Docstoc

Rutgers University Newark

Document Sample
Rutgers University Newark Powered By Docstoc
					Introduction to Criminal Justice 21:202:201:02:12123 
Syllabus effective September 1, 2006 (rev. 9/21/06; rev. 11/8/06; rev. 12/6/06; rev 12/7/06) 


                                    Rutgers University –Newark 
                                   Department of Criminal justice 
                                             Fall 2006 


Instructor: Jon M. Shane, M.A. 
Course Meeting Time/Place: 
Office: 
Office Hours: 
Email: 

Course Overview 
        “Criminal justice has always been the subject of intense political debate, but never 
more so than today, when issues of crime and justice are the foremost subject of the media 
and politicians” (Adler, Mueller, Laufer, 2003:xxiii). Because of this the criminal justice 
discipline includes intense theoretical foundations, a variety of practice groups—police, 
prosecutors, defense attorneys, courts, and corrections—and programs that meld together 
to form a “system” whose goals and priorities are often in irreconcilable conflict. 

       This course will examine “societal responses to people and organizations that violate 
criminal codes; police, courts, juries, prosecutors, defense, and correctional agencies, and 
the standards and methods used to respond to crime and criminal offenders; social 
pressures that enhance or impair the improvement of criminal laws and the fair 
administration of criminal justice” (Rutgers Undergraduate Catalog, 2003­2005:83). 

        The goal of this course is to provide students with a foundation for the criminal 
justice system in America; we will not delve deeply into any single topic, rather there will be 
a broad overview of many topics. This will be accomplished through thought­provoking 
lecture and discussion of the controversies and challenges of crime, some potential solutions 
and the machinations of justice. 

I.      Required Readings 
        A.    Books 
              1.      Adler, F., Mueller, G.O.W. and Laufer, W. (2006). Criminal Justice: An 
                                             th 
                             Introduction. 4  ed. New York: McGraw­Hill. 
              2.      Decker, S.H.,  Alarid, L.F. and Katz, C.M. (2003). Controversies in 
                             Criminal Justice. Los Angeles: Roxbury. 
              3.      The book order was placed at New Jersey Books, 167 University Ave 
                      Newark, NJ (corner Bleeker Street/973­624­5383). 
        B.    Articles 
              1.      Supplements distributed in class. 
              2.      BlackBoard postings. 
              3.      Internet­based articles. 
        C.    All readings other than from text books shall be downloaded or reviewed the 
              prior week; students should be ready for discussion the following week. 
              Students shall bring the readings to class each week. 
        D.    Make sure you review BlackBoard and this syllabus frequently for revisions; 
              remember you are responsible for all course material.




                                                       1 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 21:202:201:02:12123 
Syllabus effective September 1, 2006 (rev. 9/21/06; rev. 11/8/06; rev. 12/6/06; rev 12/7/06) 



II.     Exams 
               st 
        A.   1  Exam                                33.3% 
        B.   Midterm Exam                           33.3% 
        C.   Final Exam                             33.3% 
        D.   TOTAL                                  100% 

III.    Numerical Grades 
        A.   A      90­100 
        B.   B+     86­89 
        C.   B      80­85 
        D.   C+     76­79 
        E.   C      70­75 
        F.   D      65­69 
        G.   F      Below 65 
        H.   There will not be any temporary/incomplete grades issued. All course 
             requirements must be completed by the end of the semester. If all course 
             requirements are not met, then a failing grade will be assigned. 
        I.   Numerical grades will be rounded up from .5 and higher. 
        J.   Grades will not be curved. 

IV.     Prerequisites – There are no prerequisites for enrollment in this class. 

V.      Exams 
        A.   Since some students perform well on multiple choice tests and others on 
             short answer or fill­in, exams may be designed with both types to ensure 
             different students have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and 
             understanding of the subject material. 
        B.   The short answer part may consist of fill­in questions or longer answers. All 
             exams will be objective, that is, the material comes exactly from a 
             documented source (i.e., the required texts, articles, handouts or lecture 
             notes). This will remove differences in interpretation and source. 
        C.   All exams cover the assigned readings and lectures prior to the exam date. 
             The final exam will cover all of the material from the mid term exam forward. 
             The exams are not cumulative; however, extra credit questions may derive 
             from material covered at any point during the semester. 
        D.   There are NO make­up exams without a documented, verifiable 
             medical excusal or emergency excusal on the day of the exam.  You 
             must meet with me prior to the exam to explain your absence and 
             present verifiable documentation upon return. Your documentation 
             will be your “ticket” to admittance for the make­up exam. 
        E.   Make up exams will be different from the original exam. 

VI.     Attendance 
        A.    Since exam material is heavily dependent on class lectures, students are 
              expected to attend every class. 
        B.    An attendance sheet will be distributed each class. It is your responsibility to 
              sign the sheet next to your name. If your signature does not appear next to 
              your name you will be marked absent; your forgetfulness is not a permissible 
              excusal. 
        C.    Three or more absences may result in a loss of one full letter grade. 

VII.    General Classroom Conduct and Responsibilities 
        A.   The teaching style may be the Socratic method: teaching by asking instead of 
             by telling. This means I will call upon specific students to answers questions.
                                                       2 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 21:202:201:02:12123 
Syllabus effective September 1, 2006 (rev. 9/21/06; rev. 11/8/06; rev. 12/6/06; rev 12/7/06) 


                 To avoid uncomfortable situations, please be prepared to participate in 
                 discussion. Your classmates and I will appreciate your attentiveness and 
                 participation. 
        B.       Discussion is a key aspect of this course.  Each of us has unique backgrounds, 
                 life experiences and opinions.  Sharing these is invaluable to the classroom 
                 experience.  Feel free to challenge the course material.  If you have a 
                 different experience or completely disagree with a point someone else has 
                 made, please present to the contrary. Please disagree with me and your 
                 classmates. Express your opinions and experiences freely; just do so in a 
                 mature and intellectual manner. Your argument should be logically based. 
        C.       There is to be no argument by ad hominem. All discussions will be mature 
                 and free of personal bias, which includes being rude toward others. Be 
                 respectful when voicing your opinion, and be receptive to other people’s point 
                 of view. This is a very enriching part of learning. 
        D.       Ask questions!! The only stupid questions are those that do not get asked! 
                 This is important to your overall academic experience as well as a process you 
                 should carry with you beyond the classroom. 
        E.       You are responsible for all readings whether or not they are covered in the 
                 lectures. The readings serve as source materials for all exams. 
        F.       Please eat and drink quietly and politely. Police your area by discarding all 
                 trash. 
        G.       Because of security, ALL students visiting the CLJ building (123 Washington 
                 St.) MUST have an official Rutgers identification card. This includes visiting 
                 classroom 025, using the SCJ library or scheduling office hours with me. You 
                                                              rd 
                 can obtain a card from Blumenthal Hall, 3  floor. The cards cost $5.00. 
        H.       Do not be late to class, it is disruptive and rude. Be punctual! 
        I.       Do not disrupt others by talking, reading outside materials such as 
                 newspapers or magazines and generally not paying attention to the lecture. 
        J.       Turn off all electronic devices, cell phones, pagers etc. that can be disruptive. 
                 Interruptions from cell phones are particularly annoying because of the ring 
                 tones. Such interruptions may results in you beings asked to leave the 
                 classroom. If you are using a laptop computer to take notes, turn the volume 
                 off. 

VIII.  Policies, Procedures and Academic Integrity 
       A.     Cheating, plagiarism, fabrication, and all other violations of academic integrity 
              will not be tolerated and will be reported to university officials for proper 
              action. 
       B.     Please refer your student book of conduct/ethics for details. To view the 
              University's Code of Student Conduct visit 
              http://polcomp.rutgers.edu/judaff/ucsc.shtml. Or, visit 
              http://cat.rutgers.edu/integrity/policy.html. 
       C.     Please visit http://dsa.newark.rutgers.edu/Freshmen/index.htm for additional 
              information regarding Rutgers Newark. 
       D.     Violating the University policy on academic integrity may result in disciplinary 
              action ranging from Level 1 sanctions (least serious) to Level 4 sanctions 
              (most serious). 
       E.     ADA Procedures. Students requiring special consideration relating to a 
              disability covered under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the 
              Americans with Disabilities Acts (ADA) of 1990 should call the Office of 
              Student Activities and Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities at 
              (973) 353­5300 or (973) 353­5881. The office is located at the Paul Robeson 
              Campus Center, Room #234 or fax (973) 353­5666.



                                                       3 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 21:202:201:02:12123 
Syllabus effective September 1, 2006 (rev. 9/21/06; rev. 11/8/06; rev. 12/6/06; rev 12/7/06) 



IX.        Course Documents 
           A.    Course documents may be obtained from 
                 http://BlackBoard.newark.rutgers.edu/. Students should check BlackBoard 
                 often as documents may be added or modified, including the syllabus. 
           B.    All students can login using their net ID and password.  If you need further 
                 assistance using the BlackBoard system contact the Help Desk at 973­353­ 
                 5083 or email help@newark.rutgers.edu. Obtaining access to BlackBoard is 
                 your responsibility. 
           C.    Some documents and other necessary communiqué may be delivered via 
                 email, so ensure your Rutgers email that is listed on BlackBoard is 
                 operational. 
                            1 
X.         Course Schedule 
                                                                              th 
           A.    Part I, The Universe of Crime and Justice September 5 
                 1.     Syllabus 
                 2.     Course expectations 
                 3.     Introductions 
                 4.     Chapter 1, Criminal Justice: Introduction and Overview 
                               th 
           B.    September 7 
                 1.     Chapter 1, cont’d, (Criminal Justice: Introduction and Overview) 
                 2.     Decker, Introduction…(p.1) 
                 3.     Chapter 2, Crime and Criminals 
                 4.     BlackBoard: Stewart Convicted on all Charges 
                                 th 
           C.    September 12 
                 1.     Chapter 2, cont’d, (Crime and Criminals) 
                 2.     Decker, Issue IV: Terrorism….(pp.83­93 ) 
                 3.     BlackBoard: 
                        a.       2004 FBI UCR Report; Only required to read the following: 
                                 i.     Foreword 
                                 ii.    Crime Factors 
                                 iii.   Summary of the UCR Program 
                                 iv.    Crime Clock 2004 
                        b.       National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS); Read only: 
                                 i.     NCVS 
                                 ii.    Redesign of the National Crime Victimization Survey 
                        c.       National Incident­based Reporting System (NIBRS); Read: 
                                 i.     About the National Incident­Based Reporting System 
                                        (NIBRS) 
                                 ii.    Program Activities 
                                 iii.   National Incident­Based Reporting System 
                                        (NIBRS)Implementation Program: Factsheet 
                        d.       UCR Handbook; Read only: 
                                 i.     Hierarchy Rule (p.10­12) 
                                 ii.    Separation of Time and Place Rule (p.12­13) 
                                 iii.   Hotel Rule (p.28­29) 
                        e.       Star Ledger article: “Can’t  Count on Crime Statistics” 
                        f.       9/11Commission Report: 5.4 “A Money Trail?” 
                                 i.     General Financing (p.169­172) 
                                 ii.    Funding of the 9/11 Plot (p.172) 
                                 th 
           D.    September 14 
                 1.     Chapters 3 and 4, The Criminal Law; Explaining Criminal Behavior 
                 2.     Decker, Issue III: Intelligence and Crime…(pp.56­68) 

1 
     This schedule is tentative and may be altered at any point during the semester without prior notice.
                                                       4 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 21:202:201:02:12123 
Syllabus effective September 1, 2006 (rev. 9/21/06; rev. 11/8/06; rev. 12/6/06; rev 12/7/06) 

                                  th 
        E.       September 19 
                 1.     Chapters 3 and 4, cont’d, (The Criminal Law; Explaining Criminal 
                        Behavior) 
                 2.     Decker, Issue III: Intelligence and Crime…(pp.56­68) 
                                                     st 
        F.       Part II, The Police September 21 
                 1.     Chapter 5, History and Organization of the Police 
                 2.     Decker, Issue V: Police Organizations…(pp.103­116) 
                                  th 
        G.       September 26 
                 1.     Chapter 5, cont’d, (History and Organization of the Police) 
                 2.     Decker, Issue V: Police Organizations…(pp.103­116) 
                                  th 
        H.       September 28 
                 1.     Chapter 6, Police Functions and Police Culture 
                 2.     Decker, Issue VII: Zero Tolerance Policing…(pp.135­144) 
                            rd 
        I.       October 3 
                 1.     Chapter 6, cont’d, (Police Functions) 
                 2.     Decker cont’d, Issue VII: Zero Tolerance Policing…(pp.135­144) 
                 3.     BlackBoard: Broken Windows Flow Sequence 
                            th 
        J.       October 5 
                 1.     Chapter 6, cont’d (Police Culture) 
                 2.     BlackBoard: Police Culture, Individualism, and Community Policing: 
                        Evidence from Two Police Departments 
                              th 
        K.       October 10 
                 1.     Chapter 6, cont’d (Police Culture) 
                 2.     BlackBoard: Police Culture, Individualism, and Community Policing: 
                        Evidence from Two Police Departments 
                              th 
        L.       October 12 
                 1.     Exam 1 
                 2.     Full class period 
                              th 
        M.       October 17 
                 1.     Chapter 7, The Rule of Law in Law Enforcement 
                 2.     Constitutional Amendments 
                                    th 
                        a.        4  Amendment Review 
                                    th 
                        b.        5  Amendment Review 
                 3.     BlackBoard: Jerome Skolnick, Deception by Police 
                              th 
        N.       October 19 
                 1.     Chapter 7, cont’d, (The Rule of Law in Law Enforcement) 
                 2.     Exclusionary Rule 
                 3.     BlackBoard: Enforcing the Fourth Amendment: The Exclusionary Rule 
                                                  th 
        O.       Part III, The Courts October 24 
                 1.     Chapter 8, The Origin and Role of the Courts 
                 2.     Decker, Issue IX: …Federal Grand Jury…(pp.167­182) 
                            th 
        P.       October 26 
                 1.     Chapter 8, cont’d, The Origin and Role of the Courts 
                                       st              nd 
Tentative class cancellation October 31  and November 2  due to American 
Society of Criminology Conference




                                                       5 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 21:202:201:02:12123 
Syllabus effective September 1, 2006 (rev. 9/21/06; rev. 11/8/06; rev. 12/6/06; rev 12/7/06) 



                           th 
        Q.       November 7 
                 1.   Chapter 10, Criminal Prosecution and Adjudication 
                 2.   Decker, Issue XI: The Public as Thirteenth Juror…(pp.228­247) 
                           th 
        R.       November 9 
                 1.   Chapter 10, cont’d, (Criminal Prosecution and Adjudication) 
                 2.   Decker, Issue XI: The Public as Thirteenth Juror…(pp.228­247) 
                             th 
        S.       November 14 
                 1.   Chapter 9, Lawyers and Judges 
                             th 
        T.       November 16 
                 1.   Chapter 9, cont’d, (Lawyers and Judges) 
                             st 
        U.       November 21 
                 1.   Chapter 9, cont’d, (Lawyers and Judges) 
                 2.   Tentative guest lecture: Michael Troisi, Esq. 

Change in class designation. No class Thursday, November 23 to Sunday, 
November 26, 2006 for Thanksgiving recess 
                              th 
        V.       November 28 
                 1.   Midterm Exam 
                 2.   Full class period 
                              th 
        W.       November 30 
                 1.   Chapter 11, Sentencing 
                 2.   Decker, Issue XII: Lock ‘Em Up…(pp.257­264) 
                 3.   Confirmed guest lecture: Ms. Paula Dow, Esq. Essex County 
                      Prosecutor—Newark, NJ. 
                            th 
        X.       December 5 
                 1.   Chapter 11, cont’d, (Sentencing) 
                 2.   BlackBoard: Outline on Michael Tonry’s book “Malign Neglect.” 
                 3.   BlackBoard: Racial Disparity in Sentencing: A Review of the Literature 
                 4.   BlackBoard: Roper v. Simmons, ([03­633] 112 S. W. 3d 397, affirmed, 
                      March 1, 2005). Only required to read the following: 
                      a.        Case summary 
                      b.        Summary of Justice Stevens, with whom Justice Ginsburg joins, 
                                concurring 
                      c.        Summary of Justice O’Connor’s dissenting opinion 
                      d.        Summary of Justice Scalia, with whom The Chief Justice and 
                                Justice Thomas join, dissenting 
                                                    th 
        Y.       Part IV, Corrections December 7 
                 1.    Chapter 12, Corrections: Yesterday and Today 
                             th 
        Z.       December 12 
                 1.    Chapter 13, Institutional Corrections 
                 2.    Confirmed guest lecture: Abraham Espada, Northern State Prison 
                 3.    BlackBoard: Fact Sheet: Women in Prison 
                 4.    BlackBoard: Executive Summary, Gender and Justice: Women, Drugs 
                       and Sentencing Policy 
                             th 
        AA.      December 14 
                 1.    Chapter 13, cont’d 
                 2.    Chapter 14, Alternatives: Community Corrections 
                 3.    BlackBoard: Keeping Track of Electronic Monitoring 
                 4.    Tentative field trip: Northern State Prison Newark, NJ 
                 5.    You MUST attend the tour and write a paper to receive extra credit; 
                       not other extra credit assignments will be offered. Review BlackBoard 
                       frequently for details on the trip.
                                                       6 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 21:202:201:02:12123 
Syllabus effective September 1, 2006 (rev. 9/21/06; rev. 11/8/06; rev. 12/6/06; rev 12/7/06) 


                 6.   Extra credit assignment based on prison tour due on or before 
                      December 21, 2006, via email only (jmsnpd@andromeda.rutgers.edu). 
                      Review BlackBoard section entitled Tour of Northern State Prison 
                      for formatting instructions and other details. 
                             th 
        BB.      December 15 
                 1.   Final exam 
                 2.   11:30 AM to 2:30 PM in our regular room 
                 3.   Grades will only be accessible according to Rutgers’ policy! Visit 
                      http://taproject.rutgers.edu/GradePosting.pdf for the policy on posting 
                      grades. 
                             st 
        CC.      December 21 
                 1.   Extra credit papers due by 10:00 AM via email. 
                 2.   Late papers will not be accepted! Check your email for receipt 
                      confirmation.




                                                       7