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PGT Handbook 1011

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					              UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS

        DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS

                         GUIDE FOR
                        STUDENTS ON
                         TAUGHT MA
                        PROGRAMMES
                               2010-2011


Welcome to the Taught MA programme in the Department of Classics. This booklet
contains essential general information about our department, together with detailed
academic information about your programme of study. You will need to read this
booklet before you register, but you will also need to refer to it throughout the
academic year—so keep it safe.

Contents
1. Essential Information for Postgraduate Students in the Department of Classics:
pp.2-9
2. The Taught MA Programme in Classical Studies: pp.10-17
3. Rules and Guidelines for Assessment: pp.18-24


   In addition to this Guide to the Department of Classics, you will find a lot more
     information about being a student at Leeds in the Taught Students Guide:
                          http://www.leeds.ac.uk/qmeu/tsg/
1. Essential Information for Taught MA Students in the Department
of Classics

1.1 Registration
All students are required to register at the start of each academic year. The process takes
place on-line and is available from 2 August 2010. If you are able to register before arrival in
Leeds this will save you time. But if you have problems with the on-line registration, do not
worry—it will still be possible to do it after you have arrived.
To register on-line, go to http://myuni.leeds.ac.uk/
- if you are a new student, follow the link ‘Obtain ISS username and password’: you will need
to have your 9-figure Student ID (on the offer letter sent to you by Taught Postgraduate
Admissions) and your date of birth;
- then follow the link ‘Login to online registration’: you will be asked to log in using the
username and password obtained in the previous step;
For more details on registration, see http://www.leeds.ac.uk/studentguide/registration.htm
There is a separate process for choosing and enrolling on the particular modules. For this, it
is best to wait until you have discussed the options with tutors after your arrival.

1.2 Induction
There will be an introductory meeting at 11am on Monday 20 September 2010, in the
departmental library (Parkinson Room 116). The procedures for module enrolment will be
explained at this meeting, and other useful information provided. You will also have an
individual meeting with the Postgraduate Tutor (Dr Brock) on Tuesday or Wednesday to
discuss your choice of modules (times will be arranged at the introductory meeting). Once
you have decided on your modules, you will meet with module tutors to discuss your topics
and the schedule for your work.
If for any reason it is not possible for you to arrive in Leeds in time for these meetings, please
let us know—we may be able to make alternative arrangements.
Details of a variety of other events, including the department’s welcome party for new
students, and tours of the Union facilities and the campus will be available at the introductory
meeting.
Students whose first language is not English are required by the University to take an English
language test at the start of their course. The test can be taken at any of nine sessions from
22 to 29 September: details will be provided at the introductory meeting.

1.3 Dates
Term dates for the coming year are as follows:
                                             Registration Week   20-24 Sept 2010
 SEMESTER 1        13 weeks     TERM 1       11 weeks (teaching) 27 Sept – 10 Dec 2009
                                                 CHRISTMAS VACATION
                                TERM 2       2 weeks (exams)     10 Jan – 21 Jan 2011
 SEMESTER 2        15 weeks                  10 weeks (teaching) 24 Jan – 1 Apr 2011
                                                   EASTER VACATION
                                TERM 3       1 week (teaching)   2 May – 6 May 2011
                                             1 week (revision)   9 May – 13 May 2011
                                             3 weeks (exams)     16 May – 3 June 2011




                                                2
The dates for teaching and exams apply mainly to undergraduate, not postgraduate,
courses, so you will have opportunities to meet your tutors for the optional modules and the
dissertation during the vacations. However, the postgraduate seminar only meets in the 11
teaching weeks of each semester, and if you take language modules, the teaching and
exams for those will be in the weeks indicated above. See below 1.6 on attendance.

1.4 Communication
From the point of view of a postgraduate student the most important channels of
communication within the department are as follows:
 The departmental office (Room 121) should be your first port of call for routine questions
  about your course or the way things run in the Department of Classics. If the secretaries
  don’t have the answer, they should be able to tell you who does. The office opening times
  are displayed on the door. The office can be telephoned on (0113) 3433537, faxed on
  (0113) 3433554, or e-mailed (z.r.alvandi@leeds.ac.uk). The postal address is:
  Department of Classics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT.
 Pigeon-holes for MA and PhD students are located outside the departmental office. Any
  mail or university/departmental documentation addressed to you will be placed in these
  pigeon-holes.
 The postgraduate noticeboard is opposite the departmental library (Room 116). General
  information for postgraduate students will be posted on this noticeboard, which you should
  consult on a regular basis.
 Tutors will normally contact individual students by e-mail, sent to their university e-mail
  address. In addition, an e-mail distribution list for postgraduate students will be set up at
  the beginning of term, which will be used for circulating announcements that may be of
  interest to everyone. E-mail will also be used by other parts of the University—for
  example, messages from the library telling you that a book you have borrowed has been
  recalled and must be returned. It is essential that you check your university e-mail
  account at least twice a week.
 E-mail is also the easiest way to contact lecturers with quick queries about your academic
  work, or to set up an appointment for a longer consultation if necessary. Contact details
  for members of staff are as follows:
Name                          Ext.       E-mail                         Room
Dr. K. Belcher                33549      k.belcher@leeds.ac.uk          120
Dr. R.W. Brock                36785      r.w.brock@leeds.ac.uk          232
Dr. P J Goodman               33536      p.j.goodman@leeds.ac.uk        125
Dr. S.J. Green                33540      s.j.green@leeds.ac.uk          233
Dr. S.D. Hamstead             33548      s.d.hamstead@leeds.ac.uk       234
Prof. M.F. Heath*             33542      m.f.heath@leeds.ac.uk          117
Dr. R.J.F. Jones              33547      r.j.f.jones@leeds.ac.uk        127
Dr. R. May**                  33541      r.may@leeds.ac.uk              118
Dr. E.E. Pender               33538      e.e.pender@leeds.ac.uk         115a
Dr. E.J. Stafford***          33539      e.j.stafford@leeds.ac.uk       235
* Prof. Heath will be on research leave all year and is replaced by Dr. Hamstead.
** Dr May will be on research leave all year: her replacement will be appointed shortly.
*** Dr. Stafford will be on research leave in Semester 1.
 Information is available on-line from the Department of Classics web-site
  (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/classics), the Student Portal (http://myuni.leeds.ac.uk: this is the
  default homepage on computers around campus), and the University’s VLE (‘Virtual
  Learning Environment’).




                                              3
1.5 Personal tutors
Every postgraduate student in the Department of Classics is assigned a personal tutor. You
will have two scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, one towards the end of either
semester; these will provide a regular opportunity to discuss your progress. You will receive
details about these nearer the time by e-mail and via the noticeboards. Your personal tutor
will also be willing to meet you at any time during the year, to offer academic advice and
assistance, and to discuss questions regarding university life or personal difficulties with you
in confidence. Some tutors operate a regular ‘surgery’ time or ‘office hours’, while others
prefer you to make an appointment—details of individual tutors’ arrangements will be posted
on the noticeboards, and you can always make contact by e-mail or phone or via the
Departmental Office. It is very important that you attend all meetings called by your tutor.

1.6 Attendance
The University has a strict code of practice on attendance, which is stated in the Taught
Student Guide: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/aqst/tsg/1copatt.htm. The Department monitors
attendance at the Postgraduate Seminar (see below 1.10) and personal tutor meetings, and
failure to attend and/or absence without permission can result in serious consequences for
the        student       through        the       Unsatisfactory    Student       Procedure:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/aqst/tsg/12usp.htm. A register will be circulated at the Postgraduate
Seminar: failure to sign will be treated as proof of absence.
If you have a good reason for missing a seminar, supervision or personal tutor meeting, you
should let the relevant lecturer know, in advance if possible (this will be the PG Tutor in the
case of the Seminar). If you are ill for up to one week (five working days) a self
certification form (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ssc/selfcert.htm) should be completed and
submitted to the Department Office. If illness is causing you to miss more than one week of
classes, you should complete a Mitigating Circumstances form (see below 1.7 Mitigating
Circumstances), and return it to the Office, with medical evidence where relevant.
If personal or academic problems are causing you to miss lectures and classes regularly, it is
very important that you discuss them with your personal tutor as soon as possible.
You will, of course, want to spend some time away from Leeds during the year, on holiday or
visiting your family back home. However, extended periods of absence are likely to disrupt
your study and leave you without enough time to complete all your assessed work to a
satisfactory standard. We strongly advise, therefore, that you keep even vacation-time
absences to a minimum. Over the summer vacation in particular you should plan to spend
a substantial amount of time in Leeds, where you have access to research materials and can
easily remain in contact with your dissertation supervisor. All periods of absence should in
any case be agreed in advance with the Postgraduate Tutor, who will permit longer absences
only in exceptional circumstances.

1.7 Mitigating Circumstances
Mitigating circumstances are significantly disruptive or unexpected events which are beyond
your control but which might affect your academic performance. If you experience difficulties
that you think have affected, or might affect, your ability to complete coursework or to take
examinations it is your responsibility to advise the Department as soon as possible.
You must obtain a Mitigating Circumstances form from the Office or from the Classics
website (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/classics/current.htm#idd).    You should firstly read the
guidance notes which accompany the form, then complete the form giving as full an account
as you can of the circumstances, if possible supported by independent evidence (such as a
doctor’s note for illness); you should also specify how your work has been affected (which
classes have been missed, which pieces of coursework submitted late, in which exams you
may have underperformed). If the circumstances are such that you want them to be kept



                                               4
confidential, you should speak in confidence to your personal tutor or the Head of
Department, who can then vouch for you without revealing details; you should still complete
a Mitigating Circumstances form, stating that there are confidential circumstances, and
specifying who knows about them. You can also consult your personal tutor if you are
uncertain whether a problem might be considered as mitigating circumstances, but if in
doubt, do notify the Department – it is always to your advantage to notify your Personal
Tutor and to keep them informed of developments throughout the year.
In response, we may grant a student a new first attempt at a module or modules: such cases
are dealt with by the Department’s Progress/Special Cases Committee.

1.8 Departmental facilities
 The Departmental Library (Parkinson Room 116) is normally available for use as a
  reading room every afternoon (1pm to 4.30pm). You are also welcome to borrow books
  from our collection.
 Our Postgraduate Study Room (Parkinson Room 236) is available for use by
  postgraduate students between 9.00am and 4.30pm every day. (When the door is locked
  you must sign out the key from the departmental office.) You are welcome to use the
  computing facilities (including printing and scanning) and the photocopier in that room. We
  do ask, however, that you make responsible (and legal!) use of these facilities. The rules
  on use of the departmental computer are posted next to the PC itself. In particular, the PC
  can be subject to heavy demand, so please be aware that a booking system is in
  operation.
 All postgraduate students are invited to make use of the Staff Common Room (Room
  119), and its tea/coffee-making facilities—but you must help to keep it tidy and you must
  do your own washing-up.
 There is also a departmental lunch for staff and postgraduate students at 1pm each
  Monday in term, also in the Staff Common Room. We hope that you will join us!

1.9 University facilities
As you will find out very quickly, the university has an extensive range of facilities for use by
all students. Essential facilities that you need to become familiar with straightaway include
the following:
 The Brotherton Library houses the University’s main research collection, and will be the
  library most useful for your work as a postgraduate. The entrance is on the ground floor of
  the Parkinson Building (Parkinson Court). The Classics collections (Ancient History,
  General Classics, Greek, Latin) are shelved downstairs in Level 2 of the West Building;
  many of the Ancient Philosophy holdings are located in the basement of the Main Building
  (as part of the main Philosophy section).
 The Edward Boyle Library contains both a lending and a reference section, and has
  multiple copies of some books that are in heavy demand. Although it is aimed primarily at
  the needs of undergraduates, you will sometimes find that it contains the University’s only
  copy of an important book; and it can also be useful if the book you need is on loan from
  the Brotherton.
   A library tour will be arranged for students new to Leeds library facilities; further details will
   be provided at the initial meeting.
 Computer clusters are dotted all over the campus. The nearest large cluster to the
  Department of Classics is the Woolhouse Cluster in the Parkinson Basement. Some
  clusters are accessible 24 hours a day, using a keypad code available from the
  Computing Help Desk in ISS (Level 10, Red Route i.e. directly above the main entrance to



                                                 5
  the Boyle Library) on production of your Student ID. Details can be found at
  http://www.leeds.ac.uk/iss/clusters/index.html.
  If you require training, ISS (Information Systems Services) provide short courses: you
  should consult the department’s User-Rep, Dr. S. Hamstead, s.d.hamstead@leeds.ac.uk
  (room 234)
 The Graduate Training and Support Centre is located in Parkinson 135 (on the other side
  of the Parkinson Gallery from the department) and provides a wide range of resources for
  use by postgraduate students. You can find out more on the web
  (http://www.leeds.ac.uk/sddu/gts/gtsc.html).
 The Language Centre offers a range of services for students whose first language is not
  English; and it provides courses in other modern languages that may also be of interest to
  students    whose      first  language     is  English.   For    further   details    see
  http://www.leeds.ac.uk/languages/lc_home.html.
 The Print and Copy Bureau (Roger Stevens Building, Level 6) offers a wide range of
  facilities which may be useful to you in preparing coursework, especially if you want to
  reproduce art-work and/or get something special like a dissertation smartly bound.
  Services include scanning and printing, photocopying (black and white or colour), binding,
  photo processing.

1.10 The Postgraduate Seminar
The department’s Postgraduate Seminar normally meets on Wednesday afternoons, at 2pm,
in Seminar Room 101, throughout term-time. It is essential that you keep this time free, since
the seminar is linked to the compulsory Research Skills module.
The first meeting of the seminar, in the first week of teaching (Wednesday 29 September
2010), will be an informal session, providing an opportunity for the graduates to get to know
each other; student representatives (see 1.14) will also be elected at this meeting.
Subsequent sessions will include introductions to some of the resources and techniques for
advanced work in Classics (research resources; writing up your work; giving oral
presentations); but the main focus of the seminar for most of the year will be presentations
by postgraduate students. You will be required to give at least one presentation at some
point during the year as part of the assessment for the Research Skills module. But you
should not feel nervous about this: remember that you will have a sympathetic audience of
other students in the same position as you! The seminar aims above all to provide a friendly
and supportive forum for graduates to talk to each other about their work. Also, for the
seminar to be successful it is vital that every postgraduate make a contribution to the
discussions.
The success of the Postgraduate Seminar is something to which we attach the utmost
importance, so we welcome suggestions and contributions from postgraduates about how
they think it could be improved.

1.11 Departmental seminars and conferences
The Postgraduate Seminar is usually followed at 3pm on a Wednesday by the Department
Research Seminar, at which papers are given by members of staff or visiting speakers.
These are an integral part of the research culture of the department, and attendance at these
seminars, and at any conferences run by the department, is considered an essential part of
your postgraduate course. Under normal circumstances, postgraduate students who wish to
accompany a visiting speaker to dinner after a seminar/conference will have part of the cost
of their dinner met by the department.
The local branch of the Classical Association organises a programme of evening meetings,
with talks by visiting speakers, which you are also encouraged to attend.



                                              6
1.12 Conferences at other universities
The department is keen to facilitate, so far as possible, attendance at external conferences
by its postgraduate students.
 Details of important forthcoming Classics conferences and events can be found on the
  noticeboard opposite the departmental office, and schedules for seminars at other
  universities are posted on the postgraduate noticeboard; some conference
  announcements will also be circulated by e-mail.
 Postgraduate students may apply to the head of department for funds to enable them to
  attend conferences (or participate in courses) directly relevant to their research. Grants
  will normally be limited to a maximum of £125 per student per annum, and the total sum
  granted to students in any one year will depend upon the department’s financial
  circumstances.
 We have been very successful in recent years in winning student bursaries for attendance
  at the Classical Association annual conference, the biggest research conference of its
  kind in Great Britain. The deadline for applications for bursaries is normally in January;
  further details of how to enter the bursary competition will be provided as soon as they are
  available. In 2011 the CA conference will held at Durham, 15-18 April 2011. For further
  details see: http://www.classicalassociation.org/
You should also keep an eye on the postgraduate noticeboard and your e-mail for
information about other funding opportunities.

1.13 Teaching Assistants
There are some opportunities for teaching available to postgraduates within the Department
of Classics, particularly seminar teaching associated with first-year undergraduate modules.
Such Teaching Assistantships, paid at university rates, are awarded to suitably qualified
postgraduate students. If you may be interested, please contact Dr. Green, who is
coordinating Teaching Assistants for 2010-11, as soon as possible.
Postgraduate students who are offered teaching in the department must first successfully
complete university training on small group teaching and assessing student work. Graduate
students who are teaching in the department for the first time will be automatically booked
onto these courses, and will not be allowed to teach if they do not attend. Additional training
and mentoring will be provided within the department.

1.14 Student Representatives
We greatly value both formal and informal feedback from the postgraduates. Constructive
advice on how to improve the service we provide for our students will always be welcome.
Equally, we aim to ensure that any complaints from the postgraduate body are addressed as
speedily as possible.
Two Student Representatives (one for MA students, and one for PhD students) will be
elected in the first session of the Postgraduate Seminar. These representatives are
mandated to pursue a point on your behalf with an appropriate member of staff, or to raise it
for discussion in the Staff-Student Forum (SSF), as appropriate. SSF is the principal channel
of formal communication between staff and students in the department and normally meets
three times a year. Notices about meetings of SSF and minutes of the committee meetings
can be found on the noticeboards in the department.




                                              7
1.15 Answering questions and resolving problems
Questions and problems can arise at any stage in your programme. Please do not hesitate to
talk to someone about them: we are always happy to help as much as we can. It is in our
interests, as well as yours, to ensure that all problems are quickly and satisfactorily resolved.
If an issue arises, here are some guidelines that you may find helpful:
 If your question or problem concerns a particular module, you may wish first of all to talk
  to the tutor concerned.
 Your personal tutor (see 1.5) will be happy to discuss, in strict confidence, any general
  academic or personal issues you may wish to raise.
 Dr Brock, the Postgraduate Tutor, has overall responsibility for the general academic
  welfare of postgraduate students in the department.
 Problems that cannot be resolved through informal discussion with your personal tutor or
  the Postgraduate Tutor can be referred to the head of department.

1.16 Departmental Complaints Procedure
The Department of Classics wishes to be responsive to the views of its students and to
manage complaints in a way that is both sensitive to the needs of each specific case and
integral to the Department’s quality enhancement procedures. The Department wishes to
ensure that all students are fully aware of its complaints procedures and of the avenues open
to them to register dissatisfaction. Local procedures particular to the Department of Classics
are as follows:

Level 1: informal procedures
(a) Dissatisfaction with departmental teaching provision: If you wish to register problems of a
non-specific nature (that is, not applying to one individual in particular), you are encouraged
to make use of the opportunities offered by Staff-Student Committee. You may also inform
the Head of Department, Dr Steven Green, of such problems. If you are uncertain about how
best to proceed, your personal tutor will be able to advise you.
(b) Complaints against individual members of staff: If your dissatisfaction relates to the
teaching or conduct of an individual member of staff, you are encouraged in the first instance
to discuss the issue with the individual concerned; in many cases, informal discussion will be
the best way to resolve the problem. If you are unwilling to do so, or if the nature of the
complaint is such as to make it inappropriate, you should approach the Head of Department,
Dr Steven Green, informally to seek a resolution. (Where the complaint is against the Head
of Department, you should approach the Head of the School of Humanities, Prof. Philip
Mellor, p.a.mellor@leeds.ac.uk).
You may approach your personal tutor or other member of staff for advice on how best to
proceed in such cases, but individual members of staff will not be able to act in your place: it
is essential that you pursue your complaint in person. However, you do have the right to be
accompanied and assisted by a friend or adviser (e.g. from the Student Union).

Level 2: formal procedures
If you are dissatisfied with the outcome of the informal procedures, you may make a formal
complaint by writing to the Head of Department. The Head of Department undertakes to
meet you to discuss your concerns within 5 days of receiving formal notification of the
complaint, and should seek to resolve the problem and report back to you within a further 10.
What if I cannot resolve the problem at a local level?
If you cannot resolve the problem at departmental level, you can pursue your complaint at
University level, by writing to the University Complaints Officer. The procedures for making



                                               8
and dealing with formal complaints are laid down in detail in the University’s Student
Complaints Procedure, details of which can be found in the Taught Student Guide, or at
http://campus.leeds.ac.uk/docs/stucompsproc.DOC. Any student contemplating a formal
complaint is strongly recommended to seek advice from the Student Union’s Student Advice
Centre.
What is covered by this procedure?
The above procedure covers complaints such as:
   dissatisfaction with standards of academic provision
   dissatisfaction with the quality of supervision
   dissatisfaction with standards of service
   violation of the University’s Code of Practice on Equal Opportunities
   harassment or bullying of any kind
   professional misconduct by members of staff
   any other matter affecting the quality of the learning experience
What is not covered?
Appeals against academic judgement (the outcome of degree examinations and
assessments) are dealt with by a separate procedure (details from the department’s
Examinations Officer: Dr Hamstead (Semester 1) or Dr Stafford (Semester 2). There is also
a separate procedure for considering appeals against disciplinary decisions taken by the
University.

1.17 Leeds for Life: Making the Most of your Opportunities at Leeds
We want all our students to get the best out of the whole experience of coming to study at
the University of Leeds. We want Leeds students and graduates to be distinctive, to stand
out from the competition by being able to demonstrate academic excellence and the skills
and attributes that fit them for the challenges of the 21st century. Leeds for Life
encapsulates that aim; it’s the way we view the Leeds University academic community to
which you belong.
Societies, volunteering, internships, sport, work-experience, project work – these are all
opportunities which can provide you with really valuable experience and new or enhanced
skills that will benefit you while you are at University and when you move on. Funding is
available, through the Leeds for Life Foundation, to help you to undertake your own projects.
The Leeds for Life student dashboard gives you easy access to explore the variety of
opportunities offered at Leeds and provides you with on-line forms to help you prepare for
your personal tutorials. Records of your personal tutorials can be stored in the ‘Living CV’
area of the dashboard alongside your University Transcript, the notes you’ve made about
Leeds for Life opportunities and links you want to keep to relevant websites. You’ll be able to
draw on this information (and guidance provided on developing a CV and career planning)
when compiling your CV, filling in job applications or asking your tutor for a reference.
To find out more about what Leeds for Life can do for you,
log in via the Student Portal and discuss it with your
personal tutor at your first meeting.




                                               9
2. The Taught MA Programme in Classical Studies

2.1 The programme in outline
The duration of all Taught MA programmes in the Department of Classics is 12 months (full-
time) or 24 months (part-time).
The Taught MA programme has a modular structure. During the course of your degree you
will take the following modules, making a total of 180 credits for your MA degree:
       CLAS5400 Research Skills in Classics                  (20 credits)
       CLAS5410 Classics Dissertation                        (60 credits)
       One 40 credit option                                  (40 credits)
       One 60 credit option                                  (60 credits)
Students taking this programme part-time will normally take the Research Skills module in
year 1 and the Dissertation in year 2. The division of optional modules between the two years
is flexible.
The research skills module will provide an introduction to the most important research tools
and resources in Classics, practice in their effective use, and advice on the presentation of
research material in written and in oral form. It will be taught through the Department’s
weekly postgraduate seminar (§1.10).
Your dissertation may be on a topic in any of the areas in which the Department can
provide expert supervision. The broad subject area of your dissertation will be decided at the
beginning of the academic year in consultation with the Postgraduate Tutor (it would be
helpful if you can develop some preliminary ideas in advance of registration). Once the
general subject-area of your dissertation has been agreed with the department, you will be
assigned a dissertation supervisor, who will help you to identify a specific topic for your work,
and will provide support and guidance as you do your research and write the dissertation.
Although you will need to be thinking about your dissertation throughout semesters 1 and 2,
you will work most on it intensively during the summer, after you have completed your other
modules.
The 40- and 60-credit modules provide a flexible framework within which you can choose
from a range of options. Tuition will mainly be provided through one-to-one tutorials. Within
each module a variety of topics will be available (see below). You will be able to choose
which topic or topics you wish to work on, and agree appropriate essay titles with the module
tutors.
It is possible to replace the 40-credit option with 40 credits of modules in classical Greek or
Latin, either at beginners’ level (if you have not previously studied the language in question)
or at an appropriate post-beginners’ level (if you have only a limited knowledge). It is possible
for students who opt for language study, but who subsequently experience difficulties, to
transfer out of the language module in question.
One important point to bear in mind is that the ability to read classical languages in the
original is an essential prerequisite for PhD research. The Postgraduate Tutor is happy to
offer advice on this issue to students who envisage progressing to doctoral studies after their
MA.




                                               10
2.2 Compulsory modules
CLAS5400 Research Skills in Classics
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: show familiarity with a
range of research tools for Classical study; apply those tools to assemble material relevant to
their dissertation; give a seminar presentation based on their research.
Teaching: This module will be delivered via the weekly postgraduate seminar.
Assessment: Portfolio of practical exercises in research skills (30%); seminar presentation
(70%).

CLAS5410 Dissertation
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design (with
appropriate guidance), implement and complete a major independent research project in the
field of classics; demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in
contemporary study related to the research project; read, analyse and interpret appropriate
material from classical texts (and other relevant source material) associated with the
research project; understand and critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and
defend a personal position on the issues raised by, current scholarship related to the
research project.
Teaching: The dissertation should be the product of your own research. You will be
assigned a dissertation supervisor, who will give advice on matters such as the selection of a
topic; the planning and execution of your research; bibliography. Your supervisor will be
available to discuss problems with you, and may read and comment on drafts. An
introductory meeting with your supervisor will take place at the beginning of the academic
year in order to establish contact but, under normal circumstances, formal supervisions will
not begin until semester 2. The exact number of meetings you have with your supervisor will
be agreed between you, but you are entitled to a minimum of six supervision sessions
during the course of the academic year. Your tutor will not normally be prepared to comment
in detail on more than one substantial section of the finished (or near-finished) draft of the
whole dissertation.
Assessment: A dissertation of approximately 12,000 words, to be submitted not later than
Monday 19 September 2011.

2.3 Minor (40-credit) options
Teaching: 8 tutorial meetings
Assessment: Two 4000 word essays (equally weighted)
The topics listed in the following module specifications are meant to be indicative of the
general scope of each module. However, not every topic will necessarily be offered in every
year.

CLAS5510 Early Greek Poetry
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of early Greek
poetry; read selected poetic texts of the archaic and early classical periods with an
understanding both of their literary qualities, and of their relationship to the social, cultural
and intellectual context within which they were produced; demonstrate an understanding of
key concepts and methodologies in contemporary study of early Greek poetry; understand
and critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal position on the
issues raised by, current scholarship on early Greek poetry.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of texts and/or themes to be
studied within one or more of the following areas: Homer; the epic cycle; Hesiod; Greek lyric
poetry in the archaic and early classical periods.




                                               11
CLAS5520 Hellenistic Poetry
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, and execute a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of
Hellenistic poetry; demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in
contemporary study of Hellenistic poetry; read and interpret selected poetic texts with an
understanding of the principal poetic genres of the Hellenistic period, the major themes of
Hellenistic poetry and the complexities of Hellenistic poetics; understand and critically
evaluate positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal position on the issues raised
by, current scholarship on Hellenistic poetry.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of texts and/or themes to be
studied within the following menu of Hellenistic poetry: the Idylls of Theocritus; the
Argonautica of Apollonius Rhodius; the poetry of Callimachus.

CLAS5530 Roman Society and Literature
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry examining the relationship between
Roman society and certain genres of literature; demonstrate an understanding of key issues
and methodologies relevant to the area of study; read and interpret selected texts with an
understanding of specific literary genres and how literature shapes and increases our
understanding of Roman society; understand and critically evaluate positions taken in, and
develop and defend a personal position on issues raised by, current scholarship in the area
of study.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of texts and/or themes to be
studied within the following menu: Catullus; satire; the Roman novel

CLAS5540 Greek and Roman Historiography
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: - design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of Greek and/or
Roman historiography; conduct detailed research in particular areas within these fields with
an understanding of the literary, historical and cultural factors involved; demonstrate an
ability to read, analyse and interpret primary texts (in the original language or in translation
as appropriate) and relevant secondary works (including the standard works of reference);
demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in contemporary study of
relevant aspects of Greek and/or Roman historiography; understand and critically evaluate
positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal position on the issues raised by,
current scholarship on relevant aspects of Greek and/or Roman historiography.
Topics: Students will study two topics on an author or authors in Greek and/or Roman
historiography. Those normally offered are Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon; and
Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus. These may be studied in combination, and other authors may be
included by individual arrangement.

CLAS5550 Greek and Roman Oratory
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the fields of Greek and/or
Roman oratory and rhetoric; conduct detailed research in particular areas within these fields
with an understanding of the political, cultural, literary and rhetorical contexts as appropriate;
demonstrate an ability to read, analyse and interpret primary texts (in the original language or
in translation as appropriate) and relevant secondary works (including the standard works of
reference); demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in
contemporary study of relevant aspects of Greek and/or Roman oratory and rhetoric;
understand and critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal
position on the issues raised by, current scholarship on relevant aspects of Greek and/or
Roman oratory and rhetoric.
Topics: Students will study two topics in one or more of the following areas: classical Greek



                                               12
and/or Roman oratory (forensic, deliberative and/or epideictic); later Greek oratory and
declamation; ancient rhetorical theory.

CLAS5560 Religion in the Ancient World
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of Greek and/or
Roman religion; conduct detailed study in particular areas of Greek and/or Roman religion
with an understanding of the historical and cultural factors involved; demonstrate an ability to
read, analyse and interpret a wide range of primary sources and relevant secondary works
(including the standard works of reference); demonstrate an understanding of key concepts
and methodologies in contemporary study of Greek and/or Roman religion; understand and
critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal position on the
issues raised by, current scholarship on Greek and/or Roman religion.
Topics: The study of ancient religion is one of the most rapidly changing in classical
scholarship, as increasingly sophisticated theoretical models are brought to bear on it: this
module will provide an opportunity to study aspects of Greek and/or Roman religion in the
light of these. Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of topics to be studied
within one or more of the following areas: worship of individual gods or heroes; festivals of a
particular city or region; major inter-state sanctuaries; religion and politics; ruler cult; religious
personnel; rituals of the individual and the household; divination; the relationship between
myth and ritual; attitudes to foreign religion; concepts of religious decline and revival.

CLAS5570 Greek Art
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of Greek art;
demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in contemporary study of
Greek art; understand and critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and defend a
personal position on the issues raised by, current scholarship on Greek art.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of topics to be studied within
the general area of Greek art. Topics may be defined in one or more of the following ways:
by medium and/or period and/or place (e.g. Corinthian vase-painting, fifth-century
architectural sculpture, South Italian vase-painting, Hellenistic sculpture); by artist (e.g.
Pheidias, the Meidias Painter); by iconographic theme (social-historical themes, e.g. images
of children; or mythological themes, e.g. images of Perseus). Also available: ancient writers
on Greek art.




                                                 13
2.4 Major (60-credit) options
Teaching: 12 tutorial meetings
Assessment: By agreement with the module tutor, you may submit either
(i) four 3000 word essays (equally weighted); or
(ii) two 6,000 word essays (equally weighted); or
(iii) one 6000 word essay (50%) plus two 3,000 word essays (25% each).
The topics listed in the following module specifications are meant to be indicative of the
general scope of each module. However, not every topic will necessarily be offered in every
year.

CLAS5710 Ancient Drama
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of ancient drama;
read selected ancient dramatic texts with an understanding both of their literary and dramatic
qualities, and of their relationship to the social, cultural and intellectual context within which
they were produced; demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in
contemporary study of ancient drama; understand and critically evaluate positions taken in,
and develop and defend a personal position on the issues raised by, current scholarship on
ancient drama.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of texts and/or themes to be
studied within one or more of the following areas: Greek Tragedy; Greek Old Comedy; Greek
New Comedy; Roman Comedy; Roman Tragedy; the postclassical reception of ancient
drama; drama and Greek vase-painting.

CLAS5720 Greek Epic
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of Greek epic; read
selected Greek epic texts with an understanding of their literary qualities, and of their
relationship to the social, cultural and intellectual context within which they were produced;
demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in contemporary study of
Greek epic; understand and critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and defend a
personal position on the issues raised by, current scholarship on Greek epic.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of texts and/or themes to be
studied within one or more of the following areas: Homer; the epic cycle; Apollonius of
Rhodes.

CLAS5730 Augustan Poetry
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, and execute a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of
Roman poetry in the Augustan period; demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and
methodologies in contemporary study of Roman poetry; read and interpret selected literary
texts with an understanding of thematic content and genre, of the place of Augustan poetry
within the context of the classical tradition, and the contemporary historical, socio-political
and literary milieux within which the texts were composed; understand and critically evaluate
positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal position on the issues raised by,
current scholarship on Roman poetry in the Augustan period.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of texts and/or themes to be
studied from the following subject-areas: Alexandrianism and Roman poetry; Virgil; Horace;
Roman Elegy; Ovid.

CLAS5740 Greek History
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of Greek history;


                                               14
conduct detailed research in particular areas of Greek history with an understanding of the
historical and cultural factors involved; demonstrate an ability to read, analyse and interpret
primary literary and/or documentary sources and relevant secondary works (including the
standard works of reference); demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and
methodologies in contemporary study of relevant aspects of Greek history; understand and
critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal position on the
issues raised by, current scholarship on relevant aspects of Greek history.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of topics to be studied within
one or more of the following areas of Archaic (c.850-480 BC) and/or Classical (480-323 BC)
Greek history (for certain topics the period covered may be extended by arrangement into
the Hellenistic era (323-86BC)): aspects of the narrative of events (either generally or with
reference to a particular polis or region); particular topics within the history of these periods
(e.g. relations between Greeks and non-Greeks); political history in general, or more specific
fields (e.g. oligarchy, political ideology), or Athenian democracy or an aspect or aspects
thereof; aspects of social history such as women and the family, slavery, education; topics in
cultural history such as popular ethics and cultural values, ethnicity and identity.

CLAS5750 Roman History
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of Roman history;
conduct detailed research in particular areas of Roman history with an understanding of the
historical and cultural factors involved; demonstrate an ability to read, analyse and interpret a
wide range of sources and relevant secondary works (including the standard works of
reference); demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in
contemporary study of relevant aspects of Roman history; understand and critically evaluate
positions taken in, and develop and defend a personal position on the issues raised by,
current scholarship on relevant aspects of Roman history.
Topics: Students will agree with module tutors a selection of topics to be studied from Rome
and the Greek world; the late republican senate; the fall of the republic; the establishment of
the principate; the Julio-Claudian and Flavian emperors; the city of Rome; Roman Italy; the
Roman provinces; Roman society and culture; the Roman imperial coinage.

CLAS5760 Ancient Thought
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of ancient philosophy
and intellectual history; read relevant ancient texts with an understanding both of their
philosophical and conceptual content, and of their relationship to the social, cultural and
intellectual context within which they were produced; demonstrate an understanding of key
concepts and methodologies in contemporary study in the field ancient philosophy and
intellectual history; understand and critically evaluate positions taken in, and develop and
defend a personal position on the issues raised by, current scholarship in the field of ancient
philosophy and intellectual history.
Topics: Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of texts and/or themes to be
studied within one or more of the following areas: Presocratic philosophy; the Sophists;
Socrates; Plato; Aristotle; Stoicism; Epicureanism; Greek cultural values; Greek theology;
ancient literary theory.

CLAS5770 Ancient Myth
Objectives: On completion of this module, students should be able to: design, with
appropriate guidance, a coherent programme of enquiry within the field of ancient myth;
conduct detailed study in particular areas of ancient myth with an understanding of the
historical and cultural factors involved; demonstrate an ability to read, analyse and interpret a
wide range of primary sources and relevant secondary works (including the standard works
of reference); demonstrate an understanding of key concepts and methodologies in



                                               15
contemporary study of ancient myth; understand and critically evaluate positions taken in,
and develop and defend a personal position on the issues raised by, current scholarship on
ancient myth.
Topics: This module encourages students to look at ancient myth in a variety of different
media. Students will agree with the module tutors a selection of topics to be studied within
one or more of the following areas: mythological theory; problems with sources (e.g. survival,
poetry vs. prose, literature vs. art); particular characters (e.g. Helen, Theseus); larger themes
(e.g. the Trojan War, the history of the Labdacids); myth and politics (e.g. use of
Gigantomachies in architectural sculpture, or Alexander’s claim of descent from Herakles);
cultural and ethical values in particular myths; myth in Roman literature; Roman myth; post-
classical reception of Greek/Roman myth.

2.5 Language modules
The Beginners courses listed here are designed for those who have not studied the language
before. Modules in Greek and Latin at more advanced levels are also available. Details can
be found on the department’s web-pages. You should contact the language programme
manager, Dr. Belcher, before choosing a language course.

CLAS1801 Fast-Track Ancient Greek 1
Semester: 1
Credits: 20
Taught by: Dr Hamstead
Teaching method: Classes (4 hours per week, over 11 weeks).
Assessment: Two 1-hour in-class tests (in weeks 3 and 6), the average of the two marks to
count for 50%, and a 1½-hour exam at the end of the semester (50%).
Objectives: This is a challenging and intensive module for those serious about learning
ancient Greek in a short space of time. It is hoped that students will, on successful
completion of this module, continue onto CLAS1802 Fast-Track Ancient Greek 2, with a
possible view to reading ancient Greek texts in the original in their next academic year.
Attendance at all classes and completion of all homework is compulsory and will be closely
monitored.
Syllabus: Units 1-13 of the text-book.
Text-book: G. Betts and A. Henry, Teach Yourself Ancient Greek (London 1989).

CLAS1802 Fast-Track Ancient Greek 2
Semester: 2
Credits: 20
Taught by: Dr Hamstead
Teaching method: Classes (5 hours per week, over 11 weeks).
Assessment: Two 1-hour in-class tests (in weeks 3 and 6), the average of the two marks to
count for 50%, and a 3-hour exam at the end of the semester (50%).
Objectives: This is a challenging and intensive module for those serious about learning
ancient Greek in a short space of time. Following on from CLAS1801 Fast-Track Ancient
Greek 1, the current module provides the foundation for reading ancient Greek texts in the
original in the next academic year. Attendance at all classes and completion of all homework
is compulsory and will be closely monitored.
Syllabus: Units 14-24/25 of the text-book; reading of continuous passages of Greek.
Text-book: G. Betts and A. Henry, Teach Yourself Ancient Greek (London 1989).

CLAS1901 Fast-Track Latin 1
Semester: 1
Credits: 20
Taught by: Dr Belcher
Teaching method: Classes (4 hours per week, over 11 weeks).



                                               16
Assessment: Two 1-hour in-class tests (in weeks 3 and 6), the average of the two marks to
count for 50%, and a 1½-hour exam at the end of the semester (50%).
Objectives: This is a challenging and intensive module for those serious about learning Latin
in a short space of time. It is hoped that students will, on successful completion of this
module, continue onto CLAS1902 Fast-Track Latin 2, with a possible view to reading Latin
texts in the original in their next academic year. Attendance at all classes and completion of
all homework is compulsory and will be closely monitored.
Syllabus: Units 1-9 of the text-book.
Text-book: New course materials will be provided, but you might find it useful to have a copy
of G. Betts, Teach Yourself Latin (London 1986) for reference.

CLAS1902 Fast-Track Latin 2
Semester: 2
Credits: 20
Taught by: Dr Belcher
Teaching method: Classes (5 hours per week, over 11 weeks).
Assessment: Two 1-hour in-class tests (in weeks 3 and 6), the average of the two marks to
count for 50%, and a 3-hour exam at the end of the semester (50%).
Objectives: This is a challenging and intensive module for those serious about learning Latin
in a short space of time. Following on from CLAS1901 Fast-Track Latin 1, the current module
provides the foundation for reading Latin texts in the original in the next academic year.
Attendance at all classes and completion of all homework is compulsory and will be closely
monitored.
Syllabus: Units 13-23 of the text-book; reading of continuous passages of Latin.
Text-book: New course materials will be provided, but you might find it useful to have a copy
of G. Betts, Teach Yourself Latin (London 1986) for reference.




                                             17
3. Rules and Guidelines for Assessment

3.1 Timetable for submission of work
You will need to plan your work over the course of the year carefully if you are to avoid
having too little time to complete your assessed work. The key deadlines are summarised in
the following table, and explained more fully in the notes that follow
Date                           Full-time                   Part-time
Monday 15 November 2010        40-cr option, essay 1
Monday 10 January 2011         40-cr option, essay 2       40-cr option, essay 1
                                                           60-cr option, essays 1+2
Monday 21 March 2011           60-cr option, essays 1+2
Tuesday 3 May 2011             60-cr option, essays 3+4    40-cr option, essay 2
                                                           60-cr option, essays 3+4
Before Tuesday 3 May 2011      Skills module work          Skills module work
Monday 19 September 2011       Dissertation                Dissertation

Full-time students:
 All work for CLAS5400 Research Skills in Classics is to be completed by 3 May 2011.
  See the module documentation for a schedule of deadlines for the exercises. The date for
  delivery of your presentation at the Postgraduate Seminar will be arranged in agreement
  with the Postgraduate Tutor.
 You will work on your 40-credit option in semester 1. The topics for your two essays and
  the exact schedule for completion should be agreed with your tutors; but you should aim
  to submit the first essay by 15 November 2010, the other (preferably) before Christmas,
  and certainly by 10 January 2011 at the latest.
 You will do most of the work on your 60-credit option in semester 2. However, you
  should have met the tutors and discussed the essay topics and the schedule for
  completion before the end of semester 1. You should aim to submit two 3000-word essays
  (or one 6000-word essay) by 21 March 2011; the other two 3000-word essays (or one
  6000-word essay) must be submitted by 3 May 2011 at the latest.
If you are taking language modules in place of the 40-credit option, then you will work on
your 60-credit option over both semesters. You will need to have met the tutors and agreed
the essay topics and the schedule for completion at the beginning of semester 1, and you
should aim to submit the two sets of essays by 10 January 2011 and 3 May 2011
respectively.
Part-time students:
 You have the whole year to complete the optional module that you are taking this year, in
  addition to either the Research Skills module or the dissertation (see 2.1).

3.2 University marking scheme
The University’s standard marking scheme is based on a scale of marks from 20 (absolute
fail) to 90 (exceptional distinction). In addition:
 a mark of 10 will be recorded if it is judged that a candidate has made no serious attempt;
 a mark of 0 will be recorded if a candidate has failed to produce any work worthy of
  assessment.



                                              18
 candidates suspected of plagiarism, collusion or cheating (see §3.6) will be referred to the
  University’s disciplinary procedure: this may result in expulsion from the University.
To pass the MA you must achieve an overall average mark of at least 50. For a merit you
must achieve an average mark of 60; for a distinction you must achieve an average mark of
70.

3.3 Grade Descriptors
These grade descriptors are intended as an indication of the level of achievement and quality
of work reflected by marks in the range associated with each class. The features described
are those characteristic of work falling in the middle of each class; work on or near
borderlines will typically display characteristics of more than one class; not all work will
present all of the features listed, and the influence of different features on the overall mark
assigned is variable.
Outstanding distinction (80-90): Answers the question outstandingly well, demonstrating
full command of the topic, with an excellent understanding of its subtleties and the
complexities of the issues involved. Typically shows evidence of original thought, together
with exceptional insight and powers of analysis. Excellent argumentative structure and
expression. Research is very wide-ranging and thorough. Excellent use is made of primary
evidence. The selection and synthesis of secondary literature demonstrates a high level of
engagement with, and a critical approach, to current scholarly debate. Referencing and
bibliography are of a professional standard.
Distinction (70-79): Answers the question very well, demonstrating full command of the
topic, with attention to all aspects of its aspects and a good understanding of the issues
involved. Shows evidence of independent and even original thought, with high-level insight
and powers of analysis. The argument is balanced, well-structured and effectively expressed.
The research is wide-ranging and thorough. Specific, detailed and accurate use is made of
primary evidence. There is accurate and critical engagement with secondary literature.
Referencing and bibliography are of a professional standard.
Merit (60-69): Answers the question well, demonstrating sound understanding of the topic,
with a balanced and judicious awareness of the complexities of the issues involved. Shows
evidence of independent, though not necessarily original, thought, with good insight and
powers of analysis. The answer is coherently structured and argued, and clearly expressed.
The research is careful and thorough, displaying mastery of primary evidence and a thorough
understanding of a good range of secondary literature. Scrupulous in citation of primary and
secondary sources, and accurate in adherence to referencing and bibliographic conventions.
Pass (50-59): Answers the question satisfactorily, demonstrates a sufficient understanding of
the topic and the issues involved. The argument may be derivative and lacking in
discrimination, and may exhibit some problems of relevance and structure. Expression may
also exhibit deficiencies. Shows a satisfactory understanding of relevant primary evidence
and secondary literature. Careful in citation of primary and secondary sources, though there
may be some deficiencies in adherence to referencing and bibliographic conventions.
Fail (40-49): Attempts to answer the question, but does so with limited success. Shows some
understanding of the subject, but with serious misunderstandings of the issues involved. The
argument is likely to be weak in structure and relevance. Expression may be deficient. The
selection and understanding of primary evidence and secondary literature is likely to be
haphazard. There may be serious deficiencies in the adherence to referencing and
bibliographic conventions.
Bad fail (30-39): Does not address or fails to answer the question. Shows an insufficient
knowledge of the subject and the issues involved. Seriously deficient in argument, structure
and expression. Insufficient understanding and use of primary and secondary sources.
Referencing and bibliographic conventions may not be followed.



                                              19
Complete fail (20-29): The answer displays no understanding of the topic or the issues
involved. Lacks argument, and is poorly expressed. Primary and secondary sources are
ignored or misunderstood. Referencing and bibliographic conventions may not be followed.

3.4 Rules for submission of essays and dissertations
Two copies of each essay or dissertation are required. They must be handed in to the
departmental office not later than 4pm on the specified date. You are encouraged to hand
in essays in advance of the deadline where possible, as a safeguard against last-minute
delays. Faxed or e-mailed submission of essays is not acceptable except by prior
arrangement in exceptional circumstances.
Coursework must be submitted in word-processed format, and accompanied by the
Assessed Coursework Submission Sheet supplied by the Office; the lower part of one sheet
is torn off and given to you when you hand your essay in. This is your receipt, and should be
kept carefully: it will be the only valid evidence that the work was in fact received.

3.5 Presentation
The Department regards the ability to present your work in a professional manner as an
important academic and transferable skill. You will therefore lose marks for poor
presentation, including illegibility (caused e.g. by poor print-quality, or the use of too small a
font-size); bad spelling, poor grammar and syntax, and poor proof-reading; and failure to
follow the department’s guidelines concerning the citation of evidence, references and
bibliographies.
The Department requires submission in typed or word-processed form. Text should be
in legible font of reasonable size (e.g. Times New Roman 12-point), double-spaced with
wide margins on A4 paper, and a letter-quality or laser printer should be used. You should
also provide page numbers in your essay.
At the end of your essay you should state the total number of words used (most word-
processing programmes have a word-count facility). Word-limits include footnotes, but do
not include bibliographies. If your essay is considerably under or over the word-limit, you
risk losing marks. If in doubt, please consult the relevant tutor before submitting your work.

3.6 Plagiarism and collusion
The University regards plagiarism, collusion, cheating in exams, and other instances of
academic malpractice with the utmost seriousness. Over the past few years, the
University has been obliged to expel certain students from the Department of Classics
for plagiarism offences. You must make sure that you are fully aware of your
responsibilities in this area.

 The University defines plagiarism as follows:
    Plagiarism is defined as presenting someone else’s work as your own. Work
    means any intellectual output, and typically includes text, data, images, sound or
    performance, or any combination of these.
    Any use of someone else’s words or phrasing, however brief, counts as plagiarism
    unless it is directly marked as a quotation using quotation marks.
 If you have paraphrased, or expressed the same ideas in your own words, you must still
  acknowledged the source from which have you have taken the ideas. Plagiarism includes
  the unacknowledged use of other people’s ideas, as well as their words. You may use
  information that you gather from journals, books, the internet, websites, lectures or other
  teaching sessions, contact with others, etc., but it must always be properly attributed and
  all external sources used must be referenced.



                                               20
 The University’s definition of plagiarism makes no reference to deliberate intent:
  unacknowledged use of another’s words or ideas is a disciplinary offence even if it is
  accidental. You must therefore be very careful when taking notes: make sure that your
  notes include full details of the source from which they are taken, and that they clearly
  identify direct quotations as such. Poor working practices and careless note-taking will
  not be accepted as a defence if you are charged with plagiarism.
 Collusion is subject to the same penalties as plagiarism. Although we recognise that it is
  often good to discuss assignments with other students, you must not go beyond that. You
  will be guilty of collusion if you collaborate with another student in writing an essay, unless
  group work has been explicitly permitted or required as part of the assessment for that
  module. You will also be guilty of collusion if you help another student by sharing your
  essay plans or drafts with them.
 If another student makes use of your work without your knowledge, you may find it hard to
  prove that you did not collude: do not leave your work where someone else may gain
  unauthorised access to it (e.g. on a shared computer).
 Material that has been submitted as part of one assignment may not be accepted if it is re-
  used to satisfy the requirements of another assessment. If you are in doubt, you should
  consult the module tutor for advice. If you do re-use material from a previously submitted
  assignment, this must be explicitly acknowledged.
 Getting someone else to write an assignment for you is fraud.
The Assessed Coursework Submission Sheet which you are required to complete for every
piece of submitted coursework includes a Declaration of Academic Integrity. Work will not be
accepted or will not be marked unless this declaration is signed at the time of submission.
By signing the declaration, you confirm that the work is your own, and that you are aware
that it is your responsibility to know the definition and importance of plagiarism. You will be
held to your declaration.
All cases of plagiarism, collusion and cheating in coursework must be reported to the
University.
The Department or the University may use electronic techniques to monitor your work,
comparing it with work of other students or with published material (including internet sites).
You may be required to submit your work in an electronic format for this purpose.

3.7 Bibliographies and referencing
There are standard scholarly conventions for citing other people’s work. These may at first
seem a little tedious, but once you get used to them they can save you a great deal of time,
as well as making your own work more professional. If you are not certain about how to
follow these conventions in your own work, ask the module tutor or your personal tutor for
advice.

a) Bibliographies
Every essay must have a bibliography listing all the secondary sources you have used,
including unpublished sources. Items should be given in alphabetical order of author’s
surname. The title of a book or journal should be underlined or italicised; the title of an article
is in plain type but placed in quotation marks.
 For books give the author, title, place and date (and edition [edn.] if appropriate) of
  publication, e.g.:
   Adkins, A.W.H. Merit and Responsibility (Oxford 1960).
 For articles in a journal, give the author and title, plus journal, volume, year, and pages,
  e.g.:



                                                21
  Zanker, G. ‘Sophocles’ Ajax and the heroic values of the Iliad’, Classical Quarterly 42
  (1992), 20-25.
 For items in a book of collected essays, give the author and title of the essay, then the
  editor(s) and title of the book, year, and pages, e.g.:
  Ducat, J. ‘Perspectives on Spartan education in the classical period’, in Hodkinson, S. and
  Powell, A. (eds), Sparta: New Perspectives (London 1999), 43-66.
  Each essay or chapter in an edited volume which you use should have a separate entry in
  the bibliography (though you can save space by including the whole volume as an item,
  too, and citing chapters in the form: Ducat, J. ‘Perspectives on Spartan education in the
  classical period’, in Hodkinson & Powell (eds), 43-66).
 For a web-site, give as much information as possible about where you found it: author’s
  name, date of publication or updating, title of page, URL, date when you accessed it, e.g.:
  Konstan, D. (2000), Women, ethnicity and power in the Roman                          Empire,
  http://www.uky.edu/ArtsSciences/Classics/konstan1.pdf, accessed 1/12/2003.
b) Reference to a primary source
(i) When you quote from an ancient text you must provide a reference. You may do this
either by placing the reference in the main body of the text, or by creating a footnote (i.e. a
note at the bottom of the same page) or an endnote (i.e. a note at the end of your essay).
There are some basic rules for good academic practice that we require you to follow. If you
are only quoting a short amount of text (i.e. a phrase or a single sentence or verse) you may
include it in the sentence that you are writing by placing the quote in inverted commas (‘like
this’), providing the reference either in brackets afterwards, or by creating a
footnote/endnote. If, however, you are quoting more than one sentence or verse, you should
start a new paragraph and indent the text you are quoting. To give an example, if you quote
the first five verses of the Penguin edition of Homer’s Odyssey in your essay, you should
present your quote in one of the following ways:
      Tell me, Muse, the story of that resourceful man who was
      Driven to wander far and wide after he had sacked the holy
      Citadel of Troy. He saw the cities of many people and he learnt
      Their ways. He suffered great anguish on the high seas in his
      Struggles to preserve his life and bring his comrades home.
                                                Homer Odyssey 1.1-5.
Or:
      Tell me, Muse, the story of that resourceful man who was
      Driven to wander far and wide after he had sacked the holy
      Citadel of Troy. He saw the cities of many people and he learnt
      Their ways. He suffered great anguish on the high seas in his
      Struggles to preserve his life and bring his comrades home.¹
         ¹ Homer Odyssey 1.1-5.
Some points to note:
 There is usually no need to write ‘lines’ or ‘book’ when making a reference. In other words,
  you should not write ‘Homer’s Odyssey Book 1, Lines 1 to 5’ as a reference to the above
  passage.
 Sometimes it is not possible to provide references in the manner set out above, because
  the translation of the text you are reading does not give the original line number. In these
  instances you will not be penalised for using an alternative convention for referencing (e.g.
  the page-number of a specified translation), but you must make it clear what reference
  system you are using, and stick to it throughout your essay.



                                               22
 There are standard reference conventions for classical authors. Some examples of these
  are as follows: Homer Iliad 1.1-6; Sophocles Antigone 35-46; Plato Republic 355a-356e;
  Thucydides 1.22.1. As you can see, titles of literary works should be italicised. (If you
  prefer, it is permissible to underline them instead: e.g., Sophocles Antigone 35-46.) You
  may also care to become familiar with and use the abbreviated reference conventions for
  classical authors that you will see used by scholars in your secondary reading. Please
  become familiar with the reference system associated with the author you are reading,
  and use it! Your essay will look more professional on the page if you take care over this.
ii) As well as quoting directly from a text, you may wish to refer to it, but without
quoting from it. As a general rule, you should provide a reference whenever you are making
a point based directly upon the text in question. Here are some examples of good practice,
based upon a sentence from an essay on Virgil’s Aeneid:
      In his speech of self-justification to Dido as he is about to abandon her (Aeneid
      4.333-61), Aeneas attempts to counter her recriminations by stressing the
      importance of his mission to Italy.
Or:
      In his speech of self-justification to Dido as he is about to abandon her, Aeneas
      attempts to counter her recriminations by stressing the importance of his mission to
      Italy.¹
      ¹ Aeneid 4.333-61.

c) Reference to a secondary source
You should give a reference whenever you make a point based on something you have
taken from a secondary source. This is true for information and ideas as well as direct
quotations. The rules for quoting from or making references to secondary authors are more
or less the same as those set out above for primary source-material. For references to
secondary sources there are two further points to remember:
i) You do not need to give full details of the book you are quoting from/referring to,
since these will be in the bibliography at the end of your essay.
In other words, if you wish to quote from or refer to the Adkins book mentioned above (p.21),
all you need to do is give the name of the author and the page reference as follows:
      In your main text: (Adkins, 23-4).
      Or, if you are using footnotes/endnotes: ¹ Adkins, 23-4.
If there are two or more works by the same author in the bibliography, you should distinguish
them by inserting the date of publication in brackets as follows:
      In your main text: (Adkins (1960), 23-4).
      Or, if you are using footnotes/endnotes: ¹ Adkins (1960), 23-4.
ii) If you are quoting from/referring to a collection of essays, you cite it in exactly the same
way, i.e. give the name of the person who wrote the essay in question, followed by the exact
page number(s) that you require:
In other words, if you wish to quote from or refer to the Ducat article mentioned above (p.22),
all you need to do is one of the following:
      In your main text: (Ducat, 51-2).
      Or, if you are using footnotes/endnotes: ¹ Ducat, 51-2.
Finally, one overall rule covering both primary and secondary references: if you are using
footnotes or endnotes in your essay, remember to number them sequentially. It is best to use
Arabic numerals (i.e. 1, 2, 3 etc.).




                                                23
d) Reference to Visual Material
For some subjects it may be appropriate to include an illustration of some visual material,
e.g. an archaeological site-plan, or a specific sculpture or vase. Like textual material, this
needs to be properly referenced. It is usually clearest if you put the detailed information into
captions beneath the pictures themselves, although you could put it into a footnote; once you
have the details noted in one of these ways, you only need to make a general reference in
the body of your text to identify the piece you’re talking about. If you are just referring to an
image in passing it may not be appropriate to include an illustration, but you still need to give
a reference. In this case fewer details are required, but you should at least direct the reader
to a book where s/he could find a picture if s/he wanted to follow up your point.
Information to include in your caption:
 What the picture represents—essential. This might be just a note of the type of thing it is
  (e.g. ‘bronze helmet’, ‘the sanctuary of Zeus at Olympia’), or you might also need a short
  explanation of the scene depicted (e.g. ‘Attic black-figure pot showing women fetching
  water from a fountainhouse’).
 Date (may only be approximate, e.g. ‘archaic’, or ‘c.450 BC’)—essential (especially if
  you’re using the picture to illustrate chronological developments).
 For moveable artefacts: place of discovery (‘from the Athenian Akropolis’, ‘found in a tomb
  at Vulci’, etc) and current whereabouts (museum name and reference number)—this
  information is not always given, but include it if you can.
 The book or website you got the picture from (on the same principle as reference to a
  written quotation, e.g. ‘Shapiro 1994, fig. 38’)—essential.
For example:
In your text…
    On a late fifth-century skyphos from Boiotia (fig. 4), Odysseus’ encounter with Circe
    is represented in a humorous style. As Odysseus approaches to attack, Circe
    holds out a wine-cup which presumably holds her magic potion, while behind her
    stands a loom.
… referring to an illustration with a detailed caption:




     Fig. 4 Odysseus meets Circe. Boiotian black-figure skyphos, c.410-400 BC, from
       the sanctuary of the Kabeiroi at Thebes. Oxford, Ashmolean Museum G259
                               (Carpenter 1991, fig. 344).




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