPS not big enough to be observed in fresh-standing water).
Older block at Oasis date garden was completely disked, dry with no standing water. The soil in Barreto
date garden was recently irrigated, damp, but no standing water. No evidence of TPS depressions seen. At
Hadley date garden, the soil in block D was damp with no standing water. Block B had standing water in
some rows, with small TPS (5 mm.) present. Block A, with the grain crop, had not been irrigated was dry,
and the grain appeared to be ready for harvest. Second week in May at Anderson date garden water in row
13 had medium size TPS. Row 14 had no TPS in standing water. Rows in Hadley date Garden in block D
were dry. No TPS. Row opposite block D (by standpipe) had a small puddle of water had no TPS but
large skins of TPS were found. Block B had some standing water with TPS (1-2 cm.) present. Block A
was dry, grain crop in row centers drying up. Water turned off.

Oasis date garden had just started irrigation; older block had standing water but fresh, no TPS present.
Young dates under irrigation, no TPS evident in fresh water. Barreto date garden had damp soil and one
puddle of water with TPS ( 1 cm.) in the north block. The south block had one large puddle of water in
one row, but no TPS seen.

CONCLUSION: It seems that TPS is prevailing in all habitats previously found positive. However, on
some ranches, there may be a need for augmentation, as the density appears to be low. Also, it will be
interesting to confirm studies on Block A of Hadley date gardens if the wheat crop under flood and drip
irrigation of the trees is conducive to TPS propagation. If water stands in the wheat stubble, this habitat
will require stocking and inundation with TPS.
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                                                  July 14, 2009




Agenda Topic: Informational Item
Staff reports from:
    1. Special District and Local Government Institute, Administration Seminar, June 18-19,
        2009, Seaside, California.

Report:

   1. The focus of the Administration Seminar was:
       • Creating a Winning Public Agency
       • Management: Staff and Board Perspectives
       • Better Board Meetings and Policies
       • Effective Administration

Individual reports:
   • Anita Jones – Human Resources Manager:
          o This seminar was my first of the series which also includes Special District
              Governance and Special District Finance. A Certificate in Special District
              Leadership and Management is awarded upon successful completion of all three
              seminars. I found the sessions in this seminar to be very valuable. It gave me a
              good perspective on the wider issues that impact special districts. An interesting
              perspective that was given in the Introduction was that cities and counties think
              that special districts dilute their funds. This reasoning might explain why
              sometimes tension exists between government agencies. The session on
              Technology Solutions for Records Management provided very interesting ideas
              on the direction that online records management may be moving in. He taught
              that records management is not a one-time event solved with a new technology
              purchase. Districts need to look into the future to be sure that their agency’s data
              would always be available to them if the technology or the vendors are not longer
              available.
                                            Section

                                             15




     Legislative Updates




COACHELLA VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT
                        Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                  Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                                                     July 14, 2009




Agenda Topic: Legislative Update, State Budget, and NPDES status


Looking Ahead – Monthly Legislative Status Report

AB 288 - (Nestande) – Vector Control
An act to amend Sections 2079 and 2082 of the Health and Safety Code, relating to vector
control.

Status: May 20, 2009 – Committee Recommendation: Do pass and re-refer to APPR Committee
with recommendation to place on Consent Calendar.
Current Location: SEN APPROPRIATIONS

Summary: Introduced by Assemblyman Brian Nestande - February 13, 2009. Taken over from
Senator Ducheny and it is identical to SB-1326 vetoed by the Governor because of the delayed
budget. Existing law, the Mosquito Abatement and Vector Control District Law, authorizes the
establishment of mosquito abatement and vector control districts governed by a board of trustees.
This bill would require the board of trustees to adopt a formal, written response to any
irregularities or accounting issues rose in the audit and provide this response to the appointing
authority of each member of the board of trustees. The bill would also require the district, before
it levels special benefit assessments, to provide specified notice to the appointing authority.
Fiscal effect: minimal; state non-reimbursable.

SB 759 (Leno) – Aerial Spraying
(An act to add Sections 105206 and 105207 to the Health and Safety Code, relating to public
health.)

Status: Set, first hearing. Held in committee and under submission. (5/28/09)
Current Location: SEN APPROPRIATIONS

Summary: Existing law establishes various programs for the prevention of disease and the
promotion of health to be administered by the State Department of Public Health, including, but
not limited to, programs relating to the reporting of pesticide poisoning.

This bill would, in the case of aerial pesticide spraying near residential or sensitive areas, require
the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment to use prescribed information regarding
the effects of pesticides, including inert ingredients, to develop educational materials for
distribution of physicians and surgeons and to the public.

SB 711 (Leno) – Public meetings: closed sessions: labor negotiations.
(An act to amend Sections 54954.5, 54957.1, and 54957.6 of the Government Code, relating to
public meetings.)

Status: Set, second hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
Current Location: SEN LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Summary: Existing law prohibits a closed session from including any final action on the
proposed compensation of unrepresented employees. The act also requires the legislative body of
a local agency to publicly report any action taken in closed session, as prescribed, including the
approval of an agreement concluding labor negotiations with represented employees after the
agreement is final and has been accepted or ratified by the other party.

This bill would require a local agency, before holding a closed session regarding employee
compensation, to identify the employee or class of employees that are the subject of the
negotiations, the representatives of the employees, and all known matters within the scope of the
negotiations, and to make available to the public certain written proposals. The bill would require
the legislative body to present, in an open and public session, the new collective bargaining
agreement or an initial proposal. The bill would additionally require any vote of the legislative
body on the collective bargaining agreement or initial proposal to be taken at an open and public
session. The bill would require a final vote on any action taken pursuant to a closed session to be
conducted during an open and public regular meeting of the legislative body, and only after
disclosure of certain writings, cost projections, and methodology.

                                    State Budget Update


         Controller Releases May Cash Flow Figures
SACRAMENTO – State Controller John Chiang today released his monthly report detailing
California’s cash balance, receipts and disbursements in May and through the first 11 months of
the fiscal year. In May, revenue was $827 million below the latest projections found in the
Governor’s May Budget Revision.

"Without immediate solutions from the Governor and Legislature, we are less than 50 days away
from a meltdown of State government. This presents a terrible threat to California’s economy
and to the State’s delivery of basic public services,” said Chiang. “A truly balanced budget is the
only responsible way out of the worst cash crisis since the Great depression.”

Personal income taxes were $475 million below (-23.0%) estimates in the May Revision.
Corporate taxes were down $84.4 million (-25.8%), and sales taxes fell by $109 million (-3.3%).
The Controller has met with Governor Schwarzenegger and Legislators in the past week to brief
them on the State’s immediate cash problem. He also sent a letter to State leaders this morning
with new cash projections – updated to reflect May actuals and final May Revision numbers
from the Department of Finance – that continue to show the State exhausting all available cash
by late July. The State is now projected to run $2.78 billion into the red on July 31.

The State started the fiscal year with a $1.45 billion cash deficit, which grew to $19.8 billion on
May 31, 2009. That deficit is being covered by a combination of Revenue Anticipation Notes
(RANs) and internal borrowing from special funds. Borrowing from special funds is expected to
provide enough cash to fund State operations through the end of the fiscal year on June 30.


    State Forced to Issue “IOUs” Without Immediate
                        Budget Fix
SACRAMENTO – Today State Controller John Chiang announced that he will be forced to
issue registered warrants – also known as IOUs – beginning July 2 if immediate budget and cash
solutions are not quickly adopted by the Governor and Legislature.

 “Next Wednesday we start a fiscal year with a massively unbalanced spending plan and a cash
shortfall not seen since the Great Depression,” Chiang said. “The State’s $2.8 billion cash
shortage in July grows to $6.5 billion in September, and after that we see a double digit freefall.
Unfortunately, the State’s inability to balance its checkbook will now mean short-changing
taxpayers, local governments and small businesses.”

The Controller was forced to delay payments for 30 days in February to manage a smaller cash
crisis. But the magnitude of this shortfall – which is nearly five times larger – cannot be
temporarily covered by payment delays. The option to pursue short-term, high-cost loans from
Wall Street to cover the cash shortfall was taken off the table by Governor Schwarzenegger
earlier this month.

The State Controller met with the Governor and Legislative leaders this week to warn them of
the consequences of further budget delays. In addition to the burden on those who receive the
notes, resorting to IOUs sends a signal that California has exhausted all other options to manage
its cash flow.

Payment categories protected by the State Constitution, federal law and court decisions will
receive regular payments in July. All other general fund payments will be paid with IOUs. These
include payments to local governments for social services, private contractors, state vendors,
income and corporate tax refunds, and payments for State operations including legislative per
diem.

The warrants will carry an interest rate set by the Pooled Money Investment Board. The
Controller has requested an emergency meeting of the Board on July 2 to set the rate. Any rate
adoption will become effective immediately. The warrants will have a maturity date of October
1, 2009.
                          State Budget Update from Ralph Heim

The Governor met with 3 of the legislative leaders again yesterday, but no progress was
reported. Assembly Speaker Bass chose not to attend the Big 5 meetings yesterday, telling
reporters she was tired of Schwarzenegger’s proposals, which she said were not likely to
help erase the state’s $26.3 billion shortfall through next June. Bass also stated: “We
believe that many of the Governor’s reforms are worthy of consideration, but what is most
important right now is that we close the deficit.” In response, the Governor said he hoped
that Speaker Bass would reconsider attending Big 5 meetings, as it is his goal to resolve the
budget impasse by Friday, the last day that the state’s major banks have said that they will
cash the state’s IOU.

The Governor was referring to a decision by Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo, J.
P. Morgan Chase, and others that announced yesterday that they would no longer cash the
state’s IOU on Friday.

Monday’s bad budget news continued with the expected downgrading of the state’s bond
rating when Fitch downgraded California from A to BBB, citing the state’s failure to close
the budget deficit last week. Fitch’s action is only points away from junk-bond status and
State Treasure Bill Lockyer warned last week that a downgrade to BBB-plus, which is one
grade higher that BBB, could cost the state $7.5 billion over a 30-year period.

Finally, suspension of Proposition 1A remains on the Big 5 discussion table and if the
Legislature chooses not to suspend Proposition 98, the school funding guarantee
constitution measure, suspension of Proposition 1A is a foregone conclusion. Even if
Proposition 98 is suspended, Proposition 1A suspension is still a very real possibility.

Simone Smith

   Mosquito & Vector Control Association of California | 1215 K Street Suite 2290 | Sacramento | California | 95814
                                         P: 916-440-0826 | F: 916-231-2141




                                                    NPDES
                       Coachella Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District
                                                 Board of Trustees Meeting
                                                             July 14, 2009




Agenda Item: Legislative Update
President Underwood, Vice-President Lock, Secretary-Treasurer Howell, and General Manager
Lothrop attended meetings with the local legislative members to discuss topics such as: AB288,
the Mosquito Research Program, and the Clean Water Act and Mosquito Control.

Schedule of Meetings:
   1. Denise Ducheny, Senator, District – Conference Call – June 29th at 3:30pm
   2. Brian Nestande, Assembly Member, District 64 – July 10th at 1:30pm
   3. Benoit, Senator, District – July 10th at 1:30pm
   4. Manuel Perez, District – July 10th at 3:30pm

Outline of conference call with Senator Ducheny and attached support material.

       1. AB- 288 - The Trustee’s comments included unified support for transparency and
          accountability that are set forth in the bill as this is the policy of the present Board.
          The concern that the Trustees expressed during the discussion includes the part of the
          bill that inappropriately singles out vector control districts and suggests that they need
          to be more closely watched. The remedy for that part of the bill, according to the
          Board discussion, should be to include all special districts with appointed and elected
          boards to remove the suggestion that the vector control district boards are more likely
          to make poor policy decision.

       2. Mosquito Research Program - In 1970, Senator Fred Marler, Jr. authored legislation
          establishing the Mosquito Research Program at the University of California. Since
          that time, the Legislature has appropriated funding each fiscal year to the University
          for the Program’s research activities - see attached. The Trustees and the District
          staff would appreciate if Senator Ducheny will be in a position to write the letter to
          Mr. Yudof questioning why the funds were eliminated- see attached letters from
          Senator Cogdill and Senator Wolk, as well as response letter from Mr. Yudof.


       3. Clean Water Act and Mosquito Control: The ability to continue to protect the
          public from these mosquito-borne diseases has been greatly reduced as a result of a
          recent ruling by the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals vacating the U.S. EPA final
          ruling regarding the use of public health pesticides that are applied to or enter into the
          waters of the United States. Should the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals decision
          become final, all mosquito control programs throughout the country will need
          National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits – see attached.
      The 6th Circuit panel granted a two-year stay, until April 9, 2011. This ruling has no
      direct influence on the parallel question of rehearing the case en banc, which is being
      considered by the full court. The Trustees and the District staff would appreciate
      Senator Ducheny’s support of S.787, Vitter #4, to amend the federal Water Pollution
      Control Act to clarify the jurisdiction of the United States over waters of the United
      States – see attached.

**Oral Report will be given on meetings taking place after Board Packet Delivery.**
Mosquito Research Program

In 1970, Senator Fred Marler, Jr. authored legislation establishing the Mosquito Research Program at the
University of California. Since that time, the Legislature has appropriated funding each fiscal year to the
University for the Program’s research activities.

The Mosquito Research Program has proven a very valuable research program and has maintained an
excellent working relationship with the Department of Public Health and local mosquito and vector
control agencies, neither of which have the fiscal resources to conduct the level of research the University
has provided.

Last year, the University announced it has discontinued the funding for the Mosquito Research Program.
At the request of the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California, Senator Lois Wolk sent the
attached letter to the University’s President Mark G. Yudof, expressing concerns and requesting President
Yudof to provide a response as to why the University decided to discontinue funding the Mosquito
Research Program.

The Mosquito Research Program has been extremely important to local mosquito and vector control
agencies to better respond and manage mosquito and other vector-borne disease outbreaks and emerging
mosquito and vector-borne issues.

For these reasons, the Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California supports legislative efforts
to encourage the University to fully fund the Mosquito Research Program.

Please see attached letter from Senator Lois Wolk for additional information on the Mosquito Research
Program.




                                                                                   1215 K STREET, SUITE 2290
                                                                                     SACRAMENTO, CA 95814
                                                                                                916-440-0826
                                                                                              www.mvcac.org
.----------------------------------------------_.                                                                                   __   ._----_._-----




     .~   STATE CAPITOL.    ROOM 5097
           SACRAMENTO. CA 95814
                                                             QIul ifrrrrria ~tut£ ~£nut£                            DISTRICT   OFFICES



               TEL (916) 651-4014                                                                            4974 E CLINTON WAY. SUITE 100·
               FAX(916) 327·3523                                                                                   FRESNO. CA 93727
                                                                                                                   TELi5591253-7122
          SENATOR.COGDILL@SEN.CA.GOV                                                                               FAX,5591 253·7127
            WWW.5EN.CA.GOV/COGOILL

                                                                                                                1308 W. MAIN ST.    SUITE C
                                                                                                                    RIPON. CA 95366
                                                                                                                   TEL (209) 599-8540

                                                                    DAVE   COGDILL                                 FAX(209) 599-8547


                                                                      STATE SENATOR
                                                                    FOURTEENTH   DISTRICT




                             June 10, 2009

                             Mr. Mark G. Yudof, President
                             University of California
                             1111 Franklin Street
                             Oakland, CA 94607-5200

                             Re: University of California Mosquito Research Program

                             Dear Mr. Yudof:

                             On behalf of the San Joaquin and Turlock Mosquito and Vector Control Districts, Iam
                             writing to inquire why funding for the University of California Mosquito Research
                             Program (UCMRP) has been discontinued. This has caused concern in light of the
                             potential threats from West Nile Virus and other mosquito borne illnesses.

                             For local mosquito and vector control districts, the mosquito research program has been
                             an extremely important research tool. The program enables districts to better respond to
                             and manage mosquito and other vector-borne disease issues. Without this research, an
                             integrated mosquito management program will be difficult to implement.

                             Established by the Legislature in 1970, it is my understanding that the program has been
                             funded at approximately $500,000 for the past 30 years. Although I understand these
                             difficult times require difficult decisions, it seems appropriate that the Legislature
                             understand why the funds for this program were eliminated.

                             Thank you for your time, and I look forward to your reply.




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                              14th Sen   e      strict




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